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Sad new twist in search for Madeleine McCann

<p>Kate McCann has been forced to close down an online shop aimed at raising funds to help find her missing daughter Madeleine McCann.</p> <p>The website sold T-shirts, posters and car stickers with Maddie’s face on it, along with slogans saying, “Please don’t give up on me” and “Still missing, still missed.”</p> <p>Kate said she shut it down because of her “many commitments and pressures”, making it too difficult to attend to orders, the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://metro.co.uk/2018/09/23/kate-mccann-shuts-online-store-to-find-madeleine-as-donations-dwindle-to-virtually-zero-7970987/" target="_blank">Metro UK</a></em> reported.</p> <p>The family, who has already faced so much tragedy, has faced another low blow as it has been revealed that donations from the public to the Maddie Fund have dwindled to “virtually zero” over the past 11 years – when the little girl went missing in Portugal.</p> <p>A friend claiming to be close to Kate and Gerry McCann told the<em> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6196197/Shock-Kate-McCann-closes-online-fundraising-shop.html" target="_blank">Daily Mail</a></em> that the idea that money is still flooding in was just wrong.</p> <p>“Donations dried up a long time ago. At times the story comes into the news a few kind people send a quid or two but there is nothing of any real value,” the friend said.</p> <p>According to <em>Metro UK</em>, in the first month of investigations regarding the disappearance of Madeleine, £1.8 million ($NZ3.6 million) was donated to the fund, out of which £64,000 ($NZ126,000) was from merchandise sales.</p> <p>The fund, which is officially called Leaving No Stone Unturned, has a total of £750,000 ($NZ1.5 million) left in the pot, but this could soon be wiped out.</p> <p>If police and investigators decide to close the case, the McCanns will be forced to dip into the fund and pay for their own investigators.</p> <p>A majority of it ($NZ844,000) may also be needed to cover the costs on an ongoing legal battle against former Portugal police chief Goncalo Amaral.</p> <p>Amaral accused the McCanns of being involved in their daughter’s disappearance, saying they killed her and are now covering it up – claims which the couple has denied and has sued him for.</p> <p>Up until now, police have spent over $NZ39 million searching for Maddie, who would have turned 15 in May this year. The last handout from the government of $NZ294,000 was given at the start of April.</p> <p>Speaking to the <em>Daily Mail</em>, a family member said: “We have to wait to see what the Home Office decide about the Grange operation.”</p> <p>However, a Home Office spokesperson said that to date, no request has ever been received from the Metropolitan Police Service to extend funding for operation Grange beyond the end of September 2018.</p> <p>In 2011, Scotland Yard launched its own review, named Operation Grange, into the case.</p> <p>“Before we would even consider an application from the Met Police to continue its Operation Grange inquiry, we need to know what work is left to be done and how much it would cost,” a spokesperson said.</p> <p>Despite the global search and high level of funding, there has been no significant clues as to what could have happened to Maddie. </p>

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This will blow your mind: You've been unwrapping stock cubes wrong

<p>It's one of the easiest ways to add flavour to your dishes – and it's about to get even easier.</p> <p>A handy hack on how to open stock cubes is causing a stir online, as it seems many of us have been doing it all wrong.</p> <p>Forget crumbling up the cube after opening the silver foil packaging – it seems that the packaging was actually designed to be flattened.</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AKI40q38LUw" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Simply open up the flaps on the side, flatten them out and then crumble the cube inside the package, turning it into a powder that's a heck of a lot easier to add to your dish.</p> <p>The tip first made the rounds online in 2016, but it seems a whole new group of stock cube fans have recently stumbled across it, and they've had plenty to say about it on social media.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">OMG in all my cooking years I’ve only just discovered how to open an oxo cube! Anyone else know that it squashed into a sachet which you tear open?? Doh! <a href="https://t.co/2opyqBb9rg">pic.twitter.com/2opyqBb9rg</a></p> — w7emporium (@w7emporium) <a href="https://twitter.com/w7emporium/status/1041967627525140481?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 September 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">I’m 54 yrs on this planet and never knew until today that you should squish an Oxo cube into a sachet type shape and simply tear off a corner and pour away - no bits of foil and no messy fingers. One gets wise with age one does. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/oxosecrets?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#oxosecrets</a> <a href="https://t.co/YynlQ7KLYy">pic.twitter.com/YynlQ7KLYy</a></p> — Ex Fed Paul Herdman (@DyfedPowysFed) <a href="https://twitter.com/DyfedPowysFed/status/1037455045934149632?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">5 September 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">I have spent years unwrapping Oxo cubes gettin beefy fingers and it’s been a goddamn packet all along. Mind.blown. 🤯 <a href="https://t.co/ehkBoqR6GQ">pic.twitter.com/ehkBoqR6GQ</a></p> — 💃🏼Glen Scott💃🏼 (@glenrules) <a href="https://twitter.com/glenrules/status/1042390871159844865?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">19 September 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Will you be trying this genius hack? Let us know in the comments below. </p> <p><em> Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/food-wine/food-news/107230047/have-you-been-opening-oxo-cubes-the-wrong-way" target="_blank">Stuff.co.nz.</a></em></p>

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Girl arrested: Confesses to needles in strawberries "prank"

<p>A 12-year-old has reportedly admitted to inserting needles into strawberries in what police believe to be a copycat prank.</p> <p>New South Wales Acting Assistant Police Commissioner Stuart Smith said the child was caught in recent days but refused to release any further details.</p> <p>While the youngster was reported as a male due to Mr Smith addressing the child as a “he” at a press conference, it is now discovered that the police commissioner misspoke.</p> <p>After inserting the needles into the strawberries, the girl then showed her friends at school in the NSW Blue Mountains, reported <em><a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/">The Daily Telegraph</a></em>. One student informed staff and the police were immediately called to the scene. They reportedly interviewed the girl at her home and she eventually confessed.</p> <p>“Obviously, in the last few days we found a young person has admitted to a prank, including putting needles in strawberries,” Mr Smith told reporters in Sydney.</p> <p>Mr Smith said the child would be dealt with under the youth cautioning system.</p> <p>He further went on to say that while some may believe the behaviour could be “called a prank”, he warned that any copycat cases would be dealt with the full extent of the law.</p> <p>“What we’ve seen in the state (of NSW) we believe is the work of copycats and pranksters, we’ve got to deal with it though, the way we deal with any crime,” he said.</p> <p>The event comes as the Attorney-General said there have now been over 100 reported cases of sabotaged fruit across the country, with the scare initially starting in Queensland then spreading to Tasmania and Western Australia.</p> <p>The most recent incident occurred at a primary school in Newcastle today, where a student discovered a needle inside the banana that they packed for lunch.</p> <p>The child, a pupil at St Paul’s Primary School, alerted teachers after biting into the banana and finding the sharp object lodged inside.</p> <p>Detectives were sent to the school to investigate the incident and have removed the banana for further tests.</p> <p>A spokesman for NSW Police said authorities will not comment on individual cases as they had a “duty of care.”</p>

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The legal matters you need to consider as you get older

<p><em><strong>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</strong></em></p> <p>As we are ageing, it is essential at some stage to be realistic and sort our legal affairs. This incorporates writing your last will and testament. It is an individual’s choice whether to use a will kit, or to engage a solicitor. We must decide on an executor of the will, to ensure any assets are disposed of, in accordance with our intentions.</p> <p>Secondly, it is an excellent idea to appoint a medical power of attorney to a trusted person, to factor in a case scenario if you are on life support. Someone needs a medical power of attorney to make tough decisions on your behalf.</p> <p>Thirdly, when writing your will, you need to list your beneficiaries. Moreover, you need to compile a file of your assets and investments. Furthermore, it is also a good intention to prepare any wishes for your funeral, burial or cremation. Do you wish to be an organ donor? Ultimately, if any doubts occur, it is always possible and feasible to seek advice from any legal professionals.</p> <p>Right, having done all that, it’s easy to think, “all sorted!” But remember, any golden oldie’s status can be affected by any change in circumstance, such as either health conditions, or by marriage, or divorce, or the death of a spouse. Then we may need to revise our will and testament.</p> <p>But, in the interim, put morbid thoughts to one side, that is all ‘worst case scenario’. Now we can plan for our happy and leisurely retirement, enjoying being ‘golden oldies’, anyway we choose!</p> <p>Here are the stats: 10/10 people are going to die, so appreciate being alive! Rise and smile!</p>

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Metal found in Queensland bananas Australian police confirm

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">Police in Australia have confirmed they are investigating an incident where a metal object was found inside a banana, after needles were found in Queensland strawberries.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Queensland Police Commissioner Ian Stewart confirmed police were actively investigating an incident, but did not give details about where the contaminated banana was found.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It comes after metal needles were found in strawberries in Queensland.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"There are significant leads in relation to that [banana] matter," Stewart said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It's understood the incident with the banana was isolated and involved a person placing a metal object in a banana at a shop.</p> <div class="sics-component__ad-space sics-component__ad-space--storybody "> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Stewart said the potential for copycat events was "very real" and the strawberry investigation was ongoing.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We're focusing very, very much on the supply chain, the people involved in that, this is a very, very significant, economically powerful industry, particularly in the south-east of Queensland and obviously of great concern," he said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Stewart said there had been incidents across Australia and Queensland police were working with counterparts interstate.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"There's some specific leads that we're following in relation to the banana incident – strawberries are still our major focus," he said.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said it is unbelievable that any person could do this knowing the eventual harm or destruction it could do to a human life.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Queensland chief health officer Jeanette Young said that there had been no further reports of needles or metal objects found in strawberries in Queensland, and only three brands had been withdrawn from the market.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The state government has offered a A$100,000 reward for any information leading to the arrest and conviction of anyone responsible for the strawberry sabotage.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">New Zealand company Foodstuffs has halted all imports of Australian strawberries after needles were discovered in strawberries sold in Queensland, Victoria and NSW.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt has also ordered the national food safety watchdog to assess Queensland's handling of strawberry contamination.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/world/107153174/metal-found-in-queensland-bananas-australian-police-confirm">Stuff.co.nz</a>.</em></p> </div>

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Why difficult childhood experiences could make you age prematurely

<p>We know that comparatively disadvantaged people, even in rich countries, have worse health and <a href="https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2017/01/31/low-socioeconomic-status-affects-life-expectancy-more-than-obesi_a_21704449/">shorter life expectancy</a> than others. But what is it exactly about socioeconomic disadvantage and other environmental difficulties that affects our biology? And at what age are we most vulnerable to these effects?</p> <p>While it is unclear exactly how the social environment influences a person’s biology at the molecular level, processes related to ageing are likely to be involved. One such process is DNA methylation, a mechanism used by cells to control gene expression. Specifically, it determines whether and when a gene is turned on, turned off or dialled up or down. Now a new study, <a href="https://academic.oup.com/aje/advance-article/doi/10.1093/aje/kwy155/5060528?guestAccessKey=df5d8e87-4e2d-4bff-b0fb-72ad5319f825#119252619">published in the American Journal of Epidemiology</a>, suggests that this process may be affected by circumstances in our youth – ultimately affecting how we age.</p> <p>All cells in the human body – from blood and skin cells to neurons – share the same genetic code. So how are they so different? The answer lies in gene expression: which of the many thousands of genes in each human cell are switched on, to what extent, and at which stage in the cell’s development.</p> <p>This varies not just between cell types but between people, helping to explain why identical twins can be visibly different. Physically, DNA methylation involves modification of “letters” of the genetic code by addition or removal of a <a href="https://www.britannica.com/science/methyl-group">methyl group</a> – affecting how much the gene is expressed. Because the distribution of methyl groups along the genome changes in systematic ways with ageing, you can estimate a person’s age from DNA methylation patterns in cells from a blood sample by applying an algorithm.</p> <p>This <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-epigenetics-may-help-us-slow-down-the-ageing-clock-76878">measure of “biological age”</a> is relevant to longevity – individuals with an “older” DNA methylation age are at greater risk of age-related disease and mortality. Meanwhile, it seems environmental influences may alter or “accelerate” age-related changes in methylation: associations have been shown between DNA methylation age and stress, dietary factors and pollution. This suggests DNA methylation age may be one pathway by which the social environment can affect health.</p> <p><strong>New data</strong></p> <p>Data was used from 1099 adults in the UK to look at whether different dimensions of socioeconomic disadvantage were linked to elevated DNA methylation age, calculated in two ways. When blood samples were collected, the survey had already collected annual information on the same people’s socioeconomic circumstances for 12 years. This meant the study was able to consider current and longer-term measures of things like income, employment status and educational qualifications. Crucially, this data also included information about the occupational social class of an individual’s parents when they were 14.</p> <p>The research discovered that only the last measure showed a clear link with DNA methylation age. Individuals whose parents worked in semi routine or routine occupations were about one year “older” than individuals whose parents worked in managerial or professional roles. Individuals who did not have working parents, or had parents who had died, fared still worse: they were 2.4 or 1.85 years older depending on the algorithm used. The calculations did take account of other relevant factors including smoking, body mass index and the actual age of the study participants.</p> <p>These results suggest DNA methylation age is an aspect of a person’s biology which is vulnerable to influences early in life, but surprisingly robust when it comes to difficulties experienced in adulthood. The next question is which aspects of the childhood socioeconomic environment are most relevant. Is it financial strain, housing quality or diet? Equally important will be to figure out which factors could provide resilience to these effects, potentially buffering children from a lasting impact of disadvantage on DNA methylation age.</p> <p>Of course, the results will need to be replicated, and since DNA methylation age was only measured once, the survey could not definitively prove cause and effect. But the results <a href="https://jech.bmj.com/content/62/5/387">add to extensive evidence</a> that early life circumstances can cast a long shadow on adult health. Perhaps most importantly, this strengthens the case for making sure all children are fully supported.</p> <p><em>Written by Amanda Hughes and Meena Kumari. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/difficult-childhood-experiences-could-make-us-age-prematurely-new-research-102807">theconversation.com</a>.</em></p>

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12 crazy conspiracy theories that actually turned out to be true

<p>Laughing at conspiracy theories is good fun - at least until they turn out to be true.</p> <p>Take the conspiracy surrounding the "Project Sunshine," for example.</p> <p>In the wake of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the U.S. government commenced a major study to measure the effects of nuclear fallout on the human body.</p> <p><strong>1. The horror of 'Project Sunshine'</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> The government was stealing dead bodies to do radioactive testing.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> The government was stealing parts of dead bodies. Because they needed young tissue, they recruited a worldwide network of agents to find recently deceased babies and children, and then take samples and even limbs - each collected without notification or permission of the more than 1,500 grieving families.</p> <p><strong>2. Bad booze</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> During Prohibition, the government poisoned alcohol to keep people from drinking.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> Manufacturers of industrial alcohol had been mixing their product with dangerous chemicals for years prior to Prohibition.</p> <p>But between 1926 and 1933, the federal government pushed manufacturers to use stronger poisons to discourage bootleggers from turning the alcohol into moonshine.</p> <p>That didn't stop the bootleggers or their customers, and by the end of Prohibition, more than 10,000 Americans had been killed by tainted booze.</p> <p><strong>3. The first lady who ran the country</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> A stroke rendered President Woodrow Wilson incapable of governing, and his wife surreptitiously stepped in.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> Wilson did suffer a debilitating stroke towards the end of his presidency - but the government felt it was in the country's best interest to keep things quiet.</p> <p>The public didn't learn about the stroke for months, during which time his wife, Edith Wilson, was making most executive decisions.</p> <p>Despite Mrs. Wilson claiming that she acted only as a "steward," historians who have analysed the Wilson term in office confirm that for well over a year, Mrs. Wilson was effectively president.</p> <p><strong>4. Government mind control</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> The CIA was testing LSD and other hallucinogenic drugs on Americans in a top-secret experiment on behaviour modification.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> The program was known as MK-ULTRA, and it was real.</p> <p>The CIA started by using volunteers - the novelist Ken Kesey was one notable subject.</p> <p>But the program heads soon began dosing people without their knowledge; MK-ULTRA left many victims permanently mentally disabled.</p> <p><strong>5. The Dalai Lama's impressive salary</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> The Dalai Lama is a CIA agent.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> Perhaps the reason the Dalai Lama is smiling in all those photos has something to do with the six-figure salary he pulled down from the U.S. government during the 1960s.</p> <p>According to declassified intelligence documents, he earned $180,000 in connection with the CIA's funding of the Tibetan Resistance to the tune of $1.7 million per year.</p> <p>The idea was to disrupt and hamper China's infrastructure.</p> <p><strong>6. John Lennon was under government surveillance</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> The FBI was spying on former Beatle John Lennon.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> They most certainly were. Like many counter-culture heroes, Lennon was considered a threat: "Anti-war songs, like "Give Peace a Chance" didn't exactly endear former Beatle John Lennon to the Nixon administration," NPR reported in 2010.</p> <p>"In 1971, the FBI put Lennon under surveillance, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service tried to deport him a year later."</p> <p><strong>7. The government is spying on you</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> With the advances in technology, the government is using its vast resources to track citizens.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> In 2016, government agencies sent 49,868 requests for user data to Facebook, 27,850 to Google, and 9,076 to Apple, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (the EFF), a major non-profit organisation that defends civil liberties in the digital world and advises the public on matters of internet privacy.</p> <p><strong>8. Fake battle, real war</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> The Gulf of Tonkin incident on August 2, 1964, was faked to provoke American support for the Vietnam War.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> By the time news reached American ears, the facts surrounding the North Vietnamese attack on the American Naval ship Maddox were already fuzzy.</p> <p>Declassified intelligence documents have since revealed that the Maddox had provided support for South Vietnamese attacks on a nearby island and that the North Vietnamese were responding in kind, according to the U.S. Naval Institute.</p> <p>The event "opened the floodgates for direct American military involvement in Vietnam."</p> <p><strong>9. Big Tobacco knew that cigarettes caused cancer</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> For decades, tobacco companies buried evidence that smoking is deadly.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> At the beginning of the 1950s, research was showing an indisputable statistical link between smoking and lung cancer, but it wasn't until the late 1990s that Philip Morris even admitted that smoking could cause cancer.</p> <p><strong>10. There is alien evidence in the American Southwest</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> E.T. is buried in the desert of New Mexico.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> This one is real: The Atari video game E.T., the Extra-Terrestrial failed so miserably that the company buried unsold cartridges in a desert landfill. (Wait, what did you think we meant? Real aliens? In New Mexico? Not yet, anyway.)</p> <p><strong>11. Canada tried to develop 'gaydar'</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> The Canada government was so paranoid about homosexuality that it developed a "gaydar" machine.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> It really happened: In the 1960s, the government hired a university professor to develop a way to detect homosexuality in federal employees.</p> <p>He came up with a machine that measured pupil dilation in response to same-sex-erotic imagery; the Canadian government used it to exclude or fire more than 400 men from civil service, the military, and the Mounties.</p> <p><strong>12. The Illuminati and the U.S. government</strong></p> <p><strong>Conspiracy:</strong> A secret society that rules the world - the Illuminati - and the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) are in cahoots.</p> <p><strong>The truth:</strong> We're here to tell you that a link does, in fact, exist.</p> <p>Of course, that "link" is actually a hyperlink (i.e., an electronic link between two Internet sites).</p> <p>If you type Illuminati backwards - Itanimulli - into a web browser, you will land on the NSA website.</p> <p>Click this link if you dare: <a href="http://www.itanimulli.com/">Itanimulli.com</a></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><em>Written by Lauren Cahn. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/12-crazy-conspiracy-theories-actually-turned-out-be-true?items_per_page=All">Reader's Digest</a>.<img width="70" height="71" src="/media/7820158/1-rd-logo.jpg" alt="1-RD-LOGO" style="float: right;"/></em></p>

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Woman dodges parking fine after writing hilarious poem to council

<p>A UK woman has managed to escape a parking fine thanks to her witty poetry skills.</p> <p>Jayne Parsons, 53, from Salisbury in England, was recently issued a fine after parking her car on yellow lines near her home, according to the <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-wiltshire-45307817">BBC</a>.</p> <p>She knew she had a good excuse so instead of copping the fine, she decided to plead with her local council using verse.</p> <p>In a rhyming letter sent to Wiltshire Council, Ms Parsons explained that she was loading her vehicle with cakes and sweets to sell at a fundraiser for her local riding club when she was struck with a “nervous tum” and needed to dash to the loo – urgently.</p> <p>But we’ll let her explain the situation.</p> <p>Ms Parsons wrote in her letter:</p> <p>“Dear Sir, or to whom it may concern,</p> <p>A parking fine I did earn.</p> <p>I was parked outside my house on yellow lines,</p> <p>Intending to move and dodge your fines.</p> <p>But on Sunday I was loading my car</p> <p>With food and cakes for a horseshow; not far</p> <p>Before these events, I get a nervous tum,</p> <p>For the toilet I had to run.</p> <p>And with not a moment to lose,</p> <p>I made it indoors to release my poos!</p> <p>I couldn’t move until all was done,</p> <p>But when I returned the fine was done.</p> <p>I thought it better was be discreet</p> <p>And leave the car parked in the street.</p> <p>Next time I’ll move and not be a pain,</p> <p>But if I get caught short, I’ll s*** in the drain.”</p> <p>But the most stunning part of the story is not that the council let her off, but that they responded in the form of poetry, too.</p> <p>“The penalty charge notice was correctly issued as the vehicle was parked in a restricted street during prescribed hours. In this instance the restriction is clearly indicated by the double yellow lines which are in effect at all times,” the council wrote.</p> <p>“However, in considering people’s circumstances,</p> <p>The council is often led song and dances,</p> <p>It’s difficult to know the truth,</p> <p>And quite often we would ask for proof,</p> <p>But the photographs the officer has taken,</p> <p>Shows that indeed, you had been baking,</p> <p>These cakes had been loaded in your Land Rover,</p> <p>On the double yellow lines it was parked over,</p> <p>So on this occasion we are pleased to say,</p> <p>The council accept your appeal, you do not have to pay.”</p> <p>Ms Parsons told the BBC she was shocked to have “got out of the fine, even though I was parked in the wrong place”.</p>

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The crazy reason why Harry and Meghan won’t have custody of their own children

<p>While living the royal life can seem like a dream for some, the truth is, there are many bizarre rules that average people are lucky to not have to follow. One of them, in particular, has to do with the royal children.</p> <p>It’s hard enough raising children in the spotlight, with paparazzi constantly on your tail and having to figure out creative ways for them to behave during official royal events. But the most peculiar is the custody arrangement with the Queen.</p> <p>Despite how much of a royalist you claim to be, there is a chance that you skipped over this fine detail. According to royal historians, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge do not have legal custody of their own children.</p> <p>That right is given to the children’s great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II.</p> <p>Royal expert Marlene Koenig spoke to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity-life/royals/bizarre-reason-why-meghan-and-harry-wont-have-custody-of-their-children/news-story/5070826afa1e1869db31304d4674bd3b" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em> and said: “The sovereign has legal custody of the minor grandchildren.</p> <p>“This goes back to King George I [who ruled in the early 1700s], and the law’s never been changed. He did it because he had a very poor relationship with his son the future King George II, so they had this law passed that meant the King was the guardian of his grandchildren.”</p> <p>With the law dating back 300 years, it was passed by a majority of 10 out of 12 judges in the year 1717, who ultimately came to the decision that the monarch should have the “right of supervision extended to his grandchildren and this right of right belongs to His Majesty, King of the Realm, even during their father’s lifetime”.</p> <p>Koenig, who has written two books on the history of the British royal family and has had multiple articles published in the <em>Eurohistory Journal</em>, says the law has not changed since 1772, as the law was legislated again during King George III’s reign and has not been suspended by new legislation.</p> <p>Due to this, the upbringing of royal children is greatly affected especially when it comes to their upbringing, travel and education.</p> <p>“When [Princes William and Harry] were little, Prince Charles asked the Queen if both children could fly on a plane to Scotland, to which the Queen said yes,” Koenig said.</p> <p>“Technically, they needed permission for travel. The Queen has the last word on parenting decisions like that.”</p> <p>And that wasn’t the only time the Queen was asked for her approval.</p> <p>Before her passing, Princess Diana was not allowed to fly with her children to Australia as per the Queen's refusal. Also, later Prince Charles was forced to ask for the Queen’s permission before sending Prince William to a holiday camp in America in the late 1990s.</p> <p>According to Koenig, once the Queen passes, Prince Charles would then be handed the legal custody of George, Charlotte, Louis and all other grandchildren as he would then be king.</p> <p>But due to Prince Charles having progressive views, Koenig believes he is “very respectful of his son’s parenting” and would not choose to interfere in their upbringing.</p> <p>“He understands they want to raise their children privately … the only thing Charles might ask for is more pictures,” she joked.</p>

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Lisa Marie Presley to testify against estranged husband in bitter divorce case

<p>Lisa Marie Presley will testify against her estranged husband when their bitter divorce trial goes to court on Monday.</p> <p>Presley split with musician Michael Lockwood in 2016 after 10 years of marriage. They share nine-year-old twin daughters, Finley and Harper.</p> <p>She says that her estranged husband has been trying to claim a share of the inheritance left to her by her late father, rock 'n' roll legend Elvis Presley.</p> <p>According to legal documents, the 50-year-old is set to take the stand to testify that her husband had "assured her that he was not that guy" after she told him prior to their 2006 wedding that she "would not marry someone who would come after her for her money."</p> <p>Presley, once worth a staggering $87 million, asked Lockwood to sign a post-nup for peace of mind after their marriage. The post-nup was signed by both parties and stated that neither would pursue the other for support "at any time, regardless of the circumstances."</p> <p>"So much for assurances," Presley's attorney, Gary Fishbein, said of Lockwood, who is now contesting the post-nup with Presley.</p> <p>Lockwood, 57, is arguing the document be void because he was coerced into signing it, and his lawyer at the time, who has since died, failed to properly explain the terms of the agreement.</p> <p>"Lockwood cannot now complain that he's sorry he entered the agreement because he doesn't like the terms," said Fishbein. "He knew what he was signing, was represented and cannot invalidate the agreement because he has a case of sour grapes."</p> <p>In her count documents, Presley has claims that she is $22 million in debt, with $14 million owed in back in taxes. However, Lockwood refutes this, claiming Presley earns around $5.8 million every year, or $480,000 a month, thanks to a trust set up by her father.</p> <p>The trial is expected to last four days.</p>

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From $230K to $28 – Grieving widow shocked to find late husband’s super fund drained dry

<p>After Kim Garbutt’s husband, Craig, passed away 10 years ago, his family was expecting a cheque for more than $230,000 in death benefits from AMP – Craig’s superannuation fund. Instead, they received $27.64 13 days later.</p> <p>The grieving widow was shocked to find that the account had only a small sum of money, when she was under the impression that her husband had left her with $230,000.</p> <p>“When the account arrived, I was a bit dumbfounded,” she told <em><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-13/widow-expected-$200,000-super-death-benefit-amp-paid-her-$25/10114662"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">7.30.</span></a></em></p> <p>“Sometime after that I spoke to them and they were saying basically the account had run dry. They went, ‘So sad that he’s died but too bad, the accounts got no money in it.”</p> <p>Ms Garbutt only discovered the account was $233 in arrears – and that AMP had cancelled the policy – five months before Craig’s death.</p> <p>Before his death in 2008, Craig had fought an alcohol addiction which put strain on his marriage with Ms Garbutt. Although the two split shortly after the wedding, they decided to stay legally married for the sake of their two children.</p> <p>Craig, who passed away at the age of 39, was described by Ms Garbutt as someone who was “super smart…he was funny, he liked to dress well.”</p> <p>“He wasn’t ostentatious, he was bombastic, he was just a nice friendly guy. He was well-liked, he was well-loved.”</p> <p>While he tried to seek help by attending rehab facilities, in the end he couldn’t rid himself of his addiction. Before he passed away, Craig was using friends’ couches and his car to live out of after his business went bankrupt.</p> <p>“He was in debt to what we think is $300,000 to $400,000 to maybe six or seven creditors. Phones had been cut off,” said Ms Garbutt.</p> <p>After investigating, Ms Garbutt discovered that Craig had transferred $1786.55 into the account from his previous super fund in 2003, but in as little as 5 weeks, the amount was down to $1579.29 after he was charged over $207.08 in fees and premiums.</p> <p>Even though Craig had no further contribution to his account after the initial $1786.55, AMP continued to deduct fees and charges – many of which were hidden.</p> <p>AMP claims to have contacted Craig before his death to let him know that his account was low on funds and would be cancelled. They advised her that there was nothing more they can do.</p> <p>According to Ms Garbutt, AMP was not cooperative and refused to speak with her on compassionate grounds, and since Craig’s passing, she has been struggling to compete with the insurance company about Craig’s superannuation and insurance.</p> <p>Ms Garbutt reveals that while AMP sent her late husband letters regarding his fund, he was seriously ill and was not opening mail at the time.</p> <p>A spokeswoman from AMP said that the company “strongly rejects” the idea that Ms Garbutt had been uninformed throughout the process.</p> <p>“At no time were we informed that [Craig] was unwell, and we corresponded with him as early as seven months before his death that he was at risk of losing his valuable insurance,” said the spokeswoman.</p> <p>“We do allow customers to reinstate lapsed policies based on medical evidence, however we do not allow this where the reinstatement is due to the customer now wishing to claim.”</p> <p>Ms Garbutt claims to have “begged and pleaded” with the insurance giant regarding where Craig’s money had gone, but AMP remained uncooperative.</p> <p>“It was ‘Nope, we told Craig it was going to be cancelled’,” she said.</p> <p>“I went, ‘Craig wasn’t functioning, we wouldn’t have read the letters’.”</p>

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How a murderer was caught by his text messages

<p>A conman who murdered his lover and mutilated her body to cover his tracks has come undone over a single punctuation mark in a text message.</p> <p>In July 2013, British man David Ryan, 48, was found guilty of murdering Diana Lee, 54, before setting fire to her house in Cranage, Cheshire in August 2012.</p> <p>Ryan, who is married, cheated Lee out of £60,000 ($A105,000) to cover his "mountain of debts". Ryan never told Lee he had a wife.</p> <p>He spent the stolen cash on IVF treatment for his wife, and a number of luxuries for himself including a laptop, a puppy, Armani clothes and new luggage.</p> <p>But when Lee started asking questions about the money, Ryan decided to end her life.</p> <p>Lee was bludgeoned to death and found face-down in a wheelbarrow full of wood.</p> <p>Ryan then dragged her body to the garage, and set four fires around the house in an attempt to destroy the DNA evidence and cover his tracks.</p> <p>However, the fire failed to spread properly, and firefighters found remains of the woman’s naked body in a wheelbarrow after they were called to attend the blaze.</p> <p>It later emerged that Ryan had also tried to frame the victim’s lodger, Andrew Leese, by planting her underwear in his room and planting her blood on his antique German dagger.</p> <p>And he may have gotten away with it – if it hadn’t been for the fake text messages he sent to some of Lee’s clients right after killing her.</p> <p>In his latest book, <em>More Wordcrime,</em> leading forensic linguist John Olsson explains how an analysis of Lee’s text messages played an important role in revealing Ryan’s guilt.</p> <p>As Ryan attempted to clean up his murder, he sent messages from the victim’s phone to clients who were scheduled to visit Lee, telling them to stay away from the crime scene, <em><a href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/john-olsson-to-catch-a-killer-look-at-how-he-punctuates-his-texts-32qbbvdhr"><strong>The Times</strong></a></em> reported.</p> <p>But analysis showed how the messages were inconsistent with Lee’s usual method of texting. In particular, the fake texts featured two spaces after full stops and question marks, and no space after commas. This was in line with Ryan’s style of texting.</p> <p><img width="500" height="400" src="/media/7819948/text-messege.jpg" alt="Text Messege" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/>When police confronted Ryan, he initially denied their relationship, but later admitted they had sex on the night of her disappearance. He denied killing her, saying he was watching television at the time of her death.</p> <p>But police found a large amount of evidence against him, including bloodied footprints in Lee’s home matching the shoe brand worn by Ryan and his DNA was found on her body.</p> <p>According to the <strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-23455078">BBC</a></span></strong>, Mr Justice Henriques said Ryan had a history of borrowing cash from people with “no intention” of paying it back. The court heard he was bankrupt and had racked up £90,000 (A$158,000) in debts.</p> <p>“You literally bled her dry,” the judge said of Ryan’s relationship with Lee.</p> <p>“You suffer from the toxic combination of being work-shy and grossly extravagant. Your extravagance knew no bounds. As your friend said, you bought only the best, and then you met Diana Lee.”</p> <p>The judge concluded Ryan decided to kill Lee when she started questioning him about the money she lent him.</p> <p>“You killed Diana Lee to prevent your spectacular fraud upon her coming to light.”</p> <p>The judge rejected the defence claim that the killing was spontaneous, saying "if you could have strung her along indefinitely then you would have done so".</p> <p>Ryan was jailed for 34 years.</p>

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"How accepting a friend request cost me $570,000"

<p>One year ago, 61-year-old Jennifer Chen* from Victoria in Australia received a Facebook friend request from an attractive US doctor named Frank Harrison. Being an acupuncture therapist, she was used to receiving messages from potential clients. But what seemed like a harmless request ended up costing Jennifer over $570,000.</p> <p>You see, Dr Frank Harrison was actually the ringleader of a sophisticated team of African scammers, who also created profiles claiming to be a US orthopaedic surgeon named Michelle Tan, a customs officer from Malaysia and a man named Raja Bin Abudullah, who worked for OCBC Malaysia Bank.</p> <p>The scam started in November, two months after Jennifer accepted the friend request, when she received a message from “Dr Harrison” who informed her of his plans to move to Australia to start a business. He wanted to meet her in person.</p> <p><img width="498" height="245" src="/media/42543/image__498x245.jpg" alt="Image_ (7)" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Image credit: news.com.au</em></p> <p>“In early November I got a phone call from him,” she told <a href="http://www.news.com.au/finance/money/costs/i-dont-know-why-im-so-stupid-how-accepting-a-friend-request-cost-this-melbourne-mum-570000/news-story/2a9ba435274e1c8649c9f7ef8a689282" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">news.com.au</span></strong></a>. “He told me, ‘I’m at the airport in [Kuala Lumpur], I got in trouble.’ I said, ‘What kind of trouble?’ He said, ‘I carried $US1.5 million through customs, they think I’m carrying too much cash. I got big penalty. Please help me.’”</p> <p>After his story was backed up by a customs officer, Jennifer agreed to transfer the $3,000 “penalty fee” in order to release Dr Harrison and his money. In the six months that followed, the scammers managed to extract a staggering 33 payments from Jennifer supposedly covering everything from security fees and stamp duty to legal costs and GST.</p> <p>“I don’t know why I’m so stupid,” she said. “My psychology is I already pay the money to him, the girl tell me once you pay this you will get the money back, customs will release the luggage to him. I didn’t wake up, I didn’t realise both of them are group scam. I also scared to tell my husband. Finally I had to tell my husband I made a big mistake.”</p> <p>By the time she fessed up, Jennifer had already parted with a whopping $571,000 – her entire life savings, plus some of her husband’s super funds.</p> <p>Mr Chen blamed his wife’s naivety on her upbringing in Commuist China, but warns all Aussies may be at risk. “The scammers used Facebook information to pick their targets,” he explained. “They have a team that play different roles to manipulate the emotions of the victim. It’s just a matter of time [before] they harvest more Australian victims.”</p> <p>Unfortunately for the Chens, it’s unlikely they’ll ever see their money again. They now join the long list of 200,000 reports of money lost due to cybercrime, totalling almost $300 million – but the Australian Bureau of Statistics believes that number may really be as high as $3 billion, since so many people fail to report these scams.</p> <p><em>*Name has been changed.</em></p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p>

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Chocolate thief apologises to Woolworths with note 43 years later

<p>A remorseful thief has made amends for his childhood behaviour by contacting the supermarket he stole from 43 years ago.</p> <p>Belle Vale Shopping Centre in Liverpool, UK took to Facebook to say their faith in humanity had been restored after receiving a letter and a £5 note in the mail.</p> <p>“I stole two bars of chocolate from Woolworths in your shopping centre in 1975, when I was a little boy,” the note read.</p> <p>“I apologise, I didn’t know any better here’s the money I owe you for them.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbellevaleshopping%2Fposts%2F2004775649535150&amp;width=500" width="500" height="594" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>After four decades, the supermarket he stole from was unfortunately no longer in business, meaning his £5 ($AU8.92) will be donated to the centre’s chosen charity – Zoe’s Place baby hospice.</p> <p>“In a time of division, it is great to see an act of kindness that restores faith in humanity,” a spokesperson for the shopping centre told the Liverpool Echo.</p> <p>“Belle Vale Shopping Centre wants to thank the sender and acknowledge his apology. It is a positive message that is worth sharing to encourage all to be kind.”</p> <p>The gesture, however, drew mixed reactions from social media, with many wondering why the adult had the handwriting of a child.</p> <p>“Why does it look like a kid wrote this when it’s clearly a fully grown adult,” one man asked.</p> <p>“As an adult I love the way he’s spelt chocolate,” another added.</p> <p>“That’s why Woolworths went under,” one woman joked.</p>

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Widower shattered after PayPal sends his deceased wife threatening letter

<p>PayPal has issued an apology after sending a letter to a customer who died of cancer, saying her death had “breached its rules”.</p> <p>Howard Durdle, whose wife Lindsay passed away in May after a battle with breast cancer, provided PayPal with copies of his wife’s death certificate, her will and his ID, as they requested.</p> <p>Lindsay was first diagnosed with breast cancer a year-and-half earlier, and it spread to her lungs and brain.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="500" height="379" src="/media/7819768/3_500x379.jpg" alt="3 (37)"/></p> <p>When Howard discovered that PayPal’s response was to send a letter to inform him that his wife had “breached its rules”, he was shocked.</p> <p>He posted the letter that he received at his home in the UK to Facebook.</p> <p>The letter said his wife owed PayPal £3200 ($A5700) and said: “You are in breach of condition 15.4(c) of your agreement with PayPal Credit as we have received notice that you are deceased … this breach is not capable of remedy."</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="500" height="488" src="/media/7819767/2_500x488.jpg" alt="2 (100)"/></p> <p>“What empathy-lacking machine sent this?” Howard asked on Facebook.</p> <p>After Howard’s post drew attention, PayPal apologised to the widower, admitting that the letter was “insensitive”.</p> <p>The company then launched an investigation into how the letter was sent to begin with.</p> <p>“We apologise to Mr Durdle for the distress this letter has caused,” the PayPal spokesman said, reported the <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-44783779" target="_blank" title="www.bbc.com">BBC</a></strong></em></span>.</p> <p>Howard told the <em>BBC</em> that PayPal had said the letter was either sent because of a bug, a bad letter template or human error.</p> <p>Reportedly, the company said it would be able to share the findings of the investigation because it was an “internal matter”.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>“I’m in a reasonable place at the moment ─ I’ve got quite a level head on my shoulders ─ and am quite capable of dealing with paperwork like this,” Mr Durdle, who is a member of the charity group Widowed and Young, said.</p> <p>“If I’m going to make any fuss about this at all, it’s to make sure that PayPal, or any other organisation that might do this kind of insensitive thing, recognises the damage they can cause the recently bereaved.”</p>

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Jenny Craig fined $37,800 for misleading ads

<p>Jenny Craig has been fined AU$37,800 in Australia for misleading consumers in television advertisements featuring Mel B.</p> <p>The former Spice Girl singer featured in a series of ads for Jenny Craig as an ambassador to the program.</p> <p>The adverts, which ran from December 2017 to February 2018, promoted the line that people could lose up to 10kg of weight for a $10 program fee.  </p> <p>But the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission issued three infringement notices, noting that the weight loss firm failed to disclose customers also had to purchase food at an additional cost.</p> <p>ACCC Commissioner Sarah Court said they were “concerned” the ads may have misled consumers into thinking they could lose 10kg for just $10. </p> <p>“In reality customers would have had to spend far more than that,” she said.</p> <p>The ad also featured someone employed by the business, not an independent reviewer.</p> <p>“Businesses need to be transparent about any relationships with people providing a testimonial,” Ms Court said. </p> <p>“Consumers must be informed when a testimonial is given by someone who is employed by the business, and is not an independent reviewer.”</p> <p>Mel B is promoted as a success story on Jenny Craig, after she lost 16kg in five months. </p> <p>“After various attempts at different fad diets Mel B joined Jenny Craig,” the ad promotes.</p> <p>“In the five months that she was on the Jenny Craig Program she successfully lost 16kgs and reached her goal weight.”  </p>

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Girl writes letter thanking police for “catching drunk people”

<p>A young girl from New Zealand has wrote a heart-warming note to police, thanking them for “catching drunk people”.</p> <p>The letter was shared on the Auckland Police Instagram page, after Madison had written her thanks to the police for pulling over her mum at a random breath testing spot.'</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50.0% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bife0wvn4zA/" target="_blank">A post shared by Auckland Police (@aucklandpolice)</a> on May 7, 2018 at 2:49pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I just wanted to thank you for helping everybody because a few weeks ago my dad was crashed into by a drunk lady. Lucky he was okay,” the letter reads.</p> <p>“Thank you for standing out in the cold.”</p> <p>The officers appreciated Madison’s letter so much, the constable wrote her a response.</p> <p>“Your mum is right! We do try to stop drunk people from driving in order to keep them safe, as well as other people on the road like your family,” the letter reads.</p> <p>“I am sorry to hear your Dad was in an accident, but pleased he is OK. It’s good to remember that we all make mistakes, but it is what we learn from them and how we act afterwards that shows what type of person we really are.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FCounties.Manukau.Police%2Fphotos%2Fa.455248524507579.106799.321854097847023%2F1935498289815921%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="714" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p><a href="http://www.news.com.au/" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>News.com.au reports</strong></em></span></a> organisation NESA that helps victims of drink driving were so impressed with Madison’s letter, they offered to send her a present.</p> <p>“Amazing letter. Madison our organisation was created for you in mind so that you can live in a world free of drink driving. If you get in touch with us, we would love to send you a gift to say thanks for your beautiful letter to the police.”</p> <p>What are your thoughts?</p>

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Verdict in on killing of Morgan Freeman's granddaughter

<p><span>A man from the US has been found guilty of stabbing to death Morgan Freeman’s step-granddaughter E’dena Hines.</span></p> <p><span>Judge Ellen Biben convicted Lamar Davenport, Hines’ boyfriend, on lesser manslaughter charges for knifing her 25 times on a sidewalk in full view of pedestrians and neighbours in August 2015.</span></p> <p><span>Davenport’s lawyers argued that their client, who stood on trial for murder charges, attacked the granddaughter of Morgan Freeman’s second wife, in an attack that occurred after using hallucinogen PCP.</span></p> <p><span>During the three-week trial, eyewitnesses who watched as Davenport knifed his 33-year-old girlfriend in the chest multiple times, shared their testimony.</span></p> <p><span>Hines’ estranged biological mum, Deena Adair, took to the stand to emotionally recount how they were reconnecting in the days prior to her death.</span></p> <p><span>Hines’ mother was in court on Monday to hear the verdict from Judge Biben.</span></p> <p><span>Hines, who has no blood relation to Morgan Freeman, was raised by the actor’s second wife, Myrna Colley-Lee.</span></p> <p><span>Previously, Freeman and Hines were inundated with rumours that they had a sexual relationship.</span></p> <p><span>During Davenport’s trial, the affair was confirmed when lawyers for both the defence and prosecution stipulated that Hines had “disclosed to Lamar Davenport and others that her grandfather engaged in a sexually inappropriate relationship with her.”</span></p> <p><span>It is unknown when the relationship took place and where it occurred.</span></p> <p><span>Davenport’s lawyers requested for Biben to find Davenport guilty of a lesser manslaughter charge after he did not meet the guidelines for the defence of not guilty by reason of insanity.</span></p> <p><span>Prosecutors argued that Davenport fully intended to kill Hines as he attacked no one else in the street and the couple had previously smoked PCP together without incident.</span></p> <p><span>Davenport will receive his sentencing on May 29 and could face up to 25 years in jail. </span></p>

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