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Top 10 tips for your financial back-up plan

<p>It’s natural to procrastinate over a daunting task, but the bottom line for any financial plan is how well it provides for the protection of you and your family if the worst happens. These tips will help you identify the key elements your plan should include to get the right cover at the right price.</p> <p><strong>How much is enough life insurance?</strong><br />When it comes to insuring your life, working out how much cover you should have may seem like a very subjective question, but there are certainly some guidelines to follow.</p> <p>If, for example, the family breadwinner was suddenly taken out of the picture, how much would the family need to invest to replace their income and how much capital would you need from an insurance payout to fund that investment?</p> <p>You may also want to have additional cover amounts to pay out a mortgage, cover specific emergencies or situations, or fund special purposes, such as a children’s education fund.</p> <p><strong>Are you insuring your greatest asset?</strong><br />Do a quick mental calculation of your annual income multiplied by the number of working years you have left before retirement. The answer is the amount you potentially risk if you don’t have income protection to cover you against sickness and accident.</p> <p>You can generally insure up to 75 per cent of your gross income and you can tailor cover with a “waiting period” that ties in with your sick leave entitlements, to keep premiums to a minimum.</p> <p><strong>How do you "bridge the gap" between life cover and income protection?</strong><br />If you really want to protect your lifestyle against the threat of major diseases such as a heart attack, stroke, or cancer, then why not consider trauma cover? You can insure yourself for a lump sum that is payable upon diagnosis of a range of medical conditions. You can then use this cover to fund a lifestyle change, an extended recuperation holiday, pay off debts to de-stress your life — the choice is yours.</p> <p><strong>Are you protected from a fate worse than death?</strong><br />Financially speaking, a total and permanent disablement can be a fate worse than death. You could completely and permanently lose your ability to earn income, but on top of that you may incur even greater expense burdens related to your condition, such as home renovations for wheelchair access, special vehicles, and expensive medical treatments. To protect against this financial threat, you can attach lump sum total and permanent disablement cover on your life insurance plan.</p> <p><strong>Will the cover in your super fund be enough?</strong><br />Relying on your super alone to take care of your insurance needs can be a shaky strategy. Will it be enough cover to give you the level of protection you need? Will you be able to continue coverage if you leave your employer? If not, will you still be insurable if you want to take out cover privately?</p> <p>Your financial planner can help you answer these questions and complement your work super cover with personal insurance plans.</p> <p><strong>It’s not all about the breadwinner</strong><br />A full-time homemaker in a family will also need to be protected, in case something happens to them. Lump sum life insurance cover on their life can be used to fund the cost of home help or even replace the breadwinner’s income if the breadwinner wants the flexibility to leave work and take care of children.</p> <p><strong>Don’t compromise on quality</strong><br />Not all insurance plans are the same — especially when it comes to income protection and trauma insurances. Benefit definitions and supplementary benefit inclusions can make thousands of dollars of difference when it comes to claim time, so consult a financial planner to ensure you have quality cover at the right price. When it comes to personal insurance, value is far more important than cost.</p> <p><strong>What about the children?</strong><br />Did you know that you can even insure children against premature death? It may not be a pleasant thought, but the harsh reality is that there will be significant expense if a child was to die.</p> <p>You are also ensuring that they will have the option in future to convert their cover to their own personal insurance when they reach adulthood, thus avoiding any insurability issues that may emerge at that time.</p> <p><strong>Have a review system in place</strong><br />Cover needs can fluctuate dramatically at different stages of life, so you could suddenly find yourself dangerously under-insured or wastefully over-insured. An annual review program with a qualified financial planner will help keep your plan relevant to your needs and potentially save you real dollars.</p> <p><strong>Are you paying too much?</strong><br />Using a financial planner to help with your protection program gives you the benefit of their inside knowledge on a range of insurers. They can save you the hassle of comparing plans so you can achieve the most economical solution.</p> <p>No single insurer will be cheapest for everybody at every age, so the expertise of someone who understands the market is invaluable for sourcing the best cover at the best price.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/money/financial-planning/top-10-tips-for-your-financial-back-up-plan.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Robert De Niro sued for harassment and gender discrimination

<p>Robert De Niro has been accused of gender discrimination and harassment in a $12 million lawsuit filed by former employee Graham Chase Robinson.</p> <p>In a court document obtained by <a href="https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/6446423-Robinson.html">the <em>Hollywood Reporter</em></a>, Robinson alleges that De Niro and his film production company Canal Productions subjected her to a “hostile work environment” and “years of gender discrimination and harassment”, including “gratuitous unwanted physical contact”, “abusive and sexist comments”, and underpayments “because she was not a male breadwinner”.</p> <p>According to Robinson, whose most recent position at the company was vice-president of production and finance, De Niro called her a “bitch” and a “spoiled brat”, asked her to “scratch his back” and “put away his boxers”, and made her work 20 to 30 hours of overtime per week without any additional pay.</p> <p>De Niro also allegedly implied Robinson deserved a lower salary than a male staff “whose job required no greater skill, effort or responsibility” because she was “a woman without children”.</p> <p>“De Niro made demands of Ms Robinson that he never imposed on males,” said Robinson’s lawyer Alexandra Harwin.</p> <p>“De Niro’s treatment of Ms Robinson was inappropriate, demeaning, abusive, and intolerable, and he needs to be held accountable.”</p> <p>The complaint comes after De Niro’s company filed <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/aug/19/robert-de-niro-sues-ex-employee-embezzlement-netflix-binge">a $6 million suit</a> against Robinson in August, accusing her of embezzling money and binge-watching television shows during office hours.</p> <p>Robinson argued that De Niro’s decision to sue her was “filled with baseless, bad faith and frivolous allegations” designed to “destroy her reputation” and prevent her from pursuing her claims.</p> <p>“Now, when her name is Googled, these allegations pop up on the screen,” the file read. “The results have been devastating to Ms Robinson. Her reputation and her career have been destroyed.”</p> <p>In response, De Niro’s lawyer Tom Harvey said Robinson’s claims are “beyond absurd”.</p>

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Starting a business later in life

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Should age be a barrier to entrepreneurship? A quick look at the statistics suggests that the answer is a resounding “no”, with nearly 30 per cent of business owners in Australia aged over 55. This includes 11.8 per cent who are aged between 55 and 59, 9.7 per cent between 60 and 64 and 7.8 per cent 65 and over.*</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So, what motivates people to start a business later in life? For many, it may be a case of fulfilling a dream that was simply impractical earlier in life, due to family or financial circumstances. For others, it might be a desire to take a new direction in life after becoming stagnant in their current job or being made redundant. Some may also see it as a way of staying engaged and active in their retirement years, rather than just putting their feet up.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whatever the reason, starting a business offers some real benefits, as well as some challenges. So what key aspects should you consider?</span></p> <p><strong>What are the positives?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On the plus side, you will have lifetime of experience to draw upon. Your experience in your previous jobs may have given you skills and attributes that are essential to running a business, such as technical know-how, an understanding of human relations, and a more sober ability to assess what you are good at and what you may need assistance with. These are qualities that you would not necessarily have had in your younger days.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You may also have developed a strong network of contacts and experts with specialist knowledge whose experience you can draw on, such as accounting and finance, legal, sales and marketing, and tradespeople.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Financially, you may also be in a better position as an older person, since you may have the expenses of family and a mortgage behind you, and you may have savings, superannuation or a redundancy payout available to help fund the venture.</span></p> <p><strong>Consider the negatives</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It is equally important to consider what may hold you back. For starters, the skills required in the business you are starting may not correlate to experience you have gained from previous employment. For example, if you have been working in a white-collar business all your life and want to start a café, there may be a steep learning curve about suppliers, food service regulations, and retail practices.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s also important to be realistic about your physical stamina and health. You’re not as young as you used to be and you don’t want to end up running a business that becomes a burden. You need to have a real passion for the business, so that you enjoy it as part of your lifestyle and are not doing it purely for financial gain. In other words, make sure it is a joy and not a jail!</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ensure your spouse is happy with the venture, too. The last thing you want is for the business to drive a wedge between personal relationships.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Possibly the biggest negative, however, is the financial risk. Assuming that one day you will want to retire completely, you need to be wary about overcommitting your financial resources to the business. If things don’t work out as you plan, or if selling the business proves to be a struggle, you may find yourself risking your retirement lifestyle.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once you have weighed up the pros and cons, and have decided to go ahead, you need to get your planning in place.</span></p> <p><strong>Be prepared</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Before you jump into a new business venture, you need to do your homework. That means doing some research and analysis on the market for your product or service to understand your competitors and your target customers. If you are buying into an existing business, get a professional to help assess its financial state and viability.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once you have established that there is a good business case, the next step is to put together a business plan. This is essential for articulating concrete business goals, sales and marketing plans, financing arrangements, cashflow projections, staffing issues, and regulatory/compliance obligations. It is vital to seek professional input on your plan to make sure it is sound.</span></p> <p><strong>Have an exit strategy</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Before you commit to going in, make sure you have a defined path for getting out too. That means:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ensure you are not overcommitting retirement funds and superannuation, so that you have a fallback if things go belly up.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are dipping into retirement funds, have a plan to allocate a portion of your profits to replenish your retirement savings, so that your retirement is not overly dependent on business income or the sale of the business.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Have a succession plan for a smooth and financially successful exit from the business down the track. Will it be passed to another family member? What financial records will you need to keep on top of to maximise future sale value? How will the business be sold?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To get such a plan in place, it is wise to speak with a financial planner who has the experience to integrate your business plans with your overall financial plan. They can also work with your accountant to make sure all the bases are covered. Drawing on the expertise of competent advisers is a critical aspect to making your venture the success that you want it to be.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">*Australian Bureau of Statistics: Counts of Australian Business Operators by Selected Characteristics, 2012</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/work/small-business/starting-a-business-later-in-life.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

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Safety at home is more important as we age

<p>The ageing of Australia’s population in the coming decades has significant implications for the housing market. So how might your needs change and what should you be thinking about when it comes to your current home or future needs?</p> <p>Home safety features, small and manageable housing, and easy accessibility will become more attractive to a growing proportion of our population, turning much of Australia’s traditional housing, designed for a post-war baby boom as well as younger, larger families, on its head.</p> <p>Over the 20 years between 1994 and 2014, the proportion of Australians aged 65 and over increased from 11.8 to 14.7 per cent of Australia’s population. This group is expected to increase more rapidly over the next decade, according to Australian Bureau of Statistics data, to almost 26 per cent by 2051. A further nine per cent is expected to be aged over 80.</p> <p>It’s therefore pretty clear that many more of us will be living alone and wanting suitable housing. More families will be caring for a parent or relative, and others will want to stay on in their homes despite debilitating illnesses that can be associated with ageing.</p> <p>This has important implications for the design, layout, fittings and locations of our existing and future housing. Because it’s increasingly clear that government may struggle to fund the supply of dedicated, affordable housing facilities for seniors, many of us will find that it is up to us to plan how we can adapt our existing homes so they remain suitable for us well into the future. This means we need to start anticipating today what our future needs may be, as well as what precautions and aids may be needed.</p> <p>If you are beginning to weigh up your housing options or you’re keeping an eye on a parent, relative or friend, here is some advice:</p> <p><strong>Stairs and entrances</strong></p> <p>Many of us downsize from family homes to multi-level townhouses and, as time goes on, we start struggling with stairs. If you’re considering downsizing, try and keep in mind finding a property with at least one bedroom and bathroom on the ground floor. That way, if stairs become difficult, you have the option of adjusting your living arrangements and staying in your home, rather than having to sell. If you have stairs, make sure there are secure handrails, a smoke detector, and that the stairs and stairwell are well lit. Also make sure that the floor coverings, whether carpet, wood or tiles, are secure and can’t be slipped on. The entrance and hallways should also be clear of any clutter, and have easily accessible bright lighting.</p> <p><strong>The kitchen</strong></p> <p>It’s important to make sure that kitchen appliances are easy to reach and are in good working order. Easily reached kitchen taps, microwave, oven, and stovetop controls all play a role in helping us remain self-sufficient in meal preparation. Thought should also be given to the height of bench tops, cupboards, and how easy it is to carry food from the kitchen to the eating area. It can be worthwhile making some simple design changes now rather than waiting until a parent or relative starts to have problems.</p> <p><strong>The bathroom</strong></p> <p>Moving in and out of the shower or bath without risk, and with ease, is the most important safety feature for the bathroom. Could you need to install bars or a shower seat in the future? Is it possible to add non-slip rubber mats in and beside the shower and bath? Is the shower door easy to open and close or is it difficult to manoeuvre around? Also, can the bathroom be easily accessed at night, without having to use stairs?</p> <p><strong>The bedroom</strong></p> <p>It’s important there’s a clear, uncluttered path from the bedroom to the bathroom as well as to the doorway leaving the bedroom. You might also want to consider whether it’s possible to put a television and armchair in the bedroom, if there’s the space, as this can provide a private, comfortable and secure area to relax in the evenings. It’s also important to consider whether there’s an easily accessible telephone, in the event of emergencies.</p> <p><strong>Other areas</strong></p> <p>It’s also important to make sure working smoke alarms are placed throughout the home, and make arrangements for batteries to be changed at least annually. In fact, better still, it’s a good idea to check your smoke alarms at the beginning and end of daylight saving. As you re-set clocks, just check the smoke detectors. All appliances should be in good working order and stray cords that can easily be tripped over should be firmly taped or reorganised. Take a look at your door and cupboard handles. It’s much easier to replace handles than the property, when somebody in your care is becoming less mobile. And finally, make sure emergency phone numbers are kept beside every phone in the house.</p> <p>While a safety assessment of the home might seem something only parents of young children need to need to worry about, it is an exercise that can benefit everybody.</p> <p><em>Written by First National. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/property/safety-at-home-is-more-important-as-we-age.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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How to get a good job after 50

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We might roll our eyes when politicians suggest we work until we are 70 but the fact is many older Australians want, or need to work. As the baby boomer generation ages, the number of workers aged 60 plus is increasing at four times the rate of any other demographic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With national age discrimination legislation barely a decade old, workers who lose their jobs at 55 or older spend an average of 72 weeks unemployed, 1.8 times longer than their younger counterparts.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s a statistic that calls for some hard-hitting strategies to level the playing field, which is what prompted veteran career coach Rupert French to write 'How To Get A Good Job After 50.'</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Age is not the issue; it is the perception of being too old that creates the barrier and, too often, that perception is greater in the mind of the job seeker than it is in the mind of an employer,” French says.</span></p> <p>Rupert French and his master class for mature job seekers</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The book outlines the strategies and tools to give mature workers the confidence to win a rewarding role.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A master of reinvention, having been a journalist, a teacher and a truckie, before his 20 years as a career coach, French knows firsthand just how to repackage transportable skills and make yourself a must-have job market commodity.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over the past 20 or more years, French has developed a very effective job search methodology.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Now that I’m getting closer to retirement, I would like to share these insights so that others can enjoy the same success that my clients have enjoyed,” he said.</span></p> <p>In the books he writes: </p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"So you are over 50 and you’re looking for a job. Perhaps your job search isn’t being as easy as you would like it to be and you are beginning to think that no one wants you because you’re too old. Well, think again. You can, and almost certainly will, get a good job within a reasonably short period of time if you follow the strategies described in this book. By ‘good job’ I mean one that will give you job satisfaction — one that matches your interests, your values and personality; and one that is a job of your choosing. It may not be the same as your last job. That sort of job may no longer be available due to changes in technology or economic circumstances. But it will be a job that will give you fulfilment and, as a result, a feeling of success."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">'How to Get a Good Job After 50' is available from </span><a href="http://www.exislepublishing.com.au/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Exile Publishing</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and wherever good books are sold RRP $29.99. Also available as an eBook.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Shannon Wall. Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/work/employment/how-to-get-a-good-job-after-50.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></p> <p> </p>

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Major heartbreaking change in Kevin Spacey lawsuit

<p>A male massage therapist who accused disgraced Hollywood heavyweight Kevin Spacey of sexual assault has died - however the lawsuit the star faces may still continue according to court records. </p> <p>Spacey, whose real name is Kevin Fowler, is being investigated in both London and Los Angeles over several allegations. </p> <p>The 60-year-old faces a titan federal lawsuit alleging he assaulted the late masseur, and his lawyers have filed a “notice of statement noting plaintiff’s death” in the federal case on Tuesday, according to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9957461/kevin-spacey-sexual-assault-allegations-accuser-dead/" target="_blank">The Sun. </a></p> <p>The filing said they were informed on September 11 of the masseur’s passing. </p> <p>“No further information or details have been given to Mr Fowler’s counsel, but Plaintiff’s counsel stated they intended to notify the Court with additional information at an appropriate time in the future.”</p> <p>The massage therapist claimed he was attacked by the Oscar winning actor three year ago during a massage session in Malibu, US. </p> <p>The actor also allegedly grabbed the masseur’s hand twice and guided it to his private parts. </p> <p>He has also been accused of asking to perform a sexual act on the massage therapist - which caused him to bolt from the session. </p> <p>The lawsuit could continue despite the therapist’s death. </p> <p>Spacey has been accused by more than a dozen men of sexual misconduct. </p>

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What you should know about renovating and asbestos

<p>We all love making our own home better to live in, but are we aware of the risks? </p> <p>Many amateur renovators aren’t aware of some of the hidden renovating risks. For instance, you only have to inhale one tiny dot of asbestos into your lungs and there’s a chance, many years later, you could develop mesothelioma – a deadly cancer of the lungs and chest wall.</p> <p>In the past, the people who were being diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma were mostly men who’d been exposed to asbestos through their work as tradesmen. However, more recently, this has changed with current research showing more people – including women – are exposing themselves to very slight amounts of asbestos when they do simple home renovations.</p> <p>A recent study by Professor Eun-Kee Park into Asbestos exposure during home renovations in NSW showed: </p> <ul> <li>61.4 per cent of DIY renovators reported being exposed to asbestos during home renovations.</li> <li>39.3 per cent reported their partner and 22.8 per cent reported their children, were also exposed to asbestos during home DIY home renovations.</li> <li>Non DIY renovators were less likely to be exposed or have their families exposed.</li> </ul> <p><strong><em>In Australia, at least one house in every three has some asbestos in it</em></strong></p> <p>Asbestos was widely used in Australian homes before 1987 and so to help get this information to the general public, this month is National Asbestos Awareness Month.</p> <p><strong>John Jarratt wants to help spread the message</strong> <br />Well-known Australian actor, <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/entertainment/where-are-they-now-john-jarratt.aspx">John Jarratt</a>, feels strongly about asbestos exposure because he had a close friend, Harold Hopkins, die from mesothelioma at the age of 67. Because of Hopkins story Jarratt agreed to be a spokesperson for National Asbestos Awareness.</p> <p>Jarratt’s friend was a fellow actor and when he was studying his craft, used to work in the building trade, renovating houses. In 1968, he renovated a fibro house and was exposed to the asbestos fibres.</p> <p>“He ended up with mesothelioma,” says Jarratt. “It killed him in six months, once he was diagnosed.”</p> <p><strong>A few seconds of exposure is all it takes</strong> <br />Jarratt is aware of just how easy it is to expose yourself to asbestos accidentally – even just momentarily – but he says that’s enough to be a death sentence. Jarratt also worked in the building industry when he was an up-and-coming actor, and he’s seen first-hand how easy it is to accidentally come across asbestos.</p> <p>“It’s potent stuff. Only one tiny little dot of it goes into your lungs, and you’re gone,” he says.</p> <p>The trick with mesothelioma is the fact it can lay dormant for between 20 and 50 years but when it does develop, it’s usually at a rapid pace. Unfortunately, there’s no cure for mesothelioma and the average survival time is 10 to 12 months following diagnosis. As well as mesothelioma, you can develop lung cancer, asbestosis and benign pleural disease from inhaling asbestos fibres.</p> <p>“It can lay dormant a long, long time,” says Jarratt. “I could be down the drain myself because I was raised in a fibro house myself in a little coal-mining village on the south coast of New South Wales.”</p> <p>“Every time my mum got pregnant, the old man was out there cutting up sheets of fibro and building another room. And we were all sucking it all in, helping him out. So I could just as easily suffer for it – who knows?” he explains.</p> <p>Jarratt is quick to point out, it doesn’t matter how careful you are after you’ve been exposed. His friend, Hopkins, was a vegan and kept himself extremely fit.</p> <p>“If you wanted to put money on somebody to get to 100, you’d put all your money on Harold. He ran 15k, which was his morning run and halfway through his hundred push ups he got a pain in the chest. Six months later he was dead,” says Jarratt. “But none of that helps – once you’ve been exposed, there’s nothing much you can really do.”</p> <p>“Also, unfortunately you can be susceptible to it too. That’s the other thing. You can be a lucky guy and have a strong immunity to it or maybe not,” Jarratt adds.</p> <p><strong>It’s easy to check if your house has asbestos</strong><br />Jarratt emphasises it’s very easy to be proactive and find out if your house has asbestos in it.</p> <p>“You go to your local council. Every council in Australia knows about it,” says Jarratt. “You just go there and they’ll give you a leaflet on it and that’ll tell you exactly what to do and what the problems are. It’s all very well organised in that regard.”</p> <p>“If your house is pre-1987, it’ll most definitely have asbestos in it – could be the back board of your meter box. It’s everywhere. You know those old hot water services that used to be in the roof? They usually sit on a bed of asbestos. So it’s in all sorts of places,” he adds.</p> <p>As for DIY renovating, Jarratt warns it’s important to know what you’re doing: “If you’ve got an old house and some timber cladding, you’ve got to make sure that someone hasn’t put that over fibro which is very common.”</p> <p>“Just don’t bore a hole into a wall unless you know what it’s all made of,” he adds. “I know, because I’ve done a lot of building. I just simply go under the house and look up through the stud wall and see on the inside, all the sheeting. That’s the only way you can see the sheeting so that’s what experts who know what they’re doing, do,” he explains.</p> <p>Jarratt adds there’s no safe level of working with asbestos.</p> <p>“Look, I’ve been exposed to it all my life because I’ve built houses in between acting jobs. I mean, it’s very extensive in this country. I mean they call the working class the fibro belt for god’s sake,” he laughs.</p> <p>But as Jarratt explains, if you find some fibro in your house and don’t touch it, you’re fine. “If you don’t touch it you’re fine – don’t touch it. You can paint it – that’s fine. But don’t go sanding!!! Leave it alone and get advice – it’s not worth it!”</p> <p>It’s important to keep in mind, asbestos is not only found in fibro homes. Australia was among one of the largest consumers of asbestos-containing materials in the world with asbestos-containing products still found in one in three brick, weatherboard, fibro or clad homes built or renovated before 1987.</p> <p>Asbestos was also used in the manufacture of a broad range of products. It can literally be anywhere! Under-floor coverings including carpets, linoleum and vinyl tiles, behind wall and floor tiles, in cement floors, internal and external walls, ceilings and ceiling space (insulation), eaves, garages, roofs, around hot water pipes, fences, extensions to homes, garages, outdoor toilets, backyard and farm structures, chook sheds and even dog kennels.</p> <p>Without knowing where these types of asbestos-containing products might be located or how to manage and dispose of asbestos safely, you can end up at risk when you try to renovate your house yourself.</p> <p><strong>Asbestos exposure is common during home renovations</strong><br />To find out more about asbestos and where it could be in your house, take a look at the <a href="http://asbestosawareness.com.au/">Asbestos Awareness site here</a>. This site will make it easy for you to identify the sorts of products you need to look out for, the locations where asbestos might be found and how you need to get professional help to manage and dispose of asbestos safely.</p> <p>The video below with Cherie Barber will help you identify the various locations in homes where asbestos might be found in your home, providing the most practical and easily accessible resource for homeowners, renovators and tradespersons.</p> <p><strong>Asbestos Safety Check</strong></p> <p>1. At least 1 in 3 Australian homes contains asbestos including brick, weatherboard, fibro and clad homes. </p> <p>2. Asbestos was widely used in building materials before 1987 so if your home was built or renovated before 1987 it most likely contains asbestos in some form or another.</p> <p>3. If asbestos is disturbed during renovations or maintenance your health and the health of your family could be at risk.</p> <p>4. DIY is not recommended where asbestos is present.</p> <p>5 When renovating or working in and around homes, if in doubt assume asbestos materials are present and take every precaution.</p> <p>6. Dealing with asbestos is important and serious, but it’s not overwhelming – it is manageable!</p> <p>7. If you’re not sure if asbestos is in your home you can have it inspected by a licenced removalist or a licensed asbestos assessor.</p> <p>8. Products made from asbestos cement include fibro sheeting (flat and corrugated), water, drainage and flue pipes, roofing shingles, guttering and floor and wall coverings.</p> <p>9. If left undisturbed asbestos materials in good, stable condition are unlikely to release dangerous fibres and pose a health risk. Generally, you don’t need to remove the asbestos. Paint it and leave it alone but remember to check it occasionally for any signs of wear and tear.</p> <p>10. There are legal requirements regarding asbestos management, its removal and disposal</p> <p>11. While some might follow the regulations and safety requirements to remove small amounts of asbestos, the safest way to manage its removal is to retain a licenced professional asbestos removalist equipped to protect you and your family from the dangers of asbestos dust and fibres.\</p> <p>12. Where asbestos fibres are friable (loose and not bonded into building materials), ONLY licenced friable asbestos removalists are allowed to remove it.</p> <p>13. The cost of asbestos removal by a licenced professional is comparable to most licenced tradesmen including electricians, plumbers and tilers.</p> <p>14. If you must work with any material that may contain asbestos or remove asbestos yourself, protect yourself and your family and follow the legal and safety requirements for the management of asbestos to minimise the release of dust or small particles from the asbestos materials.</p> <p>15. Never use tools on asbestos materials as they will make asbestos fibres.</p> <p><em>Written by Pamela Connellan. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/what-you-should-know-about-renovating-and-asbestos.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Drug laws on possession: several countries are revisiting them and these are their options

<p>Many countries are changing the way they approach people who use drugs. The Irish government <a href="http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Final_Report_of_the_Working_Group.pdf/Files/Final_Report_of_the_Working_Group.pdf">has just announced</a> possible alternatives to criminalisation for possession of some drugs. Other countries, including <a href="https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/norway-decriminalize-drug-use_n_5a387b70e4b0860bf4aa96c4">Norway</a> and <a href="https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/06/malaysia-decriminalise-drug-health-minister-190628060223845.html">Malaysia</a>, are weighing options. But what can countries do if they don’t want to arrest or convict people because they use drugs?</p> <p>To inform the Irish government’s decision, we carried out a <a href="http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/ANNEXE_I_-_Hughes_Stevens_Hulme_Cassidy_-_2018_-_Review_of_approaches_taken_in_Ireland_and_in_other_jurisdictions_to_simple_possession_drug_offences.pdf/Files/ANNEXE_I_-_Hughes_Stevens_Hulme_Cassidy_-_2018_-_Review_of_approaches_taken_in_Ireland_and_in_other_jurisdictions_to_simple_possession_drug_offences.pdf">detailed review</a> of approaches in various countries. These countries were Australia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Jamaica, the Netherlands, Portugal, the UK and the US. We found three main approaches: depenalisation, diversion and decriminalisation. (We did not review models of legally regulating the production and sale of drugs. Decriminalisation is not the same as legalisation.)</p> <p><strong>Depenalisation</strong> is where the crime remains in law, but the police stop imposing penalties for some people. For example, police in England and Wales can issue written <a href="https://theconversation.com/policing-of-cannabis-possession-is-largely-accidental-and-many-officers-dont-think-it-makes-a-difference-100102">warnings</a> to people found to be in possession of small amounts of cannabis for the first time, instead of arresting them.</p> <p><strong>Diversion</strong> is when people found to be in possession of drugs are sent to education sessions, treatment or social services, instead of being charged and prosecuted. These schemes have been adopted in Australian states, such as <a href="https://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au/sites/default/files/ndarc/resources/DPMP%20Monograph%2027%20-%202019%20-%20Criminal%20justice%20responses%20relating%20to%20personal%20use%20and%20possession%20of%20illicit%20drugs.pdf">New South Wales</a>, and in some parts of England and the US. Some schemes, including one in Queensland, are written into law. Others, like County Durham’s <a href="https://www.durham.police.uk/Information-and-advice/Pages/Checkpoint.aspx">Checkpoint</a> scheme and the <a href="http://leadkingcounty.org/">LEAD programme</a> in Seattle, are based only on changes in police practice.</p> <p><strong>Decriminalisation</strong> involves legal changes so that it is no longer a criminal offence to possess a small quantity of drugs for personal use. But there are three approaches to this model.</p> <p>Since the 1970s, many US states have replaced criminal sanctions and prison sentences with civil sanctions, such as fines for the possession of less than an ounce of cannabis. Similar schemes operate in the Czech Republic, Jamaica and some Australian states, such as South Australia.</p> <p>Other countries and states, such as <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002204260403400302">Germany</a> and <a href="https://eu.burlingtonfreepress.com/story/news/politics/government/2018/01/22/vermonts-legal-marijuana-law-what-you-should-know/1045478001/">Vermont</a> have decriminalisation with no sanction at all. Still others, like Portugal, have favoured decriminalisation with diversion to targeted health and social responses.</p> <p>In 2001, Portugal decriminalised the possession of small amounts of all kinds of drugs, combined with the possibility to impose civil sanctions (such as fines or suspension of driving licences) and diverting people into treatment, via a meeting with a “commission for the dissuasion of addiction”. In practice, most cases end with no sanction. Portugal also expanded access to treatment, health and social services with <a href="https://academic.oup.com/bjc/article/50/6/999/404023">positive results</a>.</p> <p><strong>How the models stack up</strong></p> <p>Each approach has its own advantages and drawbacks. Depenalisation, for example, is easy to implement and lets police use their discretion in deciding who to arrest. But this may lead to discriminatory enforcement, as black people are often <a href="https://www.release.org.uk/publications/ColourOfInjustice">far more likely</a> to be stopped, arrested and punished for drugs.</p> <p>Decriminalisation requires legal changes to be made. Some may argue that it leaves authorities without legal opportunities to intervene in undesired activities, such as public drug use. But these can still be banned by separate rules. Indeed, possession of cannabis has been formally decriminalised in New York State since 1977, but it has still been an offence to have the drug “in public view”, leading to hundreds of thousands of arrests for low-level drug offences, again falling most heavily on <a href="http://www.drugpolicy.org/new-york/marijuana-reform">people of colour</a>.</p> <p>But decriminalisation also brings the potential for health, social and criminal justice benefits, by reducing stigma surrounding drug use - a known barrier to treatment and harm reduction - and <a href="http://www.ndlerf.gov.au/sites/default/files/publication-documents/monographs/monograph-66.pdf">improving employment prospects and housing stability</a>. It can also reduce the burden on police and courts. In Portugal, the extra spending on health services was offset by savings in the criminal justice system and other benefits, meaning the <a href="https://www.sciencediret.com/science/article/pii/S095539591400231X?via%3Dihub">overall social cost of drugs fell</a></p> <p><strong>No models lead to increased drug use</strong></p> <p>Importantly, we did not find evidence that any of these alternative measures consistently increased the use of drugs. A <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955395919300210?via%3Dihub">study</a> of over 100,000 teenagers in 38 countries did not show higher rates of drug use in countries with more liberal approaches. Recent decriminalisations in five US states produced big reductions in arrests but <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955395918301786?via%3Dihub">no apparent increase</a>in cannabis use among young people.</p> <p>As countries look for ways to implement <a href="https://www.unsceb.org/CEBPublicFiles/CEB-2018-2-SoD.pdf">UN recommendations</a> to avoid criminalising people for using drugs, they will need to consider these different options carefully. They will, <a href="https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/first-time-drug-offenders-to-be-referred-to-hse-in-policy-overhaul-1.3974643">as Ireland has found</a>, need to adapt them to their own legal, social and drug use contexts. They can do so with a fair amount of confidence that removing the harms of punishment is not likely to increase drug use. But, given some models bring greater long-term gains, there is merit in arguing that governments ought to be bold.</p> <p><em>Written by Alex Stevens and Caitlin Hughes. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/drug-laws-on-possession-several-countries-are-revisiting-them-and-these-are-their-options-121221"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

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Here is what William Tyrrell would look like today

<p>A team of experts has released a projection of what William Tyrrell would look like today, five years since the boy disappeared.</p> <p>Newcastle University criminologist Xanthé Mallett and her team generated an age progression image using the latest technology in her forensic services company.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7830711/william-tyrrell-10-xm.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/294b328cf15f407d9a23e26cca570dac" /></p> <p>Tyrrell was last seen at his foster grandmother’s yard in Kendall on the New South Wales mid-north coast on September 12, 2014.</p> <p>He would be eight years old today.</p> <p>“He will have changed quite a lot in the intervening five years so it helps people imagine what he would potentially look like now,” Mallett told <a rel="noopener" href="https://10daily.com.au/news/crime/a190911dvaio/this-is-what-william-tyrrell-would-look-like-today-20190911" target="_blank"><em>10 News</em></a>.</p> <p>“Most interestingly for a child, the dentition would’ve change. Their adult teeth would’ve come through and that would have changed the lower part of William’s face.”</p> <p>Despite being one of the largest investigations in the state’s history, Tyrrell has not been found.</p> <p>A <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/major-development-in-william-tyrrell-inquiry-as-local-claims-sighting" target="_blank">part-heard inquest into the disappearance</a> will continue next year.</p>

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9 times ibuprofen won’t work – and could be dangerous

<p><strong>When ibuprofen should be avoided</strong></p> <p>Athletes call it “Vitamin I.” Women with menstrual cramps depend upon it. But scientists are beginning to realise that ibuprofen may not be as benign as we thought. Here’s when you should just say no.</p> <p><strong>If you have heart disease</strong></p> <p>While low-dose aspirin can help prevent heart attack, other painkillers in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug family (NSAIDs) – which include ibuprofen – have been associated with an increase in the chance for heart attack or stroke. A 2017 <em>British Medical Journal</em> study reported a 20 to 50 percent elevated risk of heart attack among people who used NSAIDs daily for a week or more. The increased risk associated with ibuprofen could be as high as 75 percent. The greatest danger occurred within the first month of NSAID use and at high doses.</p> <p>Those with heart disease or at risk for heart disease should be especially mindful of these findings, though the elevated risk affects everyone, says Catherine Sherwin, PhD, chair of the clinical pharmacology track at the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists PharmSci 360 Meeting. If you’re taking blood-pressure medication, be especially cautious – NSAIDs could make them less effective. Talk to your doctor about alternative medications to treat your pain, whether it’s, say, paracetemol for a headache or physical therapy for back pain.</p> <p><strong>If you’re on anti-clotting meds</strong></p> <p>Anticoagulants and antiplatelets prevent blood from clotting easily. Anticoagulants are typically prescribed for people at high risk for stroke (such as those with atrial fibrillation or artificial heart valves), or those who’ve suffered from a pulmonary embolism; antiplatelets are usually advised for those who’ve already suffered a heart attack or stroke, as a way to prevent it from happening again. The problem? “The combination of these drugs with ibuprofen could significantly increase the risk for bleeding complications,” says David Craig, PharmD, pharmacist lead at the Moffitt Cancer Centre. So instead, discuss other options with your doctor.</p> <p><strong>If you have gastrointestinal issues</strong></p> <p>NSAIDs not only irritate the lining of the stomach and intestines, but they can also reduce blood flow in the area and impair its ability to fix itself. So if you already have digestive issues, such as inflammatory bowel disease, you probably wouldn’t want to pop any NSAID. They’re not effective for pain associated with IBD and, in the cases where you’re suffering from other achy issues, you’re better off talking to your doctor about alternative treatments. According to Venkata Yellepeddi, PhD, adjunct assistant professor in pharmaceutical chemistry, if you have trouble with menstrual cramping, birth control pills could help.</p> <p><strong>If you’re pregnant</strong></p> <p>NSAIDs have been found to harm the foetus, raising the risk of miscarriage in early pregnancy and heart defects in the third trimester. What’s more, a recent Human Reproduction study on foetal tissue suggests an association between women who have taken ibuprofen during their first trimester with a subsequent reduction in egg development in the foetal ovaries – which could compromise a daughter’s future fertility. Ibuprofen is also not a good idea during laboor and delivery since it could lead to prolonged bleeding. If you’re in need of pain relief at some point over the course of your pregnancy, check with your doctor.</p> <p><strong>If you have a UTI</strong></p> <p>A few years ago, researchers reported that NSAIDs may be useful for treating urinary tract infections. Besides possibly soothing pain, they may reduce recurrence, as well as help curb the use of antibiotics – a good thing, given the threat of antibiotic resistance. The hitch? NSAIDs might actually not do any of that: “There’s conflicting evidence in the literature on the effectiveness of ibuprofen, and it’s dependent on the antibiotic with which it’s compared,” says Sherwin. In addition, a PLOS Medicine study reports that women who took ibuprofen only to treat a UTI took an average of three days longer to heal than those on antibiotics, and they had a slightly higher risk of complications.</p> <p><strong>If you have arthritis</strong></p> <p>Arthritis sufferers have long taken ibuprofen and other NSAIDs for arthritis pain. But because of its negative effects on the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular system, certain patients – particularly if they had a history of stomach or heart issues – should probably think twice before popping an ibuprofen. A 2017 <em>European Heart Journal</em> paper compared the blood pressure effects of different types of NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib) on osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients. The verdict? All the drugs were associated with an increased risk of hypertension – and ibuprofen had the worst impact, with 23.2 percent of patients on the drug going from normal to hypertensive, compared to 19 percent for naproxen and 10.3 percent for celecoxib.</p> <p>What’s more, for those with rheumatoid arthritis, NSAIDs are not able to control the inflammation enough to prevent further joint damage. What can? Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) as well as biologic-response modifiers (or simply, biologics). Non-drug options – like exercise, physical therapy, and warm baths – can also offer some pain relief.</p> <p><strong>If you enjoy wine or cocktails</strong></p> <p>We’ve been there. You’ve got plans to meet a friend for drinks, and you’ve got an awful headache. But think twice before popping an Advil just before running out for that cocktail. Alcohol can irritate the stomach and so can NSAIDs. Put the two together, and you just compounded your chances damaging your tummy. “Alcohol should be avoided due to increased risk of stomach ulcers,” says Sherwin. Making matters worse, the one-two punch can also up your risk of liver damage.</p> <p><strong>If you’re about to tackle a really tough workout</strong></p> <p>Die-hard athletes sometimes take an Advil before, say, a long run. But that may be, at best, a waste of time and potentially harmful at worst. “Painkillers are a chemical Band-Aid,” says Lillie Rosenthal, DO, a medical advisory board member at MedShadow Foundation, a nonprofit group that educates patients on long-term drug safety and efficacy. “You have to listen to the body and figure out the cause,” says Dr. Rosenthal, who specialises in physical medicine and rehabilitation. With ibuprofen muting the pain, you may not know if you’re overexerting yourself or it may prevent you from slowing down or getting help when it’s needed.</p> <p>Plus, if you’re working out extremely hard – as in ultramarathon hard – taking ibuprofen can exacerbate the kidney damage that’s sparked by rigorous exercise. In a 2017 <em>BMJ Emergency Medicine </em>paper, ultramarathoners who took ibuprofen over the course of 80 kilometres (for a total of 1200 mg) were about 18 percent more likely to experience acute kidney injury than those who took a placebo. Extreme workouts tax the kidneys by drawing blood to the muscles for a prolonged period of time; taking ibuprofen – which reduces prostaglandins, which then, in turn, diverts blood flow from the kidney – exerts a double whammy on the kidneys.</p> <p>Furthermore, an ibuprofen may not even be that helpful. In a small 2015 study published in the <em>Journal of Athletic Training</em>, researchers rounded up experienced runners, had them do a baseline workout, and then induced muscle pain in their legs through strenuous exercise (ouch!). Later, the subjects were either given ibuprofen or placebo and then told to do a follow-up workout. The difference? Essentially, none. One possible reason, say the researchers, may be that the drug’s effect on the heart may compromise oxygen uptake and negate any gains in pain reduction.</p> <p><strong>If you have asthma</strong></p> <p>Ibuprofen and other NSAIDs quell inflammation by inhibiting an enzyme that reduces the production of substances called prostaglandins, which help with healing. The issue is that interfering with prostaglandins could exacerbate asthma. That’s why the insert in your ibuprofen packages warns asthma sufferers to exercise caution, says Marilyn E. Morris, PhD, SUNY Buffalo distinguished professor and chair of the department of pharmaceutical sciences. “Asthmatics who have a demonstrated sensitivity to NSAIDs, like ibuprofen, could have a life-threatening bronchospasm event,” explains Craig. “These patients should talk to their doctors about alternative options to manage pain.”</p> <p><em>Written by Joanne Chen. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/drugs-medicine/9-times-ibuprofen-wont-work-and-could-be-dangerous?slide=all">Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em><em><u> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a> </u></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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How to make excellent arguments

<p>From as early as Grade 3 teachers start teaching children how to put across their own points of view. It’s not about winning arguments, but ensuring kids grow up to be <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/0260137032000138158">thoughtful and engaged citizens</a>. These skills might come in to play at school in essay writing, in oral presentations or in debates.</p> <p>And whether we’re talking about making arguments for in life, there are three things present in all good arguments.</p> <p><strong>1. Reasonability</strong></p> <p>Reasonability is about connecting reasons and evidence to your opinions. This serves two purposes.</p> <p>The first is for our own clarity of thought, so we understand how concepts and events relate to each other (or realise when they don’t).</p> <p>The second is so others can assess our reasons. We need to respect the person we’re arguing with and that means giving them the opportunity to agree or disagree with our reasoning. Without this, we’re tricking people into agreeing with us.</p> <p>One shortcoming in the <a href="https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-curriculum/english/?strand=Language&amp;strand=Literature&amp;strand=Literacy&amp;capability=ignore&amp;priority=ignore&amp;year=11581&amp;elaborations=true&amp;cd=ACELA1536&amp;searchTerm=Modality#dimension-content">Australian Curriculum</a> is that it asks students to write persuasively, by using <a href="http://docs.acara.edu.au/curriculum/worksamples/Year_9_English_Portfolio_Below.pdf">emotive language</a>. We should be teaching our students to provide the reasoning behind their opinion as well as backing it up with evidence, not to manipulate emotions.</p> <p>So if students are asked to write a persuasive essay against same-sex marriage in Australia, for example, it’s not enough to assert an opinion such as “it’s bad for public morals”. They need to say which morals, how the public would suffer, and present any historical or contemporary evidence to support this claim. An argument needs to have reasoning to make it reasonable.</p> <p><strong>2. Charity</strong></p> <p>Charity is one of the most overlooked aspects of debating, which is ironic considering many prominent philosophers, including <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/heyj.12009">Thomas Aquinas</a>, <a href="https://eet.pixel-online.org/files/etranslation/original/Mill,%20On%20Liberty.pdf">John Stuart Mill</a> and <a href="https://www.earlymoderntexts.com/assets/pdfs/hume1751.pdf">David Hume</a>, saw it as as the highest of virtues. In the context of argumentation, charity means looking past the text of what someone is saying to see the heart of their issue.</p> <p>We’ve probably all enjoyed watching our opponent struggle to articulate their points or deconstruct arguments (<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AioJbNL1JS8">President George W. Bush was famous for these gaffes</a>), but doing this serves no purpose but to humiliate.</p> <p>We all fail to make our arguments clear and coherent from time to time, and we need to be generous when interpreting what’s being said. If we approach all people as having worthwhile ideas that might just not be fully developed or expressed, we’ll not only reveal clearer ideas but also make everyone feel valued. And making people feel valued isn’t touchy-feely nonsense – there are <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/1467-9256.12069">demonstrable benefits to learning and democracies</a> when we feel our contributions matter.</p> <p>Say another student has done an oral assignment on the dangers of migrants in Australia – of them supposedly taking jobs or causing fights. This may be a racist argument but a more charitable interpretation might lead the listener to take a look at the job security of the debater’s family or their experiences of safety. Their conclusion may be entirely false, but it’s worth looking into whether there are underlying reasons for their argument. Our charity here brings knowledge rather than conflict.</p> <p><strong>3. Fallibility</strong></p> <p>It’s a struggle for anyone – child or adult – to admit they don’t know the answer. But the willingness to be wrong is crucial to learning. We improve our ability to find solutions when we recognise that we might be wrong or limited in our point of view.</p> <p>There are several major benefits in recognising our own fallibility.</p> <p>The first is in learning; children are far more likely to <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/pits.10092">be willing to try and participate</a> if there’s no need for them to get it perfect the first time round. <a href="https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.edu.documents/46412880/Exploring_transformative_learning_and_th20160612-12330-c3kvju.pdf?response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3DExploring_Transformative_learning_and_th.pdf&amp;X-Amz-Algorithm=AWS4-HMAC-SHA256&amp;X-Amz-Credential=AKIAIWOWYYGZ2Y53UL3A%2F20190822%2Fus-east-1%2Fs3%2Faws4_request&amp;X-Amz-Date=20190822T014719Z&amp;X-Amz-Expires=3600&amp;X-Amz-SignedHeaders=host&amp;X-Amz-Signature=14bb04b603f483a9af8462714a41fad2e76efef7bf051ed6eb40c7685e6d1dac">Failure and learning are linked</a></p> <p>The second benefit is we engage in <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11245-015-9307-6">more meaningful inquiry</a> <a href="https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11229-012-0062-6.pdf">if we don’t treat any one argument or perspective</a> as objectively correct.</p> <p>Imagine a school debate on “students shouldn’t have to do homework”. Children aren’t going to be in favour of homework and they’re going to struggle to find reasons in favour of it. At the same time, it’s the perfect topic to separate how they feel (I hate homework) from the practical benefits of doing homework (revision and improved retention).</p> <p>Students don’t need to change their minds and come to love homework. But having them recognise the limitations of their own perspectives is valuable.</p> <p><strong>Try this out</strong></p> <p>A fun way to try this out in the classroom is through a “fishbowl” exercise.</p> <p>This involves having some of the students sit in a circle and discuss a contentious ethical topic. The other half of students sit in a larger circle around them. Their task is to individually analyse the arguments of a specific student and look for fallacies.</p> <p>The outer ring gets the chance to critique the inner ring for their reasoning. After this, the inner ring gets the chance to critique the outer ring for charity.</p> <p>Throughout this, students develop a willingness to be wrong when they discover everyone makes mistakes. Genuine inquiry, reasonableness and open-mindedness become more important than score-keeping.</p> <p>It’s perfectly acceptable to want to win and to be heard. But we want to teach our kids inquiry and making everyone feel valued is more important than winning. After all, we can win and still be wrong.</p> <p><em>Written by Luke Zaphir. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-to-make-good-arguments-at-school-and-everywhere-else-121305">The Conversation.</a> </em></p> <p> </p>

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Weird brain exercises that help you get smarter

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Giving your brain new experiences will keep it healthier. Try these mini mental workout exercises to prevent memory loss and sharpen your mind.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Giving your brain new experiences that combine physical senses – vision, smell, touch, taste and hearing – with emotional “sense” stimulates more connections between different brain areas, causes nerve cells to produce natural brain nutrients that dramatically help memory and makes surrounding cells stronger and more resistant to the effects of aging. Try these brain exercises during your morning routine or your down time and see if you feel the difference.</span></p> <p><strong>Brush teeth with your non-dominant hand</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Research has shown that using the opposite side of your brain (as in this exercise) can result in a rapid and substantial expansion of in the parts of the cortex that control and process tactile information from the hand.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Brush, and don’t forget to open the tube and apply toothpaste in reverse, too.</span></p> <p><strong>Shower with your eyes closed</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your hands will probably notice varied textures of your own body you don’t “see,” and will send messages back to your brain.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Try using just your tactile senses (although, use common sense to avoid burn or injury). Locate the taps solely by feel, and adjust the temperature. Then wash, shave and so on with your eyes shut.</span></p> <p><strong>Switch around your morning activities</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain imaging studies show that novel tasks exercise large areas of the cortex, indicating increased levels of brain activity in several distinct areas. This activity declines when the task becomes routine and automatic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Get dressed after breakfast, walk the dog on a new route or change your TV or news station. Even watching a kids’ program like Sesame Street, for example, may arouse the brain to notice how much of what you take for granted is explored in depth by children.</span></p> <p><strong>Turn familiar objects upside down (literally)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When you look at things right-side up, your left “verbal” brain quickly labels it and diverts your attention elsewhere. When they’re upside down, your right brain networks kick in, trying to interpret the shapes, colours and relationships of a puzzling picture.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Turn pictures of your family, your desk clock or an illustrated calendar upside down.</span></p> <p><strong>Switch seats at the table</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In most families, everyone has his or her “own” seat, but your brain benefits from new experiences.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Switch seats to change whose position you occupy, who you relate to, your view of the room and even how you reach for salt and pepper.</span></p> <p><strong>Make a new connection with your nose</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You probably don’t remember when you “learned” to associate the smell of coffee with the start of a day. However, by linking a new odour – say, vanilla, citrus or peppermint – to an activity, you’ll alert new neural pathways.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Keep an extract of your favourite scent near your bed for a week. Open it and inhale when you first wake up, and then again as you bathe and dress.</span></p> <p><strong>Open the car window</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The hippocampus, an area of your brain that processes memories, is especially involved in associating odours, sounds and sights to construct mental maps.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Try to identify new smells and sounds on your route. Opening the windows provides these circuits with more raw material.</span></p> <p><strong>Play with spare change</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Because our brains regularly rely on visual cues to distinguish between objects, using touch to identify subtly different things increases activation in cortical areas that process tactile information and leads to stronger synapses. (Similarly, adults who lose their sight learn to distinguish Braille letters because their brain devotes more pathways to processing fine touch.)</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Place a cup full of coins in your car’s drink holder. While at a stoplight, try to determine the denominations by feel alone. You can also put coins in your pocket, and identify them when you stop at a corner.</span></p> <p><strong>Play “10 Things”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Forcing your brain to think of alternates to the everyday will help keep it strong.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Someone hands you an ordinary object, and you must demonstrate 10 different “things” that the object might be. Example: A fly swatter might be a tennis racket, a golf club, a fan, a baton, a drumstick, a violin, a shovel, a microphone, a baseball bat or a canoe paddle.</span></p> <p><strong>Scan at the supermarket</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stores are designed to have the most profitable items at eye level, and when you shop you don’t really see everything there.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Stop in any aisle and look at the shelves, top to bottom. If there’s something you’ve never seen before, pick it up, read the ingredients and think about it. You don’t have to buy it to benefit; you’ve broken your routine and experienced something new.</span></p> <p><strong>Do an art project in a group</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Art activates the nonverbal and emotional parts of the cerebral cortex. When you create art, you draw on parts of your brain interested in forms, colours and textures, as well as thought processes very different from the logical, linear thinking that occupies most of your day.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Ask each person to draw something associated with a specific theme like a season, an emotion or a current event.</span></p> <p><strong>Make more social connections during your day</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scientific research has repeatedly proved that social deprivation has severe negative effects on overall cognitive abilities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Thirsty? Buy a drink from a person rather than a vending machine. Need gas? Pay the clerk at the counter rather than just swiping your credit card at the pump.</span></p> <p><strong>Read differently</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When we read aloud or listen to reading, we use very different brain circuits than when we read silently to ourselves.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Read aloud with your partner or a friend, alternating roles of reader and listener. It may be slow to get through a book, but as a bonus you’ll spend quality time together.</span></p> <p><strong>Eat unfamiliar foods</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your olfactory system can distinguish millions of odours by activating unique combinations of receptors in your nose. There’s a direct link to the emotional centre of your brain, so new odours may evoke unexpected feelings and associations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brain exercise: Choose a cuisine unfamiliar to you, and browse the variety of novel vegetables, seasonings and packaged goods.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Lawrence C. Katz, PhD and Manning Rubin. This article first appeared in </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/14-weird-brain-exercises-that-help-you-get-smarter?slide=all"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest.</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, h</span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ere’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Why this photo of a politician feeding a baby in New Zealand has gone viral

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A House Speaker from the New Zealand Parliament has been pictured feeding milk to a newborn toddler from his official chair while presiding over a debate. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The image has since gone viral online, and pictures Trevor Mallard holding the baby of a fellow parliamentarian, Tāmati Coffey. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Normally the Speaker’s chair is only used by Presiding Officers but today a VIP took the chair with me,” Mr Mallard said in tweet with cute photos of baby Tūtānekai Smith-Coffey attached.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Normally the Speaker’s chair is only used by Presiding Officers but today a VIP took the chair with me. Congratulations <a href="https://twitter.com/tamaticoffey?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@tamaticoffey</a> and Tim on the newest member of your family. <a href="https://t.co/47ViKHsKkA">pic.twitter.com/47ViKHsKkA</a></p> — Trevor Mallard (@SpeakerTrevor) <a href="https://twitter.com/SpeakerTrevor/status/1164026068078125057?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Congratulations [Tāmati Coffey] and Tim on the newest member of your family.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Coffey, a Labour MP for the New Zealand seat of Waiariki and Smith, welcomed his son into the world last month - making him and his husband one of the only gay couples in the country to have found a surrogate and gained access to IVF. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The images gained over 11,000 likes online with warm responses and a flurry of praise to both the speaker and the Kiwi parliament for supporting the new father. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Thank you for normalising the family unit," one person wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"We need to see more of this. Workplaces need to adapt to enable this behaviour."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is not the first time the New Zealand speaker has shared his important chair with a newborn. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In November 2017, the three-month-old baby of Labour MP Willow-Jean Prime got to have a cuddle with Mr Mallard as well. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New Zealand’s attitude towards babies in parliament is a stark contrast to those in other countries. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kenyan MP Zuleika Hassan was ordered to leave the parliament after she brought her five-month-old baby into the chamber. </span></p> <p> </p>

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Airport security worker’s horrendous note to passenger goes viral

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An airport security worker from New York, US, has been fired from her job after handing a passenger a cruel handwritten note that insulted his appearance. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The incident, which occurred in June, has since gone viral after passenger Neal Strassner obtained security footage from the bizarre moment a female security worker from Greater Rochester International Airport gave Mr Strassner a note after he passed through a metal detector. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Strassner didn’t think much of the situation and he headed toward the gate. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">That’s when he said the woman yelled out, “You gonna open the note?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once he did, the woman burst out laughing. </span></p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/npIWjuk1KVA" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The note had a cruel message about the man’s appearance, which read “You Ugly!!!!” on a ripped piece of cardboard. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After complaining to her supervisors, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) revealed the woman worked for a contractor. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The woman has since been let go from her position. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video shared to Youtube has since had over 499k views. </span></p>

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“Abhorrent”: Prince Andrew speaks out over Epstein scandal

<p>The Duke of York has broken his silence over the Jeffrey Epstein scandal. </p> <p>Prince Andrew, 59, says he is “appalled” by the recent reports of Epstein’s alleged crimes. </p> <p>The statement comes after footage emerged showing the Duke peering out from behind the door of Epstein’s multi-million dollar Manhattan mansion - footage filmed in December 2010. </p> <p>He is taped waving goodbye to a brunette woman and less than an hour later, Epstein is seen leaving his property with a blonde woman. </p> <p>Buckingham Palace has released a statement on behalf of the Duke, to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/08/18/duke-york-appalled-epstein-sex-allegations/" target="_blank">The Telegraph</a><span> </span>saying he is dismayed by Epstein. </p> <p>"The Duke of York has been appalled by the recent reports of Jeffrey Epstein's alleged crimes.</p> <p>"His Royal Highness deplores the exploitation of any human being and the suggestion he would condone, participate in or encourage any such behaviour is abhorrent."</p> <p>The “damaging” footage was taken while the Duke was in New York while he was the UK’s Special Representative for Trade. </p> <p>He stayed with Epstein in his NY home, two years after the accused was convicted of child sex offences and put on the sex offender register. </p> <p>"The new footage is damaging in terms of the Duke of York's judgement,"<span> </span>The Telegraph's<span> </span>Camilla Tominey, told Today.</p> <p>"He was criticised at the time because photographs emerged of his visit to Jeffrey Epstein in 2010 and he explained to the press and public afterwards that he had made an error of judgement and that he should haven't met with the convicted paedophile.</p> <p>"It wasn't then known that he had stayed with Jeffrey Epstein so I think this footage is damaging to the Duke's reputation."</p> <p>Last week the Queen was pictured with her third eldest son, leaving church following Sunday mass at Crathie Kirk. </p> <p>He was staying at Balmoral Castle with Sarah Ferguson and their two daughters, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie. </p> <p>Since then, he and his family have left and are now in a private villa in Mallorca, Spain. </p> <p>"He was conspicuous by his absence this morning, not being in Scotland with his mother and other members of the royal family but out in Spain with reports suggesting the couple is trying to have a holiday with their daughters," Tominey said.</p> <p>"In fact, the Duke was contemplating playing a round of golf in a very famous course there."</p> <p>Buckingham Palace has vehemently denied any allegations made against the Duke - particularly Virginia Roberts, one of Epstein’s victims. </p> <p>"This relates to proceedings in the United States, to which the Duke of York is not a party. Any suggestion of impropriety with under-age minors is categorically untrue," a palace spokesperson said.</p> <p>"It is emphatically denied that the Duke of York had any form of sexual contact or relationship with Virginia Roberts. </p> <p>"Any claim to the contrary is false and without foundation."</p>

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The real way McDonald’s makes their money – it’s not their food

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This fast-food giant may serve billions and billions of customers, but the bulk of their profit isn’t made from food sales.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">McDonald’s sells a lot of food. Like, a lot of food. We’re talking enough food to serve more than 70 million people every day, with more than 75 burgers sold every second.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">That shouldn’t be too surprising, considering McDonald’s is one of the largest fast-food chains in the world. But their menu actually isn’t what generates the company’s multi-billion dollar profits. The real best-seller? Real estate.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are more than 36,000 McDonald’s locations worldwide, but only about five percent of them are company-owned. The rest are franchised out, meaning they’re run by individuals who McDonald’s has contracted to operate them. In those situations, the company only spends money on the real estate of that location. The franchisee is responsible for all the costs of running the restaurant while also paying McDonald’s for rent (which adds up to an average of 10.7 percent of their sales), a US$45,000 franchisee fee, and a monthly service fee equal to four percent of gross sales, </span><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/what-it-costs-to-open-a-mcdonalds-2014-11"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Business Insider reports.</span></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">With multiple means of collecting revenue at relatively minimal costs, it’s no wonder McDonald’s relies so heavily on franchises.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are not basically in the food business,” former McDonald’s CFO Harry J. Sonneborn reportedly told investors. “We are in the real estate business. The only reason we sell 15 cent hamburgers is because they are the greatest producer of revenue from which our tenants can pay us rent.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Being able to hand off the costs of running the restaurants is a primary key to McDonald’s success. According to Wall Street Survivor, in 2014, the company made US$27.4 billion in revenue, with US$9.2 billion coming from franchised locations and US$18.2bn from company-owned locations. But after you factor in the total costs of running those locations, McDonald’s kept only 16 percent of the revenue from locations it owned directly compared to the 82 percent of the franchise-generated revenue.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So, while you may spend money at McDonald’s on a Big Mac and fries, McDonald’s is spending money on prime real estate – and they’re lovin’ it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Claire Nowak. This article first appeared in </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/real-way-mcdonalds-makes-their-money-its-not-their-food"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></p>

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5 hidden things in your home that may be a fire hazard

<p>Keep your family and property safe by being mindful of these hidden fire dangers in your home.</p> <p><strong>1. Beware these hidden fire traps</strong></p> <p>Keep your family and property safe by being mindful of these hidden fire dangers in your home.</p> <p><strong>2. Smoke detector</strong></p> <p>Every year people die because their smoke detectors didn’t go off during a fire. That’s usually because the batteries were dead (or had been removed to stop false alarms) or the detector was past its useful life or was located where occupants couldn’t hear the alarm.</p> <p><strong>3. Cooking fires</strong></p> <p>A towel or curtains hanging too close to an unattended stove can ignite. The statistics: Cooking fires cause 23 per cent of home fires and 9 per cent of deaths. The grease in an unattended frying pan catches on fire and ignites nearby combustibles, which in turn ignite curtains, cabinets or anything else in the vicinity.</p> <p><strong>4. Extension cords</strong></p> <p>Overloaded extension cords, bad connections and other careless use of electrical devices can melt wire insulation and cause a fire. The statistics: Electrical equipment causes nine percent of home fires and 10 percent of deaths. Overloaded extension cords, hidden electrical shorts, bad connections and oversized bulbs and fixtures can ignite nearby combustibles and burn down your house.</p> <p><strong>5. Gas water heaters</strong></p> <p>Clothes piled too close to a gas water heater can ignite when the water heater comes on, especially if the protective doors for the gas burners are missing. Appliances (clothes dryers and gas water heaters) cause 7 percent of home fires and 4 percent of deaths. After problems with stoves and heaters, the biggest culprits in appliance fires are lint in dryers and combustibles near gas water heaters.</p> <p><em>Written by Nick Gerhardt. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/20-hidden-things-in-your-home-that-may-be-a-fire-hazard?slide=all">Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, h</em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">ere’s our best subscription offer.</a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Outrage over Cadbury changing iconic Dairy Milk chocolate recipe

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cadbury has released a “diet” version of their popular Dairy Milk chocolate bar and the country has reacted in blaze and fury. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are many of us who may be looking to cut down sugar intake, and the popular Cadbury brand has decided to cater to those looking for a healthier treat when they’re yearning for a sweet snack by creating a version of their all time favourite choccy with 30 per cent less sugar. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The news was not met with well wishes though and has caused a mass exodus of the brand on social media, with many customers asking “why?”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“WHAT HAS SOCIETY COME TO?!” one unhappy person commented.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Sendddd it back! No one wanted it!” another angry response read. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What’s bloody next?” One horrified customer wrote. “Cadbury could live to regret this decision.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another added: “Chocolate is meant to be a treat. Why make it healthy?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is the first time in 114 years the Dairy Milk recipe has been altered, a representative said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cadbury brand manager Katrina Davidson said there are people all over the country looking for a healthier alternative to an unhealthy snack.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And that’s why we have worked tirelessly to create a Cadbury Dairy Milk bar with 30 per cent less sugar, which still tastes great,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are committed to responding to relevant consumer trends, and are always striving to offer chocolate lovers greater choice through exciting innovations and portion control offerings.”</span></p>

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Robert Irwin being investigated over "cruel treatment" of animals

<p>In what seems impossible to believe, Robert Irwin has been named in a proposed animal cruelty investigation following his appearance on <em>The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon</em>.</p> <p>Animal rights organisation PETA has called for a ban on wild animals on the US TV show, saying that celebrities and other members of the public were not licensed to  interact with the wildlife.</p> <p>In a statement, PETA noted that Irwin handled various animals – including an alligator, a camel, and servals – for the show’s segments on various occasions.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ieFrIvFzJd8"></iframe></div> <p>The organisation also mentioned actor Kate Beckinsale, who poked an African bullfrog, and <em>Game of Thrones </em>star Jacob Anderson, who was locked in a phone booth with a python snake on the show.</p> <p>“Animals suffer every time they’re exposed to the chaos of a television set and passed around like props,” said PETA senior vice president Lisa Lange.</p> <p>The organisation called for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to investigate exhibitor Grant Kemmerer, who supplied the animals to the NBC show, as well as other shows, including <em>The Rachael Ray Show, The Wendy Williams Show </em>and <em>Good Morning America</em>.</p> <p>It said that Kemmerer should be banned from obtaining future permits for breaching the city’s health code.</p> <p>“PETA is calling on authorities to throw the book at this hack for brazenly violating – on camera – the clear conditions of his exhibitor permits,” Lange said.</p> <p>However, Kemmerer denied that he violated his permit requirements by allowing the animals to appear on the program.</p> <p>“[Host Jimmy] Fallon or Robert Irwin are not the public,” Kemmerer told <em>Page Six</em>.</p> <p>“It was deemed even people in the audience are not looked at as the public in the eyes of the USDA, because they’re paying for an entertainment show and expect this type of show … You’re not going to pull out a random animal and hope it goes OK.”</p> <p>Kemmerer said Fallon was a willing participant. </p> <p>“We are alleviating any potential risk, and for Jimmy Fallon, he’s not going into this unknowing.</p> <p>“He is a participating person in this. They’re having Robert on there to bring the animals.”</p>

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Why Princess Diana's niece Lady Kitty Spencer could lose her inheritance

<p>Princess Diana’s younger brother Charles Spencer has revealed he will be planning to follow a long-kept tradition in his family by leaving the Spencer family estate to his son despite having an older daughter. </p> <p>The father-of-seven admitted to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/" target="_blank"><em>The Sunday Telegraph</em></a> he wishes to leave Althorp Estate to his eldest son Viscount Louis Spencer, 25, instead of his eldest child, Lady Kitty Spencer, 28. </p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7829293/diana-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2b3611d3e9e74027b1c6d49cdc372959" />Charles Spencer and Princess Diana.</em></p> <p>The 9th Earl Spencer says he sees no issues with the decision, which is tied to the archaic tradition of male primogeniture where the eldest son inherits property, titles and fortunes. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7829294/diana-5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a93e86f0fbe441b4a343cccb52badd98" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Victoria Aitken, Lady Kitty Spencer and Viscount Althorp. </em></p> <p>“Is it any fairer that the eldest child gets it instead of the eldest male? Whatever you say is a selection,” he said. </p> <p>Charles inherited the estate over his eldest sisters, Lady Sarah McCorquodale, Jane Fellowes, Baroness Fellowes and Princess Diana.</p> <p>The Althorp Estate was the home of Princess Diana before she married into the royal family and it is located in the district of Daventry in Northamptonshire. </p> <p>The estate includes a Grade I listed stately home, along with 50 square kilometres of cottages, woodland and farms.</p> <p>Princess Diana’s grave can be found in the middle of an ornamental lake on the state – a location chosen to defend the royal’s remains from ghouls. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7829296/diana-6.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/950a5d30f14349b397267b2e3830d08c" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Charles Spencer and his wife Victoria Aitken (m. 1989-1997) with their 3 daughters : Kitty Eleanor, Eliza Victoria and Katya Amelia, attending a horse show at Althorp house, Northamptonshire.</em></p> <p>A memorial for visitors is available for those wishing to pay their respects to the beloved princess. </p> <p>The home recently became available to rent, however, it does come at a hefty price – just one night's stay will set you back a staggering NZD$46,000.</p>

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