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University students jailed after finding KFC loophole

<p>A group of Chinese university students have been sentenced to up to two and a half years in jail after they found a loophole to receive AUD $40,000 worth of KFC.</p> <p>The university students from east China’s Jiangsu Province scammed KFC through their mobile apps,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202105/1223171.shtml" target="_blank">the<span> </span><em>Global Times</em><span> </span>reports.</a></p> <p>The group obtained free KFC meals and made profits by reselling it.</p> <p>In total, the fast food giant had economic losses equating to 200,000 yuan ($40,000).</p> <p>One student discovered that through his WeChat account, he could get meals and coupons without fronting up the money.</p> <p>The young person would sell coupons as well as meals to make a profit.</p> <p>He would also order meals for himself.</p> <p>In the time period between April and October 2018, his dealings led for the company to lose over 58,000 yuan ($11,000).</p> <p>The other students that were part of the elaborate scam had losses that ranged from 8,900 yuan ($1700) to 47,000 yuan ($9400) each.</p> <p>The court ruled the main instigator, whose last name is Xu, would be given a two-and-a-half-year jail sentence, along with a 6000 yuan ($1200) fine.</p> <p>They were charged for “crimes of fraud and imparting criminal methods”.</p> <p>The other four scammers were sentenced from 15 months to two years in jail.</p> <p>They were also fined between 1000 yuan ($200) and 4000 yuan ($800).</p>

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Four new stamps issued in memory of Prince Philip

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Four new stamps have been issued by the Royal Mail in the UK to remember the Duke of Edinburgh.</p> <p>The four stamps are in black-and-white and showcase the life of Prince Philip.</p> <p>The first stamp, which is a portrait of Prince Philip as a young man was taken by the photographer Baron whereas the second stamp is Prince Philip attending the passing out of his son, Prince Andrew, at Dartmouth Naval College.</p> <p>The third stamp is Philip at the Royal Windsor Horse Show and the last stamp is a portrait taken by photographer Terry O'Neill.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">We're proud to present a commemorative collection of stamps and collectibles honouring the life and work of HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. <br /><br />Explore the collection: <a href="https://t.co/hvTzqbqIdm">https://t.co/hvTzqbqIdm</a> <a href="https://t.co/vI0t9KRebm">pic.twitter.com/vI0t9KRebm</a></p> — Royal Mail (@RoyalMail) <a href="https://twitter.com/RoyalMail/status/1392766571035123713?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 13, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>Simon Thompson, chief executive of Royal Mail, said: "Throughout adulthood, the Duke of Edinburgh dedicated himself to the service of this country, the Commonwealth and to the many causes he was involved with.</p> <p>"For more than seven decades he was at the centre of our national life. His passing is a key moment in our history which we mark with this set of commemorative stamps."</p> <p>The stamps are available for pre-order at a cost of £5.76 (NZD $11.27).</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Queen’s cousin caught in royal scandal

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The royal family has been hit with another scandal after the Queen’s cousin was accused of selling access to the Kremlin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A joint undercover investigation by The Sunday Times and Channel 4 reportedly caught Prince Michael of Kent admitting he was willing to use his royal status for personal gain.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The sting involved reporters posing as investors of a fake South Korean gold company who approached Prince Michael seeking contacts in the Kremlin to further its business in Russia.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though the investigation is yet to be aired, clips were posted on Channel 4’s Twitter account that revealed snippets from the recorded conversations.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">He said he was willing to accept $200,000 from our fake company in return for making the speech. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RoyalForHire?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RoyalForHire</a><br />3/ <a href="https://t.co/qODD4Wta5e">pic.twitter.com/qODD4Wta5e</a></p> — Channel 4 Dispatches (@C4Dispatches) <a href="https://twitter.com/C4Dispatches/status/1391078183265525765?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 8, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the clips, Prince Michael allegedly told the journalists by Zoom that he would record a speech giving their company his royal endorsement for a fee of $US 200,000 ($254,000).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 78-year-old royal also said he was happy to use his home in Kensington Palace as a backdrop for the endorsement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The royal’s business partner, Simon Reading, reportedly said the prince could be hired for 10,000 pounds ($17,800) a day to make “confidential” discussions with Mr Putin on behalf of the fictitious gold firm.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If [Prince Michael] is representing the House of Haedong, he could mention that to Putin and Putin would find the right person who is interested in South Korea or interested in gold,” Mr Reading told the undercover reporters.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It just opens the door, you know, which is so helpful.”</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Vladimir Putin “regards Prince Michael as a friend of Russia.”<br />We asked Lord Reading if Prince Michael’s relationship with Putin has been damaged by growing tensions between Britain and Russia. <br /><br />He said “It hasn’t.” 6/ <a href="https://t.co/r4tyH1GKDs">pic.twitter.com/r4tyH1GKDs</a></p> — Channel 4 Dispatches (@C4Dispatches) <a href="https://twitter.com/C4Dispatches/status/1391078794841272320?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 8, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He also described Prince Michael as “Her Majesty’s unofficial ambassador to Russia”.</span></p> <p><strong>Royal response</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Prince Michael, who is tied to Russia through grandmother and speaks Russian, has since issued a statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the royal’s office, Prince Michael “has no special relationship with President Putin” and that he “has not had contact with him or his office” since they last met in 2003.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since Prince Michael isn’t a working royal and doesn’t receive public funds, his office also pointed out he “earns his living through a consultancy company that he has run for over 40 years.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Lord Reading is a good friend, who in trying to help made suggestions which Prince Michael would not have wanted, or been able, to fulfil,” his office continued.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Reading said he regretted his “over-promise” in trying to facilitate an introduction to Michael.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He told reporters, “I made a mistake and over-promised, and for that I am truly regretful.”</span></p>

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Mum charged after daughter almost dies from lice

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A woman in Indiana is facing neglect charges after investigators said her four-year-old daughter nearly died from a severe lice infestation that resulted in multiple blood transfusions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Shyanne Singh, 26, was arrested on Tuesday, May 4 on three felony counts of neglect of a dependent. She was released from custody on Friday at the Scott County Jail.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scottsburg police were contacted April 20 after Singh’s daughter was taken to hospital. According to a probable cause affidavit, doctors declared her a “near fatality” because lice had fed off her for so long.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The child was so sick she couldn’t walk. According to court documents, a Department of Child Services supervisor also told police the girl’s blood haemoglobin levels were at 1.7, when she should have had a level of 12. As the lowest haemoglobin level the hospital had seen, the girl required four blood transfusions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The girl’s six-year-old sister also had lice.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Both girls were placed in the care of their maternal grandparents in April, according to court records. Their grandmother told police that she tried to take care of the lice with treatments but a pharmacist told her to “take the kids to the hospital”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Singh’s mother confronted her about the condition her grandchildren were in, and Singh allegedly told her that “she didn’t notice, and that she was in a fog”, court documents state.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Singh appeared for an initial hearing in front of a judge on Friday, who appointed a public defender for her.</span></p>

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Recall issued for popular treadmill after child dies

<p><span>Peloton has recalled more than approximately 125,000 of its treadmills after previously claiming their equipment was not dangerous.</span><br /><br /><span>There have been injuries to at least 29 people and a child has died.</span><br /><br /><span>The company said it would now offer full refunds for the Peloton Tread+ treadmills.</span><br /><br /><span>They retail for more than $US4,200 ($5,400). It will also stop selling them.</span><br /><br /><span>The recall follows after the US Consumer Product Safety Commission warned on April 17 that owners of the Tread+ treadmill with children and pets should immediately stop using them.</span><br /><br /><span>The warning came after a six-year-old child died after being pulled under the machine.<br /><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841088/daily-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/62969fb9a8134ecfa95e73a191db208e" /></span><br /><br /><span>Peleton initially denied the safety commission, saying the warning was "inaccurate and misleading" and there was no reason to stop using the machines.</span><br /><br /><span>Company chief executive John Foley also said at the time he had "no intention" of recalling the treadmills.</span><br /><br /><span>However, a little less than a month later, Mr Foley apologised and said the company "made a mistake" in their initial response to the safety commission.</span><br /><br /><span>Peloton is best known for its stationary bikes, but it introduced treadmills about three years ago.</span><br /><br /><span>In the last three months of 2020, Peleton brought in $US1 billion ($1.3 billion) in revenue due to most gyms being closed throughout the year in response to COVID-19.</span><br /><br /><span>Peloton said it received 72 reports of adults, kids, pets or other items, such as exercise balls, being pulled under the treadmill.</span><br /><br /><span>29 of those reports were of children who suffered injuries, including broken bones, cuts and the one fatality.</span><br /><br /><span>Joseph Martyak, a spokesman at the Consumer Product Safety Commission, said it appeared the design of the machine could make it more likely to pull people, pets and items under the machine than other brands of treadmills.</span><br /><br /><span>A full refund is being offered until November 6 from Peloton.</span></p> <p><span>Peloton said they would move the treadmill free of charge if the owner did not want to get rid of it, to a room where children or pets could not access it.</span><br /><br /><span>Peloton said it would also update the software so a passcode was required to unlock it.</span></p> <p><span><em>Images: Peleton</em></span></p>

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Queen caught up in new royal security scare

<p>The Queen has been caught up in two major security scares in just six days.</p> <p>Reports claim two intruders, a 31-year-old man and his 29-year-old girlfriend, scaled a fence at Windsor’s Royal Lodge on April 25.</p> <p>Police intercepted the couple and arrested them.</p> <p>The lodge is home to Prince Andrew, near where Queen Elizabeth regularly walks her corgi dogs and goes horse riding.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841022/quene-elizabeth-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2005479a15c14898bb8b8f20cd79456d" /></p> <p><em>Queen's Windsor Estate</em></p> <p>The breach follow just six days after a woman was mistakenly allowed into the Lodge grounds by security guards.</p> <p>The 44-year-old Spanish national claimed to be Andrew’s fiancée and was waved through by guards at the gate.</p> <p>The intruder spent 20 minutes travelling around the grounds before they attempted to enter the building.</p> <p>She told security her name “Irene Windsor” and proclaimed she was engaged to the Duke of York.</p> <p>Maps of the residence and a self-defence key ring were allegedly found in her handbag.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841024/quene-elizabeth.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f4c2b55936be46ec89ca27becf67b51d" /></p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>The Sun</em>, Princess Diana’s former protection officer Ken Wharfe has called for security to tighten their reign on royal households.</p> <p>He said they are “totally unacceptable and make the Queen vulnerable.”</p> <p>“This is very worrying and things really need to change,” he added.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

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Is this the world’s most arrogant piece of parking?

<p>Resident's in Sydney's southeast are fed up with "arrogant a**holes" taking up parking spaces in their neighbourhood - often taking up two spots at a time.</p> <p>One resident in the Botany/Mascot area took to social media, furious about one driver's behaviour.</p> <p>A driver had taken up two car spaces, but not just any parking spots - they were reserved for “parents with prams”.</p> <p>“You’re just that arrogant that you think you’re so special you can take up two spots so no one parks near you then you should remove your head from your rectum ASAP!” an enraged resident posted to a local Facebook group along with the picture.</p> <p>The photographs caused outrage and soon other people began sharing more bad parking stories.</p> <p>One person even called for an “album” so they could keep a record of the area’s worst drivers to “give awards out at the end of the year”.</p> <p>“I don’t normally do this, but this truly is a case that deserved attention!” the original poster said.</p> <p>“Worlds (sic) worst Parker or worlds most arrogant a**hole - you decide!</p> <p>“But if you can’t park in spots already designed for extra space, you have issues.”</p> <p>A local said they had called someone out in the past for parking exactly like this, and the female driver said she needed to park like that because she had twins.</p> <p>“One particular lady pointed out that she always parks like this because she has twin babies and needs the room to get her capsules in and out,” they said.</p> <p>“I have twins (they’re now 6 years old) and I NEVER parked like this!” another mother said.</p> <p>The area seems to be inundated with people who don't know how to park, as many people came forward with their own stories of frustrating drivers. </p>

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"Cannibal" accused of killing mum and eating remains for TWO WEEKS

<p><strong>WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT</strong></p> <p>Alberto Sanchez Gomez, 26, is accused of strangling his mother, chopping up her body and putting it into lunchboxes, which he allegedly stored in the fridge and ate over the course of two weeks.</p> <p>Gomez had frequently been violent towards his 66-year-old mother Maria, who had taken out a restraining order on him but would frequently accept him into her home whenever he called.</p> <p>Gomez allegedly murdered his mother in Madrid on February 21st, 2019 after family friends alerted police about not seeing Maria in several days.</p> <p>Police officers were greeted by Gomez, who admitted he strangled his mother, but police were not prepared for what was inside.</p> <p>Inside the house, officers reported Maria's limbs were wrapped in plastic and left in various rooms in the house.</p> <p>The stench was so bad that many officers were violently sick as well as being in shock at the violent scene.</p> <p>Other parts of Maria's body were in the fridge as well as the oven. Gomez later admitted that he spent 15 days eating his mother's remains and fed the parts he didn't want to his dog.</p> <p>Maria had tried in vain to get her son the help he needed as he was admitted to psychiatric care three times. Gomez would routinely physically attack his mother, and she was terrified of him.</p> <p>Despite her friend's concerns, Maria would let her son back into her life after being served the restraining order, saying "What am I going to do? After all, he is still my son."</p> <p>The court currently believes that Gomez is suffering from a mental illness and was at the time consuming hard drugs.</p> <p>Gomez is currently on suicide watch in prison due to his fragile mental state and the police officers who were at the scene of the crime will be testifying on Tuesday in Madrid's provincial court.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Newsflash</em></p>

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Woman shocked by threatening note left in backyard

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Sydney woman has revealed the sinister note left next to a bone she found in her backyard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cheri Blair, 66, found the bone on Monday when she let her puppy out into her backyard in Sydney’s northern suburb Lane Cove.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Feeling suspicious about discovering the bone, she then found a nearby envelope containing a note.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Opening the unsealed letter, she was “shocked” to read the threat to her puppy.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The note read, “Your dog is to be poisoned, too much barking, sorry but no choice, your fault”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Blair told </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">7news.com.au</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about the “sickening” discovery.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If they had a problem with us, they should have said,” she told the publication.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Claiming the bone was specifically a dog treat available in pet shops, Ms Blair speculated the neighbour would have had to specially buy it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Blair said she rushed her pet to the vet. After inducing vomiting, Jolene was unharmed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After sharing the threatening note, Ms Blair said she had received messages from neighbours saying they had not heard her dog barking.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, she does recall one incident on Saturday where Jolene had been barking for about 20 minutes. She said she remembered hearing a female voice yelling “shut up” and wondered if they may be behind the incident.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After sharing her experience on Facebook, comments poured in with messages of support and outrage, with many calling it “horrifying”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What a [cowardly] thing to do … hide behind a note! This makes my blood boil,” one wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“How disgusting is this?” another commented.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Absolutely terrible to hear that someone would stoop so low as to put poison in the backyard for the pup to ingest,” a third said.</span></p> <p><br /><strong>Image credit:</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> 7News</span></p>

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Fake Bunnings! Overseas hardware clone baffles fans

<p dir="ltr">New photographs of an eerily similar Bunnings store have cropped up that have everyone talking on social media.</p> <p dir="ltr">Builders Warehouse, not to be confused with Bunnings Warehouse, has opened in the Philippines. The two chains share the same classic colour scheme, hammer logo, and even the uniform are lookalikes.</p> <p dir="ltr">The only difference? Instead of the famous ‘Lowest prices are just the beginning’ slogan, Builders Warehouse has gone with ‘You build. We provide.’</p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="width: 500px; height: 375.3846153846154px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840811/builders-warehouse-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7c512fe3dd24449c904ac9e06a436c56" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.53846153846155px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840810/bunnings-warehouse-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4f089538f97f473e935ca4b591e3842f" /></p> <p dir="ltr">It is understood that Bunnings Warehouse isn’t affiliated with Builders Warehouse.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bunnings fans on Twitter were surprised by the similarities.</p> <p dir="ltr">‘Sincerest Form of Flattery? Meet #Bunnings Warehouse Clone - Our Builders Warehouse,’ said one.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.53846153846155px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840814/builders-warehouse-3.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/06cb1c5113f2449fb62b7c84ab057eef" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><span>According to </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://ourbuilderswarehouse.com.ph/home" target="_blank">its website</a><span>, Builders Warehouse started in 2018 and now has five stores across the Philippines, including Dau, Mabalacat, Pampanga, Malolos, and Bulacan. It describes itself as the go-to for home improvement in the Philippines.</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><span><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.53846153846155px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840812/builders-warehouse-4.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0920009faac34e808f2199655e9b1da6" /></span></p> <p dir="ltr">The similarities don’t stop there either, with similar mission statements.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to the Builders Warehouse website, ‘Builders Warehouse is anchored in delivering first-class construction materials to everyone who needs a hand in home building from the groundwork, furnishing up to the final modifications of any structural development’.</p> <p dir="ltr">On the Bunnings website, it reads, ‘Our ambition is to provide our customers with the widest range of home improvement products in accordance with our lowest prices policy, backed with the best service.’</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Bunnings did not wish to comment on the new Filipino stores.</p>

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Can milkshakes and sharks teach kids consent?

<p dir="ltr">Criticism over the government’s ‘bizarre’ new campaign designed to educate school kids on consent have come from sex educators and advertising bodies alike. In the campaign, actors discuss respectful relationships with the help of a milkshake, taco and a shark.</p> <p dir="ltr">The videos, made by The Good Society, Morrison government’s Respect Matters organisation, discuss topics involving consent and relationships across the different school groups. In the videos aimed at senior high-school students (Years 11-12), actors act out the process of gaining consent through a discussion of ‘trying milkshakes’ and other activities.</p> <p dir="ltr">The ‘Moving the Line’ campaign also features a man trying to convince a woman to swim in shark-infested waters, reassuring her that they’ll be fine with his spear gun. Another depicts a man eating tacos to discuss sexual assault, saying that people have desires and objects such as tacos do not.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://thegoodsociety.gov.au/about/what-is-the-good-society" target="_blank">The Good Society website</a>, all content has been developed to align with the Australian curriculum, but rape prevention advocates have criticised the resources, saying that they fail to meet national education standards.</p> <p dir="ltr">Fair Agenda and End Rape on Campus on Australia (EROCA) called for a complete review of the content featured on the website. In a statement, the two groups said the videos are often “confusing” for teens trying to navigate the behaviours the videos try to address.</p> <p dir="ltr">Caitlin Roper of Collective Shout, a national body campaigning against the objectification in media and advertising, agreed and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://honey.nine.com.au/latest/governments-sex-and-consent-education-video-slammed/1b924691-c64e-4b1d-b1a8-a313eabd8357" target="_blank">told 9Honey</a><span> </span>the videos are “confusing and awkward”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“They underestimate young people’s ability to comprehend sexual assault completely,” Roper said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s important to have a national dialogue, but the content widely missed the mark.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The Good Society launched last week with 350 online materials about safe and respectful relationships for schools and families. As part of the government’s Respect Matters program, the program aims to support respectful relationships education in Australian schools and change attitudes of young people around domestic, sexual, and family violence.</p> <p dir="ltr">The push for better consent education came after Sydney activist Chanel Contos’ petition to teach consent earlier, which received 4,000 testimonies detailing school-aged sexual assault.</p> <p dir="ltr">These include allegations of violent rapes, coerced drinking, and sexual harassment, mostly perpetrated by young male students.</p> <p dir="ltr">Roper says the new videos, including the one depicting a woman rubbing a milkshake in a man’s face, avoid ‘real, honest, and meaningful conversations’ and neglect to acknowledge the ‘highly gendered’ nature of sexual assault.</p> <p dir="ltr">Depicting a woman as the perpetrator, “didn’t acknowledge the fact it is overwhelmingly women and girls enduring sexual assault and rape by men and boys,” Roper said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Kids are open to having these tough conversations, but the concept of consent alone is quite limited.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Better education around sex and consent is largely meaningless without looking at the wider culture and male sexual entitlement,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">A recent report by UN Women found that 97 percent of women experienced some form of sexual assault or harassment before they turn 24, and 97 percent of men who experienced sexual assault were assaulted by men.</p> <p dir="ltr">The videos also drew criticism for downplaying the experience of the victim and for offering more support to the perpetrator.</p> <p dir="ltr">In a narration over an infographic likening sharing milkshakes to consent, the narrator said, ‘In a respectful relationship, if someone moves the line, you might be upset but ultimately want to repair the situation.’</p> <p dir="ltr">In the video, the woman, named Veronica, smears a milkshake in the face of her visibly unhappy male counterpart, Bailey.</p> <p dir="ltr">‘It’s just a funny game, Bailey. I know you really like my milkshake,’ Veronica tells him.</p> <p><img class="post_image_group" src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/NbkEtQQ1DhxyN-_fHZdBJtzjHFE6jV1y3mcHCgnH6ieGUiwgwIbEbzrjkbEGBPEXnD8VyY0q_jo-ywiCptX8h6KEiUbx6ROzUet4N_IwlT-pPHPZdaHm8d2ZM1-2JM82N2CCtaU_" alt="" width="396" height="214" /><span></span></p> <p dir="ltr">‘Maintaining any relationship is hard work, but handling a disrespectful relationship can be upsetting, lonely, even dangerous. In fact, it can be one of the hardest things we do in our lives,” the narrator continues.</p> <p dir="ltr">Brandon Friedman, co-founder of sex education program Elephant Ed, told 9Honey, ‘Any engagement with young people around consent and respectful relationships needs that balance between humour and clear and concise messaging.’</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CMwCOXfDlZh/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CMwCOXfDlZh/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Elephant Ed 🐘 (@elephant.ed)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">‘Historically there has been taboo and shame that surrounds these issues and often people will side step around them without tackling them. But young people are crying out for educators to tackle them head on.’</p> <p dir="ltr">Social media was filled with criticism of the campaign, as many slammed how the videos approached teaching consent.</p> <p dir="ltr">EROCA wrote, ‘Yes the videos are weird. They trivialise what is a very serious issue. But they’re just one small part of what’s wrong with this resource. We need the government to start listening to actual experts in violence prevention.’</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">I spent three days digging through the government's website. I watched every video. I read all of the accompanying materials. <br /><br />I cannot work out what the milkshakes, tacos or sharks are supposed to represent. And I run an org called "End Rape on Campus Australia". <a href="https://t.co/sshajJPAkk">https://t.co/sshajJPAkk</a></p> — Sharna Bremner (@sharnatweets) <a href="https://twitter.com/sharnatweets/status/1383943321345613825?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 19, 2021</a></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">When the program launched last week, Federal Education and Youth Minister Alan Tudge said the program would be a ‘vital role’ in informing young Australians on consent and sex education.</p> <p dir="ltr">‘These materials will provide additional support to better educate young Australians on these issues and have been designed to complement programs already being offered by states and territories,’ he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">‘I will be discussing these matters further with my state and territory counterparts when we meet later this month.’</p> <p dir="ltr">Consent education on the Australian curriculum will be publicly reviewed on April 29.</p>

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How Prince Charles' role will change after the death of Prince Philip

<p>As Prince Philip was laid to rest on Sunday, many royal fans have been wondering about the next steps of the monarchy.</p> <p>This is due to Queen Elizabeth II being without her most trusted advisor for the first time in 73 years.</p> <p>Prince Charles now assumes the role of the Queen's closest confidant as he prepares to be King when his mother passes away.</p> <p>He also has the title of "The Duke of Edinburgh" as the eldest son and heir to the throne.</p> <p>As the Queen's motto is "if I stop, I drop", it'll be interesting to see whether or not Prince Charles helps ease the new workload that comes with Prince Philip's passing.</p> <p>Prince Charles also reportedly met with Prince William and Prince Harry to discuss the next steps for the monarchy after the funeral service for Prince Philip.</p> <p>An insider explained to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/14689387/harry-reunited-william-charles-brothers-rift-healed/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>: “It’s early days but you’d hope this is exactly the first step Philip would have wished for.</p> <p>“It is not known what was said behind closed doors and when the cameras were turned off, but it’s unfathomable to think Megxit and Oprah did not come up.”</p> <p>“Harry and William appeared cordial as the cameras rolled and that seemed to pave the way for Charles to join them when everyone had left.”</p> <p>As the Queen's 95th birthday is this Wednesday, a roster of support has been made so that the Queen can turn to a trusted friend or family member when she needs it the most.</p> <p>There are also hundreds of Prince Philip's patronages left vacant, with Prince Charles having to decide how many patronages and engagements there should be.</p>

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Scrabble fans furious over banned words

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Scrabble fans are furious over the board game owner's decision to ban a long list of words that are now considered slurs.</p> <p>The decision has angered players so much that three prominent members of the global Scrabble Players' Organisation have quit.</p> <p>One of Scrabble’s owners, however, has said there are no other games where players “can win by using a racial epithet”.</p> <p>Scrabble is owned by Hasbro and Mattel, with both firms restricting certain words from officially being able to score points.</p> <p>More than 200 dictionary defined terms have now been banned from being used in Scrabble.</p> <p>British author Darryl Francis resigned from the World English-Language Scrabble Players Association (WESPA) and spoke to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/" target="_blank"><em>The Times</em></a><span> </span>about his decision.</p> <p>“Words listed in dictionaries and Scrabble lists are not slurs,” Mr Francis wrote.</p> <p>“They only become slurs when used with a derogatory purpose or intent, or used with a particular tone and in a particular context.</p> <p>“Words in our familiar Scrabble word lists should not be removed because of a PR purpose disguised as promoting some kind of social betterment.”</p> <p>Francis said he left due to Mattel forcing the changes on the game.</p> <p>Mattel has said the company made changes due to recent global events, including Black Lives Matter.</p> <p>“We looked at some of the social unrest that’s going on globally. I’ve heard the argument that these are just words, but we believe they have meaning,” Mattel’s global head of games told<span> </span><em>The Times</em>.</p> <p>“Can you imagine any other game where you can score points and win by using a racial epithet? It’s long overdue.”</p> <p>Some of the banned words include "Abo, "boong", "n****r", "c**t", "Paki" and "shiksha", which is a derogatory term used to refer to a non-Jewish girl or a Jewish girl who doesn't live up to traditional Jewish standards.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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RECALL: Kmart recalls popular furniture item

<p dir="ltr">Kmart has issued a recall of a popular chair on sale between July 2014 and March 2016, saying it can pose a risk of “entrapment or laceration” to the public.</p> <p dir="ltr">Customers have been warned to stop using the chair immediately and return it to stores for a full refund.</p> <p dir="ltr">This warning comes as a reissue of a previous recall announcement made in April 2016. The chairs, which came in white, red, and black, were also sold at Brayco and Fantastic Furniture.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The tapering of the inside bottom of the chair legs may lead to an entrapment or laceration hazard,” Kmart Australia said in a<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/KmartAustralia/posts/3774893009276258" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Facebook post</span></a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Customers have the option to have a free plug kit inserted into the legs of the chairs to continue using the chairs or return the chairs for a full refund.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The plugs will be available by contacting our Kmart Customer Service team,” Kmart Australia said in its post.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We encourage customers to cease using this product immediately and return to any Kmart store for a full refund, with or without a receipt.”</p> <p dir="ltr">According to The Daily Telegraph, eight people were injured by the chairs in 2016, with victims’ feet being sliced open by the sharp chair edges.</p> <p dir="ltr">One victim told the newspaper a doctor said the cut to his foot was so severe that “I couldn’t have done a better job with a scalpel.”</p> <p dir="ltr">At the low price of $33, thousands of chairs were bought and appeared in cafes and homes across the country prior to their initial recall in 2016.</p> <p dir="ltr">The design is a reproduction of the Tolix French cafe chair, first released in 1934.</p>

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Who will inherit the Duke of Edinburgh title?

<p dir="ltr">Following the news of Prince Philip’s passing comes a change in who holds which royal title, but this won’t come into effect until Prince Charles takes the throne.</p> <p dir="ltr">Prince Edward, Philip and Queen Elizabeth’s fourth child and current Earl of Wessex, will eventually claim his late father’s title as the Duke of Edinburgh.</p> <p dir="ltr">His wife, Sophie, will become the Duchess of Edinburgh and the fourth woman to hold the title since its creation in 1726.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CKllqcPHuz-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CKllqcPHuz-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Royal Family (@theroyalfamily)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">After Prince Philip’s death on April 9, Charles now holds the Duke of Edinburgh title according to the rules around the line of succession. This also means that his wife and Duchess of Cornwall, Camilla, is now regarded as the Duchess of Edinburgh.</p> <p dir="ltr">Once he becomes king, the title will be passed down to his youngest brother.</p> <p dir="ltr">This goes against the Letters Patent issued by George VI, which gave Philip the title in 1947 and stipulated the duke’s eldest son would inherit the title.</p> <p dir="ltr">But, when Charles becomes king the title can be re-granted to Edward.</p> <p dir="ltr">The decision to appoint Edward as the eventual Duke of Edinburgh was announced in 1999, following his marriage to Sophie Rhys-Jones and adoption of the title of Earl of Wessex.</p> <p dir="ltr">As a trustee and Chairman of the Duke of Edinburgh Award program, Edward’s succession as the Duke of Edinburgh also recognises his commitment to the program.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Duke of Edinburgh Award program, one of Philip’s educational initiatives, has been undertaken by over eight million children globally and involves pursuing a well-rounded education through acts of service, physical activity, camping trips, and personal hobbies.</p>

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Why BBC was hit with 100,000 complaints over Prince Philip coverage

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>According to<span> </span><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/politics/14625897/bbc-receives-100000-complaints-prince-philip-coverage/"><em>The Sun</em></a>, the BBC has received 100,000 complaints from members of the public over the coverage of Prince Philip's death.</p> <p>BBC cleared its programming schedule to cover the death when Prince Philip died at the age of 99 to run more than 24 hours of programmes about the Duke of Edinburgh.</p> <p>The BBC said: "We are proud of our coverage and the role we play during moments of national significance."</p> <p>Programs that people were eager to watch, including EastEnders and the MasterChef final were replaced by news programmes.</p> <p>The decision to shut down regular programming received so many complaints that there was a dedicated form on the BBC website to process them.</p> <p>BBC is currently not saying how many complaints it received, but a fortnightly bulletin of all complaints is due to be published on Wednesday.</p> <p>Viewers turned off in droves after the blanket coverage was too much, with BBC Two losing two-thirds of its audience between the prime times of 7 pm to 11 pm.</p> <p>The coverage has quickly become the most complained about television event in British history.</p> <p>One insider told <em>The Sun</em>: “I feel sorry for the Beeb.</p> <p>“They would be criticised and accused of not being respectful enough if they didn’t lay the programmes on.</p> <p>“But they seem to have left many people very cross.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Queen’s “favourite” grandson questioned by police in bizarre 740km lockdown trip

<p><span>Cops turned up on the doorstep of a married woman in Scotland after a complaint that the Queen’s grandson Peter Phillips had driven 740 km to see her.</span><br /><br /><span>Police were forced to “issue advice” to Mr Phillips, 43, who currently resides 460 miles (740 kilometres) away in Gloucestershire.</span><br /><br /><span>The grandson of Her Majesty lives at his mum, Princess Anne’s Gatcombe Park estate in Gloucestershire.</span><br /><br /><span>But locals had little patience for the royal when he turned up in the village of St Cyrus, Aberdeenshire.</span><br /><br /><span>Police called on him and the 40-year-old mum of two at her £475,000 ($860,000) home.</span><br /><br /><span>It was quickly discovered Phillips was not in breach of any COVID-19 lockdown rules after he explained he was on a business trip.</span><br /><br /><span>The woman — who is separated from her husband — is a pal of Peter’s sister Zara Phillips after their days at private school Gordonstoun in Moray, Scotland.</span><br /><br /><span>She attended Zara’s wedding to rugby star Mike Tindall in 2011.</span><br /><br /><span>The woman and Peter met again at a school reunion.</span><br /><br /><span>The father-of-two split from his wife, 41-year-old Autumn, in a public announcement in February of 2020.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840489/peter-phillips.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/462147d9d43d403882d55ccecdf044c4" /><br /><br /><span>“It seems wrong he has travelled here from England, whatever the circumstances,” one local source said.</span><br /><br /><span>“Scotland is closed and if you flew here you would have to quarantine for 10 days.”</span><br /><br /><span>A spokesman for Mr Phillips said the royal had travelled on business with his company XL Medical, which provides rapid COVID-19 tests.</span><br /><br /><span>“We do not comment on ­details or circumstances of Mr Phillips’ accommodation when travelling on ­business,” he said.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840487/peter-phillips-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/19e41b2b78014e838769ef45cc1e858b" /><br /><br /><span>A Police Scotland spokeswoman said, “At around 6.40 pm on Friday March 26, 2021, police received a report of a potential breach of coronavirus regulations at a property in St Cyrus, Montrose. Officers attended, spoke to the occupants and found no breaches of ­legislation.”</span><br /><br /><span>Mainland Scotland is in lockdown with travel only permitted for “essential purposes”.</span><br /><br /><span>Peter and Autumn have daughters Savannah, 10, and Isla, eight.</span><br /><br /><span>Peter is 17th in line to the throne, as he is the son of Princess Anne and her ex-husband Captain Mark Phillips.</span></p>

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