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Neighbour sends confronting note about a nearby home’s exterior

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A neighbour has been left feeling shocked after they received a scathing note that details how they have been letting down their street.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The author of the letter, who is new to the neighbourhood, has detailed all the ways that the house needs to be renovated to keep up appearances. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The letter was posted on Reddit, and reads, “Dear neighbour. Just thought I'd drop a line to ask you to do something with your house.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"We recently moved in and are down the corner from you, and yes the front yards are very small, and the landscaping is very minimal, it's easy to clean, plain, fixup and garden these homes, especially in the front.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The letter goes on to detail how the author’s family nominated the house as “the worst on both sides of the block”, as they tell their children “that’s where the lazy’s live.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845949/neighbour-note.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b746806abf1e4bfba8b62d75a4b703ae" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Reddit</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The letter goes on to rattle off a list of things they expect to be done to their neighbour’s house, including having the house painted, lawn mowed, weeds removed and “showing some initiative.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The author even wonders if the residents “have absolutely no pride”, as they insist they “do something with the front of that s*** hole.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Reddit post welcomed a flood of comments from sympathisers, saying the author’s request is uncalled for and unfair. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While some users shared their own experiences with nightmare neighbours, many people told the recipient of the letter to simply adorn their front lawn with “plastic flamingos and lawn gnomes”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another thought it was a good idea, adding, "Flamingos might be too tame. I think it's time to invest in a modest display of giant lawn gnomes in raunchy poses."</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Getty Images / Reddit</span></em></p>

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Woman halts hundreds of protestors with kung fu moves

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A New Zealand woman </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/covid-19-delta-outbreak-kiwi-woman-tries-to-stop-anti-mandate-lockdown-protest-with-kung-fu-moves/OD4WENQRDBQOGK2TLZH2UEEZZI/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">has taken the internet by storm</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> after her attempts to single-handedly stop a protest against vaccine mandates and lockdowns emerged online.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The introduction of new mandates across the country and the placement of regions into strict lockdowns has prompted thousands of Kiwis to take to the streets in protest.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At a recent rally in Nelson, on New Zealand’s South Island, an unknown woman took a stand against the crowd and attempted to stop them with a kung-fu move.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The footage, posted to social media, shows the woman jumping in front of the protestors as they move down the street.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Someone can be heard saying, “they’re not going to stop, lady”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instead of moving out of their way, the woman took a kung-fu pose to halt the protest.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the protestors managed to continue past her, lifting their banner that read “freedom for all Kiwis” over her head.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The clip has since gone viral on social media, with many saying it was an “only in New Zealand” moment.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You have three props and three wingers on that front line. At what point did she believe they were going to stop?” one joked.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Okay let’s give nana an award for the best reaction to protesting,” another wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Kung fu grandma love it!” a third said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This isn’t the first time a New Zealander has dealt with those hesitant to get the COVID-19 vaccine in their own, unique way.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another woman was spotted approaching vaccine-hesitant men and encouraging them to get the jab.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Twitter user Te Kuru Dewes (@TeKuruDewes) said that the “Aunty” was “waving cars down” and making them get vaccinated.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Apparently there’s an Aunty stopping traffic in Mangamuka (Taitokerau), waving cars down and making grown anti-vax-leaning men go and get their jab in the van. Classic.</p> — Te Kuru Dewes (@TeKuruDewes) <a href="https://twitter.com/TeKuruDewes/status/1456388117447860225?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 4, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Apparently there’s an Aunty stopping traffic in Mangamuka (Taitokerau), waving down cars and making grown anti-vax-leaning men go and get their jab in the van. Classic,” they tweeted.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If anything is going to lift Māori vaxx rates it’s going to be Aunties that told you to get vaxxed or else,” one person replied.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Don’t mess with Aunties… just don’t,” another commented.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The conflict between protestors and pro-vaccine grandmas and aunties comes as </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-data-and-statistics/covid-19-vaccine-data" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">92 percent</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> of Kiwis have received their first COVID-19 jab and 84 percent are fully vaccinated.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Tiktok</span></em></p>

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North Korean man sentenced to death for distributing Squid Game

<p>A man in North Korea has been handed the death penalty after smuggling in copies of the hit Netflix show <em>Squid Game</em> and illegally distributing them. </p> <p><span>Sources in the North Hamgyong province told Radio Free Asia that the man brought in the copies on USB drives from China and sold them to high school students. </span></p> <p><span>The operation was foiled when authorities caught seven students watching the hit South Korean drama. </span></p> <p><span>The perpetrator has been sentenced to death by firing squad, as North Korea tightens its laws on letting capitalist media into the country. </span></p> <p><span>One student that purchased the show has been sentenced to life in prison, while six others who watched <em>Squid Game</em> have been sentenced to five years hard labour.</span></p> <p><span>The students were punished under North Korea’s new Elimination of Reactionary Thought and Culture law, which keeps a firm grip on outside media. </span></p> <p><span>Penalties were extended to the school too, with reports teachers, the principal and other administrative staff were dismissed.</span></p> <p><span>The nine-part fictional Netflix drama sees 456 bankrupt contestants compete for a multi-million dollar cash prize. </span></p> <p><span>The contestants take part in a series of children's games to win the money, and those who lose the games end up paying with their lives. </span></p> <p><span>After being released in September, <em>Squid Game</em> has quickly become the most popular show in Netflix's history. </span></p> <p><em>Image credits: Netflix</em></p>

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The seas are coming for us in Kiribati. Will Australia rehome us?

<p>Our atoll nation is barely two metres above sea level, and the waters are coming for us.</p> <p>Despite the progress and momentum of the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, we are still not moving fast enough to avoid the worst of climate change.</p> <p>It is heartening that more than 190 countries and organisations agreed to rapidly phase out coal power and end support for new coal power stations. More than 100 countries signed a pledge to cut methane emissions 30% by the end of the decade, and about the same number agreed to stop deforestation on an industrial scale in the same timeframe.</p> <p>But even with these agreements, we in Kiribati face the death of our homeland. Co-author Anote Tong led our country as president for 15 years, alongside lead author Akka Rimon, who was foreign secretary between 2014 and 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/432664/original/file-20211118-13-pb2hli.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="man looks at camera in front of the word " /> <span class="caption">Author Anote Tong, when he was Kiribati president, at the Pacific Islands Forum in 2015.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Mick Tsikas/AAP</span></span></p> <p>The problem is speed. Our land is <a href="https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/7f455136b85f4edd8655d15a89b5039f">disappearing faster</a> than global action can stem climate change. Delays and a lack of global leadership mean the existence of small island states like Kiribati is now in the balance.</p> <p>That means we must urgently find ways to rehome our people. It is very difficult to leave our homes, but there is no choice. Time is not on our side. We must prepare for a difficult future.</p> <p>What we need is a model where displaced people can migrate to host nations when their homes become uninhabitable. Countries like Australia need workers – and we will soon need homes.</p> <p>This is, increasingly, a question of justice. Australia’s actions, in particular, raise questions over how sincere it is in honouring its recent commitments at COP26.</p> <p>As the world’s <a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6568957/australia-now-the-worlds-largest-natural-gas-exporter/">largest exporter</a> of fossil gas and the second largest exporter of coal, Australia’s reluctance to change is putting its neighbours in the Pacific at risk of literally disappearing. It is the only developed nation not committed to cut emissions at least in half by 2030.</p> <p>In Glasgow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-australian-way-how-morrison-trashed-brand-australia-at-cop26-171670#:%7E:text=Fijian%20Prime%20Minister%20Frank%20Bainimarama,keep%20faith%20with%20future%20generations%E2%80%9D.">Fiji urged Australia</a> to take real action by halving emissions by 2030. Did it work? No. Australia also refused to sign the agreements on ending coal’s reign, with prominent politicians <a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/glasgow-cop26-climate-summit-a-win-for-coal-industry-senator-matt-canavan-says/a0e35fc5-4c31-4d94-9eb4-d4655c8af4ce">undermining the COP26 agreement</a> as soon as the conference was over.</p> <p>We desperately hope the commitments Australia did make at COP26 are not just words on paper. But if they are, that makes our need for certainty even more urgent.</p> <p>Let us speak plainly: If Australia really does plan to sell as much of its fossil fuel reserves as possible and drag its feet on climate action, the least it can do is help us survive the rising seas caused by the burning of its coal and gas.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/432566/original/file-20211118-19-o2c6cs.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Satellite image of Tarawa Atoll" /> <span class="caption">Kiribati’s Tarawa Atoll is home to more than half of the island nation’s far-flung population.</span> <span class="attribution"><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/europeanspaceagency/50381716376" class="source">European Space Agency, Flickr</a>, <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" class="license">CC BY-SA</a></span></p> <h2>To migrate with dignity</h2> <p>Eighteen years ago, the Kiribati government – then headed by Anote Tong – introduced a <a href="https://www.un.org/en/ga/69/meetings/gadebate/pdf/KI_en.pdf">“migration with dignity” policy </a> as a way for I-Kiribati people to adapt to climate change.</p> <p>We gave our I-Kiribati workers international qualifications tailored for jobs in demand overseas. After this, Kiribati, Tuvalu, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand <a href="https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/pacific-access-category-resident-visa">set up a scheme</a> to allow workers to migrate to New Zealand if they had an offer of a job. Each year prior to COVID, 75 people from Kiribati were able to migrate through the scheme.</p> <p>New Zealand is the first and only country currently offering a permanent labour migration program from Kiribati. While welcome, we will need more places for I-Kiribati as climate change intensifies.</p> <p>Like New Zealand, Australia has expanded its seasonal worker schemes for Pacific workers, and is now moving towards a longer stay, multi-visa arrangement under its <a href="https://www.dfat.gov.au/geo/pacific/engagement/pacific-labour-mobility">Pacific Labour Scheme</a>. We expect this scheme will evolve into a permanent migration scheme similar to New Zealand.</p> <p>While we wait in hope for a true safe haven for our people, our diaspora is growing. I-Kiribati are moving now to Pacific countries higher above the water level such as Fiji, the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and Tonga.</p> <p>Are we scared? Of course. We are on the front line of this crisis, despite having done amongst the least to cause it. It is difficult to leave the only home we have known. But science does not lie. And we can see the water coming.</p> <p>Labour migration will not solve climate change, but it offers hope to those of us who will be displaced first.</p> <p>This is a vital question of climate justice. This upheaval is caused by high-emitting economic powerhouses like the US, China, and the European Union. But the vulnerable are paying the full cost. That is not fair.</p> <p>As climate change worsens, other global leaders must consider how best to support adaptation through labour mobility. Far better to plan for this now than to let climate change rage unchecked and trigger ever-larger waves of refugees.</p> <h2>The question of climate justice</h2> <p>Consider this: in 2018, each person in Kiribati was responsible for 0.95 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent. By contrast, each person in the United States was <a href="https://www.climatewatchdata.org/ghg-emissions?calculation=PER_CAPITA&amp;end_year=2018&amp;regions=KIR%2CUSA&amp;start_year=1990">responsible for 17.7 tonnes</a>. Despite this imbalance, the US has taken little responsibility for what is happening to Kiribati and other low-lying nations.</p> <p>We are hopeful this may change, given US President Joe Biden recently pledged to make his nation a leader in climate finance by supporting nations worst hit by climate change and with the least resources to cope. It’s also encouraging that <a href="https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/2826">new laws have been proposed</a> to allow people displaced by climate change to live in America.</p> <p>We must work to slash emissions and devise solutions for the problems caused by the warming.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/432571/original/file-20211118-13-1w1so2v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Sign saying that the highest point on Kiribati's main island is three metres above sea level" /> <span class="caption">The highest point in Kiribati is 3 metres above sea level, with the average less than 2 metres.</span> <span class="attribution"><a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:As_an_extremely_low-lying_country,_surrounded_by_vast_oceans,_Kiribati_is_at_risk_from_the_negative_effects_of_climate_change,_such_as_sea-level_rise_and_storm_surges,_2011._Photo-_Erin_Magee_-_DFAT_(12426392094).jpg" class="source">Erin Magee, Wikimedia Commons</a>, <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/" class="license">CC BY</a></span></p> <p>International law must recognise climate displaced populations and create ways we can be rehoused.</p> <p>While other solutions such as <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/aug/10/kiribatis-presidents-plans-to-raise-islands-in-fight-against-sea-level-rise">climate-proofing infrastructure</a> or even floating islands have been proposed for Kiribati, these cannot happen overnight and are very expensive. By contrast, labour mobility is fast and advantageous to the host country.</p> <p>Kiribati’s current government is working to increase skills and employability in our workforce. We are doing our part to get ready for the great dislocation.</p> <p>When I-Kiribati have to migrate, we want them to be able to do so as first class citizens with access to secure futures rather than as climate refugees.</p> <p>We are doing all we can to stay afloat in the years of ever angrier climate change. But it will take the global village to save our small village and keep alive our culture, language, heritage, spirits, land, waters and above all, our people.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/172137/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/akka-rimon-1290725">Akka Rimon</a>, PhD Student, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/australian-national-university-877">Australian National University</a></em> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/anote-tong-1292095">Anote Tong</a>, Distinguished Global Leader-in-Residence, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-pennsylvania-1017">University of Pennsylvania</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-seas-are-coming-for-us-in-kiribati-will-australia-rehome-us-172137">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Barcelona plagued by hoards of wild boars

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Barcelona has been battling an influx of wild boars, with many venturing into the city and digging through bins and even attacking celebrities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Latin pop star </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-trouble/shakira-claims-she-was-attacked-and-robbed-by-wild-boars-in-barcelona" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Shakira</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> had to fight off several boars in September while walking in a park with her eight-year-old son. Though she made light of the incident on social media, local experts have taken action to manage the problem, which has been exacerbated by COVID-19 lockdowns.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845846/boars1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1bacf4d303274553ac4d695fff1f1b1f" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">A wild boar foraging in Molins de Rei, Barcelona in 2020. Image: Getty Images</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“So many wild boars in Barcelona, because in this case Barcelona is acting as an ecological sink,” veterinarian Carles Conejero told the</span> <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-europe-59352740" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It means that the excess of wild boar population, they see Barcelona [as] a suitable environment to disperse.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">City Hall has been trapping the wild animals, then taking samples before killing them humanely.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though the decision has upset animal rights groups, Carles has said it has become necessary.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"> “When they are piglets they are so nice and they are not dangerous,” he explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But when they grow and they cause problems, they attack humans [and] dogs or they cause traffic accidents, then [they] are the animals that we need to remove.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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Shocking notice left at a Christchurch Airbnb

<p><em>Image: Getty </em></p> <div> <div class="reply-list-component"> <div class="reply-component"> <div class="reply-body-component"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply-body-wrapper"> <div class="reply-body-inner"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Shock and fear went through a guest’s mind when he noticed signs at an Airbnb property in Christchurch, saying Māori is not to be spoken and not to refer to their country as Aotearoa.</p> <p>Ameen Makani, had been chatting with the owner of the house for at least half an hour last weekend when he noticed three signs printed and pasted on each glass door in the living room.</p> <p>The “Important Notice to Visitors” contained four rules, including ‘No Maori to be spoken on these premises’, and ‘We live in NEW ZEALAND. Please don’t refer to our country as ‘Aotearoa’.’</p> <p>Makani said he was struck by fear because the Pakeha man, aged about 70, was the most unsuspecting individual.</p> <p>“He’s charismatic, he’s well-travelled and he’s kind. You could strike up a conversation with this man and probably chat for hours,” said Makani, saying he found it difficult to stay composed and contain his reaction after seeing the notices.</p> <p>Makani said he was taught when growing up to consider what conversations are worth engaging in and decided not to ask the host about the signs.</p> <p>“What I most certainly have never seen before and never hope to again, is the absolute confidence in which this man has blatantly showcased his instructions for his guests to see.</p> <p>“I made a last-minute booking on the day and he wasn’t home when I checked in. So<br />it makes you wonder how long these signs have really been up and do they ever come down?” the guest said about the incident.</p> <p>Makani also realised a simple Airbnb complaint was not going to cut it, saying the<br />issue was bigger than a house being taken off a website.</p> <p>Derek Nolan, Airbnb’s Head of Public Policy for New Zealand and Australia, said discrimination is unacceptable and has no place in our community. </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Tourists fined for “just having a beer” in Colosseum

<p dir="ltr">Two tourists have received a hefty $1200 fine after breaking into the Colosseum in Rome and having a beer after it was closed.</p> <p dir="ltr">The pair, aged 24 and 25 according to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2021/nov/17/us-tourists-fined-800-for-breaking-into-colosseum-for-beer" target="_blank"><em>The Guardian</em></a>, climbed to the second tier of the tourist attraction in the early hours on Monday (local time).</p> <p dir="ltr">They<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/tourist-fined-1200-illegal-act-colosseum-rome-200613025.html" target="_blank">reportedly</a><span> </span>chatted over some beers while the amphitheatre was closed to the public.</p> <p dir="ltr">The American tourists climbed over high railings, walked to the second level, and settled at a spot overlooking the city,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/tourists-rome-colosseum-beer/index.html" target="_blank"><em>CNN</em></a><span> </span>reported.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, they were spotted by a member of the public at about 5.30 am who alerted the police.</p> <p dir="ltr">They told police they were “just having a beer”, the Italian press reported, but were then fined by police for illegally entering the Colosseum.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to the<span> </span><em>BBC</em>, the pair were fined a total of 800 Euros, or $NZD 1290.</p> <p dir="ltr">But, this isn’t the first time tourists have broken the rules at the Colosseum.</p> <p dir="ltr">In 2015, two California women left their tour group and etched their initials into the structure, an action which is strictly forbidden.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Father’s final heroic act saves his daughter

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A US man has been remembered as a hero after he died saving his daughter’s life in a plane crash.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mike Perdue was one of four people who perished after a light plane crashed near Michigan’s Beaver Island over the weekend.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His daughter, 11-year-old Laney, was the sole survivor of the crash.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“He cradled her in his arms,” family friend Ryan Wojan </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/news/world/us-dads-final-act-to-save-daughter-before-tragic-plane-crash-in-michigan-c-4579789" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">said</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“She doesn’t remember anything, except for her daddy squeezing her so hard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“He saved her life… he died a hero.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:270px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845703/e8911d523598f44beaaec6e097ca5f0844fb8dec.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9dbe2ff61c414b6095ac9181c66c9fba" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: NBC / UpNorthLive</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Laney has undergone two surgeries so far and is expected to recover after suffering multiple fractures during the crash.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Wojan added that all of her injuries occurred on the opposite side of where her dad had been sitting in the plane.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He and Mr Perdue were meeting on the island for opening day of firearm deer season, with the Perdue’s flying on the same plane he had three hours earlier.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Laney had joined her dad on the way to meet a family friend for the weekend.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Wojan said his friend’s two passions were his family - including his wife and four kids - and his faith.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845702/61232801_1636911094768244_r.jpeg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7567644df43747dea1d81cb5863661e6" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: GoFundMe</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“He’s taken his girls out hunting and fishing but there’s a special bond between a dad and his sons,” Mr Wojan said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And he was very much looking forward to getting his kids involved with hunting and fishing and I feel a great weight to be a part of that for them going forward.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/prayers-for-perdues?utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet&amp;utm_medium=copy_link_all&amp;utm_source=customer" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">fundraiser</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> started for the Perdue family to help them pay for funeral costs has received over $USD 109,000 ($AUD 149,000 or $NZD 156,000) in donations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The other victims of the crash included Kate Leese and Adam Kendall, who were travelling in the plane to take their dogs to the vet.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The dogs also died in the crash.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Kate and Adam were meant for each other. They lived 20 lives in the time they knew each other. Kate was larger than life,” Kate’s sister, Amanda Leese, said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“She wanted to experience the world. She wanted to taste it. She wanted to explore it and Adam was right there with her.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The pilot was the fourth victim of the crash and remains unidentified.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Investigations are being conducted to determine the cause of the crash.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: NBC / UpNorthLive</span></em></p>

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Deforestation can raise local temperatures by up to 4.5℃ – and heat untouched areas 6km away

<p>Forests directly cool the planet, like natural evaporative air conditioners. So what happens when you cut them down?</p> <p>In tropical countries such as Indonesia, Brazil and the Congo, rapid deforestation <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nclimate3250">may have accounted for</a> up to 75% of the observed surface warming between 1950 and 2010. <a href="https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/ac2fdc">Our new research</a> took a closer look at this phenomenon.</p> <p>Using satellite data over Indonesia, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea, we found deforestation can heat a local area by as much as 4.5℃, and can even raise temperatures in undisturbed forests up to 6km away.</p> <p>More than 40% of the world’s population live in the tropics and, under climate change, rising heat and humidity could push them into <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-021-00695-3">lethal conditions</a>. Keeping forests intact is vital to protect those who live in and around them as the planet warms.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431859/original/file-20211115-13-g3akke.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431859/original/file-20211115-13-g3akke.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <span class="caption">Trees provide shade, habitat, and regulate the supply of clean water.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></p> <h2>Deforestation hot spots</h2> <p>At the recent climate change summit in Glasgow, world leaders representing 85% of Earth’s remaining forests committed to ending, and reversing, <a href="https://ukcop26.org/glasgow-leaders-declaration-on-forests-and-land-use/">deforestation by 2030</a>.</p> <p>This is a crucial measure in our fight to stop the planet warming beyond the internationally agreed limit of 1.5℃, because forests store vast amounts of carbon. Deforestation releases this carbon – <a href="https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rstb.2019.0120">approximately 5.2</a> billion tonnes of carbon dioxide per year – back into the atmosphere. This accounts for nearly 10% of the global emissions from 2009-2016.</p> <p>Deforestation is <a href="https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.aax8574">particularly prevalent</a> in Southeast Asia. <a href="https://data.globalforestwatch.org/documents/14228e6347c44f5691572169e9e107ad/explore">We calculate</a> that between 2000 and 2019, Indonesia lost 17% of its forested area (26.8 million hectares of land), and Malaysia 28% of its forest cover (8.12 million hectares). Others in the region, such as Papua New Guinea, are considered “<a href="https://wwf.panda.org/discover/our_focus/forests_practice/deforestation_fronts_/">deforestation hot spots</a>”, as they’re at high risk of losing their forest cover in the coming decade.</p> <p>Forests in this region are cut down for a variety of reasons, including for expanding palm oil and timber plantations, logging, mining and small-scale farms. And these new types of land uses produce different spatial patterns of forest loss, which we can see and measure using satellites.</p> <h2>What we found</h2> <p>We already know forests cool the climate directly, and losing forest causes local temperatures to rise. But we wanted to learn whether the different patterns of forest loss influenced how much temperatures increased by, and how far warming spread from the deforested site into neighbouring, unchanged areas.</p> <p>To find out, <a href="https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/ac2fdc">we used</a> satellite images that measure the temperature of the land surface. As the illustration below shows, we measured this by averaging forest loss in rings of different widths and radius, and looking at the average temperature change of the forest inside the ring.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431019/original/file-20211109-27-mpcx2l.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431019/original/file-20211109-27-mpcx2l.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Illustration of how temperature changes due to forest loss." /></a> <span class="caption">How forest clearing near an unchanged area causes temperatures to rise.</span></p> <p>For example, if you consider a circle of forest that’s 4km wide, and there’s a completely deforested, 2km-wide ring around it, the inner circle would warm on average by 1.2℃.</p> <p>The closer the forest loss, the higher the warming. If the ring was 1-2km away, the circle would warm by 3.1℃, while at 4-6km away, it’s 0.75℃.</p> <p>These might not sound like big increases in temperature, but global studies show <a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/114/35/9326.short">for each 1℃ increase in temperature</a>, yields of major crops would decline by around 3-7%. Retaining forest within 1km of agricultural land in Southeast Asia could therefore avoid crop losses of 10-20%.</p> <p>These estimates are conservative, because we only measured the effect of forest loss on average yearly temperatures. But another important factor is that higher average temperatures <a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2011JD016382">usually create</a> higher temperature extremes, like those during heatwaves. And those really high temperatures in heatwaves are what put people and crops at most risk.</p> <p>Of course, forests aren’t normally cut down in rings. This analysis was designed to exclude other causes of temperature change, putting the effect of non-local forest loss in focus.</p> <h2>Why is this happening?</h2> <p>Forests cool the land because trees draw water from the soil to their leaves, where it then evaporates. The energy needed to evaporate the water comes from sunshine and heat in the air, the same reason you feel colder when you get out of a pool with water on your skin.</p> <p>A single tree in a tropical forest can cause <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378017300134">local surface cooling equivalent</a> to 70 kilowatt hours for every 100 litres of water used from the soil — as much cooling as two household air conditioners.</p> <p>Forests are particularly good at cooling the land because their canopies have large surface area, which can evaporate a lot of water. When forests in tropical regions are cut down, this evaporative cooling stops, and the land surface warms up.</p> <p>This is not news to the people of Borneo. In 2018, researchers surveyed <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378017314188">people in 477 villages</a>, and found they’re well aware nearby forest loss has caused them to live with hotter temperatures. When asked why forests were important to their health and the health of their families, the ability for trees to regulate temperature was the most frequent response.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431029/original/file-20211109-13-18wfaj.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/431029/original/file-20211109-13-18wfaj.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Logging road" /></a> <span class="caption">A logging road in East Kalimantan, Bornea: logged forest on the left, virgin/primary forest on the right.</span> <span class="attribution"><a href="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/Logging_road_East_Kalimantan_2005.jpg" class="source">Aidenvironment, 2005/Wikimedia Commons</a>, <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" class="license">CC BY-SA</a></span></p> <h2>A climate change double whammy</h2> <p>In many parts of the world, including the tropics and Australia, expanding farmland is a major reason for cutting down forest. But given hotter temperatures also reduce the productivity of farms, conserving forests might prove a better strategy for food security and for the livelihoods of farmers.</p> <p>If forests must be removed, there may be ways to avoid the worst possible temperature increases. For example, we found that keeping at least 10% of forest cover helped reduce the associated warming by an average of 0.2℃.</p> <p>Similarly, temperatures did not increase as much when the area of forest loss was smaller. This means if deforestation occurs in smaller, discontinuous blocks rather than uniformly, then the temperature impacts will be less severe.</p> <p>To help share these findings, <a href="https://treeheat.azurewebsites.net">we’ve built a web mapping tool</a> that lets users explore the effects of different patterns and areas of forest loss on local temperatures in maritime South East Asia. It helps show why protecting forests in the tropics offers a climate change double whammy – lowering carbon dioxide emissions and local temperatures together.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/163584/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/sally-thompson-1223399">Sally Thompson</a>, Associate professor, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-western-australia-1067">The University of Western Australia</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/debora-correa-1288935">Débora Corrêa</a>, Research fellow, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-western-australia-1067">The University of Western Australia</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/john-duncan-1288934">John Duncan</a>, Research fellow, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-western-australia-1067">The University of Western Australia</a></em>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/octavia-crompton-1246306">Octavia Crompton</a>, Postdoctoral researcher, Pratt School of Engineering, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/duke-university-1286">Duke University</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/deforestation-can-raise-local-temperatures-by-up-to-4-5-and-heat-untouched-areas-6km-away-163584">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Investigations continue into hospital terror explosion

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An explosion in a taxi has prompted British authorities to amp the country’s threat level up from substantial to severe, as the incident is treated as an act of terrorism.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">David Perry, a taxi cab driver, was injured after the cab he was driving exploded outside Liverpool Women’s Hospital just before 11am on Remembrance Sunday.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Authorities are investigating the explosion and have since identified the passenger as 32-year-old Emad Al Swealmeen, who died at the scene.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to police, Mr Al Swealmeen brought a homemade explosive device into the cab and asked Mr Perry to drive him to the hospital.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845675/bus-explosion2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0c2d4a82a159482193623405ddd5b4a6" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Carl Bessant was inside the hospital when the explosion occurred. Image: Carl Bessant</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">CCTV footage shows the cab pulling into the drop-off section of the hospital car park at speed before the explosion occurred.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The driver then got out of the vehicle before it was engulfed in flames, and has since been treated for injuries.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Liverpool Mayor Joanne Anderson praised Mr Perry and suggested he had diverted the incident from occurring inside the hospital by locking the passenger in the cab.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The taxi driver in his heroic efforts has managed to divert what could have been an absolutely awful disaster,” she </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/world/liverpool-hospital-explosion-uk-terror-threat-level-raised-to-severe-after-men-arrested-under-terrorism-act/630e52b4-2135-4cdf-bad4-8ade94cb60f1" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">told</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> the </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The taxi driver locked the doors.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our thanks go to him.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, authorities have not confirmed her account of the incident.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Prime Minister Boris Johnson condemned the “sickening attack”, telling reporters that British people “will never be cowed by terrorism”.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CWTKqG9sKvo/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CWTKqG9sKvo/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Ian Redpath &amp; Jeremy Chopra (@allontheboard)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We will never give in to those who seek to divide us with senseless acts of violence,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Three men believed to be “associates” of the deceased man were also arrested in other parts of Liverpool on Sunday under the Terrorism Act, with a fourth detained on Monday.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They have since been </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-59287001" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">released</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> without any charges laid.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the hours following the explosion, police raided two properties where Mr Al Swealmeen was believed to live, with both located within a mile of the hospital. Police also confirmed that a controlled explosion was carried out at one of the properties where they believe Mr Al Swealmeen constructed the explosive device he used in the cab.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Assistant Chief Constable Jackson <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-11-16/heroic-cabbie-praised-for-actions-after-deadly-liverpool-blast/100622794" target="_blank">said</a> the explosion was declared a terrorism incident, but that the motive behind it was yet to be determined.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845676/bus-explosion3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/dcc90df5df7c4996bde4d00917e9c433" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Forensic officers undertook a fingerprint search outside the hospital following the blast. Image: Getty Images</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our enquiries indicate that an improvised device has been manufactured and our assumption so far is that this was built by the passenger in the taxi,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The reason why he then took it to the Women’s Hospital is unknown, as is the reason for the sudden explosion.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Constable Jackson said the connection between the explosion and the time it occurred - shortly before Remembrance Day events were due to start -  is a line of inquiry authorities are pursuing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Police also </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://newsnationusa.com/news/world/uk/controlled-explosion-near-liverpool-house-where-taxi-terrorist-made-bomb/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">believe</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> the explosive may have failed to detonate properly or was set off prematurely.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The explosion comes within a month of the UK’s first fatal incident, where British MP David Amess was stabbed to death during a constituency meeting. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: The Guardian / YouTube</span></em></p>

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COP26: what the draft climate agreement says – and why it’s being criticised

<p>Having led the delegates at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow to believe that the first draft of the final agreement would be published at midnight Tuesday, the UK presidency will not have made many friends by delaying it till 6am Wednesday morning. There will have been plenty of negotiators – not to mention journalists – who will have needlessly waited up all night.</p> <p>In fact, COP26 president Alok Sharma will not have made many friends with the <a href="https://unfccc.int/sites/default/files/resource/Overarching_decision_1-CMA-3.pdf">text itself</a> either. As the host and chair of the summit, it is the UK’s responsibility to pull together all the negotiating texts which have been submitted and agreed over the last week into a coherent overall agreement.</p> <p>But the widespread consensus among delegates I have spoken to is that the draft they have produced is not sufficiently “balanced” between the interests and positions of the various country groupings. And for the chair of such delicate negotiations, that is a dangerous sin.</p> <p>Let’s recap. This COP (the conference of the parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change) is the designated moment under the 2015 Paris Agreement when countries must come forward with strengthened commitments to act. There are two main areas for this. One is emissions cuts by 2030, the so-called “nationally determined contributions” or NDCs. The other, for the developed countries, is financial assistance to the least developed nations.</p> <p>The problem facing the COP is that we know already that, when added together, countries’ emissions targets are <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/nov/09/cop26-sets-course-for-disastrous-heating-of-more-than-24c-says-key-report">not nearly enough</a> to keep the world to a maximum warming of 1.5°C above pre-industrial times, as the Paris Agreement aims for. And the financial promises don’t even reach the US$100 billion (£74.1 billion) a year that was meant to be achieved in 2020, let alone the much larger sums the most vulnerable countries need.</p> <p>So what have the poorest countries – and the vociferous civil society organisations demonstrating in Glasgow – been demanding?</p> <p>First, that NDCs should be strengthened before the scheduled date of 2025. And second, that <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02846-3">at least US$500 billion</a> should be provided in climate finance over the five years to 2025, with half of this going to help countries adapt to the climate change they are already experiencing.</p> <h2>Urging – not requiring</h2> <p>So what does the UK draft text say? It merely “urges” countries to strengthen their NDCs, proposing a meeting of ministers next year and a leaders’ summit in 2023. But “urges” is UN-speak for: “You may do this if you wish to, but you don’t have to if you don’t.” That is not enough to force countries to get onto a 1.5℃-compatible path. The text must require them to do so.</p> <p>On finance, the text is even weaker. There is no mention of the US$500 billion demand, although it does call for adaptation funding to be doubled. There is no mention of using the <a href="https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2021/08/23/how-the-world-can-make-the-most-of-new-special-drawing-rights">special drawing rights</a> (a kind of global money supply) which the IMF has recently issued for climate-compatible development. And there is insufficient recognition that the most vulnerable countries need much better access to the funds available.</p> <p>Of course, developing countries do not expect to get all their own way in the negotiations. But commenting on the overall balance of the text between different countries’ positions, one European delegate said to me: “This looks like it could have been written by the Americans.”</p> <p>It is of course true, as Alok Sharma emphasised in his afternoon press conference, that the text can still be changed. There are several issues on which negotiations are continuing and the text has yet to reflect their progress. Sharma has asked all parties to send in their suggested amendments to the draft and to meet him to discuss their reactions. He will find himself asked for a lot of meetings.</p> <p>But it matters how this early text is drafted, for two reasons. First, the lack of balance means that it is the least developed countries which will have to do the most work to change it. In Paris the French presidency worked the other way round. They drafted an ambitious text and dared the biggest emitters to oppose it.</p> <p>Second, the perceived imbalance could affect the trust in the British hosts. Sharma has built himself a strong reputation over the past couple of years preparing for the COP. He will not want to lose that in the crucial last days ahead.</p> <p><strong>This story is part of The Conversation’s coverage on COP26, the Glasgow climate conference, by experts from around the world.</strong> <br /><em>Amid a rising tide of climate news and stories, The Conversation is here to clear the air and make sure you get information you can trust. <a href="https://page.theconversation.com/cop26-glasgow-2021-climate-change-summit/"><strong>More.</strong></a></em> <!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/171632/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michael-jacobs-840558">Michael Jacobs</a>, Professorial Fellow, Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (SPERI), <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sheffield-1147">University of Sheffield</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/cop26-what-the-draft-climate-agreement-says-and-why-its-being-criticised-171632">original article</a>.</p>

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Global emissions almost back to pre-pandemic levels after unprecedented drop in 2020, new analysis shows

<p>Global carbon dioxide emissions have bounced back after COVID-19 restrictions and are likely to reach close to pre-pandemic levels this year, <a href="https://essd.copernicus.org/preprints/essd-2021-386/">our analysis</a> released today has found.</p> <p>The troubling finding comes as world leaders meet at the COP26 climate talks in Glasgow in a last-ditch bid to keep dangerous global warming at bay. The analysis was undertaken by the <a href="https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/carbonbudget">Global Carbon Project</a>, a consortium of scientists from around the world who produce, collect and analyse global greenhouse gas information.</p> <p>The fast recovery in CO₂ emissions, following last year’s <a href="https://theconversation.com/global-emissions-are-down-by-an-unprecedented-7-but-dont-start-celebrating-just-yet-151757">sharp drop</a>, should come as no surprise. The world’s strong economic rebound has created a surge in demand for energy, and the global energy system is still heavily dependent on fossil fuels.</p> <p>Most concerning is the long-term upward trends of CO₂ emissions from oil and gas, and this year’s growth in coal emissions, which together are far from trending towards net-zero by 2050.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429724/original/file-20211102-28770-1s1j889.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="people seated around U-shaped table" /> <span class="caption">The troubling findings come as world leaders meet at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Evan Vucci/AP</span></span></p> <h2>The global emissions picture</h2> <p>Global CO₂ emissions from fossil fuels dropped by 5.4% in 2020, compared to the previous year. But they are set to increase by about 4.9% above 2020 levels this year, reaching 36.4 billion tonnes. This brings them almost back to 2019 levels.</p> <p>We can expect another 2.9 billion tonnes of CO₂ emissions this year from the net effect of everything we do to the land, including deforestation, degradation and re-vegetation.</p> <p>This brings us to a total of 39.4 billion tonnes of CO₂ to be emitted by the end of this year.</p> <p>The fast growth in emissions matches the corresponding large increase in energy demand as the global economy opens up, with the help of <a href="https://www.f4b-initiative.net/post/majority-of-17-2-trillion-covid-stimulus-packages-doing-more-harm-than-good-to-environment">US$17.2 trillion</a> in economic stimulus packages around the world.</p> <p>CO₂ emissions from all fossil fuel types (coal, oil and natural gas) grew this year, with emissions from coal and natural gas set to grow more in 2021 than they fell in 2020.</p> <p>Emissions from global coal use were declining before the pandemic hit in early 2020 but they surged back this year. Emissions from global gas use have returned to the rising trend seen before the pandemic.</p> <p>CO₂ emissions from global oil use remain well below pre-pandemic levels but are expected to increase in coming years as road transport and aviation recover from COVID-related restrictions.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429469/original/file-20211031-17-1pa5f0i.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429469/original/file-20211031-17-1pa5f0i.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <span class="caption">Global fossil CO₂ emissions.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Source: Global Carbon Project, https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/carbonbudget</span></span></p> <h2>Nations leading the emissions charge</h2> <p>Emissions from China have recovered faster than other countries. It’s among the few countries where emissions grew in 2020 (by 1.4%) followed by a projected growth of 4% this year.</p> <p>Taking these two years together, CO₂ emissions from China in 2021 are projected to be 5.5% above 2019 levels, reaching 11.1 billion tonnes. China accounted for 31% of global emissions in 2020.</p> <p>Coal emissions in China are estimated to grow by 2.4% this year. If realised, it would match what was thought to be China’s peak coal emissions in 2013.</p> <p>India’s CO₂ emissions are projected to grow even faster than China’s this year at 12.6%, after a 7.3% fall last year. Emissions this year are set to be 4.4% above 2019 levels – reaching 2.7 billion tonnes. India accounted for 7% of global emissions in 2020.</p> <p>Emissions from both the US and European Union are projected to rise 7.6% this year. It would lead to emissions that are, respectively, 3.7% and 4.2% below 2019 levels.</p> <p>US and EU, respectively, accounted for 14% and 7% of global emissions in 2020.</p> <p>Emissions in the rest of the world (including all international transport, particularly aviation) are projected to rise 2.9% this year, but remain 4.2% below 2019 levels. Together, these countries represent 59% of global emissions.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429471/original/file-20211031-75805-1jh07jf.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429471/original/file-20211031-75805-1jh07jf.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <span class="caption">Regional fossil CO₂ emissions 2019-2021.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Source: Global Carbon Project, https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/carbonbudget</span></span></p> <h2>The remaining carbon budget</h2> <p>The relatively large changes in annual emissions over the past two years have had no discernible effect in the speed at which CO₂ accumulates in the atmosphere.</p> <p>CO₂ concentrations, and associated global warming, are driven by the accumulation of greenhouse gases – particularly CO₂ – since the beginning of the industrial era. This accumulation has accelerated in recent decades.</p> <p>To stop further global warming, global CO₂ emissions must stop or reach net-zero – the latter meaning that any remaining CO₂ emissions would have to be compensated for by removing an equivalent amount from the atmosphere.</p> <p>Carbon budgets are a useful way of measuring how much CO₂ can be emitted for a given level of global warming. In our latest analysis, we updated the carbon budget outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (<a href="https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/downloads/report/IPCC_AR6_WGI_SPM.pdf">IPCC</a>) in August this year.</p> <p>From the beginning of 2022, the world can emit an additional 420 billion tonnes of CO₂ to limit global warming to 1.5℃, or 11 years of emissions at this year’s rate.</p> <p>To limit global warming to 2℃, the world can emit an additional 1,270 billion tonnes of CO₂ – or 32 years of emissions at the current rate.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429886/original/file-20211103-19-fl69o8.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429886/original/file-20211103-19-fl69o8.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <span class="caption">The remaining carbon budgets to limit warming to 1.5℃ and 2℃. Updated from IPCC 2021.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Source: Global Carbon Project, https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/carbonbudget</span></span></p> <p>These budgets are the compass to net-zero emissions. Consistent with the pledge by <a href="https://eciu.net/netzerotracker">many countries</a> to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, CO₂ emissions need to decline by 1.4 billion tonnes each year, on average.</p> <p>This is an amount comparable to the drop during 2020, of 1.9 billion tonnes. This fact highlights the extraordinary challenge ahead and the need to increase short- and long-term commitments to drive down global emissions.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/170866/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/pep-canadell-16541">Pep Canadell</a>, Chief research scientist, Climate Science Centre, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere; and Executive Director, Global Carbon Project, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/csiro-1035">CSIRO</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/corinne-le-quere-315624">Corinne Le Quéré</a>, Royal Society Research Professor of Climate Change Science, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-east-anglia-1268">University of East Anglia</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/glen-peters-114835">Glen Peters</a>, Research Director, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/center-for-international-climate-and-environment-research-oslo-707">Center for International Climate and Environment Research - Oslo</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/pierre-friedlingstein-903247">Pierre Friedlingstein</a>, Chair, Mathematical Modelling of Climate, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-exeter-1190">University of Exeter</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/robbie-andrew-422668">Robbie Andrew</a>, Senior Researcher, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/center-for-international-climate-and-environment-research-oslo-707">Center for International Climate and Environment Research - Oslo</a></em>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/rob-jackson-213135">Rob Jackson</a>, Professor, Department of Earth System Science, and Chair of the Global Carbon Project, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/stanford-university-890">Stanford University</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/global-emissions-almost-back-to-pre-pandemic-levels-after-unprecedented-drop-in-2020-new-analysis-shows-170866">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Bear breaks into people’s home to steal their KFC

<p dir="ltr">A man in California was in for quite a surprise when he arrived home to a bear in his kitchen. Not just that, but the bear was helping itself to his KFC!</p> <p dir="ltr">Sierra Madre resident John Holden found the bear in his kitchen, and said there was at least one other bear in the house and a third outside. He told ABC7, "I've had a lot of other encounters with them. I've actually had them bump into me a couple times in the backyard, but definitely never in the house like that.”</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WdMEWlEmESo" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p dir="ltr">He said that the bears made a mess of his house, and he finally got them to leave by making loud noises. Despite that, they simply retreated to his backyard, lazing around after what was obviously a filling meal.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Californian city of Sierra Madre is in Los Angeles County, in the foothills of the San Gabriel Valley, below the southern edge of the Angeles National Forest. What that means is that bear sightings aren’t particularly uncommon, although catching them eating KFC certainly remains a rare occurrence.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a rel="noopener" href="https://abc7.com/bear-san-dimas-school-lockdown/11173375/" target="_blank">Just last week</a>, a bear wandered around the grounds of an elementary school in San Dimas, before making itself comfortable in a tree at a nearby home. That bear was tranquilised, caught, and released into the wild. A cub was also spotted near the elementary school, but its whereabouts are unknown. Wildlife officials believe the adult was a mother bear looking for the cub.</p> <p dir="ltr">Black bears are the only species of bear native to California, but they come in a number of colours, ranging from solid black to shades of brown. The last California grizzly bear, the bear found on the Californian state flag, was seen in 1924.</p>

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5 of the most dangerous roads in the world

<p><strong>Proceed with caution!</strong></p> <p><span>We came up with our list of the world’s most dangerous roads by consulting the experts who have driven some of these harrowing highways and by checking out other lists from the </span><em>World Most Dangerous Roads</em><span> travel documentary TV series. These 18 roads hug the edges of cliffs with no guard rail, are covered in ice, frequently flood, feature 18 lanes of manic traffic, and have sections of their infrastructure that are crumbling that would test even the best road trip cars. Attempting to tackle one of the most dangerous roads in the world is not for the faint of heart and not for the kind of driver who struggles to find reverse!</span></p> <p><strong>Col du Chaussy, France</strong></p> <p><span>At 1,532 metres above sea level, Col du Chaussy in the Rhône-Alpes region of south-eastern France is a high mountain pass that starts with the famous “Les Lacets de Montvernier.” This special stretch is only about 3.2km long but features 17 hairpin turns as you climb up an actual cliff. There’s a small concrete barrier as you zigzag upward but this improbable road, while impossibly picturesque, is still one of the most dangerous roads in the world.</span></p> <p><strong>Karnali Highway, Nepal</strong></p> <p><span>Approximately 50 people die here every year, making a drive on the 250km Karnali Highway in the Himalayas of West Nepal a literal death wish. It is one of the most dangerous roads in the world even when it’s not monsoon season because the surface is extremely dusty making visibility poor and includes narrow stretches, landslides, falling rocks, flooded sections, potholes, huge drops off steep cliffs, and significant bumpiness. And now it is only a road passable, at best, during the day as the police have banned driving at night due to the high number of fatal accidents.</span></p> <p><strong>Commonwealth Avenue, Philippines</strong></p> <p><span>Unlike other roads and highways on this list, this one isn’t perched on the edge of a mountain or near a crumbling bridge. In fact, it’s a wide urban highway that’s just 12km long. Eighteen lanes wide to be specific and due to heavy traffic, poor drainage which brings floods on the avenue, and the constant presence of motorbikes and pedestrians that tour buses can’t even see, this road has earned the tragic nickname “Killer Highway” because of the many accidents and fatalities suffered here.</span></p> <p><strong>BR-116 ("Rodovia da Morte"), Brazil</strong></p> <p><span>Any highway called Rodovia de Morte or Highway of Death is bound to be one of the most dangerous roads in the world. Stretching from Fortaleza in the north of the country to the southeast edge along the Uruguay border, this 4,490-km highway is the second-longest in Brazil and while it is advertised as being completely paved, that designation is dubious as much of BR-116 is in poor condition. But some cracked asphalt is not what makes it dangerous. Unstable weather and steep cliffs regularly cause major accidents and because the Highway of Death passes through some of Brazil’s most poverty-stricken areas, the threat of gangs lurk in several spots along this busy route.</span></p> <p><strong>Taroko Gorge Road, Taiwan</strong></p> <p><span>Taroko Gorge Road is one of the most dangerous roads in the world because it is carved out of a mountain and runs through one too. This popular 19km stretch in Taiwan is spectacular so you can expect a parade of tour buses, cars, scooters, bicyclists and pedestrians all sharing the same narrow road, and all trying to navigate blind corners and terrifying bends that look too small to fit around. If you find yourself on Taroko Gorge Road, you better hope the weather is fair, otherwise, you might suffer through landslides, floods and falling rocks that make sections impassable.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Tamara Hinson and Jeff Bogle. This article first appeared in </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/travel/destinations/18-of-the-most-dangerous-roads-in-the-world" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Why living in an Instagram hotspot isn’t picture perfect

<p><a rel="noopener" href="https://twitter.com/alicccce/media" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Alice Johnston</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, a longtime resident of the London neighbourhood of Notting Hill, which is the setting for the Julia Roberts film of the same name, has found its growing popularity as a tourist hotspot comes with highs and lows.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With its pastel-painted row houses, the area has become a popular destination as a background for Instagram pics, and Johnston has seen all kinds of crazy behaviour as visitors snap their photos.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVTfFwCF3mu/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVTfFwCF3mu/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Callista DeGraw (@callistagoesabroad)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Johnston says there are some good stories, like the day she and a friend were walking his French bulldog. A tourist asked if they could “borrow” the dog for a photo and as a thank you for the snap, Johnston’s friend received five pounds.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, Johnston says other moments were less wholesome.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was once woken up at 6am on Easter Sunday by French teenagers taking pictures outside,” she </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://travel.nine.com.au/latest/living-in-instagram-tourist-hotspot-neighbourhood-reality-for-residents/44522c73-395b-4a9f-b9c0-2576b190a9a9" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">says</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“One time I was changing after I got out of the shower and there was an elderly man taking a picture (of my windows) with an iPad.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although her shutters were closed during that incident, she says she was still rattled by the experience.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVdgciYg57-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVdgciYg57-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Rowena Nathan (@rowenanathan_)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With the influx of visitors to one pale-pink house near where she lives, Johnston says the nearby residents have given up trying to keep them away. Instead, they’ve installed a donation box asking visitors for a donation to charity in exchange for a photo.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As busy and inconvenient as it can be, Johnston says she tries to be sympathetic to travellers visiting her hometown and recalls how she loved doing the same thing while visiting the Marais in Paris.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I love to travel, so I have to be pretty understanding when people travel to where I live, and I feel lucky that it’s cool enough that people want to come where I live,” she says.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: homesite_estate_agents</span></em></p>

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"Would this piss you off?" Gross inflight conduct captured

<p>A plane passenger has sparked outrage online after a photo surfaced of her draping her long hair over the back of the plane seat and into a fellow traveller's face.</p> <p>The picture was shared to Twitter, and shows the woman's long hair draped down over the other passenger's tray table.</p> <p>Twitter user Anthony shared the image, asking his followers "Would this piss you off?"</p> <p>The post has racked up thousands of likes and comments, with social media users all chiming in to decide how they would deal with the entitled traveller.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Would this piss you off? <a href="https://t.co/79Xlz0stcK">pic.twitter.com/79Xlz0stcK</a></p> — Anthony 🇺🇸🇮🇹 (@Antman0528) <a href="https://twitter.com/Antman0528/status/1450846505896714241?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 20, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>One critic even came up with a way to get their own back on the passenger, saying, “I would quietly lower the tray, let her hair fall in and then close it up again."</p> <p>“It would piss me off and I’d tell her to keep it in her seat. If she gets pissy, offer to cut it.”</p> <p>Another offered a revenge strategy, saying "I'd start braiding that s***".</p> <p><span>Another critic added, “I totally agree with you, absolutely unnecessary and kind of gross for that matter, how would she like it if the person behind her sneezed into her hair instead of their tissue. That might teach her!”</span></p> <p><span>This is not the first instance of long-haired travellers making the journey difficult for others. </span></p> <p><span>In November last year, a TikTok video went viral of a plane passenger obscuring the person behind's TV screen with her long hair. </span></p> <p><span>In an act of revenge, the irritated passenger put chewing gum, a lollipop and coffee into her now-tangled locks. </span><span></span></p> <p><span><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845057/plane-hair-hero.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/089ea2af0f40439494d147f20620684f" /></span></p> <p><em>Image credits: TikTok / Twitter</em></p>

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Volleyball player reportedly beheaded by Taliban

<p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Warning: This story contains graphic content which may distress some readers.</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A rising volleyball star </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10115333/Taliban-BEHEAD-womens-youth-volleyball-player-report-claims.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">has been killed</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> by the Taliban, with images of her head shared on social media, according to a report.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mahjabin Hakimi, a member of the Kabul Municipality Volleyball Club, was beheaded by members of the organisation earlier this month, according to claims her coach made in an interview with </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.independentpersian.com/node/185776/%D8%AC%D9%87%D8%A7%D9%86/%D8%B7%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A8%D8%A7%D9%86-%DB%8C%DA%A9-%D8%B9%D8%B6%D9%88-%D8%AA%DB%8C%D9%85-%D9%85%D9%84%DB%8C-%D8%A8%D8%A7%D9%86%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%86-%D8%A7%D9%81%D8%BA%D8%A7%D9%86%D8%B3%D8%AA%D8%A7%D9%86-%D8%B1%D8%A7-%D8%AF%D8%B1-%DA%A9%D8%A7%D8%A8%D9%84-%D8%B3%D8%B1-%D8%A8%D8%B1%DB%8C%D8%AF%D9%86%D8%AF" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Persian Independent</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Several conflicting claims have been circulating on social media regarding her death, with reports claiming Mahjabin was killed a week before <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-trouble/kabul-has-fallen-what-s-happening-in-afghanistan" target="_blank">the Taliban seized Kabul</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A death certificate purportedly showed her date of death as mid-August.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Other claims said she had committed suicide.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A photo purportedly of her body showed she had an injury to her neck, but it is unclear whether it was caused by a blade or a ligature.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the Payk Investigative Journalism Centre, based in Afghanistan, said its sources confirmed Mahjabin “was beheaded by the Taliban in Kabul”.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845032/volleyball1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/bf96b466d9a04384bbecf2adad8e6031" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Twitter</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mahjabin’s coach said her death was only being reported now because the Taliban had threatened her family to remain silent about what happened to her.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After the image emerged online, the coach decided that she needed to speak out.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“All the players of the volleyball team and the rest of the women athletes are in a bad situation and in despair and fear,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Everyone has been forced to flee and live in unknown places.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The coach said only two members of the Kabul team managed to flee the country before the Taliban seized power at the end of August, with the rest now in hiding.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Italian Volleyball Federation announced on Friday that all of its leagues would observe a minute of silence for Mahjabin prior to their games on the weekend.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It seems impossible that in 2021 someone will be killed just because they play volleyball or, even worse, because they want to chase their dreams,” the federation said in a </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.federvolley.it/news/il-mondo-del-volley-lutto-decapitata-una-giovane-pallavolista-afgana" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">statement</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Instead it is a horrendous reality. The whole great volleyball community is in mourning today.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Mahjabin, wherever you are, we like to think of you with a ball in your hand, finally free to play volleyball.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The devastating news comes as athletes have continued to be evacuated from the country.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">FIFA, the governing body of football, negotiated the evacuation of 57 soccer and basketball players on Thursday, with most being women and children.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The organisation also said it worked with the Qatari government to evacuate almost 100 football players and their families, and assisted cycling body UCI with the evacuation of 165 refugees via Albania.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">50 female Afghan athletes and their dependents have been evacuated by Australia after lobbying from prominent sporting figures, while several of Afghanistan’s national female youth soccer players were granted asylum in Portugal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite making vague promises that their attitudes towards women had changed, the Taliban banned girls from returning to secondary school.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Zahra Fayazi, a member of the senior volleyball team who fled to the UK, previously told the </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/sport/volleyball/58612964" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that female players were threatened and destroyed their sporting equipment out of fear.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Many of our players who are from provinces were threatened many times by their relatives who are Taliban and Taliban followers,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They even burned their sports equipment to save themselves and their families. They didn’t want them to keep anything related to sport. They are scared.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The Taliban asked our players’ families to not allow their girls to do sport, otherwise they will be faced with unexpected violence.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Taliban also replaced the government’s women ministry with an all-male “vice and virtue” department.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">No women have been included in the new government</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Twitter</span></em></p>

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Seven bodies unearthed in Gabby Petito case

<p dir="ltr">Authorities have unearthed multiple sets of human remains while searching for Brian Laundrie in Florida, prompting a wave of conspiracy theories to emerge in response.</p> <p dir="ltr">FBI Special Agent Michael McPherson said that some of the remains were found during a search of the Myakkahatchee Creek Environmental Park and Carlton Reserve, south of Tampa, Florida, not far from Laundrie's parents' home. The shocking find comes after weeks of searching for Laundrie, who is considered a person of interest in Gabby Petito’s disappearance and death.</p> <p dir="ltr">In addition to the remains, authorities <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/finance/legal/gabby-petito-items-found-in-search-for-brian-laundrie" target="_blank">also found</a> a backpack and a notebook that they believe belonged to Laundrie, which up until recently were submerged in water. This has led armchair sleuths online to conclude that the most recent set of remains found belongs to Laundrie himself.</p> <p dir="ltr">Authorities have been searching for Laundrie for over a month; Gabby was reported missing on September 11, Laundrie was last seen on September 14, and Gabby’s body was found on September 19.</p> <p dir="ltr">In addition to the Myakkahatchee Creek Environmental Park and Carlton Reserve remains, the uncovering of several bodies around the country during the search has people wondering if the cases are connected. Two of the bodies that authorities found were initially flagged as potentially being linked to the case because they had been found near where the couple had been travelling. Meanwhile, a seventh body, belonging to a woman who went missing in Colorado near where the couple had been in early July, was found this week.</p> <p dir="ltr">These coincidences appear to some like a spree on Laundrie’s part, while others have pointed out that uncovering this many bodies in national parks is not “statistically significant”, and that the increase can largely be attributed to things like increased police presence and authorities receiving more tips from the public than usual.</p> <p dir="ltr">One Reddit user wrote, “This is all coincidence. People here are hyper-focused on certain parts of the country right now so they think anything that happens is relevant.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Other bodies found include a married couple who were found murdered in Utah, a man who died by suicide in Wyoming, and a woman who disappeared in California in June.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Gabby Petito/Instagram</em></p>

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