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"You can't teach stupid": Folau receives more funds in two days than farmers' rural aid in one year

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A Facebook post by <em>The NRL Roast </em>criticising those who donated to Israel Folau’s legal battle has gone viral in just 24 hours.</p> <p>The post highlighted donations given to the Rural Aid <em>Buy a Bale </em>campaign raised in one year matched the money raised for controversial Folau’s legal battle against the Rugby League Association.</p> <p>“In 2 days, Israel Folau has received more in donations than Rural Aid's "Buy a Bale" campaign did in the 2017/2018 financial year,” the post began.</p> <p>“Folau may or may not be in the right in regard to why he got sacked and has every right to launch legal action.</p> <p>“That’s not my gripe.</p> <p>“It's the fact that every day Aussies would rather donate their hard earned, already taxed money, to a multi-millionaire professional athlete who can use the funds however he wants...TAX FREE, while people who actually make a worthwhile contribution to society, and our communities, are left in the lurch.</p> <p>“But you can’t teach stupid… You are just born that way.”</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FTheNRLRoast%2Fphotos%2Fa.248365635620899%2F729888714135253%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="435" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe> <p>Folau has raised $2.2 million in just two days by 20,000 people.</p> <p>Since then, the fundraiser, which is located on the Australian Christian Lobby’s website, has been paused – a little less than $1 million short of the sacked rugby star’s $3 million goal.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzATb_Wn3I_/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzATb_Wn3I_/" target="_blank">A post shared by Israel Folau (@izzyfolau)</a> on Jun 22, 2019 at 1:07am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The ACL said the donations, which opened on Tuesday, had been “overwhelming".</p> <p>“ACL, Izzy and everyone involved is humbled and grateful. We are hitting the pause button. But if the case drags on and Israel needs more support, we will re-open this campaign,” a statement on the website said.</p> <p>The original campaign on GoFundMe was shut down after it was determined they had violated the site’s terms of service.  </p> <p>“We are absolutely committed to the fight for equality for LGBTIQ+ people and fostering an environment of inclusivity,” Nicola Britton, GoFundMe’s Australian regional director said.</p> <p>Managing director of the ACL, Martin Iles, confirmed any money raised in the $3 million campaign will exclusively be used to meet Folau’s legal costs.</p> <p>In a poll conducted by Over60 with over 5,200 votes, it was determined 60 per cent of Australians believe Folau deserved to be sacked from his contract with Rugby Australia.</p> <p>However, 40 per cent voted Folau's controversial social post that claimed “hell awaits” gay people, among others, was not breaching his contract.  </p> <p><em>NRL Roast’s </em>post, which now sits with over 3,000 comments, has continued to stir debate with some users claiming the page was only adding “fuel to the fire".</p> <p>“If he can say whatever he believes then he should have the guts to face the consequences of his actions and use his own funds to fight his own battles,” one user wrote.</p> <p>Another added: “I don't see why people find this surprising. There are A LOT of people in the world with the same views as Falou.”</p> <p>“So you're complaining about people who are donating their OWN already taxed hard working money to Folau because they choose not to donate it to where YOU think they should donate THEIR money to?” an additional comment read.</p> <p>However, other people said it was “sad” farmers did not have “priority<span>“.</span></p> <p><span>"If only those who so support a sportsperson's contract breach which has been turned into a fight for Christianity could support those who grow our food and keep food on our tables...” one comment said.</span></p> <p>Another stated: “An absolute disgrace that people give money so easily to someone who broke his contract, not once but twice, but can’t find the money for the farmers who help put food on our tables every day, nothing like getting your priorities right.”</p> <p>Folau’s $4 million contract was terminated by Rugby Australia last month after a post on his Instagram page claimed homosexuals, among others, would burn in hell.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Heartbreaking decision – is Israel Folau’s wife risking it all?

<p>It has been almost two years since Maria Tutaia married her rugby star husband, Israel Folau, in November 2017.</p> <p>The journey has proven not to be easy; Maria has stood by her embattled husband even if it means risking her own career as well.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpqkIaggDFk/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpqkIaggDFk/" target="_blank">A post shared by MARIA FOLAU (@mariatutaia)</a> on Nov 1, 2018 at 9:47pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>As Folau prepares for a major legal fight to save his own career, after he was sacked from Rugby Australia last month for publicly voicing his anti-gay beliefs, his 32-year-old wife has used her own social media platforms to back him.</p> <p>But there are concerns the professional New Zealander netballer could be at risk of jeopardising her own career by showing her public support.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7828053/maria-folau.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/231c40aa0cc74824b5dc05a249816232" /></p> <p>Last week, she publicly donated her own money to his legal battle, Folau telling his own donors when setting up his GoFundMe page that he and Maria had “already spent over $100,000".</p> <p>However, the Adelaide Thunderbirds – the team Maria plays for – has released their own statement on her public endorsement of her husband.</p> <p>“While Netball SA in no way endorses the reposting, we do not believe Maria has contravened our social media policy,” the organisation said.</p> <p>The club also went on to say Maria was a good ambassador for the sport, by taking part in youth and community projects to inspire other young players to pursue a career professionally.</p> <p>However, other professional players do not see eye to eye with the Adelaide Netball Club.</p> <p>Aussie Netball legend Liz Ellis took to Twitter calling for Maria to be sacked.</p> <p>“Anyone who is seen to support or endorse homophobia is not welcome,” she wrote.</p> <p>“As much as I love watching @MariaFolau play netball I do not want my sport endorsing the views of her husband.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjJqpBwgWI-/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjJqpBwgWI-/" target="_blank">A post shared by MARIA FOLAU (@mariatutaia)</a> on May 24, 2018 at 12:00am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Maria is currently training for next month’s World Cup in Auckland where she will play for the national New Zealand team in the UK. </p> <p>She will be sure to face a number of uncomfortable questions regarding her personal beliefs.</p> <p>Netball New Zealand said in a statement the professional sportswoman had not broken any social media policy.</p>

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Blondie’s Debbie Harry: “I escaped serial killer Ted Bundy”

<p>Debbie Harry has made an explosive claim as she says she was once lured into a taxi by serial killer Ted Bundy in the early ‘70s.</p> <p>The 73-year-old is planning to reveal the entire story in her autobiography,<span> </span><em>Face It</em>, which is set to be released in October this year.</p> <p>In a previous interview with<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/music-news/8191211/Blondies-Debbie-Harry-claims-serial-killer-Ted-Bundy-lured-her-into-car.html" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>, the Blondie singer spoke about the unsettling encounter which occurred in New York City: “It was in the early ‘70s and I was trying to get across town at two or three o’clock in the morning.</p> <p>“This little car kept coming around and offering me a ride.”</p> <p>Harry then said she hopped inside the vehicle after many failed attempts at finding a taxi.</p> <p>“I got in the car and the windows were all rolled up, except for a tiny crack. This driver had an incredibly bad smell to him.</p> <p>“I looked down and there were no door handles. The inside of the car was stripped. The hairs on the back of my neck just stood up.</p> <p>“I wigged my arm out of the window and pulled the door handle from the outside. I don’t know how I did it, but I got out.</p> <p>“He tried to stop me by spinning the car, but it sort of helped me fling myself out. Afterwards I saw him on the news, it was Ted Bundy.”</p> <p>Once Bundy was arrested, he admitted to his lawyer that he first attempted to kidnap a woman in 1969 and implied that his first murder happened in 1972.</p> <p>He was only 27-years-old when his first recorded murder occurred in 1974.</p> <p>He went on to kill 30 women.</p> <p>But even after the serial killer was imprisoned, the nightmare wasn’t over as he managed to escape lockup twice.</p>

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Why Anderson Cooper won't get a cent of mum Gloria Vanderbilt's $290 million fortune

<p>Socialite, heiress and fashion icon Gloria Vanderbilt passed away this week with an estimated $290 million to her name.</p> <p>However, her surviving three children, which include CNN anchor Anderson Cooper, aren’t expecting to inherit any of the remaining wealth.</p> <p>It’s an arrangement that they’ve all been aware about for years.</p> <p>Cooper revealed to Howard Stern during a radio interview reported by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.businessinsider.com.au/anderson-cooper-wont-inherit-mom-gloria-vanderbilts-fortune-2014-4?r=US&amp;IR=T" target="_blank">Business Insider</a> several years ago that he’s not getting anything from his mother.</p> <p>“My mum’s made clear to me that there’s no trust fund. There’s none of that,” explained Cooper.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BT4tS_4l7UR/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BT4tS_4l7UR/" target="_blank">My mom just joined instagram @gloriavanderbilt. She thinks it is the best thing ever. she has 30k followers and can't believe that many people would want to follow her. Now she emails me several times a day asking for advice about what to post next.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/andersoncooper/" target="_blank"> andersoncooper</a> (@andersoncooper) on May 9, 2017 at 2:06pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>However, it’s something that Cooper is OK with.</p> <p>“I don’t believe in inheriting money. I think it’s an initiative sucker. I think it’s a curse.”</p> <p>He justified his point by saying he’s “doing fine on my own”.</p> <p>“Who has inherited a lot of money that has gone on to do things in their own life? From the time I was growing up, if I felt that there was some pot of gold waiting for me, I don’t know that I would have been so motivated.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bvo7a-BHEkx/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bvo7a-BHEkx/" target="_blank">Just came across this photo with @andersoncooper and Carter. It was probably taken around 1979. It seems like yesterday.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/gloriavanderbilt/" target="_blank"> Gloria Vanderbilt</a> (@gloriavanderbilt) on Mar 30, 2019 at 9:40am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Ms Vanderbilt also spoke about her difficult relationship with her inheritance, telling <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/17/style/gloria-vanderbilt-death-dead.html" target="_blank"><em>The New York Times</em></a> about her experience.</p> <p>“I’m not knocking inherited money,” she explained.</p> <p>“But the money I’ve made has a reality to me that inherited money doesn’t have.</p> <p>“As the Billie Holiday song goes, ‘Mama may have and Papa may have, but God bless the child that’s got his own’.”</p> <p>At the time of her passing, Ms Vanderbilt had reportedly already spent a great deal of her fortune, as well as donating to charity. </p>

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How much does Judge Judy make in a year?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Forbes, Judy Sheindlin or better known as Judge Judy has pocketed NZD $213 million in 2018 alone – making her the highest-grossing TV host. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Following in second place is Ellen DeGeneres who earned an estimate of $127 million in 2018 for her daytime talk show. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After 5200 episodes, there is no doubt Sheindlin has proven her worth to the US Network CBS. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 74-year-old is a go-getter and has extended her contract with CBS to 2021, which will mark 25 years of the primetime TV show. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The show typically attracts an average of 10 million viewers through Monday to Friday on the afternoon time slot and has been the top daytime program for the last nine years. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Each season fits in an impressive 260 episodes every season which is packed into just 53 filming days per year, spread over three days a week. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Executive Producer Randy Douthit, who along with other 30 staff members produces, directs and edits the show says the simplicity of the show is what makes the show successful and profitable. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Production costs for each week is relatively low at NZD $579,414 in comparison to others which can rack up at a hefty NZD$1.44 million per week. </span></p>

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Christchurch shooter pleads not guilty to 51 charges of murder

<p>Christchurch mosque terror attacker Brenton Tarrant has denied being the attacker and has entered a not guilty plea during a short appearance at the High Court in Christchurch, New Zealand, this morning.</p> <p>As he announced his plea via his lawyer, gasps were heard in the courtroom according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/world/pacific/nz-mosque-shooting-accused-to-face-court/news-story/3b53935379a34f4e5e84ab49ed01c316" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</p> <p>Tarrant has pled not guilty to 51 charges of murder, 40 charges of attempted murder and one terrorism offence over the Christchurch shootings. This is a total of 92 charges in total.</p> <p>The terror charge laid against him last month will be the first prosecution of its kind in New Zealand and some legal experts say that it could lead to a complex trial, according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/christchurch-massacre-accused-brenton-tarrant-pleads-not-guilty-222352860.html" target="_blank"><em>Yahoo! News</em></a>.</p> <p><span>Tarrant wore a grey sweatshirt and strained to hear discussions via the audio-visual link from Paremoremo Prison in Auckland. That prison is currently New Zealand’s only maximum-security prison.</span></p> <p>Prison staff have confirmed that Tarrant has no access to television, radio, newspapers or visitors.</p> <p>The courtroom was filled with survivors and family members of the 51 killed during the March 15 attack at two Christchurch mosques.</p> <p>Two further courts and 200 seats were set aside for the public, who watched the court proceedings via audio-visual link as the main courtroom was full. Police maintained a heavy presence throughout the building.</p> <p>All of the victims kept their eyes glued to the gunman throughout the hearing.</p> <p>Tarrant’s case will return to court on August 16.   </p> <p>Amid concerns his trial can be used to further incite hatred and expose far-right extremist views, New Zealand’s major media organisations have agreed to self-imposed restrictions on reporting.</p> <p>Justice Cameron Mander has also declined all media requests to film or photograph proceedings in court, in the interest of preserving the integrity of the trial process and ensure a fair trial for Tarrant.</p>

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George Michael leaves nothing to ex-boyfriends in $177 million will

<p>George Michael left out two of his former partners, Fadi Fawaz and Kenny Goss, in his NZ$186 million will, it has been revealed.</p> <p>Fawaz and Goss were not listed as the beneficiaries of the late singer’s NZ$186 million fortune, according to a five-page document obtained by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/tvandshowbiz/9215982/george-michael-will-98m-nothing-fadi-fawaz-kenny-goss/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>.</p> <p>Instead, Michael’s estate will be divided among his family and a few friends, with sisters Yioda and Melanie Panayiotou receiving a major portion. Michael’s 80-year-old father Kyriacos Panayiotou is also set to receive a horse-racing farm where he has lived for many years.</p> <p>“George was devoted to his dad and sisters, they were always going to be looked after,” an insider said.</p> <p>The will – which was made public on May 30 – also listed Michael’s backing singer Shirlie Kemp, record producer David Austin and five other friends as beneficiaries.</p> <p>However, Michael’s partner of 15 years, Goss, was left out along with Australian-born boyfriend Fawaz.</p> <p>60-year-old businessman Goss began dating Michael in 1996 before they split up in 2011.</p> <p>46-year-old hair stylist Fawaz and Michael started their relationship in 2012. </p> <p>Fawaz found the Wham! singer dead at his Oxfordshire home on Christmas Day 2016. “We were supposed to be going for Christmas lunch. I went round there to wake him up and he was just gone, lying peacefully in bed,” Fawas said in <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/george-michael-australian-boyfriend-fadi-fawaz-left-out-of-late-singers-will-044659416.html" target="_blank">a statement</a> at the time.</p> <p>Michael died from heart and kidney failure at the age of 53.</p>

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5 laws that only exist in Asia

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To westerners, laws in Asia are downright wacky. However, they exist for important reasons – even if they are considered outdated and unnecessary. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here’s a roundup of the strangest head-scratching laws that have only ever existed in Asian countries. </span></p> <p><strong>1. Look after your elders – or else!</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In China, there is a law that requires grown children to visit their parents, which was enacted in 2013. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Under the </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Elderly Rights Law, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">older parents must have their “spiritual needs” met and cared for and adults must “never neglect or snub elderly people.”</span></p> <p><strong>2. No money on the ground</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Thailand, it is considered so offensive to step on money that it is illegal. In this Asian country it is taken as a form of disrespect towards the king, lèse-majesté, since the money features a picture of the royal. </span></p> <p><strong>3. No games for kids</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Under </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cinderella Law, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">children under the age of 16 are prohibited from playing online games between midnight and 6 am in South Korea. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This regulation was made to tackle the increasing video game addiction. However, sneaky children can forgo this rule by logging into their parent’s online account or even play offline. </span></p> <p><strong>4. The whole family will be punished</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">North Korea reportedly has a seriously disturbing law in place which is dubbed as </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Three Generations of Punishment</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">. This means if one person was to break the law, a whole family can face trial and be convicted to work in a prison camp for their family member’s crime. </span></p> <p><strong>5. Don’t dress up as a woman</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Malaysia, they have anti-trans laws which makes it illegal to “impersonate a woman.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This rule is considered harassment of Muslim trans woman, according to </span><a href="https://www.hrw.org/report/2014/09/24/im-scared-be-woman/human-rights-abuses-against-transgender-people-malaysia"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Human Rights Watch.</span></a></p>

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Weird laws you never knew existed in New Zealand

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To anyone who has never lived in New Zealand, it can be pretty hard to believe how tight Kiwi laws can be. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While we may have a reputation for being a laidback little island, it turns out our rules and regulations aren’t so much.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are some of New Zealand’s strangest laws. </span></p> <p><strong>No noise near whales</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many who were planning to watch, may not have been happy after hearing Wellington’s annual Matariki fireworks last year were postponed due to a whale gracing the capital’s harbour. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, law is law - no matter where you are, and the Marine Mammals Protection Regulations say that “no person shall make any loud or disturbing noises near whales.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A fine worth up to $10,000 will be dished out to any bold Kiwi or tourist who wants to incur a penalty. </span></p> <p><strong>Māori Wardens can tell someone what to do</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Based on the Māori Community Development Act, there are criminal offences that apply to only people who are Māori. These offenses can be given by a Māori warden. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For example, those with permission to do so can refuse alcohol to be served to Māori who are likely to become difficult and can even take the car keys out of a Māori’s possession. </span></p> <p><strong>No questions asked policy</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Those who lose personal items such as their keys or wallet are required not to advertise an award for the return of their lost or stolen property, or they can risk facing a $200 fine. </span></p> <p><strong>Don’t buy these books</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some books are temporarily banned in New Zealand while some are permanent. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Everything Marijuana Book </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">was banned in 2013 because it encourages those who read it to commit a crime. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Interestingly enough, being in possession of this book incurs a harsher penalty than actually growing or selling cannabis.</span></p> <p> </p>

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The rise of DIY wills and why you shouldn’t go there

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you don’t have a legal background, navigating through a will can be an incredibly daunting experience. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And although they can be an expensive process when going through the official hoops to sort one out for yourself or a loved one, it is an important and necessary cost. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Without proper legal guidance, navigating through the correct procedure can often mean your creation and estate planning process can be an experience that can result in complications, drawn out time periods and costly court proceedings. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bennett &amp; Philip lawyer, Geoff Armstrong says “Do it yourself” wills is not the best process to choose even if they may be cost-effective. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It is common for us to see homemade wills that don’t meet legal requirements,” he explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The difference is if you have a professionally drawn will and you have to apply for a probate in the court, there’s rarely a problem. If you have a homemade will that isn’t correct, you may have to go to a judge to get it accepted as a valid will and it would cost a lot of money, in many cases between $30,000 and $50,000.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Armstrong urges those with a professional or DIY will to review them every two or three years. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“…If there has been a big life change for example a marriage, divorce, having children or grandchildren, something you’ve gifted no longer exists or a beneficiary dying or losing capacity – these changes can significantly affect a will and an appropriate amendment is required,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Armstrong advises those managing wills of their own or loved ones to implement these questions if you want to go down the correct path. </span></p> <p>Who will your executors and beneficiaries be?</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Choosing the key people who will play a huge part in dividing all your interests and assets in your will can be a difficult decision to make. While executors have the responsibility of looking after your will and dictate your funeral wishes or gifts, beneficiaries are the people who inherit what is yours. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Typically, children, spouse, or other family members are chosen as beneficiaries, but you are not required to do this. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Charities, organisations or trusts can obtain your belongings, after all it is a decision that is completely yours alone. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But whoever you do decide, it’s important to ask them first and include their full names with as much detail as you can,” Mr Armstrong said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Some people choose a professional executor such as a lawyer or accountant because they are independent from the family and managing at arms-length.”</span></p> <p>What are your funeral wishes or special gifts to give?</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You may wish to have your body cremated and ashes scattered in a special place. If so, it is important to include this in your will. While it is not a legally binding agreement, it is still important you make clear what you want to happen for yourself when you go. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Armstrong said: “I previously had a case in England where a woman wished for her Jack Russel to be euthanised immediately after she passed away, so they could meet up on the ‘other side’. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“When she did pass her dog was with the neighbour, who sent the dog away because it was perfectly healthy and did not need to be put down. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Upon further discussion, it was decided not to focus our efforts in locating the canine as it would cost thousands of pounds in the process at the expense of the ultimate beneficiary.”</span></p> <p>Who will look after your pets if you have any?</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While you cannot physically leave items or money to your pets, you can decide to leave them to someone else with a gift of money to cover the cost it would take to look after them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Whatever future you want for your pet, be sure to include it in your will.” Mr Armstrong advises.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Because it is not legally binding, people do forget about their pets but in an emergency, the executor can take care of them.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While it may be difficult to decide what to put in your will, you can always start by asking yourself these simple questions. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Should you require expert legal advice on wills and estates or any other legal matter, Bennett &amp; Philp’s Geoffrey Armstrong can be contacted at </span><a href="mailto:garmstrong@bennettphilp.com.au"><span style="font-weight: 400;">garmstrong@bennettphilp.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> or on (07) 3001 2960.</span></p>

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Store's pyjama ban causes controversy

<p>A Salvation Army manager who was slammed for banning customers who wear pyjamas has defended her store’s policy.</p> <p>The Papakura Salvation Army in South Auckland, New Zealand, has drawn controversy after a photo of the shop’s window sign went viral on social media.</p> <p>The sign read: “Pyjama wear is not acceptable in the store. Thank you for your co-operation.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7827337/sign.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b32b3b9401ff487196e31307749c7e12" /></p> <p>The pyjama ban was met with backlash, with people labelling it as “cheeky” and “silly”. </p> <p>One person commented: “I think it’s quite cheeky of them to dictate what their customers can or can’t wear.”</p> <p>Another argued: “If people have freedom of speech then [they should have] freedom to wear what they want. I have seen people wear skimpy clothing and we accept that.”</p> <p>Papakura Salvation Army manager Moana Turner told the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&amp;objectid=12235142" target="_blank"><em>New Zealand Herald</em></a> that she stands by the ruling to set a standard for the store.</p> <p>“I don’t think it’s suitable to wear PJs in a public store,” said Turner.</p> <p>“I was bought up by my mother. She was a single parent and there were 10 of us and not once did we ever go out without wearing clothes and shoes.</p> <p>“We were very poor and I don’t think there is any reason for people to get up and walk around in public in the pyjamas.”</p> <p>Turner also said that when a customer comes in pyjamas, she offers them free clothing if they have nothing else to wear.</p> <p>“We all do it nicely ... we ask if them if there is anything they need so they can avoid walking in public in their pyjamas,” she said. “I give them the option if they are desperate for clothing.”</p>

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Want to live to 100? Follow these 18 simple rules

<p>Follow these 18 simple rules and you won’t just live longer—you’ll make those (many, many) years count.</p> <p><strong>1. Stop smoking</strong></p> <p>Four years after doing so, your chance of having a heart attack falls to that of someone who has never smoked.</p> <p>After ten years, your lung cancer risk drops to nearly that of a nonsmoker.</p> <p><strong>2. Exercise daily</strong></p> <p>Thirty minutes of activity is all that’s necessary. Three ten-minute walks will do it.</p> <p><strong>3. Eat your produce</strong></p> <p>Fruit, vegetables … whatever your favourites are, just make sure you eat them every day.</p> <p><strong>4. Get screened</strong></p> <p>No need to go test-crazy; just get the health screenings recommended for your stage of life.</p> <p>Check with your doctor to make sure you’re up-to-date.</p> <p>Just be honest. How much you smoke, drink, eat, exercise and whether you use protection during sex or while out in the sun matters.</p> <p><strong>5. Make sleep a priority</strong></p> <p>For most adults who want to live to 100, that means seven to eight hours every night.</p> <p>If you have a tough time turning off the light, remember that sleep deprivation raises the risk of heart disease, cancer, and more.</p> <p><strong>6. Ask your doctor about low-dose aspirin</strong></p> <p>Heart attack, stroke, even cancer—a single 81 mg tablet per day may fight them all.</p> <p>(Aspirin comes with risks, though, so don’t start on your own.)</p> <p>If you’re older, you are at risk from the major problem of over-prescribing.</p> <p><strong>7. Know your blood pressure numbers</strong></p> <p>It’s not called the silent killer just to give your life a little more drama.</p> <p>Keep yours under 120/80 if you want to live to 100.</p> <p><strong>8. Stay connected</strong></p> <p>Loneliness is another form of stress.</p> <p>Friends, family, and furry pets help you feel loved.</p> <p><strong>9. Cut back on saturated fat</strong></p> <p>It’s the raw material your body uses for producing LDL, bad cholesterol.</p> <p>For decades, doctors and medical organisations have viewed saturated fat as the raw material for a heart attack.</p> <p><strong>10. Get help for depression</strong></p> <p>It doesn’t just feel bad; it does bad things to your body.</p> <p>In fact, when tacked onto diabetes and heart disease, it increases risk of early death by as much as 30 percent.</p> <p><strong>11. Manage your stress</strong></p> <p>The doctors we surveyed say that living with uncontrolled stress is more destructive to your health than being 30 pounds overweight.</p> <p><strong>12. Have a higher purpose</strong></p> <p>As one physician advised, “Strive to achieve something bigger than yourself.”</p> <p>By giving back, you give to yourself.</p> <p>Just try to keep your energy levels up for the personal journey ahead.</p> <p><strong>13. Load up at breakfast</strong></p> <p>People in “Blue Zones”—areas with high life expectancies—eat the most at breakfast, then have little or nothing for dinner.</p> <p>Front-loading calories can ward off hungry all day, keeping your weight in check.</p> <p><strong>14. Start fasting</strong></p> <p>You don’t need to go days without food.</p> <p>Simply limiting eating to eight hours of the day gives your body more time to finish its six to twelve hours of digestion.</p> <p>After that, it goes into “fasting” mode, burning stored fat.</p> <p><strong>15. Cook at home</strong></p> <p>Not only do you get to control the ingredients and make healthier choices, but the act of cooking is a mini workout.</p> <p>New to the kitchen and want to save some money?</p> <p><strong>16. Have a sit-down meal</strong></p> <p>Multi-tasking during meals, such as while driving or rushing to get out the door, can put stress hormones in the way of your body’s ability to digest, which won’t help you live to 100.</p> <p>Sit down, or better yet, gather the family together to get the bonus of social time while enjoying a meal together.</p> <p><strong>17. Save up</strong></p> <p>Most people who live to 100 are financially secure.</p> <p>Worrying about money (and how to pay for healthcare) could get in the way of a long, healthy life.</p> <p><strong>18. Focus on the good stuff</strong></p> <p>Research shows people who live to 100 tend to complain less than younger adults.</p> <p>Their lack of gripes could mean they’re better at handling bad situations.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/want-live-100-follow-these-18-simple-rules?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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"We're waiting for you": Madeleine McCann’s parents pay tribute on her 16th birthday

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Madeleine McCann’s parents have marked her 16th birthday with a touching message.</p> <p>Earlier this month marked 12 years since Madeleine disappeared from the family’s resort apartment room in Praia da Luz, Portugal on May 3, 2007, just days before her fourth birthday.</p> <p>On Madeleine’s birthday, which falls on May 12, parents Kate and Gerry McCann marked the date with a message to their daughter on a Facebook page.</p> <p>“Happy 16th Birthday, Madeleine!” they wrote alongside a photograph of Madeleine. “We love you and we’re waiting for you and we’re never going to give up. #ForAsLongAsItTakes”</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FOfficial.Find.Madeleine.Campaign%2Fposts%2F10157177274719931&amp;width=500" width="500" height="645" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe> <p>In an 2017 interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-39757287" target="_blank">BBC</a>’s Fiona Bruce, the parents said they still celebrated Madeleine’s birthday with presents. </p> <p>“I obviously have to think about what age she is and something that, whenever we find her, will still be appropriate,” said Kate.</p> <p>“But I couldn’t not, you know; she’s still our daughter, she’ll always be our daughter.”</p> <p>In her 2011 book <em>Madeleine: Our Daughter’s Disappearance and the Continuing Search for Her</em>, Kate also wrote about how her family would leave presents in Madeleine’s bedroom.</p> <p>“As we’ve continued to do since, we had a tea party at home with balloons, cake, cards and presents,” she wrote, as reported by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1124423/madeleine-mccann-disappearance-netflix-documentary-birthday-kate-mccann-gerry-mccann-spt" target="_blank"><em>Express</em></a>.</p> <p>“The presents go into Madeleine’s room to await her return. Her pink bedroom remains exactly as it was when she left it but it’s a lot busier now.”</p> <p>On the 12th anniversary of Madeleine’s disappearance, Kate and Gerry shared a statement expressing their gratefulness for the support they received from around the world. </p> <p>“There is comfort and reassurance though in knowing that the investigation continues and many people around the world remain vigilant,” they wrote.</p> <p>“Thank you to everyone who continues to support us and for your ongoing hope and belief.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Madeleine McCann: The emerging key witness who is a friend of the Queen's

<p>A tourist who may have spotted Madeleine McCann’s kidnapper is a friend of the Queen, reports said.</p> <p>British tourist Carole Tranmer, who was staying in the flat above where Madeleine was staying with her parents in the Praia da Luz resort in May 2007, is once again in the spotlight after a man resembling her e-fit image was reported to emerge as the “person of interest” in the case.</p> <p>Tranmer, who used to work at Windsor Castle, claimed she saw a “prowler” coming out of the ground floor apartment gate “very carefully and quietly” hours before the then 3-year-old girl disappeared.</p> <p>In her police statement, Tranmer said: “Looking down below the McCann flat I saw someone come out of the ground floor apartment closing the gate very carefully and quietly.</p> <p>“It looked very strange to me. He looked to one side and the other, shut the gate and walked very quickly below.”</p> <p>The man resembled convicted German serial killer <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/new-madeleine-mccann-development-convicted-child-murderer-emerges-as-main-suspect/" target="_blank">Martin Ney</a>, who has been speculated to be the “figure of interest” for the Portuguese police.</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9018686/madeleine-mccann-british-witness-saw-chief-suspect-helped-produce-cop-sketch-queens-friend/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>, 71-year-old Tranmer has been interviewed three times in the past by the British and Portuguese police about “the man acting suspiciously” in the holiday apartment.</p> <p>To help assess her reliability as a witness, Tranmer shared with the police that she worked for the Royal Collection and that she knew the Queen personally. She also makes frequent, private visits to the royal family.</p> <p>Madeleine vanished from her room in May 2007 when her parents were dining nearby with some family friends. Earlier this month, Madeleine's parents, Kate and Gerry McCann, marked the 12th anniversary of the disappearance with a statement: “Madeleine will be 16 this month. It’s impossible to put into words just how that makes us feel … Thank you to everyone who continues to support us and for your ongoing hope and belief.”</p>

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New hair alert: Judge Judy ditches signature bob for stunning new look

<p>We have watched her on our TV screens for years, and this time she has come back with a new hairdo – and it is drastically different to her signature short, neat bob many are used to. </p> <p>Judge Judy Sheindlin showed up to the Daytime Emmy Awards on Sunday with a modern look as she swept away the red carpet.</p> <p>Her long running courtroom television show, <em>Judge Judy</em>, has never seen her waver from her signature short hairstyle for more than 30 years.</p> <p>However, that hairdo was switched out for a combed-back low ponytail for the event, where she took out the Lifetime Achievement Award.</p> <p>The 76-year-old TV star told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.etonline.com/media/videos/judge-judy-shares-what-inspired-her-to-try-a-new-hairdo-exclusive-124659" target="_blank"><em>Entertainment Tonight</em></a> the change of style was inspired by wanting to lead a “simpler” life.</p> <p>“It used to take me an hour to get ready for work … or even to go out for dinner,” she said. “Hair, curling, blowing.”</p> <p>However, the new 'do hasn’t just been warmly accepted by fans, but herself as well.</p> <p>“I like it,” she said. “It’s comfortable and easy.”</p> <p>Her on-screen buddy and bailiff, Petri Hawkins Byrd, took to social media to share which look he liked best though.</p> <p>“I tried to stay out of this, y'all won't let me!” the co-star wrote in a caption.</p> <p>“I prefer my boss with the old 'do' (left) More sophisticated and 'Judy'cial.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwqIlE-hCP1/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwqIlE-hCP1/" target="_blank">A post shared by Petri Hawkins Byrd (@byrdthebailiff)</a> on Apr 24, 2019 at 5:26pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>While accepting her coveted honour at the 46th annual award show, Sheindlin said: “I have a profession that’s always been my passion. And tonight, I have this lovely honor which says I’ve done my job well.</p> <p>“Life has a beginning, a middle and an end. As most of us, I don’t remember the very beginning, I’m having an absolute blast in the middle, and if my luck holds, I won’t be around for the end.”</p> <p>Judge Judy first premiered on September 16, 1996 and is currently in its 23rd season.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Judge Judy’s new stunning, sleek hairstyle here.</p>

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10 rules for planning successful parties!

<p>For some of us, the mere thought of entertaining even just our nearest and dearest strikes terror in our hearts. For others, a house full of guests is true happiness.</p> <p>As an inveterate party giver, I've learned that throwing even a big holiday party doesn't have to be difficult, and can actually be fun – if you follow certain rules. Wherever you fall on the entertaining spectrum, here are our ten commandments for making your Christmas party (or any party) an unqualified success.</p> <p><strong>Sharpen your pencil and start planning your party now</strong></p> <p>It wouldn't be a bad idea to start planning your party the moment you finish reading this. Seriously, the more time you have before the Big Day, the more shopping and cooking that you can do well in advance – instead of in a mad rush at the end.</p> <p><strong>1. Get your lists in order</strong></p> <p>The first step is to create three master lists (guests, menu, shopping) that will help you keep track of everything for the party. Keep the lists in your wallet or date book, so you'll know exactly what you still need to purchase and how many guests have RSVP'd at all times.</p> <p><strong>Your guest list</strong></p> <p>You might want to call those guests whose presence you consider essential even before you set the date for your party. Inevitably, not everyone you ask will be able to come. But if it just wouldn't be the same without them, make sure they're free and invite them then and there. Your other guests should be invited as soon as you set the date. Try to give people no less than three weeks' notice – remember, holiday schedules fill up fast.</p> <p>A good strategy: invite friends and family by phone, then follow up with a written reminder. Or let your Christmas cards do double duty - as a holiday greeting and an invitation.</p> <p><strong>Your food and drink list</strong></p> <p>Whether you're planning a brunch or buffet, a cocktail party or an after-carolling get-together, food and drink are your party's most important ingredients. The first item to determine is the main dish. Jot down a list of recipes you're confident that you can cook well and that are proven crowd pleasers. Remember, to you it may be the same old lasagne, but to your guests it could be a new taste treat. If you do want to serve a dish you've never cooked before, be sure to test the recipe at least once (twice is even safer) before the party.</p> <p>After you've figured out the main course, build the rest of the menu around it, following that same ‘I feel confident I can make this’ rule. And don't make things too hard on yourself. If you'll be cooking a complicated main dish, go for simple appetisers and side dishes that can be easily prepared in advance. Next, take a careful look at the yields of the recipes you'll be using to be sure they will make enough to feed your crowd. If your favorite wild rice recipe serves four but you're inviting eight, be sure it can be easily doubled before you put it on the menu.</p> <p>Finally, don't forget to add beverages to your list. Plan to have a variety of non-alcoholic drinks on hand. It's best to buy more than you think you'll need. And buy lots of ice on the day of the party. That way, you won't have to waste precious fridge space to chill the drinks. When it comes to alcohol, don't feel obligated to set up a full bar. Unless you're having a cocktail party, it's fine to limit your selections to wine and beer, and perhaps a special holiday punch. Whatever you serve, encourage moderation – the last thing you want people to remember about your party is a hangover.</p> <p><strong>Your Party Shopping List</strong></p> <p>Look over each item on your menu and list everything you'll need to make it happen. Note each ingredient (including garnishes), then check your pantry and your spice rack. Nothing's more annoying than thinking ‘I'm sure I have that’ only to find out that you don't when it's time to add it to the recipe.</p> <p>Now is also the time to be sure that you have the equipment all the dishes on your menu call for – whether it's a food processor or a particular size roasting pan. Whatever you don't have, borrow from friends or buy cheaply at a local restaurant-supply store. If you entertain often, the right equipment is worth the investment. Keep in mind that it takes twice as long to make Christmas cookies if you have only one baking tray instead of the two required, and ten times as long to chop some ingredients by hand than by food processor.</p> <p>In addition, count up the plates and platters, serving utensils, glasses, cutlery and dinner napkins and even tablecloths you'll need. Don't forget serving trays, punch bowls, coffee urns and folding chairs. If you're short, call your local party-rental place and reserve what you need now. The holiday season is one of the biggest times of the year for party rentals and you don't want to be scrambling to find essentials at the last moment. Many people would rather borrow from friends and family than rent. But why risk Mother's fine china, when most party rentals have a breakage allowance built into the cost?</p> <p><strong>2. Appeal to the eye as well as the tastebuds</strong></p> <p>I have a friend who swears that if there's any other food available, no one will touch the large platters of raw vegetables and dip he bothers to prepare. But this particular host never fails to make such crudités the centerpiece of his buffet. Why? Because with their wonderful colours and textures, they look gorgeous, whether they get eaten or not! In planning your menu, take time to make sure you have as many colours and textures as possible. Think red capsicums, tangerines, pumpkin and green beans to brighten up all-brown, or otherwise bland-looking, dishes.</p> <p>Garnishes are another great way to add colour. As professional chefs know, most garnishes only look difficult to create, yet they have the power to make even a simple dish look special. And if radish roses and cucumber fans seem too fancy, you can get that restaurant look with a few well-placed sprigs of fresh herbs.</p> <p><strong>3. Make sure your kitchen can get the job done</strong></p> <p>It's quite pointless to plan a party that your kitchen can't handle. Every kitchen has space constraints; make sure you know yours. For example, can your refrigerator fit all those platters of cold hors d'oeuvres? Can your stove handle heating the five dishes you plan to serve hot at the same time? If not, now's the time to make adjustments and substitutions. You can avoid kitchen crunch by choosing a menu of foods served at a variety of temperatures and preparing as many dishes in advance as possible (some can be made as much as a month ahead). The one catch: don't forget to allow enough time for defrosting and reheating on the day of the party.</p> <p>If you run out of storage space, be creative. I've been known to stow food in the microwave and warm bread on top of the dryer in the laundry room. If it's really cold outside, the porch or garage can serve as a second refrigerator. And speaking of the fridge, now's a good time to clean it out. You can reclaim lots of space by removing any items that can be stored elsewhere or that should have been tossed long ago.</p> <p><strong>4. Shop smart</strong></p> <p>The sanest way to shop for a party is in stages. Divide your shopping list by store and buy all the nonperishables you need as early as possible.</p> <p>Consider some alternate resources for what you need. Read the ads in the newspaper to see what's on sale at the supermarkets in your area. It may be worth the trip to an unfamiliar store to save money on the big-ticket items on your menu, such as fillet of beef, turkey, ham or prawns. And don't forget the local beverage warehouse, where soft drinks and beer are often priced substantially lower than supermarkets.</p> <p>Finally, thrift shops can yield wonderful finds for entertaining. Extra glasses, tableware, silver and candlesticks can often be had at a fraction of what new ones would cost.</p> <p><strong>5. Set a gorgeous table</strong></p> <p>A beautifully set table can make even plain food look elegant and inviting. And you don't need to spend a lot of money to do it. Start with a great tablecloth, especially if your dining-room table has seen better days. Tablecloths cover a multitude of sins while adding colour, pattern, even drama to your party. If you don't own the perfect tablecloth, search out thrift shops and antique stores for old linens. Don't feel limited to standard tablecloths – I've seen beautifully patterned sheets called into action. Even large square silk scarves can make a statement when placed on a diagonal over a plain white tablecloth. Whatever kind of cloth you use, place a felt pad or plastic liner on the table first to protect its surface.</p> <p>When it comes to centerpieces, don't limit your thinking to flowers. A bowl of Christmas balls, fruits, vegetables, even toys can add whimsy and charm to your table setting. I remember a gorgeous table set with nothing more than three pineapples that had been spray painted gold, nestled in some evergreens and surrounded by ivory candles. To spark your imagination, walk through your house and see what's there. Look in your drawers and cabinets and you may well find decorating treasures.</p> <p>You can't go wrong with candles. Candlelight is the kindest light of all – warm, cozy and very inviting. Candles of various heights and diameters look especially lovely when grouped together on mirrored surfaces (if you don't have a mirrored tray, use a small wall mirror with the hanger on the back removed, or mirrored tile from the hardware store). Whatever method you use to display them, however, it's best to use dripless candles. They're well worth the extra expense – especially at clean-up time.</p> <p><strong>6. Make as much as you can as far ahead as you can</strong></p> <p>Waiting until the last few days before your party to cook everything just doesn't make sense – especially when, if you examine your menu, you'll see that much of it can be prepared ahead, frozen and reheated. Just pin up a reminder to yourself so you don't forget to defrost in time.</p> <p>Don't rule out convenience foods: as far as I'm concerned, the bakery does a much better job of baking bread than I do. And why spend time washing and peeling baby carrots when they come packaged that way at the supermarket?</p> <p>For those things that demand last-minute attention, don't be proud, be smart: have meats and cheeses sliced at the grocery store. Buy packaged ice. The idea is to minimise your efforts so you haven't exhausted yourself before the party even begins.</p> <p><strong>7. Don't drive yourself crazy cleaning</strong></p> <p>Our advice: don't attempt a top-to-bottom house-cleaning before your party. Confine your efforts to the rooms your guests will see and use. And close the doors to the others.</p> <p>But there is one place you should spend some time scrubbing: the bathroom. It's the one room by which your guests will judge the cleanliness of the whole house. Make sure it's spotless, and enhance the overall impression of clean by removing all the clutter – toiletries, bathrobes, rubber duckies.</p> <p>Clutter removal is key to the rest of your house-cleaning too. Here's my technique: after you've done the bathroom, start cleaning where the guests will enter. Get rid of mail on the hall table. Stash the coats, the toys and the dog's leash. Cleaning as you go, proceed to your party rooms and remove newspapers and magazines. It's a great idea to clear off tables and countertops, too, because you'll need the space for food and drinks. Polish all wooden and glass surfaces, but do not bother cleaning the windows. Once your rooms are filled with people, no one will be looking out them anyway.</p> <p><strong>8. Keep serving simple</strong></p> <p>The elaborate passing of food, called French service, should be left to the French. Unless you have an army of waiters at your beck and call, self-service rules. For a small number of guests, a good arrangement is to place all the food, buffet-style, on one main table, and designate another table for the bar. However, the bigger the party, the more you ought to consider setting up several food areas so that everyone doesn't end up crowded in one spot. For example, use your coffee table for the hors d'oeuvres, your buffet top for the cheese platter, and a card table for coffee and sweets.</p> <p>One place you should avoid using for food service is your kitchen. During the party, it will be far too busy a place to have your guests gathering (and getting in the way). During your party, check often to see how everything looks, rearranging and replacing food as necessary. As food is finished, remove empty dishes, making sure everything looks as fresh for the last guest as it did for the first.</p> <p><strong>9. Ask for help</strong></p> <p>One word separates the confident host from the person who swears she'll never entertain again as long as she lives: help. And the larger your party, the more help you'll need.</p> <p>But if you really want to save money, the number one source of your household help should be...your household. As long as they've reached coat-carrying age, your children can - and should - pitch in. In fact, most kids love being more than just decorative accessories at their parents' parties. You may be pleasantly surprised to discover how good your children feel about helping to clear away glasses, passing hors d'oeuvres and, yes, getting people's coats for them.</p> <p>In addition, don't hesitate to look beyond your doors to relatives, close friends and co-workers. As long as you're gracious about it and ask in advance, most people are only too delighted to help out at parties. It's an opportunity for them to show off their talents and resourcefulness, and you can couple your request with a promise to reciprocate at their next big event.</p> <p><strong>10. It's a party: enjoy yourself</strong></p> <p>The final commandment is both the hardest and the most important thing for a party giver to do. You've worked extra hard, you want everything to be perfect and you worry that your guests won't enjoy themselves if it isn't. But the truth is that most people are delighted to have someone go to all the trouble it takes to entertain.</p> <p>Your guests will never know that you forgot the cucumbers for the salad or that the dessert was store-bought - and if they do figure it out, chances are they won't care. When they arrive, they'll be in a party mood and pleased just to have been invited. So take a deep breath before you open the door to your first guest and relax. This is going to be fun.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/home-tips/planning-successful-parties">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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New Madeleine McCann development: Convicted child murderer emerges as "main suspect"

<p>A convicted serial killer has emerged as a key suspect in the search of missing Madeleine McCann, according to reports.</p> <p>48-year-old Martin Ney, who was sentenced to life imprisonment in 2012 for multiple child murders and abuses in Germany, is reportedly being investigated by officers from Portugal’s Policia Judiciaria as a “figure of interest”, <a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/news/crime/madeleine-mccann-case-paedophile-and-child-killer-martin-ney-a-figure-of-interest-c-95611" target="_blank">AAP</a> reported.</p> <p>“Detectives are preparing the end of the investigation, with a German paedophile who is in prison right now,” said former Portuguese police chief Goncalo Amaral, who first led the search for the young girl.</p> <p>Ney is believed to have been in Portugal when McCann vanished in 2007. It is claimed that he was working for an evangelical church on a project to help the homeless then.</p> <p>Police believe that Ney resembles a photofit of a man who was seen acting suspiciously in Praia da Luz before the then three-year-old McCann disappeared from her family’s holiday apartment in May 2007.</p> <p>Ney has previously been interviewed by detectives investigating McCann’s disappearance but has denied any involvement.</p> <p>Last Friday, May 2 marked the 12th anniversary of McCann’s disappearance. McCann’s parents, Kate and Gerry McCann, said in a statement released on the day: “Thank you to everyone who continues to support us and for your ongoing hope and belief.</p> <p>“The months and years roll by too quickly, Madeleine will be 16 this month. It’s impossible to put into words just how that makes us feel. There is comfort and reassurance though in knowing that the investigation continues, and many people around the world remain vigilant.”</p>

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Why we bend the rules

<p>In my early 30s, I used an expired uni-student ID to buy discounted movie tickets. (I’d peeled off the date sticker.) I’d tell myself, I’m buying a ticket I wouldn’t have otherwise bought. One must be resourceful in an overpriced city, right?</p> <p>If you also break rules sometimes, you understand this paradox. We think of ourselves as honest citizens despite daily acts (one to two on average) of cheating, lying, or otherwise innocuous rule breaking. We stand in the express line with too many groceries, play hooky from work, board planes before our seat is called, or lie to give our kids an advantage.</p> <p>Researchers who study everyday transgressions believe that character isn’t the real driver; situational forces are. We might break the rules under some conditions and in some mind-sets, but not in others.</p> <p><strong>The Creativity Defence</strong></p> <p>Years ago, Francesca Gino, a professor at Harvard, and Dan Ariely, a behavioural economist at Duke, wondered if people with higher IQs were more likely to cheat. The duo found that cleverness didn’t correlate with dishonesty, but creativity did. When Gino and Ariely posed ethical dilemmas to employees in an advertising firm, the copywriters and designers were more likely to break the rules than the accountants. The more creative you are, the easier it is to retell the story of what happened when you behaved dishonestly.</p> <p>Test yourself. Why did you pilfer office supplies? You might say that you worked through lunch or that businesses get the stuff cheaply. This is how creative types “reframe” an event. And a creative mind-set, Gino found, is easy to induce in almost anyone – just by using subtle cues. When players in a gambling game were primed to think more flexibly (by being exposed to words like original, novel, and imaginative in a text they read), they cheated more often than those not given the prompts did.</p> <p>“Working for an organisation that stresses being innovative and original can increase our tendency to cheat,” Gino says.</p> <p>“Should we encourage less creativity in banking?” Ariely wonders.</p> <p><strong>The Status Defence</strong></p> <p>Picture two accountants alerted to suspicious entries in the books. The first takes the violation seriously. The second pooh-poohs it. Who has more clout? When Dutch psychologist Gerben van Kleef asked study participants that question, most chose the second accountant. Powerful people break the rules – ergo, breaking rules makes one seem more powerful.</p> <p>“In its modest form, rule breaking is actually healthy,” says Zhen Zhang of Arizona State University. He found that relatively minor Ferris Bueller–style violations during adolescence – damaging property, playing hooky – predicted an esteemed occupation: entrepreneur.</p> <p>When young men, in particular, take risks that pan out, testosterone levels surge. The hormone may underlie the “winner effect,” say researchers John Coates and Joe Herbert of the University of Cambridge, who tracked the hormonal activity of stock option traders (again, all male) over their good and bad days in the market. The more wins, the higher the hormones, the greater the confidence boost, the bigger the risks, and so on.</p> <p>But at a certain point, risk taking can become irrational, reckless, or ruthless. This can cause “ethical numbing”. Consider Steve Jobs: As Apple grew, so did lawsuits against it, such as those over patents.</p> <p>Being wealthy takes a moral toll on both genders. Studies have found that the $150,000-plus-per-annum set was four times as likely to cheat as those making less than $15,000 a year when playing a game to win $50. The rich didn’t stop for pedestrians at a crosswalk nearly as often as less-wealthy drivers. This held true even when people were role-playing – that is, they weren’t rich in real life.</p> <p>That’s because environment – not any intrinsic personality trait – abets rule breaking, argues Andy Yap, a behavioural scientist. Yap and his colleagues asked volunteers to sit in an SUV-sized driver’s seat versus a cramped one or an executive-size office space versus a cubicle and then tested their responses to various moral scenarios. In roomier settings, people reported feeling more powerful and were more likely to steal money, cheat on a test, and commit traffic violations in a driving simulation.</p> <p><strong>The Bonding Defence</strong></p> <p>We aren’t born with an enlightened, universal sense of fairness for all, Harvard University psychologist Joshua Greene argues in his book Moral Tribes. We evolved as tribal animals who followed the rules within small groups (us) but not with the rest of the world (them).</p> <p>We may be born with a crude sense of right and wrong, but our culture refines it. If your tribe downloads pirated music, sells dubious stocks, or accepts bribes, you’re likely to go with the flow or cover up for peers.</p> <p><strong>The Level-Playing-Field Defence</strong></p> <p>Let’s say you witnessed someone tear through a red light. Or a colleague received a promotion after boozing with the boss, while you toiled and got nothing. Chances are, you’ll experience a knee-jerk reaction: to get even or at least to level the field.</p> <p>To test the fairness instinct, Harvard researcher Leslie John, along with two colleagues, told volunteers that others in the room were making more money than they were for getting questions right on a trivia test. Guess what happened? That group, which perceived itself as disadvantaged, cheated more than those who believed that everyone received an equal payment.</p> <p><strong>The Solution: Self Awareness</strong></p> <p>The real threat is the slippery slope – minor transgressions can snowball. Imagine Bernie Madoff or Lance Armstrong thinking, Just this once. OK, once more. And eventually, they just don’t think about it. Rule breaking worsens over time. Kids who cheat on high school exams are three times more likely in adulthood to lie to a customer or inflate an insurance claim compared with non-cheaters, according to the Josephson Institute.</p> <p>Behavioural psychology offers a few antidotes. Keep yourself fed and well-rested – we’re likelier to lapse when hungry or tired. Reflect on how your actions look through others’ eyes. In a classic British experiment, a drawing of eyes mounted over a collection box at a corporate coffee bar helped enforce the honour system.</p> <p>When people sign an ethics pledge at the beginning rather than the end of tax forms or job applications – before there’s an opportunity to cheat – they are significantly less likely to be dishonest. The same goes when asked to recall the Ten Commandments before a test, which Ariely found works even among the non-religious.</p> <p>We like to see ourselves in a positive light. In a Stanford study, when researchers used the verb cheat – please don’t cheat – participants still cheated freely because they felt distanced from the act. When the noun cheater was used – don’t be a cheater – hardly anyone did.</p> <p>The novelist Wallace Stegner summed it up in his novel All the Little Live Things: “It is the beginning of wisdom when you recognise that the best you can do is choose which rules you want to live by.” To which he added: “It’s persistent and aggravated imbecility to pretend you can live without any.”</p> <p><em>Written by Jena Pincott. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/Why-We-Bend-the-Rules"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>h</em></a><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>ere’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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