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When patients read their medical records

<p>The woman was sitting on a bed in the emergency room, and I was facing her, typing. I had just written about her abdominal pain when she posed a question I’d never been asked before: “May I look at what you’re writing?”</p> <p>At the time, I was a fourth-year medical resident. In our emergency department, doctors routinely typed notes, placed orders, and checked records while we were in patients’ rooms. To maintain at least some eye contact, we faced our patients, with the computer between us.</p> <p>But there was no reason we couldn’t be on the same side of the screen. I sat down next to her and showed her what I was typing. She began pointing out changes. She’d said that her pain had started three weeks prior, not the previous week. Her chart mentioned alcohol abuse in the past; she admitted that she was under a lot of stress and had returned to heavy drinking a couple of months earlier.</p> <p>As we talked, her diagnosis – inflammation of the pancreas from alcohol use – became clear. I wondered why I’d never shown patients their records before. In medical school, we learn that medical records exist so that doctors can communicate with other doctors. No-one told us about the benefits they could bring when shared with patients.</p> <p>Access to medical records has changed dramatically over time and can differ widely between countries. Some countries see it as a right, others demand patients jump through legal hoops. In the US, patients generally have a legal right to their medical information. But when the process for obtaining records is cumbersome, few patients try to access them. In 2010, Tom Delbanco, a Harvard professor and internist, and Jan Walker, a nurse and researcher, started an experiment called OpenNotes that let patients read what their primary-care providers wrote about them. They hypothesised that giving patients access to notes would allow them to become more engaged in their care.</p> <p>Many doctors resisted. Wouldn’t open medical records inhibit what they wrote about sensitive issues, such as substance abuse? What if patients misunderstood the notes? Would that lead to lawsuits? What would patients do with all the information anyway?</p> <p>After the first year, the results were striking: 80% of patients who saw their records reported a better understanding of their medical conditions and said they were more in control of their health. Two-thirds reported that they were better at sticking with their prescriptions. And 99% of the patients wanted the programme to continue.</p> <p>That day in the emergency room was a turning point for me. Since I started sharing notes with my patients, they have made dozens of valuable corrections and changes, such as adding allergies and telling me when a previous medical problem has been resolved. We come up with treatment plans together. And when patients leave, they receive a copy of my detailed instructions.</p> <p>The record becomes a collaborative tool for patients, not just a record of what we doctors do to patients. When patients see their medical records, there’s more trust and more accuracy.</p> <p>It’s changed my practice and fundamentally transformed my understanding of whom the medical record ultimately belongs to: the patient.</p> <p>Should doctors routinely share medical records with their patients? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Leana Wen. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/4-Things-You-Should-Really-Never-Microwave"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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"Nobody left the table that evening”: Explosive new claim in Madeleine McCann case

<p>A US private investigator has worked undercover at the holiday resort in Portugal where Madeleine McCann vanished and has made explosive new claims that cast doubt on the McCann’s parenting checking system.</p> <p>The system the McCann family told police that they conducted checks on the children throughout the evening whilst they were at dinner at a nearby restaurant.</p> <p>However, in an interview on the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/maddie" target="_blank">Maddie</a> podcast, Boston-based investigator Joseph Moura claimed a bartender and waitress told him otherwise.</p> <p>This bartender and waitress had served the McCanns and their friends that evening and told Moura that “nobody left the table that evening”.</p> <p>Nobody working at the tapas restaurant where the McCann family and their friends dined that evening knew that Moura was a private investigator.</p> <p>"[The employees] had no idea that I was working with<span> </span><em>48 Hours</em><span> </span>and CBS. I was just a tourist who happened to speak their language. So, I got to know them pretty well in that period of time, when you're spending a lot of time by the pool and you're spending time at the bar and the restaurant," he said.</p> <p>"They clearly told me that that particular night that nobody left the table. That goes by the bartender and that goes by the waitresses. Nobody left the table that evening."</p> <p>However, it is possible that the bartender and restaurant wait staff did not see Mr and Mrs McCann and their friends getting up to check regularly on their children.</p> <p>What do you think about the claims? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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10 secrets surgeons won’t tell you

<p>Surgeons have our lives in their hands, but most of us know more about the people who cut our hair than the doctors who cut our bodies. Here, insider tips to become a smarter, healthier patient.</p> <p><strong>1. To know which doctor is good, ask hospital employees</strong></p> <p>“Their word trumps a degree, prestigious titles, and charm.” - Marty Makary, MD, author of Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won’t Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionise Health Care.</p> <p><strong>2. Ask about their complication rate</strong></p> <p>“If they don’t have one, they’re hiding something or haven’t operated enough to have one. No one is immune to complications.” - Arnold Advincula, MD, division chief, gynecologic surgery &amp; urogynecology, Columbia University Medical Centre.</p> <p><strong>3. Surgeons have an inherent financial conflict of interest</strong></p> <p>“That’s because they are paid approximately ten times more money to perform surgery than to manage your problem conservatively.” - James Rickert, MD, an orthopedic surgeon in Bedford, Indiana.</p> <p><strong>4. Are they board certified?</strong></p> <p>“For the same reason, always check if your surgeon is board-certified in his specialty. Many are not.” - Tomas A. Salerno, MD, chief of cardiothoracic surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.</p> <p><strong>5. Don’t assume your doctor’s recommendation is best</strong></p> <p>“Referrals may be politically motivated or be given because the doctors work within the same multi-specialty group.” - Howard Luks, MD, chief of sports medicine and arthroscopy at Westchester Medical Center and University Orthopaedics.</p> <p><strong>6. Ask if you can talk to former patients</strong></p> <p>“It’s like getting references for a babysitter.” - Marc Gillinov, MD, author of Heart 411: The Only Guide to Heart Health You’ll Ever Need.</p> <p><strong>7. Some won’t mention procedures they don’t know how to do</strong></p> <p>“I’ll see patients who were told they needed an open hysterectomy, even though it could be handled laparoscopically. That’s one reason it’s good to get a second opinion.” - Arnold Advincula, MD</p> <p><strong>8. Find out who is going to take care of you after surgery</strong></p> <p>“You want to hear ‘I will see you on a regular basis until you have recovered fully.’ Often it can be residents or physician’s assistants. Sometimes it’s not anybody, especially after you’ve been discharged from the hospital.” - Ezriel “Ed” Kornel, MD, clinical assistant professor of neurological surgery at Cornell University.</p> <p><strong>9. It’s better to have an elective surgery early in the week</strong></p> <p>“Lots of doctors go away for the weekend and won’t be around to make sure you’re OK. If you go in on a Friday, and then on Saturday or Sunday something icky is coming out of your incision, you’re going to get someone who’s covering for your surgeon.” - General surgeon who blogs under the name Skeptical Scalpel</p> <p><strong>10. Some hire business management consultants</strong></p> <p>“The consultants may want the practice to sell equipment like knee braces or walkers at a markup. They may want the doctors to buy or build a surgery centre to capture facility fees. They usually want orthopedic surgeons to get an in-office MRI. Every time a doctor does this, he becomes more financially conflicted. As soon as you put in an MRI machine, you order more MRIs so you won’t lose money on it.” —James Rickert, MD</p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Crouch. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/48-secrets-surgeons-wont-tell-you?items_per_page=All"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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This is what Scott Morrison copied from a politician

<p>In what was supposed to be a cunning announcement foreshadowing the projected return to surplus from last week’s budget, turned out to be a copycat campaign from over five years ago.</p> <p>A series of self portraits of Prime Minister Scott Morrison accompanied by the “Back in Black” slogan were released to announce that the Budget would have a return on surplus for the first time in 12 years.</p> <p>The moody set of black and white pictures have been scrutinised heavily by Aussies for drawing inspiration from his fellow politician in New Zealand.</p> <p>Eagle eyed critiques pointed out that the social media campaign released over three weeks ago bears a striking resemblance to a similar campaign of then Prime Minster John Key back in 2014.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Who approved this theft <a href="https://twitter.com/ScottMorrisonMP?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ScottMorrisonMP</a>? You, John Key or a 'staffer'? <a href="https://t.co/SO0wvBv6ky">pic.twitter.com/SO0wvBv6ky</a></p> — John (@John_Hanna) <a href="https://twitter.com/John_Hanna/status/1114410024204242944?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 6, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The portrait taken of Mr Key was taken by Photographer Dave Richards at a Young Nationals event in 2014.</p> <p>The Kiwi snapper called it a “fast and fun shoot” with “such a busy subject.”</p> <p>“We had only four minutes to get the shot, which we somehow managed in just under two minutes,” Richards wrote on Facebook in May that year.</p> <p>Morrison’s photos were not received too well, many comparing his hunched demeanour to an album cover.</p> <p>However, Mr Key’s photograph had a positive response from Kiwi’s.</p> <p>Do you think the image of Scott Morrison is similar to John Key’s? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Man breath tested in own driveway divides Facebook – who is in the wrong?

<p>A Sydney motorist has caused quite a stir on social media after posting a photo of a police car in his driveway, claiming he had just been breath tested. Despite testing negative, driver Dylcey Grimding shared the image to Facebook asking, “Just a question... I thought that cops weren't allowed to breathalyse you in your driveway, am I wrong?”</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/42368/43f3f08500000578-0-image-m-13_1504664024152_499x560.jpg" alt="43F3F08500000578-0-image -m -13_1504664024152" width="499" height="560" /></p> <p>“I just drove in the driveway but he came flying up my street sirens going like he was in a pursuit like a f****** maniac,” he wrote.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>Hundreds of people chimed in with their opinions, with many sharing the sentiment of one commenter who wrote, “I don't think they can if it is your driveway."</p> <p>“I didn’t think they were allowed to actually breath test you, but can determine if they think you’ve been drinking by visual observation,” one woman wrote.</p> <p>“The law changed when lock-out laws were introduced, so they can but only if they saw you driving and then pulling into the premises,” another claimed.</p> <p>But what do the police have to say about it all? As the <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4856576/Facebook-divided-police-breath-testing-man-home.html" target="_blank"><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Daily Mail Australia</span></em></strong></a> discovered, you cannot be breathalysed in the property you call “home”. According to the NSW Road Transport Act 2013, “home” does indeed include the driveway or any parking spot designated to your house or apartment. A spokesperson confirmed this, telling the <em>Daily Mail</em>, “You’re not allowed to be breath tested once you get home.”</p> <p>Have you ever been breathalysed in your driveway before? Share your story with us in the comments below.</p>

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Are Madeleine McCann's parents still together?

<p>After their three-year-old child Madeleine McCann disappeared on a family holiday in Portugal in 2007, Kate and Gerry McCann have been through hell.</p> <p>After being named and cleared as official suspects in the investigation and having faced intense media scrutiny as the world developed an intense interest in the case, it’s any wonder whether or not the family have found peace.</p> <p>Although the McCanns have accepted a life where their eldest daughter is permanently absent, it’s safe to say that they’re tough circumstances for any couple.</p> <p>Which begs the question: Are they still married after all these years?</p> <p>The couple are both doctors and met in Glasgow in 1993. They have been described by friends as “inseparable” and have been together ever since, according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/parenting/family/madeleine-mccann-parents-still-together-54839" target="_blank"><em>Now To Love</em></a>.</p> <p>They had Madeleine in 2003 after going through IVF treatment and still currently live in the same house they have always lived in. The family live in Rothley, which is a small English town in Leicestershire.</p> <p>Kate McCann has said things haven’t always been easy. She explained in her 2012 autobiography <em>Madeleine: Our Daughter's Disappearance and the Continuing Search for Her</em> that she withdrew into herself after the disappearance of Madeleine.</p> <p>The couple were horrified by fears that their daughter might have been kidnapped by a sex trafficker or that she was taken by a paedophile.</p> <p>"Tortured as I was by these images, it's not surprising that even the thought of sex repulsed me," Kate wrote in the autobiography.</p> <p>"I worried about Gerry and me. I worried that if I didn't get our sex life on track our whole relationship would break down."</p> <p>Kate explained that if it wasn’t for her husband’s supportive nature and kindness, their marriage wouldn’t have survived.</p> <p>"He would put his arm round me, reassuring me and telling me that he loved me," she recalled.</p> <p>Kate also mentioned that she visits Praia da Luz, which is the Portuguese resort town where their daughter disappeared.</p> <p>She told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-27236457/kate-and-gerry-mccann-interview-in-full" target="_blank">the BBC</a>:</p> <p>"I do go back for personal reasons...</p> <p>"It's obviously the last place we were with Madeleine and I still walk those streets and I guess try and look for answers. It helps me, most of the time."</p> <p>Have you seen the Madeleine McCann documentary on Netflix? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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There is an embarrassing mistake in the Australian citizenship test

<p>An English expat has found a mistake on the Australian citizenship test and was left stumped when she came across a question that had three incorrect answers.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>DailyMail reports</strong></em></span></a> the woman has been studying the Australian Citizenship: Our Common Bond booklet in anticipation of the quiz, when she came across a misleading question regarding the size of the country’s population.</p> <p>“The three options were '18 million', '22 million' and '30 million',” she told <em>SBS</em>.</p> <p>“It made me think, ''well, I know 22 million is wrong, I know 18 million is wrong, should I just put 30 million?'”</p> <p>“I told the examiner, 'I think there's a mistake in the exam'... He said ''22 million is the right one'.”</p> <p>But, as <em>DailyMail</em> reports, 22 million is the incorrect answer as Australia’s population <span>surpassed </span>that mark back in 2011.</p> <p>The test includes 20 questions and requires 15 correct answers to pass.</p> <p>The Department of Home Affairs released a statement regarding the test: “To maintain the integrity of the citizenship test, all questions and answers are confidential. It would be inappropriate for the Department of Home Affairs to comment further on the contents of the citizenship test.</p> <p>“The Common Bond Booklet contains 20 sample test questions to assist applicants in preparing for the test.</p> <p>“For clients who sat the citizenship test from 1 July 2017 to 30 April 2018, the failure rate was 2.9 per cent.</p> <p>“A person is allowed to attempt to pass the test on three occasions on the one day. They may attempt the test a number of times.”</p> <p>What are your thoughts?</p>

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5 things turning 30 in 2019

<p><strong>1.The Simpsons</strong></p> <p>Ay Caramba! Bart Simpson and his fam made their series debut on FOX on December 17, 1989.</p> <p>The animated sitcom created by Matt Groening began as a series of shorts incorporated into The Tracey Ullman Show in 1987.</p> <p>The Simpsons is the longest running American sitcom with more than 650 episodes to date.</p> <p><strong>2. The fall of the Berlin Wall</strong></p> <p> It took 38 years, but in 1989 the Berlin Wall, which separated East and West Germany, came tumbling down as the Cold War began to thaw.</p> <p>It was November 9, 1989, to be exact that East Berlin’s Communist Party said at midnight their citizens were allowed to cross the border.</p> <p>According to History.com, more than 2 million East Berliners flocked to the checkpoints that once held them back to visit West Berlin that weekend.</p> <p><strong>3. GPS</strong></p> <p>We often take GPS (Global Positioning System) navigation for granted.</p> <p>It’s so easy to bring up directions on our phones, we don’t even need a separate device for guidance on the road anymore.</p> <p>But it was February 14, 1989, that the first of 24 satellites to make up the global positioning system was put into orbit.</p> <p>Using the GPS on your phonecan be a handy life saver. It can also suck all your data and become an expensive exercise.</p> <p><strong>4. America’s Funniest Home Videos</strong></p> <p>What could be more hilarious than watching people do downright silly things in the comfort of their own home while a friend or family member captured it on camcorder?</p> <p>Comedian Bob Saget hosted the first America’s Funniest Home Videos special in 1989 before it went to series in 1990.</p> <p>Saget continued to host the show for its initial eight seasons.</p> <p>Funny home videos used to be the bread and butter of television but they are now perfect fodder for Facebook.</p> <p><strong>5. Seinfeld</strong></p> <p>The self-proclaimed “show about nothing” became a whole lot of something… but not right away.</p> <p>Initially called The Seinfeld Chronicles when it premiered in 1989, the show wasn’t well received at first, according to Entertainment Weekly.</p> <p>But it wasn’t long before fans caught on to the antics of Jerry, Elaine, George, and Kramer.</p> <p><em>Written by Kelly Bryant. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/30-things-turning-30-2019"> Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer. </a></em></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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8 revealing everyday documents you never knew you should shred

<p><strong>1. Boarding passes</strong></p> <p>Shred them after you land: Your boarding pass has your name, your travel plans, and a bar code that free websites can decipher.</p> <p>This code often reveals your frequent flier number, which crooks can use to log in to airline accounts to view upcoming travel plans, check in to flights, and even cancel trips.</p> <p><strong>2. Prescription labels</strong></p> <p>Whether stapled to the bag or on the bottle, these labels may list your name, the date of initial dispensing, the name and strength of the drug, and the dispensing pharmacist’s name.</p> <p>Thieves may use this info to refill prescriptions or steal your identity.</p> <p><strong>3. Receipts</strong></p> <p>Shred all receipts you don’t save. Those from credit card purchases reveal the last digits of your card number and possibly your signature.</p> <p>Crooks can also use receipts for fraudulent returns and benefit from your store credit.</p> <p>If you really want to play it safe, switch to paperless receipts wherever you can – you'll be helping the environment, too!</p> <p><strong>4. Pet medical papers</strong></p> <p>Keep records of major events, and shred the rest. Papers from a vet visit show a pet’s name – which a Google Apps survey of 2,000 people found is the most common password choice.</p> <p><strong>5. Return labels</strong></p> <p>Shred free return labels you receive in the mail, along with any envelopes with your name and address.</p> <p>Thieves often pair this with what you post on social media (family member names, work history) to piece together your identity.</p> <p>When writing your return address on an envelope, omit your name.</p> <p><strong>6. Resumes</strong></p> <p>Don’t toss resume copies or drafts without shredding. Resumes hand crooks your name, phone number, address, email address, employment past and education history in one convenient piece of paper.</p> <p><strong>7. Extra birth announcements</strong></p> <p>Children are 51 percent more likely to be victims of identity theft than adults. Shred birth announcements you don’t save, which typically have the child’s name, birth date, weight, eye colour and other personal identifiers.</p> <p><strong>8. Extra funeral pamphlets</strong></p> <p>Thieves use the identities of millions of deceased people every year to apply for loans, open credit card accounts or file tax returns, collecting billions of dollars in refunds. Shred extra funeral pamphlets or obituaries you don’t save. If a loved one passes, list age in the obituary but not the birth date or mother’s maiden name – these personal identifiers are handy for ID thieves.</p> <p>Did you know you should shred these documents? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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How to landscape for privacy

<p><span>Blocks are getting smaller while house sizes are getting bigger, so we’re living closer to our neighbours than ever. At the same time, we aren’t willing to give up our outdoor areas or our privacy.</span></p> <p class="p3">omes are not just moving out but up to capitalise on living space and views, so being overlooked from above is now a problem for many residents.</p> <p class="p3">Charlie Albone, a landscape designer and presenter on the LifeStyle Channel’s Selling Houses Australia, says privacy is a common concern.</p> <p class="p3">‘While people don’t mind looking on to rooftops so much, when other people’s windows are looking into your space it becomes an issue,’ says Charlie.</p> <p class="p3">Luckily, there are many effective ways to solve the problem. </p> <p class="p3"><strong>Define the borders</strong></p> <p class="p2">Planting is a simple solution, as well as being easy on the hip pocket. </p> <p class="p3">Property-line plantings can provide year-round screening and a neat hedge can be an easy way to define adjoining yards or block sightlines. But success largely depends upon available space.</p> <p class="p3">‘Hedges can be lovely but they need at least<span> </span><span class="s1">800mm width of garden bed to thrive.<span> </span></span>For people in urban environments, there often isn’t the space to spare,’ says Charlie.</p> <p class="p3">‘Bamboo is the best solution here as it takes up very little space and grows vertically. </p> <p class="p3">‘Nandina, also known as sacred bamboo, has a nice upright habit and gives a similar effect, though it’s not technically bamboo.’ </p> <p class="p3"><strong>The problem with trees</strong></p> <p class="p1">Planting trees around the house or along a boundary line can lead to major problems if you don’t do the research first, cautions Charlie. </p> <p class="p2">‘If people have it in mind to create privacy with trees, they often go for the biggest and most dense varieties they can find. But a big tree only gets bigger and the root system can cause damage to the foundations of the house and fence lines,’ he says. </p> <p class="p2">Trees can also be a source of dispute if their size blocks light or views, or if branches encroach across the boundary line. </p> <p class="p2">Certain types of trees that are heavy shedders such as jacarandas and liquidambars can be particularly annoying for neighbours. Council may step in if complaints are made.</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">The law changed in August 2010 to include height restrictions for trees and hedges that block views or light. </span></p> <p class="p2">Make sure you research the likely growth of the tree you are considering and check guidelines with local council before buying.<span class="s2"> <span> </span></span><span class="s3"> </span></p> <p class="p2"><strong><span class="s3">Plant in layers</span></strong></p> <p class="p1">If space isn’t an issue, layered planting will actually make the garden look bigger. Planting a mix of deciduous or evergreen trees, shrubs and perennials creates a cottage garden look.</p> <p class="p2">Landscapers recommend grouping varieties in odd numbers. Stagger evergreens in the background and in the foreground, layer deciduous material for texture and colour. </p> <p class="p2">‘For screening, aim for a height over 1800mm, which is the<span> </span><span class="s1">standard fence line height,’ says Charlie.</span></p> <p class="p2">Deciduous shade trees, which grow<span> </span><span class="s1">from five to more than 15 metres high, depending on the species, are a good way to obscure a neighbour’s view from<span> </span></span>a second-storey window or balcony. </p> <p class="p2">‘Chinese tallowwood is one of my favourites. It gets great colour in the warm months and will reach a height of about six metres,’ says Charlie.</p> <p class="p2">Positioned over a patio, the canopy provides privacy and shade in the summer. In winter, the bare branches allow the sun to shine in, but this does also bring some loss of privacy.</p> <p class="p2"><strong>Add a water </strong>feature</p> <p class="p1">Even if your neighbours are not looking into your space, you may still hear them. Planting can help with noise reduction but one of the most effective buffers against the buzz of conversation or the hum of traffic is a water fountain. </p> <p class="p2">Whether it’s an off-the-shelf unit that sits on a table or a custom-built permanent feature, running water is an excellent way to screen out sounds.</p> <p class="p2">Moving water becomes louder the further it falls and the more tiers it travels over. To avoid having to raise your voice over the roar, choose a fountain with an adjustable recirculating pump to find a sound level that’s soothing for you.</p> <p class="p1"><strong>Put up a screen</strong></p> <p class="p1">After many years of total seclusion on a large block, a new house built nearby prompted Handyman’s Lee Dashiell to seek out a privacy solution.</p> <p class="p2">‘It was quite a shock to find the house would look directly onto our outdoor living area,’ says Lee. </p> <p class="p2">‘We knew we needed some kind of screening but we had enjoyed the open feel of trees and bushes and didn’t want to be boxed in.’</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">The family decided on Eden Deluxe Euro bamboo panels. ‘This type of screen is not solid but creates an effective visual barrier and the organic look blends into the area.’</span></p> <p class="p2">It took about an hour of shifting the panels around then viewing them from different positions to ensure they blocked out what they wanted. </p> <p class="p2">‘Eventually we decided the horizontal position was the most effective,’ says Lee.</p> <p class="p1"><strong>Install a fence</strong></p> <p class="p1">Major new landscaping additions such as a pool or patio may require a visual buffer in a hurry. </p> <p class="p2">A solid board fence is the quickest way to add year-round screening but be sure to discuss materials with your neighbour and check guidelines with local council before installing. </p> <p class="p2">As fences have a minimal footprint, they can be used in long or narrow side yards or other places where available space is tight.</p> <p class="p2"><span class="s1">They come in many styles but the cheapest, easiest option is treated pine. </span></p> <p class="p2">‘What you often find, especially in new builds, is that people have a kitchen window that looks out over a narrow patch of grass right on to a flat fence, which is not the most pleasing view,’ says Charlie. </p> <p class="p2">Break up the mass with a screen, an open lattice or baluster top, or plant flowering or evergreen shrubs in front to soften its solidity.</p> <p class="p2">‘If you have a fence and want, to improve the look of it quick smart, paint can be a good option. </p> <p class="p2">‘A dark fence looks great in a tropical style garden, while a formal, mostly green garden looks good with a cream tone,’ says Charlie. </p> <p class="p2">There’s no doubt a wall provides privacy, but a solid wall can feel oppressive to both sides. </p> <p class="p2">It can also be a big and expensive effort to build solid walls, and involve getting council approval or engineering work, so it’s best to reserve them for retaining rather than screening purposes.</p> <p class="p2"><em>Written by Sita Simons. Republished with permission of<a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/landscape-privacy"> Handyman.net.au</a></em></p>

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The devastating discovery about Madeleine McCann that still haunts Kate

<p>The disappearance of Madeleine McCann has been on the mind of the world since her family's holiday to Portugal in 2007.</p> <p>Madeleine went missing from her a holiday apartment while her parents and their friends were dining close by in the same hotel.</p> <p>In the year that Madeleine would’ve been 15, Netflix has released a documentary called <em>The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann,</em> that is full to the brim with detail about the case.</p> <p>Robbyn Swan, who co-wrote <em>Looking for Madeleine,</em> in 2014 is featured throughout the documentary and mentioned a detail that the family have been unable to get out of their heads since they learned of it.</p> <p>Swan said that it was “the stuff of nightmares” for Kate and Gerry McCann.</p> <p>In Kate’s book about the case, <em>Madeleine: Our Daughter’s Disappearance and the Continuing Search For Her</em>, she reveals a harrowing thought.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/42469/madeleine-mccann.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1307e606358a49c3ac297075d0bd2b72" /></p> <p>As the group’s children would be asleep in the hotel apartments at dinner time, the parents requested that they dined at the same table every night, as this table had the best view of the apartments.</p> <p>It was only once Madeleine disappeared that Kate discovered the person who wrote the booking down noted that the children would be unsupervised in the rooms in the reservation book. This means anyone who worked at the restaurant or any nosy members of the public knew that the children were left alone.</p> <p>Kate wrote in her book:</p> <p>“To my horror, I saw that, no doubt in all innocence and simply to explain why she was bending the rules a bit, the receptionist had added the reason for our request: we wanted to eat close to our apartments as we were leaving our young children alone there and checking on them intermittently."</p> <p>A tormented Kate added, “We now bitterly regret it and will do so until the end of our days."</p> <p>According to Swan, this discovery was one of the most upsetting to the McCann family. Intimate knowledge about the clan had been left in the open.</p> <p>Despite the documentary bringing light to a variety of theories, the family will never know whether or not that information was the last piece of the puzzle that led to Madeleine's disappearance.</p> <p>Have you watched the Madeleine McCann documentary series on Netflix? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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Madeleine McCann mystery at centre of new Netflix documentary

<p>A new documentary on Madeleine McCann is coming out today on Netflix.</p> <p><em>The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann</em> promises a detailed look at the case of McCann, a three-year-old British girl who disappeared from a Portuguese resort in 2007.</p> <p>The true crime documentary, which follows Netflix hits <em>Making A Murderer</em> and <em>The Keepers</em>, features 40 experts and key figures involved in the case.</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tBnarCTOiCY" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>"We’re trying to lay out as much detail as we can about the case – and if it could jog someone’s memory in some way then that would be amazing," executive producer Emma Cooper said.</p> <p>"Keeping any search for what happened to Madeleine in the consciousness – particularly globally – is something that's so important. As we show in the documentary, other children are found – so you have to hope."</p> <p>However, the missing child’s parents Gerry and Kate McCann did not participate in the film.</p> <p>"We are aware that Netflix are planning to screen a documentary in March 2019 about Madeleine's disappearance," the pair said in a statement.</p> <p>"We did not see – and still do not see – how this programme will help the search for Madeleine and, particularly given there is an active police investigation, it could potentially hinder it."</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/mar/13/netflix-to-stream-madeleine-mccann-series-after-delays-and-disputes" target="_blank"><em>The Guardian</em></a>, the parents also urged those around them to reject interview offers with Pulse Films, which produced the documentary on behalf of Netflix.</p> <p>In May 2007, Madeleine was reported missing from her holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Alvarez, Portugal. She was <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/a-madeleine-mccann-documentary-is-coming-everything-you-need-to-know" target="_blank">last seen</a> in her bedroom before her parents left to dine with family friends nearby.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8637550/disappearance-of-madeleine-mccann-netflix-doc-pic-maddie-playing-snatched/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a> reported that the documentary explores more theories behind Madeleine’s disappearance. One of the leading explanations is that she was taken by human traffickers and transported to another country.</p> <p>Investigation into the case is still ongoing in the UK.</p> <p>Will you be watching the highly anticipated documentary? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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What we know about the little-known twin siblings of Madeleine McCann

<p>Madeleine McCann is possibly one of the most famous faces in the world.</p> <p>Three-year-old Maddie, who famously disappeared on May 3, 2007 while visiting Portugal with her family, has been publicised in the hopes to eventually locate her whereabouts.</p> <p>But despite being the most reported missing person in modern history, investigators and her parents have had no luck in finding the little girl.</p> <p>Maddie’s parents, Gerry and Kate McCann, have campaigned tirelessly to find her, but while the world knows everything about young Madeleine, not much is known about her twin siblings, who were only two years old when their elder sister vanished.</p> <p>Now, 12 years later, 14-year-old Sean and Amelie are aspiring athletes, but tend to keep an extremely low profile as there are no public photos of the siblings as they are today.</p> <p>The only photographs of the two are from when they were younger.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 335px;" src="/media/7824679/twins1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/692ac17740024ab6adefc8c179fe4778" /></p> <p>Sean is an unbeaten swimming champion and also takes part in cross country and triathlons in his local area. So far, he has competed in 14 championships, runs and leagues.</p> <p>And his sister is also a force to be reckoned with, as she took part in nine athletic and triathlon competitions in 2018.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5473303/madeleine-mccanns-parents-celebrate-twins-becoming-teens-with-prayers-for-missing-daughter-wherever-she-is/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>, a guest at their 13th birthday party last year said that the teenagers had one wish; “for their big sister to come home".</p> <p>“Kate and Gerry want to give the twins a memorable occasion, they’re teenagers now and that’s a big deal,” the guest said.</p> <p>While Maddie hasn’t been around to watch her younger brother and sister grow up, the 14-year-old's are reminded of their loss every day.</p> <p>Madeleine’s bedroom remains untouched, just the way it was when she was three – bright pink.</p> <p>Her parents, who purchase Christmas gifts for her every year, make sure to leave them in her room, in case she returns home.</p> <p>The twins attend a Catholic secondary school located 12 kilometres from the family home, in Loughborough, UK.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 327.7255639097744px;" src="/media/7824680/maddie.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8fc3c69506b14d4890abb4c42b3dc1d7" /></p> <p>Kate, who works in the medical sector, has previously stated that the family regularly pray for Maddie’s safe return.</p> <p>She said the twins have “grown up essentially without knowing Madeleine but knowing their sister is missing and they want her back".</p> <p>“They have their own friends, and they keep busy and they’re really sporty, but their only wish is for their big sister to come home. We miss our complete family of five,” Kate told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5473303/madeleine-mccanns-parents-celebrate-twins-becoming-teens-with-prayers-for-missing-daughter-wherever-she-is/" target="_blank">The Sun</a>.</em></p> <p>On the 10th anniversary of Maddie’s kidnapping, Kate took to Facebook to write: “I truly hope that those reporting on the ‘story’ over the next couple of weeks will have a conscience. Even if little consideration for Gerry and me is shown, they will at least bear in mind the effect such unfounded and unwarranted negativity could have on our other children.”</p> <p>Sean and Amelie were only metres away from Maddie in a peaceful slumber when she was allegedly taken. British police and Scotland Yard have yet to locate her, despite their ongoing efforts.</p>

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"Born out of wedlock": Liz Hurley's son set to inherit nothing

<p>The biological grandfather of Liz Hurley’s son is doing everything within his power to stop Hurley’s son from getting any of the family fortune.</p> <p>Damian Charles Hurley was born in 2002 after Liz Hurley was romantically involved with US businessman Steve Bing.</p> <p>As Steve has an estimated net worth of $USD600 million ($AU853 million), with the bulk of his wealth coming from his grandfather, Leo S. Bing, a New York real estate baron, it makes sense that the family would want to protect the fortune.</p> <p>The grandfather, Dr Peter Bing, is trying to prevent Damian from getting involved with the family trust.</p> <p>Peter Bing has argued that Damian and Steve have never met since he was born, and that Damian isn’t eligible for the trust as he was “born out of wedlock”.</p> <p>Although that rule might sound old-fashioned, the trust was established in 1980 and states, according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/elizabeth-hurleys-son-damian-to-14097520" target="_blank"><em>The Mirror</em></a>:</p> <p>“[The trust] would not benefit any person bought out of wedlock unless that person had lived for a substantial period of time as a regular member of the household.”</p> <p>The legal battle began after another of Steve Bing’s illegitimate children, Kira Bing, claimed she was a beneficiary of the trust and wanted information on it.</p> <p>Despite Steve Bing demanding paternity tests for both children, they confirmed that Kira and Damian are his children.</p> <p>Peter Bing’s claim is that since Damian and Kira have never lived with Steve, they do not have rights to the trust.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7824541/liz-hurley-steve-bing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0e2a1c2fa12a413da8e49e6094726a09" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Elizabeth Hurley with boyfriend Steven Bing in 2001.</em></p> <p>In Peter Bing’s affidavit, he claims:</p> <p>“l know that neither of them has lived with Stephen while a minor as a regular member of his household,” the affidavit states.</p> <p>“To the best of my knowledge, Stephen has never met Damian, and Stephen only met Kira after she became an adult.</p> <p>“Regardless of whether, when and if Stephen met with or had any relationship with Damian or Kira while they are or were minor because neither was raised by him during their formative years l do not consider them my grandchildren.</p> <p>“Even were Stephen to develop a relationship with Damian now, l would not consider him my grandchild because he is nearing adulthood.”</p> <p>As the legal battle continues, it is unknown whether Damian and Kira will benefit from the family’s trust.</p>

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Watch out! These 7 phone call scams could steal your money

<p><strong>1. “Can you hear me?”</strong></p> <p>Pause before speaking if a caller starts by asking, “Can you hear me?” Scammers are looking for a specific answer, says Eva Velasquez, CEO and president of the US-based Identity Theft Resource Center.</p> <p>“By getting you to answer ‘yes’ to that one question at the very beginning of the call – as opposed to somewhere in the middle of the conversation, where dubbing would be more obvious – scammers can record your affirmative answer,” she says.</p> <p>They can use that recording to claim you agreed to pay for some scam program. Even if it looks like the call is from someone you know, rephrase your answer to “I hear you just fine” to be safe, suggests Velasquez.</p> <p><strong>2. IRD and ATO impersonators</strong></p> <p>Don’t freak out if someone claiming to be from the Australian Tax Office (or, in New Zealand, the Inland Revenue Department) calls to collect money. </p> <p>Scammers use fear tactics and threaten to send the police if you don’t pay up immediately, but don’t fall for it. Government bodies such as the IRD and ATO will commonly get in touch with you in the mail, on official letterhead.</p> <p>Even if the callers don't ask for money, they could prey on your information by asking you to verify your identity. They might even quote information you’d think only the ATO or IRD could know, like what you paid in taxes last year, but that doesn’t mean you can trust them with your private details. Hang up and call a phone number you can verify online.</p> <p><strong>3. Bank calls</strong></p> <p>The ATO or the IRD won't call, but your bank might, which makes it harder to figure out if it’s the real deal. Plus, it makes sense that your bank would need to confirm your identity to protect your account.</p> <p>If your bank calls and asks you to confirm if transactions are legitimate, feel free to give a yes or no. But don’t give up any more information than that, says Adam Levin, founder of global identity protection and data risk services firm CyberScout and author of Swiped: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers, and Identity Thieves.</p> <p>Some scammers rattle off your credit card number and expiration date, then ask you to say your security code as confirmation, he says. Others will claim they froze your credit card because you might be a fraud victim, then ask for your pin number or other secure details.</p> <p>Only give out that kind of information out if you made the call – and don’t just use the number that contacted you.</p> <p>“Flip your credit card or debit card over, look at the number, call customer service and ask if you guys just called me,” says Levin.</p> <p>“They have on the computer if they did or didn’t.”</p> <p><strong>4. Tech support</strong></p> <p>If someone claiming to be from Microsoft, Apple, or another tech company calls to ask if you’ve had computer problems, just say no and hang up. “No one is ‘watching’ your computer for signs of a virus,” says Velasquez.</p> <p>Those scammers won’t fix the problem – they’ll make it worse by installing malware, says cybersecurity expert John Sileo.</p> <p>What’s worse, you might not connect those later problems to that scam call. The fake tech support put it in your head that your computer is slow, so you might think it’s normal when you notice it's lagging later on, he says.</p> <p><strong>5. Grandparent scam</strong></p> <p>Scammers sometimes target elderly people, pretending to be a grandchild. On a crackly line, they’ll say they’re in trouble – maybe they lost their wallet in a foreign country – and need you to send money, says Levin.</p> <p>Unless you can confirm it's actually a relative, don't give any money.</p> <p>“If you are truly concerned, gather the appropriate information from the scammers and hang up,” says Velasquez.</p> <p>“Confirm your grandchild’s safety before doing anything else.”</p> <p><strong>6. Lucky winner</strong></p> <p>Congrats, you just won a million dollars! If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. That big cash prize or amazing holiday sounds too tempting to ignore, but real contests only enter you if you ask.</p> <p>“In a legitimate lottery or sweepstakes, you have to enter the contest somehow,” says Velasquez.</p> <p>“If you ever ‘win’ a prize that you didn’t enter – especially one with a prize worth millions of dollars – you’re probably being scammed.”</p> <p>Even if you did enter a lottery, don't trust a supposed tax collector who contacts you. You would need to pay taxes on your winnings eventually, but never before you receive the money, says Velasquez.</p> <p><strong>7. Donation collections</strong></p> <p>When charities and other non-profits request donations over the phone, it's OK to show a little healthy scepticism.</p> <p>“Some will be legitimate. Many will not,” says Levin.</p> <p>“Risk being rude and saying you will call back or say ‘Then send me something. I want to read about it.’”</p> <p>If it is a cause you care about, do a little digging online to figure out if it’s a real charity. Even legitimate charities might not live up to their good-deed claims though.</p> <p>Verify from a third party like <a href="http://www.changepath.com.au/">changepath.com.au</a> in Australia, which rates organisations on factors like how transparent they are with administrative costs and the general availability of their financial reports, or <a href="https://www.register.charities.govt.nz/CharitiesRegister/Search">register.charities.govt.nz/CharitiesRegister/Search</a> in New Zealand.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Marissa Laliberte and Greg Barton</span>. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.co.nz/money/watch-out_these-7-phone-call-scams-could-steal-your-money"><span><em>Reader’s Digest</em></span></a><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.co.nz/money/watch-out_these-7-phone-call-scams-could-steal-your-money">.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><span><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></span></a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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A Madeleine McCann documentary is coming: Everything you need to know

<p>Netflix has made a new documentary on the disappearance of Madeleine McCann, which is set to be released on the streaming service later this month.</p> <p>The documentary, which reportedly cost £20 million (NZ$38.8 million) to produce, will delve deep into the famous 2007 missing child case and feature interviews with key figures and investigators.</p> <p>McCann’s parents, Kate and Gerry McCann, did not participate in the film as the investigation by the London Metropolitan Police is still active.</p> <p>“We would have welcomed the opportunity of working with the McCanns directly, but they informed us they couldn’t and wouldn’t consider taking part while a police investigation into their daughter’s abduction is ongoing,” an insider close to the producers told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rsvplive.ie/news/celebs/netflix-set-release-documentary-madeleine-14078522" target="_blank"><em>RSVP Live</em></a>.</p> <p>“But we have interesting new interviews with people close to the inquiry and we believe we can give justice to this unbelievably tragic story.”</p> <p>A friend of the family told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6763579/Netflix-launch-Madeleine-McCann-documentary-month.html" target="_blank"><em>Daily Mail</em></a> that the documentary will be out before the 12th anniversary of the young girl’s disappearance.</p> <p>McCann was just three years old when she disappeared from a holiday apartment in Praia da Luz, Alvarez, Portugal on May 3, 2007. The British toddler was on a vacation with her parents and her younger twin siblings. She was last seen in her bedroom before her parents left to dine with family friends 50 metres away.</p> <p>Almost 12 years after McCann’s disappearance, investigations by authorities and private parties have continued. The Metropolitan Police, which has reportedly spent £11.75 million (NZ$22.8 million) for ‘Operation Grange’ to locate the missing child <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.itv.com/news/central/2019-03-01/home-office-to-consider-more-funding-for-madeleine-mccann-search/" target="_blank">since 2011</a>, has applied for more funding until the end of March 2020.</p> <p>The upcoming documentary is Netflix’s latest foray into the true crime genre, following <em>Conversations With A Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes</em>,<em> Amanda Knox </em>and<em> Making A Murderer</em>. </p> <p>Will you be watching the Madeleine McCann documentary? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

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A Current Affair busts cancer con-artist Belle Gibson on lavish $15K holiday

<p>Cancer con woman Belle Gibson has been caught out returning from a luxury trip overseas.</p> <p>Gibson convinced thousands of Australians that she was suffering from a brain tumour but healed herself due to natural remedies.</p> <p>As she was charged with five breaches of Australian Consumer Law, she was fined $AUD400,000 ($NZD 417,424) in 2017 as her empire crumbled around her. Many have questioned how she can afford to go overseas on a luxurious escape to East Africa, as her five-week trip reportedly cost $AUD15,000 ($NZD 15,653).</p> <p><em>A Current Affair</em> revealed details of her luxury overseas stay, as well as catching a refreshed-looking Gibson arriving back at Melbourne Airport with her partner by her side.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">BUSTED! <a href="https://twitter.com/tinekae9?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@tinekae9</a> catches-up with Belle Gibson after she touches down from a luxury getaway... she asks why Belle still hasn't made any effort to pay her 410K fine. <a href="https://twitter.com/ACurrentAffair9?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ACurrentAffair9</a>. <a href="https://t.co/WlW0l9l6dh">pic.twitter.com/WlW0l9l6dh</a></p> — Jonathan Gwinner (@gwinnerism) <a href="https://twitter.com/gwinnerism/status/1100645341035032576?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 27, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>This is the first time that Gibson has been confronted since her interview with <em>60 Minutes</em> in 2015, which Gibson reportedly received $AUD75,000 ($NZD 78,267) for.</p> <p>Gibson falsely claimed she had brain cancer and healed herself with natural remedies. She also lied to her supporters about donating money from her Whole Pantry app and her book sales to charities.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BlcU_udDzfK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BlcU_udDzfK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by QNA Investigations (@qna.investigations)</a> on Jul 19, 2018 at 11:00pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>One of these charities included a family whose son was suffering from the same inoperable brain tumour that Gibson herself claimed she had. Gibson was supposed to donate one week’s profit from app sales, or $150,000 to the family, but never ended up donating the funds.</p> <p>Justin Lawrence, of Henderson &amp; Ball Lawyers, told<span> </span><em>A Current Affair</em>:</p> <p>“There can actually be another situation where she’s taken back to court and wheeled out from court to the jail cell,” he said.</p> <p>“That can happen, and this is not fake jail, jail in her (Belle’s) own mind. This is real jail.</p> <p>“The court understands when people can’t pay, that’s different to circumstances where they won’t pay.”</p> <p>What do you think? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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How to help your children climb the property ladder

<p>For all first-time home buyers, the process can be extremely difficult. Saving a deposit on even a modest income can be an uphill battle, not to mention the insecurity of property prices inflating and declining rapidly, which makes bank loan lending criteria even harder to obtain.</p> <p>Many parents may have every intention to help their children buy their first home in today’s unstable climate – but what is the best way to help financially?</p> <p><strong>Co-ownership </strong></p> <p>Considering becoming a co-owner in a property with your child may help protect your money and provide a little more ease of mind knowing you have shares in such an expensive investment.</p> <p>If you decide to co-own a home with your child, your name will be registered on the property title – meaning selling or mortgaging the home is not possible without your permission or knowledge.</p> <p>Co-ownership also allows you to trust that your money is in a secure investment as you can also share capital gains and even sign a Property Sharing Agreement with your child to flesh out who pays who, who gets to live in the home, what happens when property is sold and what happens if something goes wrong.</p> <p><strong>Loaning money </strong></p> <p>If you are in a position to lend money to your child in order to purchase a home, then this might be a method that works well for you and your family by lending money towards a deposit. However, jumping straight into it is a risky decision.</p> <p>Consider a properly documented loan agreement which outlines regular repayment schedules and the longevity of the loan term. Is there interest your child must pay – if so, how much? Will the interest rate vary? If you have more than one child, will your generosity be lent to them also?</p> <p>However, a bank may not be so willing to loan money to your child as they might ask for proof of equity in the property. A loan from a parent is just another debt to be repaid, not equity.</p> <p>A bank might also need a commitment they will not have to compete with your child for loan repayments – before committing to lending your child repayments, consider how long you are willing to wait for your money to return to you and if you can financially survive without it until you get it back.</p> <p><strong>Gifting money </strong></p> <p>Many parents are willing to give away their money to their children – as they might have done for their whole parenting lives. However, gifting your children money may have repercussions for your retirement future. Consider how this may impact you. Will you have to work years longer if you gift money to your child? Are you financially able to relax after gifting money for a loan deposit?</p> <p>It is also important to keep in mind banks do not take kindly to misleading statements – if you plan on loaning money to your child but say it is a gift, there may be serious repercussions for both yourself and your family.</p> <p><strong>Guarantee </strong></p> <p>Your child may ask for a guarantee on their bank debt meaning your position will not be much different from that of the loan borrower. In the case of a default, the bank may come after you before your child.</p> <p>A bank may require you put your own home up as a security for the guarantee, which may result in you losing your own home to repay your child’s debt.</p> <p>Consider how much exposure you are willing to commit to before taking a leap. Perhaps ensure your guarantee is limited to the absolute minimum the bank will allow and ensure you obtain independent legal advice.</p> <p>If you are considering any of the options above to assist your child in purchasing their first home, seek out legal consultation to ensure your options are thoroughly explained.</p> <p>Have you helped a child out with their first home purchase? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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The dangerous 10-minute window you're most likely to have a car accident

<p>In a survey that analysed accident data of 57,000 vehicles, industry specialist AX discovered that a fifth of road accidents occur during the evening commute. This is between the time of 4 pm and 6pm.</p> <p>However, the data noticed something interesting.</p> <p>There’s a 10-minute window between 5 pm and 5:10 pm where 15 per cent of all rush hour accidents occurred, as people left their places of work during winter time. This is therefore the most error-filled and accident-prone time period for drivers.</p> <p>One in six accidents occur during that 10-minute time period after 5pm.</p> <p>Scott Hamilton Cooper, Director of Sales and Operations at AX, said that the results were of “little surprise”.</p> <p>“It is little surprise to see the majority of accidents take place during the afternoon and evening hours when many of us are busy trying to get home or rushing to pick up our kids,” Hamilton explained.</p> <p>The RAC Foundation backed the findings, saying that three quarters of the extra accidents occur during the afternoon.</p> <p>RAC Foundation director Steve Gooding explained:</p> <p>“Every year at about this time there are calls to abandon the spring forward, fall-back rhythm of daylight saving time, but our work suggests that it's darker days and winter weather together that cause the spike in road safety risk.</p> <p>“Rain, snow, ice, wind, mist and fog are all factors which make driving more challenging and – the data suggests – more dangerous.</p> <p>“Wrapped up snugly in our warm and comfortable cars it's easy to feel immune to the conditions outside, yet year in, year out, they take their toll on thousands of road users.”</p> <p>Have you been in a car accident around this time of day? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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