Travel Trouble

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How not to behave on a plane

<p>Flying economy, it’s easy to lose sight of the fact we’re all in it together.</p> <p><strong>1. The Armrest Warrior</strong></p> <p>They dominate the shared armrests and can provoke an in-flight turf war.<br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> Sharing is best, or one ‘outside’ rest for window and aisle seats and both for the middle. If someone’s obsessed with claiming ownership, it may be worth retreating peacefully for a more relaxing journey.</p> <p><strong>2. The Recliner</strong></p> <p>Their seat goes back as soon as the plane levels out and stays there until landing, making it impossible for those behind to work or eat.<br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> On a short flight, reclining is frowned upon. On longer flights, keep your seat straight until it’s acceptable to recline – generally once meal trays have been collected.</p> <p><strong>3. The Hygiene Offender</strong></p> <p>It’s a long flight, so they took a long run beforehand, then covered up with the strongest deodorant available. <br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> While most of us arrive at the airport fresh and clean, the close quarters of a plane mean that normally pleasant smells like curry and fragrance can affect other passengers. On long-haul flights, pack wet-wipes for an inflight wash and a change of socks, top and underwear.</p> <p><strong>4. The Chatterer</strong></p> <p>These flyers can’t wait to talk your ear off for the duration of the flight. <br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> Have headphones or a laptop ready to show you’re busy. Nervous flyers may need you to chat to calm them; remind them planes are statistically the safest way to travel.</p> <p><strong>5. The Overhead Storage Hog</strong></p> <p>They get on early and stuff every available overhead locker with their excess carry-on.<br /><strong>Strategise:</strong> Store heavy items under the seat in front of you, then look for free space in the overheads, accepting you may not get it above your seat.</p> <p><em>Written by Jackie Middleton. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/flights/How-Not-to-Behave-on-a-Plane"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><span>best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Travel Trouble

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Kiwis warned of deadly mozzie disease

<p>Kiwis travelling to Bali have been issued a warning after a deadly mosquito-born brain disease is spreading throughout the popular tourist destination.</p> <p>The health ministry of Indonesia says that an increased amount of Japanese encephalitis cases has been brought to light as of recently.</p> <p>The disease, which is considered to be life-threatening, can cause blindness, weakness and movement disorders.</p> <p>If the viral brain infection is contracted, the symptoms include fever, headache, neck stiffness, tremors, paralysis and convulsions, especially amongst younger children.</p> <p>The disease can also send those affected into a coma or ultimately death, and those who are lucky enough to survive the deadly disease are usually left with neurological impairments that last throughout the course of their life.</p> <p>According to The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDPC), the disease is currently spreading throughout Asia with countries such as India, Pakistan and Japan reporting an increased amount of cases.</p> <p>With 30-50,000 cases reported per year, the ECDPC says that number has been seeing a decline due to vaccinations and an improvement in agriculture.</p> <p>While the disease is most likely to occur from mosquitos, it can also be transmitted through birds, bats, cows and pigs.</p> <p>The ministry is currently monitoring the disease in Bali, North Sulawesi and Manado but so far, Bali is the worst affected area.</p> <p>“To intervene with (the spread of) this disease, we have been introducing vaccinations in Bali with pretty good results. We are intervening with immunisation,” said Vensya Sitohang, the Ministry of Health Director of Surveillance and Quarantine to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/warnings/australians-warned-about-travelling-to-bali-amid-spike-in-japanese-encephalitis-cases/news-story/e255ca32f524bcbdae9d1ee1f7e3a429" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a>.</p> <p>Children who are aged between nine months old to 15 years are eligible for vaccination as they are considered to be the most at risk when it comes to contracting the infection.</p> <p>According to the ministry, 979,953 people have been vaccinated so far.</p> <p>“The hope is that it prevents it early, so no physical disability is reached,” said Ms Sitohang.</p> <p>Signs and symptoms occur within five-15 days after being bitten by the infected insect.</p> <p>Those who are travelling to Bali or Asia are advised to remain covered up and regularly apply mosquito repellent to avoid getting bitten.</p> <p>“A Japanese encephalitis vaccine is available for people aged 12 months and older and is recommended for travellers spending extended one month or more in rural areas of high-risk countries for JE,” the NSW Health website reads.</p> <p>Contact your GP for further information on the vaccine. </p>

Travel Trouble

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Cruise descends into "pure chaos" as ship loses its balance

<p>It was supposed to be a relaxing five-day cruise trip to the Caribbean, but instead, passengers were faced with their worst nightmare after a malfunctioning switchboard forced the ship to tilt to its side.</p> <p>The Carnival Sunshine cruise liner left Port Carnaveral on Sunday, October 28, and it didn’t take long for problems to start arising as the unbalanced cruise ship caused chaos with passengers flying out of their seats and plates and glasses falling to the ground in pieces.</p> <p>Those on board compared the incident to the Titanic, with one person claiming that water was seeping into the ship during dinnertime.</p> <p>“We were actually at the table where the window broke and the water came in,” said a passenger to Orlando news station WFTV.</p> <p>“Next thing we know, the whole boat tilted … we were literally hanging on for our lives, dangling … it was really like a scene from the Titanic.”</p> <p>David Crews, a passenger on board the doomed ship, said he didn’t think the back and forth rocking of the ship was a problem until he saw others crying and screaming for help.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">This is the inside of the Carnival Sunshine cruise ship on Sunday evening. <a href="https://twitter.com/CarnivalCruise?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@CarnivalCruise</a> says the ship listed (tilted or leaned) because of a technical issue just hours after leaving <a href="https://twitter.com/PortCanaveral?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PortCanaveral</a>. <br /><br />(H/t to David Crews for the pictures) <a href="https://t.co/usSaQsZBzG">pic.twitter.com/usSaQsZBzG</a></p> — Clay LePard (@ClayLePard) <a href="https://twitter.com/ClayLePard/status/1057717193968943106?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">31 October 2018</a></blockquote> <p>“Plates and silverware started sliding off the tables. Then the tables themselves started to slide. Glasses and plates started to fall and shatter. At this point, it was pure chaos. Screams. Cries. Panic.”</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/cruise-descends-pure-chaos-ship-loses-balance-005339076.html" target="_blank"><em>Yahoo Lifestyle</em></a>, a spokesperson claims that everything was under control after a minute into the chaos.</p> <p>“There was never any issue with the safe operation of the ship and our officers quickly intervened to correct the situation,” said the spokesperson, as they also admitted to some passengers walking away with minor injuries.</p> <p>The day after the incident took place, the captain issued a note to each guest to explain what went wrong.</p> <p>“We have identified that an electrical switchboard malfunction impacted the use of the fin stabilisers,” it said.</p> <p>“It’s important to note that fin stabilisers are not a safety feature; they are deployed solely for guest comfort to minimise any potential ship motion while at sea. There was never any issue with the safe operation of the ship, and our officers quickly intervened to correct the situation.”</p> <p>Although the cruise line offered compensation of $50 to each guest, many were not impressed and chose to end their journey after the terrifying event. </p>

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Couple's creepy discovery in cruise ship cabin: "Is that what I think it is?"

<p>A US couple from Florida made a creepy discovery in their cruise ship cabin during what was supposed to be a relaxing holiday.</p> <p>Chris and Dana White were enjoying their three-day Carnival cruise to the Caribbean last October before they found a device pointed in the direction of their bed.</p> <p>When they went to have a closer look, they realised it was a video camera that was intentionally placed in between their TV wires.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.insideedition.com/" target="_blank"><em>Inside Edition</em></a> Mr White said, “We were just really flabbergasted that there’s a camera in the room and it’s plugged up and it’s working.”</p> <p>“I just immediately felt like we had been invaded,” Mrs White added.</p> <p>“Our privacy has been invaded.”</p> <p>After making the shock discovery, the pair informed the cruise company who then asked an employee to remove the camera from the premises.</p> <p>After launching an investigation, the company said that a “video transmitter” was found by the staff on the ship but did not mention if the device was connected to a power source or if it was able to record, according to a report by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.usatoday.com/" target="_blank"><em>USA Today</em></a>.</p> <p>Carnival has alerted US Customs and Border Protection and has also given the transmitter to the FBI for a more detailed analysis.</p> <p>The incident comes after a young couple came across a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-trouble/the-terrifying-moment-a-couple-make-an-eerie-discovery-inside-their-airbnb" target="_blank">video camera in their Airbnb</a> while visiting Canada. The camera was built into an alarm clock. </p> <p>Has anything like this ever happened to you on holiday? Share your story with us in the comments below. </p>

Travel Trouble

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Panic as ill passenger opens plane door during flight

<p>Passengers on a Frontier Airlines flight received the shock of their lives after an ill passenger managed to open the cabin door as the plane was taxiing, deploying the emergency slide on the taxiway.</p> <p>The incident occurred as the plane was scheduled to leave Cancun in Mexico for St Louis, Missouri, reported <a href="https://www.foxnews.com"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>Fox News</strong></em></span></a>.</p> <p>One passenger aboard the flight, Andy Karandzieff, explained that the incident started after the passenger vomited.</p> <p>“We were in the front row and a gentleman behind us started throwing up.”</p> <p>Mr Karandzieff said the man then left his seat distressed and began banging on the cockpit door, prompting the crew to reseat him.</p> <p>However, the sick passenger left his seat again and managed to open the cabin door, automatically deploying the emergency slide.</p> <p>According to Fox8, the passenger was also fighting off a flight attendant.</p> <p>Passenger Kathleen Ingham wrote on Facebook: “Thank God for the brave men and women who held him in the plane or he for sure would have been sucked into the engine.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fkathleen.ingham.3%2Fposts%2F2401345276546453&amp;width=500" width="500" height="586" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Police were then called to escort the passenger from the airport and transport him to a hospital.</p> <p>The sick passenger’s mother, who was not on the flight, said the man and his father were returning home after enjoying a trip to Cancun.</p> <p>She suggested that her son may have consumed a drink that had been spiked as he was attacked the night before.</p> <p>The mother explained that her son had been struck on the head after being attacked in his hotel.</p> <p>Passengers on the flight were moved to other flights or given hotel rooms to stay in overnight.</p> <p>What is the scariest thing that has happened to you on a plane? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Coca-Cola's embarrassing vending machine blunder

<p>It’s a pitfall marketing departments must come across regularly, the risk of a message painfully missing the mark, lost in translation.</p> <p>Coca-Cola Amatil New Zealand is currently feeling the heat over that very pitfall, with some vending machines in the country causing much mirth on social media.</p> <p>The offending slogan on the machines reads: “Kia ora, Mate”. ‘Kia ora’ is a greeting you’ll often hear in New Zealand, but “mate” in te reo Māori means “death”. So the slogan essentially reads “Hello, death.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">When the languages don't mix well. <a href="https://t.co/3piZIoptAE">pic.twitter.com/3piZIoptAE</a></p> — Waikato Reo (@waikatoreo) <a href="https://twitter.com/waikatoreo/status/1051264259089264640?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 14, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>One of the machines is at Auckland International Airport and is <span>where Gareth Seymour spotted the vending machine.</span></p> <p>"I read with Māori language eyes and thought, ‘They haven't had this checked by a Māori,” he told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.sbs.com.au/nitv/article/2018/10/15/kia-ora-death-vending-machine-slogan-gets-lost-translation" target="_blank">NITV News</a></em>. He suggested the slogan should have read “Kia ora e hoa” or “hello friend”.</p> <p>The response on social media after a shot of the vending machine was posted was merciless.</p> <p>“This reminds me of being back in uni and learning marketing 101,” said one Facebook user.</p> <p>“The coca cola company gains self-awareness?” tweeted another detractor, referencing the potentially dire health effects of Coca-Cola.</p> <p>But the commentary became serious with this comment on social media: “Totally spot on, it does mean death for a lot of Indigenous people.”</p> <p>There are some that have argued that the Māori native tongue and English language commonly mix, and that’s the line Coca-Cola Amatil NZ has taken.</p> <p>"In no way was the ‘mate’ in reference to any Māori word, that would have been inappropriate and unacceptable,” the company said in a statement to <em>NITV News</em>.</p> <p>It said that by merging the two words, it "only meant to bring Maori and English together".</p> <p>"Coca-Cola Amatil New Zealand is proudly Kiwi and respects and embraces all aspects of Maori culture and any other culture."</p> <p>The company wouldn’t say, however, whether the Māori community had been consulted on the marketing campaign.</p> <p>Seymour said that, “Even a Māori-speaking school kid would notice the mistake. The moral of [the] story is – if you use it there are ways of doing it right.”</p> <p>What "lost in translation" blunders have you seen? Let us know in the comments section.</p>

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Passenger's “disgusting” pedicure on flight caught on camera

<p>If you think you’ve dealt with awful plane passengers then think again, because it can’t get any worse than this. A passenger has become a viral sensation on social media after footage of her cutting her toenails was released.</p> <p>The woman was caught giving herself a mid-air pedicure and is now being shamed for it through an Instagram account called Passenger Shaming.</p> <p>The account, which is dedicated to exposing terrible passengers, shared the video of the lady buffing her soles with a foot file and trimming her toenails.</p> <p>She also has zero remorse, as she makes no attempt to hide her stomach-churning behaviour.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BorS94EB5RY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BorS94EB5RY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">PEDICURES ON PLANES! #happymonday ✈️👣🔪🤷🏼‍♀️😂 #DEADFLYINGSKINFORTHEWIN #passengershaming #flyingfeet #hatchetman • • • #NOPE #instagramaviation #airplaneetiquette #frequentflyer #crewlife #aviation #cabincrew #avgeek #cabincrewlife #flightattendant #flightattendantlife #stewardess #flightattendantproblems #travel #flightattendants #instapassport #aviationgeek #FAlife #airtravel #travelgram #traveltips #pilot #pilotlife #travelling #frequentflier</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/passengershaming/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Passenger Shaming</a> (@passengershaming) on Oct 8, 2018 at 8:06am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Having now been viewed close to 150,000 times, users from all over the world have left their opinions in the comments, and none of them sympathise with the woman in the video.</p> <p>“How [are you] even allowed to do that! Disgusting and I would have raised hell if I were sitting next to her. YUCK!!,” one user wrote.</p> <p>“Are you ****ing kidding me???? I am seriously losing all hope in humanity,” said another.</p> <p>Many wanted to see the woman banned off future flights or be forced to sit with the cargo next time.</p> <p>Do you think this passenger's behaviour is unacceptable? Let us know in the comments below</p>

Travel Trouble

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Family forget 5-year-old daughter at airport

<p>Reminiscent of the famous film <em>Home Alone</em>, a 5-year-old child was left stranded at an airport after her parents forgot to take her with them.</p> <p>The child was abandoned at Stuttgart Airport, which is claimed to be one of Germany’s busiest locations, on Monday.</p> <p>Police say that travellers noticed the young girl wandering around with no accompanying adult as she looked confused and lost.</p> <p>While countless announcements were made through the airport's intercom system, her parents failed to show up to retrieve their daughter.</p> <p>Authorities had no other choice but to take the child to the police station where they received a phone call from her concerned mother.</p> <p>When asked how the situation managed to happen, she explained that after coming home from a family holiday, the couple headed home in two separate cars.</p> <p>According to police, both parents were under the assumption that the other had their daughter.</p> <p>“The five-year-old was eventually safely picked up by her father,” said a police spokesperson.</p> <p>The sequence of events reminded those online of the film <em>Home Alone</em>, where a child by the name of Kevin McCallister is left alone in New York after his parents forget to take him to Paris with them.</p> <p>“Honey, are the children with you? A simple and self-explanatory sentence!” said one social media user.</p> <p>“This can happen to any mother who knows how lively children can be. People who have no children should not have a say here. No mother does this deliberately,” said another.</p> <p>Do you think the situation could have been avoided? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Why you should never pick up a dropped smartphone during a flight

<p>Passengers have been reminded to listen carefully to the instructions of cabin crew after a Qantas passenger’s mobile phone caught alight mid-flight.</p> <p>The flight, travelling from Los Angeles to Melbourne yesterday morning, was two hours away from landing when the smell of burnt rubber became apparent around 6am.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Herald Sun</span></em></strong></a><em> </em>reported that cabin crew rushed through the cabin with fire extinguishers, causing confusion among passengers.</p> <p>“Nobody knew what was going on,” a passenger told the publication.</p> <p>“The (flight attendant) was on the internal phone when two male hostesses grabbed fire extinguishers and ran up the stairs to business.”</p> <p>The smell came from a mobile phone that had become crushed in a business class seat.</p> <p>The incident, which nearly forced an emergency landing in Sydney, occurred after the passenger moved the seat to retrieve their dropped phone, crushing the device in the process and causing it to smoulder.</p> <p>However, after 10 minutes cabin crew announced that the situation was under control and the flight would continue to Melbourne.</p> <p>“They didn’t say there was a fire, but … my friend overheard two guys talking at the baggage carousel and said the seat was completely destroyed,” the passenger said.</p> <p>“It was pretty scary … it panicked a few people.”</p> <p>Qantas confirmed the incident and said it showcased why it is crucial to follow the instructions of staff.</p> <p>“Our crew are trained to handle these situations and the crew on-board followed all the correct procedures,” the statement said. </p> <p>“This incident shows why we ask passengers to seek help from our cabin crew in retrieving their mobile phones.”</p> <p>Pre-flight safety videos warn passengers to ask for the help of crew if they need to retrieve an electronic device they’ve dropped.</p> <p>Australia’s Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) said that when seats are adjusted it can damage the device’s volatile lithium battery, causing it to overheat and burst into flames.</p> <p>CASA said the number of such incidents were increasing because of the slimline design of smartphones and the increased power of batteries</p> <p>“Passengers must remember never to move their seat if a phone goes missing while in-flight and to always ask the aircraft cabin crew for assistance,” CASA said in a statement.</p> <p>“If a phone is damaged cabin crew should be alerted immediately.”</p>

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Woman's surprising discovery on plane ticket

<p>A woman has taken to social media to complain about a budget airline after they booked her into a seat that didn’t exist.</p> <p>The passenger, who is called Satwika Ika on Facebook, said the blunder occurred on Indonesian airline Lion Air.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fika.satwika%2Fposts%2F10217313106569013&amp;width=500" width="500" height="664" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>She was supposed to fly from Palembang, a city in Indonesia, to the capital city of Jakarta.</p> <p>But according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/travel/7343013/seat-lion-air-plane-doesnt-exist/" target="_blank">The Sun</a></em>, when Satwika hopped on the plane she was unable to find her seat number 35F – and quickly discovered that seats only went up to row 34.</p> <p>Satwika said the flight attendants were rude and unhelpful and asked her to sit in one of the seats in row number 34.</p> <p>She was then moved to yet another seat when another passenger claimed the seat she was sitting in.</p> <p>Recounting the incident, she said a huge argument then started with the crew members.</p> <p>She said she was not the only one that had been assigned an imaginary seat, as a family along with a child were also searching for seats in row 35.</p> <p>Satwika said she is yet to receive an apology from airline employees.</p> <p>After the post started gaining traction, only then did the airline respond and said they needed to change the flight to a smaller aircraft than the first one, because of scheduling issues that had caused delays.</p> <p>It’s unclear whether Satwika made it to her destination or not.</p> <p>The airline’s Corporate Communications officer, Danang Mandala Prihantoro explained that the flight was initially meant to involve an aircraft with a capacity of 39 seat rows. </p>

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Don't get caught out: 6 new holiday scams ripping off travellers

<p>If you’re planning to take a trip across the world soon, then be warned, as there is an influx of new holiday scams affecting tourists as they travel to their dream break.</p> <p>Holiday-makers have money to spend and relaxation on their minds, which is why they are seen as easy targets for con artists.</p> <p>UK-based consumer group <a href="https://www.which.co.uk/" target="_blank">Which?</a> has listed the six most common frauds travellers need to be aware of, along with tips on how to avoid getting scammed, <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/" target="_blank">The Sun</a> reported.</p> <p>So, if you’re planning a trip abroad, here are the things you need to watch out for:</p> <p><strong>1. Accommodation booking scams</strong></p> <p>While the introduction of the internet has been a blessing in terms of ease, it’s also made it easier for scammers to lure you into their traps. With the growth of online holiday bookings, fraudsters often need nothing more than a few fake pictures to lure their victims.</p> <p>A common scam is one that includes picturesque photographs of holiday rentals that don’t seem to exist, advertised at affordable price points. The deals were often advertised on mainstream websites but asked those who were interested in booking to contact them via email, rather than use the site’s own booking system.</p> <p>Bookers were then sent a link to a convincing payment page, which suggested the payment hadn’t cleared. They then ask for a bank transfer instead.</p> <p><strong>How to protect yourself:</strong> Do your research. Google the property to see if it shows up on other reputable websites to check its authenticity. You could use Google Maps and Street View to see if the accommodation actually exists. Also, never pay by bank transfer.</p> <p><strong>2. Dodgy flight deals</strong></p> <p>Con artists have created fake airline websites that advertise budget deals on long haul flights that leave their victims high and dry.</p> <p>The UK government’s fraud agency has reported a recent surge of scams targeting those who are travelling to Asia, Africa and the Middle East.</p> <p>In many instances, tickets were purchased with stolen credit cards and then sold to unsuspecting victims, complete with a reference number.</p> <p>But tickets were then cancelled after the credit card was reported as stolen, leaving the victims out of pocket and nothing to show for it.</p> <p><strong>How to protect yourself:</strong> Book tickets through trusted agencies.</p> <p><strong>3. Wi-Fi hacks</strong></p> <p>It’s become human instinct to try and find Wi-Fi wherever you go, and the same applies when travellers land at airports.</p> <p>While it’s important to stay connected in order to get in touch with friends and family, there is a risk involved. Fraudsters have set up their own free networks in airports and use them to gain free information about anyone that logs on.</p> <p>Many passengers have been tricked into entering their credit card details before logging on.</p> <p><strong>How to protect yourself:</strong> Ask airport staff about the real Wi-Fi connection to make sure it’s the real deal and be on the lookout for connections that don’t ask for passwords straight away. Also, if you are asked for confidential information then provide fake details where possible.</p> <p><strong>4. “Free” holidays</strong></p> <p>This decade-long scam has been one that con artists have perfected throughout the years. Back in the day, people would be pressured into buying timeshares after accepting a complimentary break.</p> <p>Now, the con is conducted through scratch cards and other fake competitions.</p> <p>In one example of the scam, around 500 British travellers in Spain’s Costa del Sol have been scammed of around $27.5 million in the last year alone.</p> <p><strong>How to protect yourself: </strong>Refuse all offers of free holidays because if it’s too good to be true, then it probably is.</p> <p><strong>5. Document fraud</strong></p> <p>Over the years, the internet has seen a growth in websites selling fake travel visas and other important documents needed to visit foreign countries.</p> <p>A few cases were found to not be conducting illegal activity but were responsible for reselling documents at a huge premium compared to official channels.</p> <p>Some common examples included websites selling the European Health Insurance Card and US visa (Electronic System for Travel Authorisation, or ESTA) documents.</p> <p>While the sites looked extremely convincing, they had nothing to do with the governments of the countries they claimed to represent.</p> <p>According to Which?, out of the top 20 search results for “ESTA visa” over half were unofficial.</p> <p><strong>How to protect yourself:</strong> Follow links to official government websites through the Department of Foreign Affairs website.</p> <p><strong>6. Fake tickets</strong></p> <p>It’s no secret that music concerts and major sporting events are on top of the list of potential scams, but travellers are now falling victim to fake packages to international events and are only finding out the true worth of their ticket once they arrive in the country.</p> <p>The FIFA World Cup in Russia was one example where countless websites offered travel packages including tickets when the only tickets that were considered valid and authentic were the ones purchased directly from FIFA themselves.</p> <p>Scammers love to lure desperate fans with fake tickets, as they know the demand is high and it’s easy to trap people who are willing to go the extra mile for a ticket to their chosen event.</p> <p><strong>How to protect yourself:</strong> Make sure the tickets you are purchasing are from legitimate websites and web pages that start with “https” and have the padlock symbol in the URL bar. And if you’re on the hunt for second-hand tickets, then do a quick check if whether or not resale is allowed, as some tickets are only valid for the original buyer.</p> <p>“Criminals are finding ever more sophisticated ways to dupe holiday-makers, both in the booking process and when they’re on the holiday itself,” Which? Travel editor Rory Boland said.</p> <p>“If something seems too good to be true, it almost certainly is. Don’t hand your money over until you can be sure it’s the real deal.”</p> <p>Do you know of any other travel scams? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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The elaborate tourist scam responsible for stealing $7200 from travellers

<p>Lawrence Andrews was just another tourist exploring the streets of Beijing before he stepped foot inside a local restaurant to enjoy a meal and some tea.</p> <p>But once he returned home, he was in for a nasty surprise as he discovered he had been charged $7200 for the experience.</p> <p>Mr Andrews is the latest victim of one of the most well-known tourist traps in Beijing: The Tea House Scam. After fighting a lengthy battle to get his money back, he’s determined to warn other unsuspecting tourists.</p> <p>“While visiting the Forbidden City, I went to (a tea house) – a local, unimpressive place,” Mr Andrews told consumer rights organisation Elliott.org, who took on his case.</p> <p>“Later, I discovered this tea house charged my American Express card a total of $US4704 ($NZ7200). Although American Express assured me that it would defend me against this fraud, it didn’t. I need help!”</p> <p>According to Mr Andrews, he was handed two bills with one converting to $380. He became sceptical, however, when he was given the second bill. While he signed both receipts, he asked for copies to which the restaurant staff declined.</p> <p>“These ladies said they were unable to give me copies,” Mr Andrews said. “Then I knew something was wrong and that I had stumbled into a tourist trap.”</p> <p>After leaving the premises, he immediately contacted American Express to which he was told that he would be protected against any fraud. But that turned out to be false, as he received a $7200 charge on his American Express bill.</p> <p>A month later, Mr Andrews was informed he’d lost the case with the bank, so he launched an appeal that was also denied. That’s when he reached out to Elliott.org.</p> <p>“There is no way a person could run up a tab of $7200 at this place,” he wrote. “This is a fraudulent merchant. This charge is a scam. But after an investigation on July 27, I officially lost my American Express dispute and the appeal. The (charge) reappeared on my statement.”</p> <p>Amex believes Mr Andrews was responsible for the amount as he signed the two non-itemised receipts.</p> <p>Elliott’s Michelle Couch-Friedman said of the popular scam: “Starting at 3:34 pm, you can see the mechanisms of the Beijing tea house scam in action.</p> <p>“What typically happens is a friendly ‘fellow tourist’ strikes up a conversation with their intended victim,” she wrote. “This scammer, who is often an attractive young woman, has been sent out to hunt for unsuspecting visitors to the area and draw them into a local tea house.</p> <p>“Once inside the restaurant, the victim is seated in a private room and prices are purposely omitted from the conversation. Soon a hostess brings light snacks and a variety of teas to sample.</p> <p>“In the end, the victim discovers that none of this was done as a friendly overture. The cost of the visit is typically hundreds of dollars for some inexpensive refreshments.”</p> <p>After a thorough investigation by Ms Couch-Friedman, Amex eventually reimbursed Mr Andrews and he received his money back.</p>

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Singapore Airlines cancelled flight chaos as pilot fails alcohol test

<p>A Singapore Airlines pilot has been asked to step down after failing an alcohol test on the morning he was due to fly an international flight.</p> <p>The airline was forced to cancel the flight from Melbourne to Wellington in New Zealand on Saturday morning and the return flight the same day.</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6172873/Singapore-Airlines-pilot-fails-alcohol-test-morning-international-flight-Melbourne.html" target="_blank">Daily Mail Australia</a></em>, a spokesman from the airline confirmed the last minute cancellation stating the reason as an “operating crew member being deemed unfit to fly.”</p> <p>“The Civil Aviation Authority officials undertook a random drug and alcohol test of all crew prior to them starting their pre-flight checks,” he said.</p> <p>“The pilot in question did not pass the test due to having a higher than suitable blood alcohol limit.”</p> <p>According to <em><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/107123051/singapore-airlines-cancels-wellington-flight" target="_blank">Stuff</a></em>, the pilot had a two-day layover in Melbourne prior to the scheduled flight after flying in from Singapore.</p> <p>He has now returned back to Singapore where a thorough investigation is underway and has been suspended from all duties.</p> <p>“We will also work closely with the Australian and Singaporean authorities to ensure they are supplied the information they require,” said the spokesman.</p> <p>Frustrated passengers lashed out on social media after they were left stranded without a flight.</p> <p>Some were flying to Wellington for the All Blacks rugby union Test match against South Africa, with one fan travelling all the way from Tokyo for the event.</p> <p>One passenger tweeted: “Care to explain why your captain (i.e. most experienced person on the aircraft) of SQ247 waits until boarding time to decide they’re too ill/drunk to fly? Will miss the All Blacks rugby match I bought tickets for and flew to WLG from NRT to see.”</p> <p>He was met with a reply saying: “At least he didn’t fly! Better to be down here wishing you were up there, then being up there wishing you were down here.”</p> <p>This list of complaints was long, as another wrote, “Terrible service on your cancelled Melbourne to Wellington flight this morning. No options given to stranded customers except to call your useless booking line! Hotel fees and taxi fares all lost not to mention a day of holiday. Appalling service.”</p> <p>One passenger was left stranded at Melbourne Airport for six hours.</p> <p>Singapore Airlines has issued an apology for the inconvenience passengers were forced to face.</p> <p>“We sincerely apologise to those affected by the cancellation of these flights. However, the safety of our customers and crew is our highest priority,” the spokesman said.</p> <p>“We have worked with customers whose travel was inconvenienced to find suitable alternate travel arrangements as quickly as possible.”</p>

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The terrifying moment a couple make an eerie discovery inside their Airbnb

<p>A Scottish couple had the fright of their life after making an eerie discovery inside their Airbnb apartment.</p> <p>Dougie Hamilton, from Glasgow, Scotland was on holiday in Toronto, Canada with his girlfriend when he noticed something didn’t feel right about his rented open-plan apartment.</p> <p>Posting on social media, Mr Hamilton shared the images of the moment he discovered a hidden camera inside a digital clock.</p> <p>He said he became paranoid after watching a video about hidden spy cameras in things such as pens, teddy bears and clocks.</p> <p>So, he decided to slide the front face off the digital clock and made the chilling discovery.</p> <p>“I just happened to be facing this clock and was staring at it for about 10 minutes. There was just something in my head that made me feel a bit uneasy,” he told the <em><a href="https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/scots-couple-call-cops-after-13218634">Daily Record.</a></em></p> <p>“It was connected to a wire like a phone charger which wasn’t quite right.</p> <p>“I took the charger out of it and saw there was a lithium battery in the back. At this point, I slid the front facing off the clock and could see there actually was a camera.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fdouglas.hamilton.56%2Fposts%2F10156590117224402&amp;width=500" width="500" height="789" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Airbnb gave Mr Hamilton a full refund and provided alternative accommodation. Police are currently investigating the matter.</p> <p>A spokesperson from Airbnb said: “We take privacy issues extremely seriously and have a zero-tolerance policy for this behaviour.”</p> <p>“We have removed the host from the platform while we investigate and are providing the guest with our full support.”</p>

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TV star vanishes from cruise ship

<p>A massive search is underway for a German TV star and singer who has gone missing while on a cruise to Canada.</p> <p>The cruise operator, Aida Cruises, said there was reason to believe Daniel Kueblboeck may have jumped into the sea on Sunday morning.</p> <p>“That is our suspicion,” spokesman Hansjoerg Kunze said.</p> <p>Kueblboeck first entered stardom after appearing on Germany’s version of <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Pop Idol</em> in 2003.</p> <p>However, the star’s disappearance follows a recent post the 33-year-old wrote about being bullied.</p> <p>Kueblboeck revealed on his official fan club page that he had suffered “months of bullying” as a child at school, that shook him “deeply”.</p> <p>“Dear fans. Unfortunately, I still do not feel better mentally and physically,” he wrote.</p> <p>“I have yet to cope with this pain of the past months.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BgiiwEmjKKS/?utm_source=ig_embed_loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Daniel Kaiser-Küblböck (@daniel_kaiserkueblboeck)</a> on Mar 20, 2018 at 2:18am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Kueblboeck, who auditioned but was not selected as Germany’s Eurovision entry in 2014, was travelling to Newfoundland, Canada, with 2200 passengers.</p> <p>When Kueblboeck was found to be missing, Aida said the ship was stopped and returned to the spot off the coast of Newfoundland where it is believed he went overboard.</p> <p>The incident occurred 185km north of the city of St John’s, Newfoundland.</p> <p>The Canadian coastguard confirmed on Sunday that it was using a surveillance plane and helicopter to search the Labrador Sea for Kueblboeck.</p> <p>Two other cruise ships also reportedly assisted with the search.</p> <p>Kueblboeck, who was born in Bavaria, made his last major TV appearance in the eighth season of <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Let’s Dance</em> in 2015 and was studying to be an actor at the European Theatre Institute Berlin.</p> <p>Kueblboeck's cruise ship disappearance comes months after an Australian woman died after she fell from an upper-level deck of the Pacific Dawn into the ocean off the coast of New Caledonia.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>Last month, a British cruise passenger was rescued after surviving 10 hours floating in the Adriatic Sea off Croatia.</p> <p>The 46-year-old claimed that she fell over the balcony, but passengers have since claimed that she jumped after a <strong><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-trouble/bizarre-twist-in-case-of-woman-who-was-lost-at-sea-for-10-hours/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">drunken argument</span></a></strong> with her boyfriend.  </p>

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10 people hospitalised after Emirates flight to New York

<p>The 10 passengers and crew members who were hospitalised in New York City after arriving sick on a flight from Dubai appear to have the flu.</p> <p>New York City health officials say they obtained respiratory samples from the patients and their symptoms look like influenza. They say they won't know for sure until they get final results. All of the patients were listed in stable condition.</p> <p>It follows them being taken to hospital for "further medical care and evaluation" after the quarantining of a flight from Dubai in New York.</p> <p>Around 100 passengers reported unknown illnesses. People complained of cough and fever on the Emirates flight, the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement. </p> <p>Initially, as many as 19 people had been confirmed unwell, NBC New York reported, with 10 taken to hospital.</p> <p>Health officials met the plane on the ground at John F Kennedy International Airport, and medics and federal customs agents took temperatures of passengers and evaluated symptoms.</p> <p>Emirates released a statement apologising for the inconvenience, saying the health and safety of those on board was its main priority.</p> <p>"Emirates can confirm that all passengers have disembarked from flight EK203.</p> <p>"All passengers were screened by the local health authorities prior to disembarkation and 3 passengers and 7 crew were transferred to the hospital for further medical care and evaluation. Nine passengers underwent additional medical screening at the site near the aircraft and were released afterwards. </p> <p>"The rest of the passengers were allowed to leave and clear customs. Our crew and on ground staff extended our full cooperation with the authorities during the onboard screenings and the aircraft has now been handed back to Emirates," the statement said.</p> <p>There were 521 passengers on board Flight EK203, the CDC said.</p> <p>The office of New York Mayor Bill de Blasio described the response as a quarantine.</p> <p>Emirates initially said at least 10 passengers had unspecified illnesses on the flight, but it is unclear why there was a wide disparity in numbers.</p> <p>Photos from passengers show rows of ambulances and firetrucks on the tarmac. Larry Coben said on Twitter that fellow passengers were asked to fill out CDC forms detailing where people have recently travelled.</p> <p>One of those onboard the plane was rapper Vanilla Ice.</p> <p>He posted footage from the scene on his social media, writing, "This is crazy. Apparently, there is over 100 people sick on the bottom floor, so happy I'm up top, it's a double-decker plane 380."</p> <p><em>Written by Alex Horton. Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/106860960/plane-quarantined-in-us-after-passengers-fall-ill" target="_blank">Stuff.co.nz</a>.</em></p>

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81-year-old grandmother and disabled son kicked off two flights

<p>An 81-year-old grandmother was left “humiliated” after two mishaps with Ryanair’s handling of her disabled son.  </p> <p>Kathleen Dunne was first asked to disembark a Ryanair flight or leave her disabled son’s wheelchair behind on Tuesday. But after she rebooked a flight for the following day at a different airport, Kathleen was once again asked to get off the aircraft after staff struggled to fold her son’s wheelchair.</p> <p>Kathleen, from Merseyside, UK, is a carer for her son Gary, 53, who has severe mobility problems and is deaf as a result of measles as a baby.</p> <p>Although the pair missed the first flight on Tuesday, they were eventually allowed to fly from Manchester Airport on Wednesday, after staff figured out how to fold the wheelchair.</p> <p>But Kathleen said she was 'mortified' after the pilot made an announcement blaming “the lady with the wheelchair” for the flight delay.</p> <p>“It was horrible. I was shaking, and it was so hard to explain what was going on to Gary because he can't hear,” she told <strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/gran-81-disabled-son-kicked-15096094">Liverpool Echo.</a> </span></em></strong></p> <p>“We have been flying with them for years and there has never been any problem. I didn't feel like going on holiday after that.”</p> <p>Kathleen said she was asked to leave the plane and led under the aircraft and over to the hold.</p> <p>She said: “There was a nice man who said one way or the other I will get this wheelchair on the plane. But the pilot said over the intercom ‘sorry for the delay it is not our problem, it is the problem of the lady with the wheelchair.’</p> <p>“People were saying I can't believe he said that. I am still upset about it now.”</p> <p>Kathleen concedes she did not have the manual for the chair nor did she know how to fold it herself, but says she never had problems before.</p> <p>A spokeswoman for Ryanair said wheelchair services at both airports are provided by outside companies “at great expense to the airlines.”</p> <p>A spokeswoman for OmniServ, which provides special assistance services at Liverpool Airport, said: “On behalf of the entire Liverpool John Lennon Airport team, we apologise for the inconveniences Kathleen Dunne and her son experienced.”</p> <p>The company said: “Various members of the team worked tirelessly with Ms Dunne to ascertain if the wheelchair could be collapsed to meet the requirements.</p>

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“Totally dumbstruck”: Passengers furious as budget airline’s refund cheques bounce

<p>Budget airline Ryanair has been made to apologise to customers after compensation cheques were found to have bounced.</p> <p>Countless passengers were overcharged during a pilot strike period where flights were cancelled. Many customers have not yet reached a resolution after their cheques were rejected at banks around the UK as they had not been signed.</p> <p>One woman named Karen Joyce was left €20 (NZD$35) out of pocket after she was charged by her bank.</p> <p>Ms Joyce took to Facebook, writing: “I was totally dumbstruck. We were loyal Ryanair customers and for them to bounce the cheque as well I just thought was disgusting.”</p> <p>After being on the phone with Ryanair for 20 minutes in an attempt to resolve the situation, the customer services rep hung up on her.</p> <p>“Then he just put the phone down. I have not received anything from Ryanair,” she said.</p> <p>The strike caused major disruption as thousands of flights were forced to cancel.</p> <p>A spokesperson for Ryanair said: “Due to an admin error, a tiny number of cheques (less than 190 out of over 20,000 compensation cheques in July) were posted without a required signatory.</p> <p>“These cheques were reissued last week, and we apologise sincerely for this inconvenience which arose out of our desire to issue these compensation cheques quickly to our customers.”</p> <p>The UK Civil Aviation Authority has advised passengers to apply for compensation under EU law 261.</p> <p>Previously, Ryanair had said that they are not planning on compensating affected passengers over the strikes as they were “caused by extraordinary circumstances.”</p> <p>The budget airline told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/ryanair-defies-watchdog-over-compensation-for-strike-chaos-gwlr5qqmk" target="_blank">The Times</a> </em>that the unions were behaving “unreasonably.”</p>

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Disabled teenager and family kicked off Emirates flight

<p>A disabled teenager and his family have been kicked off an Emirates flight while flying home to France, because he has epilepsy.</p> <p>Kiwi Adam Brown travelled to New Zealand with his wife and three boys to visit their extended family.</p> <p>Their son Eli, who has epilepsy, autism and severe learning difficulties, had flown all around the world with no problem.</p> <p>Despite having medical clearance to fly, Adam Brown’s son was kicked off a flight during the last leg of their trip from Dubai to Lyon.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Thanks <a href="https://twitter.com/emirates?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@emirates</a> for removing our family from your flight. Our son has epilepsy: we had told you, just come 14 hr from Melbourne, got his doctor on the phone &amp; medical clearance while still on board. He has <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/autism?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#autism</a> &amp; severe learning difficulties - v traumatic. <a href="https://t.co/1JXw9A4EYM">pic.twitter.com/1JXw9A4EYM</a></p> — Isabelle Kumar (@Isabelle_kumar) <a href="https://twitter.com/Isabelle_kumar/status/1022092775410597888?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 25, 2018</a></blockquote> </blockquote> <p>While they were waiting to take off in Dubai, the family were approached by staff and were asked to get off the plane.</p> <p>"They said Eli wasn’t allowed on the plane, despite already taking two Emirates flights from New Zealand without a problem, despite his doctor on the phone saying he was fine, and an email and medical certificate saying the same,” said Eli’s uncle Miles, who had been in contact with the family.</p> <p>“They kicked them off with such gusto, even threatened to get police to remove them.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Hi <a href="https://twitter.com/FrankRGardner?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@FrankRGardner</a> exhausted in grotty hotel - wondering why it took <a href="https://twitter.com/emirates?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Emirates</a> 9 hours to respond after being forced to leave Dubai to Lyon flight with our disabled epileptic son today. Happy to give you the background will fwd <a href="https://twitter.com/euronews?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@euronews</a> articles <a href="https://t.co/T59MxHPJ92">https://t.co/T59MxHPJ92</a></p> — Isabelle Kumar (@Isabelle_kumar) <a href="https://twitter.com/Isabelle_kumar/status/1022189687358857216?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 25, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Once the family were off the plane, the ground medical crew assessed Eli and deemed him fit to fly, Miles said.</p> <p>“They were scratching their heads, and said of course he is OK to fly. Regardless, the cabin chief would not let them on the plane.”</p> <p>Eli’s mother, Euronews journalist Isabelle Kumar, shared on Twitter that it took nine hours before Emirates responded to their situation and put them up in a “grotty hotel”.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">7 hours after we were meant to get on your flight <a href="https://twitter.com/emirates?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@emirates</a> and still waiting... we thought you had a solution? Where is it? Now please... <a href="https://t.co/tBPZbcoxBM">pic.twitter.com/tBPZbcoxBM</a></p> — Isabelle Kumar (@Isabelle_kumar) <a href="https://twitter.com/Isabelle_kumar/status/1022141894346924034?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 25, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>Miles said the family were “incredibly upset” over the incident.</p> <p>“The boys were crying. It is quite challenging, travelling with your disabled boy across to the other side of the world so he can see his family. We would have expected some more empathy.”</p>

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