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A computer can guess more than 100,000,000,000 passwords per second. Still think yours is secure?

<p>Passwords have been used for thousands of years as a means of identifying ourselves to others and in more recent times, to computers. It’s a simple concept – a shared piece of information, kept secret between individuals and used to “prove” identity.</p> <p>Passwords in an IT context <a href="https://www.wired.com/2012/01/computer-password/">emerged in the 1960s</a> with <a href="https://www.techopedia.com/definition/24356/mainframe">mainframe</a> computers – large centrally operated computers with remote “terminals” for user access. They’re now used for everything from the PIN we enter at an ATM, to logging in to our computers and various websites.</p> <p>But why do we need to “prove” our identity to the systems we access? And why are passwords so hard to get right?</p> <p><strong>What makes a good password?</strong></p> <p>Until relatively recently, a good password might have been a word or phrase of as little as six to eight characters. But we now have minimum length guidelines. This is because of “entropy”.</p> <p>When talking about passwords, entropy is the <a href="https://www.itdojo.com/a-somewhat-brief-explanation-of-password-entropy/">measure of predictability</a>. The maths behind this isn’t complex, but let’s examine it with an even simpler measure: the number of possible passwords, sometimes referred to as the “password space”.</p> <p>If a one-character password only contains one lowercase letter, there are only 26 possible passwords (“a” to “z”). By including uppercase letters, we increase our password space to 52 potential passwords.</p> <p>The password space continues to expand as the length is increased and other character types are added.</p> <p>However, the problem with depending on password complexity is that computers are highly efficient at repeating tasks – including guessing passwords.</p> <p>Last year, a <a href="https://www.cbronline.com/news/stolen-user-credentials">record was set</a> for a computer trying to generate every conceivable password. It achieved a rate faster than 100,000,000,000 guesses per second.</p> <p>By leveraging this computing power, cyber criminals can hack into systems by bombarding them with as many password combinations as possible, in a process called <a href="https://www.kaspersky.com/resource-center/definitions/brute-force-attack">brute force attacks</a>.</p> <p>And with cloud-based technology, guessing an eight-character password can be achieved in as little as 12 minutes and cost as little as US$25.</p> <p>Also, because passwords are almost always used to give access to sensitive data or important systems, this motivates cyber criminals to actively seek them out. It also drives a lucrative online market selling passwords, some of which come with email addresses and/or usernames.</p> <p><strong>How are passwords stored on websites?</strong></p> <p>Website passwords are usually stored in a protected manner using a mathematical algorithm called <a href="https://www.wired.com/2016/06/hacker-lexicon-password-hashing/">hashing</a>. A hashed password is unrecognisable and can’t be turned back into the password (an irreversible process).</p> <p>When you try to login, the password you enter is hashed using the same process and compared to the version stored on the site. This process is repeated each time you login.</p> <p>For example, the password “Pa$$w0rd” is given the value “02726d40f378e716981c4321d60ba3a325ed6a4c” when calculated using the SHA1 hashing algorithm. Try it <a href="https://passwordsgenerator.net/sha1-hash-generator/">yourself</a>.</p> <p>When faced with a file full of hashed passwords, a brute force attack can be used, trying every combination of characters for a range of password lengths. This has become such common practice that there are websites that list common passwords alongside their (calculated) hashed value. You can simply search for the hash to reveal the corresponding password.</p> <p>The theft and selling of passwords lists is now so common, a <a href="https://haveibeenpwned.com/">dedicated website</a> — haveibeenpwned.com — is available to help users check if their accounts are “in the wild”. This has grown to include more than 10 billion account details.</p> <p>If your email address is listed on this site you should definitely change the detected password, as well as on any other sites for which you use the same credentials.</p> <p><strong>Is more complexity the solution?</strong></p> <p>You would think with so many password breaches occurring daily, we would have improved our password selection practices. Unfortunately, last year’s annual <a href="https://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/91461-the-worst-passwords-of-2019">SplashData password survey</a> has shown little change over five years.</p> <p>As computing capabilities increase, the solution would appear to be increased complexity. But as humans, we are not skilled at (nor motivated to) remember highly complex passwords.</p> <p>We’ve also passed the point where we use only two or three systems needing a password. It’s now common to access numerous sites, with each requiring a password (often of varying length and complexity). A recent survey suggests there are, on average, <a href="https://www.newswire.com/news/new-research-most-people-have-70-80-passwords-21103705">70-80 passwords per person</a>.</p> <p>The good news is there are tools to address these issues. Most computers now support password storage in either the operating system or the web browser, usually with the option to share stored information across multiple devices.</p> <p>Examples include Apple’s <a href="https://www.computerworld.com/article/3254183/how-to-use-icloud-keychain-the-guide.html">iCloud Keychain</a> and the ability to save passwords in Internet Explorer, Chrome and Firefox (although <a href="https://www.howtogeek.com/447345/why-you-shouldnt-use-your-web-browsers-password-manager/">less reliable</a>).</p> <p><a href="https://tech.co/password-managers/what-is-a-password-manager">Password managers</a> such as KeePassXC can help users generate long, complex passwords and store them in a secure location for when they’re needed.</p> <p>While this location still needs to be protected (usually with a long “master password”), using a password manager lets you have a unique, complex password for every website you visit.</p> <p>This won’t prevent a password from being stolen from a vulnerable website. But if it is stolen, you won’t have to worry about changing the same password on all your other sites.</p> <p>There are of course vulnerabilities in these solutions too, but perhaps that’s a story for another day.</p> <p><em>Written by Paul Haskell-Dowland and Brianna O’Shea. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-computer-can-guess-more-than-100-000-000-000-passwords-per-second-still-think-yours-is-secure-144418">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Shocking twist after parents make public appeal to find missing daughter

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The parents of a missing teenager have been charged with her murder after they appealed for help to find her.</p> <p>Bernadetta Walker was reported missing 7 weeks ago by her 37-year-old mum, Sarah and 57-year-old father Scott from their home in the east of England.</p> <p>Police declared that detectives would be pursuing the case as a "no body" investigation as they continued their search for the 17-year-old who was last seen by her parents on July 18th. </p> <p>Ms Walker asked the public for help in distributing flyers and claimed she “couldn’t eat or sleep properly”, saying that she hoped her daughter was “hiding” at a friend’s home.</p> <p>“I know my baby girl wouldn't be out in the open. She's scared of being out in the dark alone, that's what makes me think she's at a friend's house,” she said, according to The Sun.</p> <p>Bernadette’s dad also appealed for help, writing on Facebook: “You can imagine how much we are both worried. We miss you. We need to know that you're safe. We love you.”</p> <p>Police have said that "significant progress" has been made in the investigation, but they are yet to find the missing teenager.</p> <p>“Therefore our plea is for anyone who has information on what has happened to her, or where she might be, to get in touch as a matter of urgency,” Policing Peterborough wrote to Facebook.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Facebook</em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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Parents receive $5 million over bungled baby birth

<p><span>A couple in Perth will keep their $5.2 million in damages after their child suffered severe and lifelong brain injuries during birth after a court challenge.</span><br /><br /><span>It has been revealed that during Cooper Ellis' birth at Bentley Hospital in August 2009, doctor Hamza Amira repeatedly tried to use an instrumental delivery, specifically one using vacuum extraction devices.</span><br /><br /><span>Cooper was eventually delivered via a combination of techniques.</span><br /><br /><span>However it was during the birthing process he was deprived of oxygen and his heart rate flatlined.</span><br /><br /><span>The young boy required resuscitation and also suffered other injuries.</span><br /><br /><span>His parents Chris Ellis and Michelle Hoglin launched legal action against the East Metropolitan Health Service and claimed that Cooper's injuries were a result of the horrifying circumstances of his birth.</span><br /><br /><span>WA District Court Judge Michael Gething sided with the family in 2018, saying Dr Amira's negligence caused Cooper's birth injuries.</span><br /><br /><span>He also acknowledged that his subsequent developmental and cognitive impairments were due to the birthing process.</span><br /><br /><span>The EMHS took the case to the WA Court of Appeal, but on Thursday the application was thrown out.</span><br /><br /><span>The appeal judges said the birth was "prolonged and difficult".</span><br /><br /><span>"(Cooper) did not take his first breath until five minutes after birth and underwent resuscitation for 20 minutes," they said.</span><br /><br /><span>The infant did not start moving his legs until an hour after birth, the judge added.</span><br /><br /><span>Slater and Gordon principal lawyer Jeffrey Potter said in a statement the firm was pleased to have assisted the family to succeed with the complex case.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Potter said Cooper's parents were relieved their "long and hard-fought battle" was finally over.</span><br /><br /><span>Now they will continue to focus on their 11-year-old son's ongoing care.</span><br /><br /><span>The $5.2 million will go towards ensuring Cooper has the support he will need for the rest of his life.</span></p>

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Facebook blocks terminally ill man from live streaming his death

<p>Facebook said it would block the livestream of a Frenchman suffering from an incurable condition who wanted to broadcast his death on the social media platform. </p> <p>Alain Cocq recently announced that he was refusing all food, drink and medicine after President Emmanuel Macron declined his request for euthanasia.</p> <p>The 57-year-old suffers from a rare medical condition which causes the walls of his arteries to stick together.</p> <p>Cocq believed he had less than a week to live and said he would broadcast his death from Saturday morning.</p> <p>"The road to deliverance begins and believe me, I am happy," he wrote on Facebook shortly after midnight in a post announcing he had "finished his last meal".</p> <p>"I know the days ahead are going to be difficult but I have made my decision and I am calm," he added.</p> <p>Facebook has been heavily criticised over the way it monitors content and said it was against their rules to portray suicide.</p> <p>"Although we respect  (Cocq's) decision to want to draw attention to this complex question, following expert advice we have taken measures to prevent the live broadcast on Alain's account," a Facebook spokesman told AFP.</p> <p>"Our rules do not allow us to show suicide attempts." </p> <p>Cocq is trying to gather supporters saying: "Facebook is blocking my video broadcast until September 8."</p> <p>"It is up to you now," he said in a message to supporters before giving out Facebook's French address "so you can let them know what you think about their methods of restricting free speech".</p> <p>"There will be a back-up within 24 hours" to run the video, he added.</p> <p>Cocq had asked Macron for permission after he wanted to die in peace by taking a substance, but the president refused, saying it was not allowed under French law.</p> <p>Cocq has used his plight to draw attention to the situation of terminally ill patients in France who are unable to be allowed to die in line with their wishes.</p> <p>"Because I am not above the law, I am not able to comply with your request," Macron said in a letter to Cocq, which the patient published on his Facebook page.</p> <p>"I cannot ask anyone to go beyond our current legal framework... Your wish is to request active assistance in dying which is not currently permitted in our country."</p>

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Zoom class captures terrifying moment student was held hostage

<p><span>An online Zoom class captured the terrifying moment a young woman was held hostage in a home invasion.</span><br /><br /><span>The scary ordeal took place during a live English lesson that was being broadcast during Zoom due to the strict coronavirus restrictions placed on citizens in the State of Durango, northwest of Mexico City.</span><br /><br /><span>The horrifying footage showed Ariana Sofia Hernandez Aldama on the left hand side of her screen with her hands tied and her face covered.</span><br /><br /><span>Throughout the video Ms Aldama remains motionless so as not to egg on the intruder.</span><br /><br /><span>Her fellow classmates watched on as the man moved silently in the background wearing a baseball hat.</span><br /><br /><span>The man lowers the camera so his movements can no longer be recorded.</span><br /><br /><span>The suspect then allegedly stole a set of keys from inside Ms Aldama’s home and used them to steal a car.</span><br /><br /><span>A number of the girl’s horrified classmates contacted emergency services to report the crime but by the time anyone arrived at Ms Aldama’s house, the attacker had already fled in the stolen vehicle.</span><br /><br /><span>While Ms Aldama was physically unharmed, there is no doubt she will be haunted forever by the incident and has undergone counselling to help recover from the invasion.</span><br /><br /><span>The Durango Prosecutor's Office reported the alleged perpetrator has been identified, and they are working to find his whereabouts.</span><br /><br /><span>The authorities also maintained that the vehicle stolen by the assailant has already been recovered.</span></p>

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Woman discovers missing brother’s body during spring clean

<p>An elderly woman living in a small house with her two brothers claim none of them realised their third brother had died in his room and rotted away to just bones by the time they noticed anything.</p> <p>The horrifying discovery was made at the family’s house in Kasugai in the Japanese prefecture of Aichi where the woman lived with her two brothers, one of whom went missing in 2015 when he was 66 years old.</p> <p>The younger siblings didn’t seem to think that their brother’s  - who was identified as Sumio Suenaga - disappearance was unusual, and didn’t report it to the authorities until a year later.</p> <p>The case didn’t go any further until the 69-year-old woman called the police after discovering bones in her brother’s room while she was cleaning.</p> <p>It was then that she thought the bones may belong to her older brother.</p> <p>She told the police: “I found something that I think are human bones.”</p> <p>Officers showed up at the house and confirmed that the bones did indeed belong to a person.</p> <p>While the police were unable to establish the deceased’s age or gender, officers believe there is a high chance the remains belonged to Sumio.</p> <p>It’s unclear how the two siblings managed to spend multiple years in the home with a decomposing body in a nearby room and not notice anything.</p> <p>The investigation is currently ongoing. Local media also reported that the home was not like a conventional Japanese house, which makes the undiscovered body even more unusual.</p>

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Mother's heartbreaking last words before tragic car crash

<p>A fatal car crash, caused by a young father high on ice, has taken the life of his grieving girlfriend who was still mourning the loss of their newborn baby.</p> <p>Bailey Hogan-Jones has pleaded guilty to culpable driving occasioning death over the high-speed smash in Bendigo, Victoria Australia in 2018.</p> <p>The car Hogan-Jones and his 21-year-old girlfriend Nukyah Gunthorpe were driving in slammed into a stationary van at speed.</p> <p>The couple had lost their nine-day old baby Eli six months prior.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837419/hero-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8256f9f3db4644f3bb432e61e0243bc2" /></p> <p>Hogan-Jones was inconsolable when police arrived at the scene only seconds after the fatal crash.</p> <p>“Is my girlfriend dead? I told her I didn't want to drive,” he said at the time.</p> <p>He had told a paramedic and police that he had smoked ice two hours before getting in the driver's seat.</p> <p>Neither he nor Ms Gunthorpe, were wearing seatbelts.</p> <p>Blood tests would later confirm that he had methamphetamine and amphetamines in his system.</p> <p>She was thrown into the windscreen and suffered critical injuries.</p> <p>Nukyah died in hospital an hour later.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837418/hero-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0ed3e26be4404ecc9b201568f461b84d" /></p> <p>Prosecutor Robyn Harper told Victoria's County Court the car was travelling as fast as 144km/h along the residential road in Flora Hill.</p> <p>Police had been pursuing the car, after seeing the driver speed through a red light and told the court that they had been travelling twice the 60km speed limit to catch Hogan-Jones.</p> <p>Two men who were driving home from a harness racing meet near Warrnambool, were stopped in a turning lane.</p> <p>They were about to cross into Hogan-Jones' path.</p> <p>The driver knew he couldn't get around the corner in time so he took action which resulted in Hogan-Jones braking suddenly and losing control of his vehicle.</p> <p>Louise Baggott said her daughter's final words when she went out that day were “I love you, mamma”.</p> <p>“I had to see my daughter's beautiful, broken face and body,” she told the court.</p> <p>”We were so full of hope at one point in our lives. It's all gone.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837420/hero-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/aa508919b1114698bf7c4b5a91abc2f9" /></p> <p>Ms Baggott's youngest daughter Lola said she didn't like how quiet the house has become without her older sister.</p> <p>“I miss her,” she said.</p> <p>“I will love you always and forever. A force to be reckoned with, a shoulder to lean on, and the bravest person I'll ever know. A piece of my heart has gone with you Nukyah. Until we meet again, have a dart rolled and ready for me.”</p> <p>Hogan-Jones' lawyer Eleanor Millar said he had made poor decisions in the past but was actively working to make his life better after he heard he was becoming a father.</p> <p>“With Eli's passing all of that was then undone ... he will have to live with another poor decision for the rest of his life,” she said.</p> <p>Hogan Jones will return to the Victoria County Court on Wednesday to be sentenced.</p>

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Mother charged with murder of disabled son

<p>A woman has faced court after being charged with the murder of her 10-year-old son at a home in West London.</p> <p>Olga Freeman was charged with the murder of her son on Monday after police paid a visit to the property in the early hours of Sunday morning.</p> <p>She appeared in Uxbridge Magistrates’ Court, only speaking when asked her name and date of birth, before being remanded in custody to appear at the Old Bailey on August 19.</p> <p>The victim is said to be the son of the 40-year-old, who is originally from Russia.</p> <p>His father is celebrity photographer Dean Freeman.</p> <p>Dean Freeman said he was "beyond devastated" over the death of his boy.</p> <p>"Dylan was a beautiful, bright, inquisitive and artistic child who loved to travel, visit art galleries and swim.</p> <p>"We travelled extensively over the years together spending such memorable time in places including Brazil, France and Spain.</p> <p>"I can't begin to comprehend his loss," he said in a statement, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/12420858/olga-freeman-charged-murder-photographer-son-west-london/" target="_blank">The Sun reports.</a></p> <p>Dean's agent added: "He was a loving and caring father and even though divorced for a number of years, he cherished all the quality time spent with his son."</p> <p>Neighbours in the affluent west London area claimed to have heard a “childish scream”.</p> <p>Keith Grindrod said he was woken by a "scream in the middle of the night".</p> <p>"It sounded like a little scream next door. It was a childish scream. It was just enough to wake me up.</p> <p>"I can hear next door and downstairs when they are moving around and I can hear outside as it is quiet at the weekend.</p> <p>"Then I woke up at about 6 am and looked out the window and saw a police car outside."</p> <p>Other neighbours said Dylan was disabled and used a wheelchair.</p> <p>Olga Freeman’s Facebook page features multiple photos of herself and one photo with a boy believed to be her son, Dylan.</p>

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Insider trading has become more subtle

<p>Insider trading comes in two main forms: arguably legal and clearly illegal.</p> <p>But, as with drugs in sport, it’s hard to tell when arguably legal ends and clearly illegal begins.</p> <p>It is generally accepted that it is wrong to buy shares in the company you run when you know something about it that the market does not.</p> <p>It’s especially wrong to buy shares when you are telling the market that things are much worse for the company than you know them to be.</p> <p><strong>Join 130,000 people who subscribe to free evidence-based news.</strong></p> <p>Get newsletter</p> <p>But what about suddenly sharing everything – an avalanche of information – in the lead-up to a share purchase in order to muddy the waters and create enough uncertainty to lower the price?</p> <p>Chief executives have enormous discretion over the tone and timing of the news they release, generally answering to no one.</p> <p>A linguistic analysis of twelve years worth of news releases by 6764 US chief executives just published by myself and two University of Queensland colleagues in the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378426620300881">Journal of Banking and Finance</a> suggests they are using this discretion strategically.</p> <p>Not clearly illegal (how can oversharing be illegal?) their behaviour can have the same effect as talking down their share price while buying, something that is clearly illegal.</p> <p><strong>Spreads matter, as well as signs</strong></p> <p>Earlier analyses of insider trading have looked at only the “sign” of the information released to to the share market. On balance was the tone of one month’s news releases positive or negative?</p> <p>We have looked at the “spread”, the range from positive to negative as well as the net result.</p> <p>It doesn’t make sense to treat as identical a month’s worth of releases which are all neutral tone in tone (sending no message) and a month’s worth of releases of which half are strongly positive and half are strongly negative (stoking uncertainty).</p> <p>Our sample of discretionary (non-required) news releases is drawn from those lodged with <a href="https://web.stevens.edu/hfslwiki/index.php?title=Thomson_Reuters_News_Analytics">Thomson Reuters News Analytics</a> between January 2003 to December 2015. It includes firms listed on the New York Stock Exchange, the AMEX American Stock Exchange and the NASDAQ technology-heavy exchange.</p> <p>The archive scores the tone of each release as positive, negative or neutral.</p> <p>We used the <a href="https://www.thomsonreuters.com/en/press-releases/2014/thomson-reuters-starmine-model-predicts-us-stock-performance.html">Thomson Reuters Insiders Filing Database</a> to obtain information on chief executive buying, limiting our inquiries to significant purchases of at least 100 shares.</p> <p><strong>Strategic uncertainty</strong></p> <p>About 70% of the chief executives proved to be opportunistic traders in the sense that they bought with no particular pattern, rather than at the same time every year.</p> <p>We found that news releases by these chief executives increased information uncertainty by 5.8% and 3.6% in the months before they bought and in the month they bought.</p> <p>In the months following their purchases, the positive to negative spread of their news releases returned to the average for non-purchase months.</p> <p>The unmistakable conclusion is that their behaviour is strategic.</p> <p> We obtained similar results when we used other measures of buying and the tone of news releases.</p> <p>Our results provide no evidence to support the contention that chief executives behave in this strategic way when selling shares. This is consistent with other findings suggesting that the timing of sales is often out of the hands of the sellers.</p> <p><a href="https://scholar.google.com/scholar_lookup?title=Insider%20trading%20and%20voluntary%20disclosures&amp;publication_year=2006&amp;author=Q.%20Cheng&amp;author=K.%20Lo">Previous studies</a> have found only <a href="https://scholar.google.com/scholar_lookup?title=Voluntary%20disclosures%20and%20insider%20transactions&amp;publication_year=1999&amp;author=C.F.%20Noe">weak links</a> between executive share purchases and the news they release to the market. This might be because those studies have looked for more easily detected (and more clearly problematic) negative news releases.</p> <p>But that’s an old and (with the advent of linguistic analysis) increasingly risky approach.</p> <p>Our research suggests that by saying many things at once chief executives can achieve much the same thing.</p> <p><em>Written by Barry Oliver. Republished with permission <a href="https://theconversation.com/insider-trading-has-become-more-subtle-142981">of The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Paul McCartney opens up on why he sued The Beatles

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Paul McCartney has decided to clear up some "misconceptions" about The Beatles' infamous break-up in 1970 and shared why he decided to sue the band.</p> <p>“I suppose that when The Beatles broke up, perhaps there was a misconception that we all sort of hated each other,” McCartney, 78, told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gq-magazine.co.uk/culture/article/paul-mccartney-interview" target="_blank" class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtflink"><em>British GQ</em></a> in a new interview.</p> <p>“What I realise now is that, because it was a family, because it was a gang, families argue. And families have disputes.</p> <p>“And some people want to do this and some people want to do that.”</p> <p>At the time, the other three members wanted to make Allan Klein their manager, which McCartney disapproved of, calling Klein a "f***ing idiot".</p> <p>“The only way for me to save The Beatles and Apple – and to release <em>Get Back</em> by Peter Jackson and which allowed us to release <em>Anthology </em>and all these great remasters of all the great Beatles records – was to sue the band,” he explained.</p> <p>“If I hadn’t done that, it would have all belonged to Allen Klein. The only way I was given to get us out of that was to do what I did.</p> <p>“I said, ‘Well, I’ll sue Allen Klein,’ and I was told I couldn’t because he wasn’t party to it. ‘You’ve got to sue The Beatles’.”</p> <p>McCartney said it was horrible having to make the decision, but it needed to be done.</p> <p>“There was no way I was going to work that hard for all my life and see it all vanish in a puff of smoke. I also knew that, if I managed to save it, I would be saving it for them (the rest of The Beatles) too.”</p> <p>Despite Lennon, Harrison and Starr eventually turning on Klein, McCartney said that there was a time that he was the reason for the band's demise and that he almost blamed himself as well.</p> <p>“I knew that that was stupid and when we eventually got back together I knew it was silly, but I think it spawned a lot of people who thought that of me,” he continued.</p> <p>After the band split, McCartney decided to turn to alcohol.</p> <p>“I just took to booze. There wasn’t much time to have mental health issues, it was just, f**k it, it’s boozing or sleeping,” he said, adding that he was inspired by his first wife Linda to get himself out of his depression by telling himself, “OK, this is really bad and I’ve got to do something about it.”</p> <p>He added, “I think that’s how I got out of it, by persuading myself that it wasn’t a good idea to give in to my depression and my doubts.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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"Lucky escape" for Winston Churchill's great-granddaughter on Epstein's notorious island

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>One of Princess Diana's younger bridesmaids detailed her "very lucky" escape after she was a guest on Jeffrey Epstein's island.</p> <p>Clementine Hambro took two flights on Epstein's jet, including one dubbed the Lolita Express.</p> <p>On both occasions, she had been at Epstein's luxury homes where he spent many years abusing young girls.</p> <p>She also was at Epstein's Island Little St James in the US Virgin Islands, which was dubbed by locals as Paedo Island.</p> <p>Miss Hambro, a great-granddaughter of Sir Winston Churchill, said she has been "completely horrified" by the revelations about the financier’s conduct and her "heart breaks for all the survivors".</p> <p>The now-married mother of four said she did not suffer or witness any abuse, but added that she hopes the victims "get the justice they so deserve".</p> <p>She issued a statement after flight logs, which were released as part of court documents, revealed that she flew on the jets to Epstein's visits to his ranch in New Mexico as well as the island.</p> <p>She made the trips back in 1999, where she was a 23-year-old employee at Christie's auction house in New York.</p> <p>In a statement last night, Miss Hambro said: "The first flight was a work trip with female colleagues to look at Epstein’s new home in Santa Fe to discuss what art he was going to buy.</p> <p>"The second trip, to Little St James, was a personal invitation, which I thought would be fun to accept, but I didn’t know anyone there, didn’t really enjoy myself, and never went back. My heart breaks for all the survivors, now I know what happened on that island.</p> <p>"In the course of those two trips, I was not abused, nor did I see anyone abused, or anything untoward happen, with minors or otherwise. I have been completely horrified about the revelations of his conduct since then. I was clearly very lucky, my heart goes out to those who were abused by him, and I trust they get the justice they so deserve."</p> <p>She also apologised for being "young and naive".</p> <p>"I was young and naive, and could not conceive of what was to unfold."</p> <p>She only travelled on the jets when leaving his homes, according to the logs. It is not known how she arrived at the ranch and the island.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Hidden cellar found at Maddie McCann suspect's house

<p>German police has reportedly discovered a hidden cellar at the former home of the suspect in the Madeleine McCann case.</p> <p>After digging for three days, using resources such as an excavator, ground penetrating radar, sniffer dogs and a drone, authorities were desperate for crucial evidence.</p> <p>The cellar was discovered as investigators dug a deep hole 15 meters wide in the garden of a secluded holiday chalet outside Hanover.</p> <p>Suspect Christian B, a German drifter, is thought to have lived in a camper van on the site in 2007, shortly after Madeleine vanished from a holiday apartment in Portugal.</p> <p>One police theory is that the suspect took Madeleine with him as he drove back to Germany, a journey of more than 24 hours.</p> <p>The German prosecutors investigating Christian B’s alleged involvement in Madeleine’s disappearance have confirmed the search is part of the inquiry, but said nothing further.</p> <p>Thomas Dressler, who runs a water sports centre close to the riverside search site, said: "None of us really know the people that stay there.</p> <p>"Yesterday I saw they were doing the investigation and I thought about how young my daughter was at that time, oh God and so close. That gave me the fear and panic of a father.</p> <p>"I believe the police are looking for Maddie. It's gruesome and I find it chilling that it could happen and so close to us. But of course, I have never seen him myself."</p>

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Michael Jackson’s daughter opens up about abuse allegations

<p>Paris Jackson has refuted claims that her father Michael Jackson assaulted children, in a never-before-seen interview.</p> <p>The late star’s daughter dismissed the abuse allegations as “lies”, and said her father is “innocent”.</p> <p>The interview, which took place in 2012 when Paris was 14, was posted online to the Jacksonology TV YouTube channel.</p> <p>Interviewed by Sonia Lowe, Paris said the allegations against her father about molesting children are “lies” and that her father is “innocent”.</p> <p>“He told us there were a lot of bad people out there, and he told us a little bit about the conspiracies.”</p> <p>“The older we got, the more we kind of figured things out”</p> <p>The model and singer added: “I will always defend him.”</p> <p>“A lot of people didn’t really understand him.</p> <p>"He's innocent.</p> <p>“He’s just like, he’s innocent and a sweetheart”.</p> <p>Paris Jackson reminisced fondly about her father, struggling to pick a highlight of her time with him.</p> <p>“A favourite memory of my dad, that is pretty hard? We had a lot. There would be a lot in Bahrain where we would hang out on the roof, or in Ireland just walking through the forest - which was fun,’” she said.</p> <p>The now 22-year-old said her father was happiest when he was not himself.</p> <p>“I would probably say he was happiest when he was in disguise.</p> <p>“Like, we went to Disneyland several times, we would be in disguise and he could be normal - there would be no one bothering him.”</p>

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Elton John’s ex-wife demands millions over film and memoir

<p><span>Sir Elton John's ex-wife, Renate Blauel, is seeking an estimate of £3m in damages after claiming the legendary singer broke the terms of their divorce deal.</span><br /><br /><span>The sound engineer was wed to Sir Elton for four years and is suing her ex-husband over passages in his memoir <em>Me</em>, and his film centering around his life, <em>Rocketman</em>.</span><br /><br /><span>Ms Blauel says both of Elton’s works revealed details of the marriage, breaking an agreement they made when they divorced in 1988.</span><br /><br /><span>She says those disclosures triggered long-standing mental health problems.</span><br /><br /><span>However Sir Elton's defence has hit back, saying they acknowledge the existence of the divorce agreement that the pair both signed, but deny any breaches or causing "psychological harm".l</span><br /><br /><span>Sir Elton previously agreed to remove certain passages from his autobiography before it was published last year, according to papers filed at the High Court in London.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837071/elton-john.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/199363a06c5340bab7ca7a8d1d4dd930" /><br /><br /><span>In the final draft, Ms Blauel only appears on eight pages.</span><br /><br /><span>Sir Elton describes her in positive terms throughout the book, calling her "dignified", "decent" and "someone I couldn't fault in any way".</span><br /><br /><span>However, Ms Blauel says some of the remaining passages "seriously misrepresented the nature of their relationship".</span><br /><br /><span>Sir Elton claimed in his book that he did not enter their marriage with the intention of starting a family.</span><br /><br /><span>Ms Blauel denies this saying they both "did attempt to have children during their relationship but were unable to do so".</span><br /><br /><span>A request to have this passage removed was rejected, according to court documents.</span><br /><br /><span>Ms Blauel also claimed not to have been consulted about her appearance in Rocketman, although her character, played by Celinde Schoenmaker took up less than five minutes of screentime.</span><br /><br /><span>Ms Blauel also said that she had felt “great anxiety” after the release of the movie resulted in a journalist attempting to “locate her in her local village.”</span><br /><br /><span>Her lawyer, Yisrael Hiller, told the BBC that Sir Elton had "ignored" his promise to keep the details of their marriage private.</span><br /><br /><span>"Renate is particularly upset by the film," he said.</span><br /><br /><span>"In her mind, the film seeks to portray their marriage as a sham, which she wholeheartedly disputes and considers a false and disrespectful portrayal of their time together.</span><br /><br /><span>"Renate wants the privacy that was promised to her - that is why she is seeking an injunction. Any claim for monetary relief is secondary, and would just cover damages and future expenses caused by Elton's breaches."</span><br /><br /><span>Elton and Miss Blauel met in 1983, after Sir Elton recorded his comeback album Two Low For Zero at London's Air Studios.</span><br /><br /><span>Ms Blauel worked as an engineer.</span><br /><br /><span>The couple married the following year in Australia, and Ms Blauel told United Press International at the time: "He's the nicest guy I've ever met".</span><br /><br /><span>However, the pair divorced four years later.</span><br /><br /><span>Sir Elton, who had told Rolling Stone magazine in 1976 that he was bisexual, went on to admit to the publication that he was "quite comfortable being gay".</span><br /><br /><span>The star went on to marry filmmaker David Furnish in 2005, and the couple have two children.</span><br /><br /><span>Ms Blauel has maintained a low profile since the divorce, however Sir Elton has previously spoken of his "huge guilt and regret" over the pain he caused her.</span></p>

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Suspected murderers' drove straight to McDonald's

<p><span>Three people have been arrested in connection with the deaths of three friends who set out to go on a fishing trip.</span><br /><br /><span>Authorities confirm they have arrested Tony "TJ" Wiggins, 26, has been arrested on suspicion of shooting and killing the three men near a lake in the central Florida community of Frostproof on Friday night, Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said.</span><br /><br /><span>Wiggins' girlfriend, Mary Whittemore, 27, and his brother, William "Robert" Wiggins, 21, have also been charged with accessory after the fact of a capital felony.</span><br /><br /><span>The trio were arrested just five days after they allegedly killed three mates, Damion Tillman, 23, Keven Springfield, 30, and Brandon Rollins, 27.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837057/murder-trio-alleged-au-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b54b11269c88432fa539056c2027153a" /></p> <p><em>Brandon Rollins</em><br /><br /><span>Mr Rollins called his father before his death, begging for “help”.</span><br /><br /><span>The three friends were planning to fish on Friday night, but a truck carrying the suspects followed them.</span><br /><br /><span>Judd says TJ Wiggins eventually got out and shot them in a rural area of Frostproof, east of Tampa.</span><br /><br /><span>"When we found these people ... massacred ... we thought, my goodness, what could have happened there. Now we know," Judd told reporters Wednesday.</span><br /><span>Details about whether the three suspects had attorneys weren't immediately available.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837056/murder-trio-alleged-au-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d13516aaec3941b0a1159a8d6a37c931" /><br /><br /><span>Surveillance video showed Damion Tillman purchasing items at Dollar General, and a clerk told investigators that Tillman said he was going fishing.</span><br /><br /><span>After questioning all three suspects, Robert Wiggins eventually admitted to investigators that he had seen Tillman at the Dollar General store Friday night while standing in line with his brother, the sheriff's office said.</span><br /><br /><span>Robert Wiggins went on to tell investigators that while driving a truck with TJ and Whittemore, his older brother directed him to turn onto a particular road instead of going home.</span><br /><br /><span>Then two trucks carrying the three eventual victims passed by, and TJ Wiggins told his brother to "make a U-turn and follow the trucks," the sheriff's office said.</span><br /><br /><span>The sheriffs office said "Robert stayed in the truck with Whittemore, while TJ got out and confronted" one of the men.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837058/murder-trio-alleged-au-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/901feef8bfb54ef4a1dfd14f93d2d75d" /></p> <p><em>Mr Rollins called his father before his death, begging for “help”.</em><br /><br /><span>He allegedly punched him and accused him of stealing his truck.</span><br /><br /><span>"Robert told detectives he watched as TJ shot all three victims. TJ then asked Robert to help him put (one of the victims) into the back of one of the trucks," the sheriff's office said.</span><br /><br /><span>Judd says he they are still uncertain about the details or veracity of TJ Wiggins' claim surrounding the stolen truck.</span><br /><br /><span>"The only information we have is TJ is allegedly mad over some kind of truck deal that happened some period of time ago. We've not had an opportunity to ... dig into that," the sheriff said.</span><br /><br /><span>Oddly enough, the suspects allegedly drove to McDonald’s right after the killings and ordered 10 double cheeseburgers and two chicken sandwiches.</span><br /><br /><span>The next morning, Robert took his truck to a car wash and cleaned it, according to the sheriff's office.</span><br /><br /><span>TJ Wiggins is being held on charges of first-degree murder; tampering with evidence; possession of a firearm by a convicted felon; and possession of ammunition by a convicted felon, the sheriff's office said.</span><br /><br /><span>All three suspects are scheduled to have their first appearance in court at 1 p.m. on Thursday.</span></p>

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British couple win legal battle to name child Lucifer

<p>A British couple has finally been allowed to name their child Lucifer.</p> <p>Dan and Mandy Sheldon went to register the baby name last week after the council office opened after lockdown, but they lodged an official complaint after a run-in with the lady at the registers desk.</p> <p>“We were really excited to go and get him registered but the woman looked at us in utter disgust," he explained to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/12187899/parents-officially-name-son-lucifer/" target="_blank" class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtflink"><em>The Sun</em></a>.</p> <p>“She told us he would never be able to get a job, and that teachers wouldn’t want to teach him.</p> <p>“I tried to explain that we are not religious people, and Lucifer in Greek means ‘light-bringer’ and ‘morning’ but she wouldn’t listen.</p> <p>“She even told us that it was illegal to name a child that in New Zealand and that maybe we could name him something else but refer to him as Lucifer at home.”</p> <p>After they were told that, the parents were then told to leave the room as she checked if she was allowed to register the boy with the name of the devil. </p> <p>Dan added: “We were gobsmacked with her behaviour.</p> <p>“Eventually she did it, but it was through gritted teeth.</p> <p>“Honestly, we just thought it was a nice name . . . a unique one. We didn’t expect to get so much grief about it.”</p> <p>Derbyshire County Council said: “We apologise if they were offended but it is the job of our registrars to advise in these matters as sometimes people are not aware of certain meanings or associations around certain names.”</p>

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Amber Heard claims Johnny Depp “pushed Kate Moss down the stairs”

<p><span>Amber Heard claims she was forced to intervene after Johnny Depp attempted to throw her sister Whitney Henriques down a flight of stairs, saying she remembered a “rumour” of the same thing happening to Kate Moss.</span></p> <p><span>Telling London’s High Court on Tuesday, the 34-year-old admitted to hitting Depp but justified her actions by saying it was in defence of her sister.</span></p> <p><span>“I did strike Johnny that day in defence of my sister, he was about to push her down the stairs,” she told the court about the alleged incident in March 2015.</span></p> <p><span>“The moment before that happened, I remembered information I had heard (that) he pushed a former girlfriend – I believe it was Kate Moss – down the stairs,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>“I had heard this rumour from two people and it was fresh in my mind.</span></p> <p><span>“In a flash I reacted in defence of her.”</span></p> <p><span>“For years, Johnny’s punched (me) and for years I had never even hit him. I never so much as landed a blow and I will never forget this incident … it was the first time after all these years (I hit him back),” she said.</span></p> <p><span>Eleanor Laws, QC, acting for Johnny Depp, said “you just added that bit in about Kate Moss. You’ve changed your story.”</span></p> <p><span>Heard denied it, saying “that’s always what it has been.”</span></p> <p><span>“This is the first time you’ve mentioned it, do you agree?” Laws pressed, to which Heard replied “I don’t know.”</span></p> <p><span>Kate Moss and Johnny Depp dated in the ‘90s when she was 20 and he was 31. Depp has denied hitting her while they were together.</span></p> <p><span>The court was also shown vision of Heard speaking at a hearing in the US on 13 August 2016 which she described stepping in to protect her sister and that she feared for her sister’s life.</span></p> <p><span>Depp has strenuously denied domestic violence against Heard.</span></p>

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Sydney grandmother furious after precious ring goes missing in jewellery store

<p><span>A woman is demanding answers after she sent her prized engagement ring to one of Australia’s largest jewellers, only to discover it went missing.</span><br /><br /><span>Rosa Minichini says her husband Joe proposed on their first date – when she was 17 and he was 23.</span><br /><br /><span>The pair actually broke family tradition to get her engagement ring.</span><br /><br /><span>"So back in those days, the parents had to come along to choose the rings and I wasn't going to have that. So I said okay, when can you get time off work? We'll catch the ferry across to the city to Diamond Traders and we'll choose a ring, and that's what we did," Joe said.</span><br /><br /><span>Rosa explained that her ring was “a little cluster. Ten diamonds but one in the centre. And it just had little ones down, down the side of it but 18k gold."</span><br /><br /><span>After decades of sporting the gorgeous jewel around, a diamond fell out, and so Rosa took her engagement ring to Angus and Coote at their local shopping centre, Warringah Mall, on Sydney's northern beaches, to get it repaired.</span><br /><br /><span>"We got a call to go in and, you know, pick it up," Rosa said.</span><br /><br /><span>"As soon as he opened that bag, and it was missing, I just went into shock."</span><br /><br /><span>That shock was amplified because her wedding rings were the only jewellery she had left after the Minichini's were robbed seven years ago.</span><br /><br /><span>"They took everything of my parents', mine, my wife's, my children's necklaces, bracelets, watches, everything. Everything was gone, because everything was in the safe," Joe shared.</span><br /><br /><span>"You know, with the heartache of just having everything taken away, I just couldn't believe that this precious engagement ring would be taken away," Rosa explained.</span><br /><br /><span>Rosa said she was shown a photograph of the repaired ring, but what happened on the way back to the Angus and Coote store is a mystery.</span><br /><br /><span>"I can't see how it's so hard to find, because all diamond places, jewellers, they've got cameras. Surely, from one place to another, the camera can tell where it's gone," Joe admitted.</span><br /><br /><span>The ring cost $1100 back in 1980, when Joe earned $80 a week, petrol was 40 cents a litre, and a home in Sydney cost $50,000.</span><br /><br /><span>But the ring hasn't been valued since.</span><br /><br /><span>"I can't even put a price onto it because of the fact that the sentimental value to me, it's worth more than a million dollars," Rosa said.</span><br /><br /><span>Angus and Coote is one of Australia's largest jewellers with stores around the country.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836999/couple-ring.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/97b76785be114818a161d0690a366901" /><br /><br /><span>The company is yet to give an explanation as to where Rosa’s ring went missing, almost seven months later since it was first entrusted to them.</span><br /><br /><span>The jewellery store has offered to make a replica of the engagement ring.</span><br /><br /><span>Angus and Coote told <em>A Current Affair</em> "as this is a private matter we will not be making any public comment."</span><br /><br /><span>Rosa says that answer is just not good enough.</span><br /><br /><span>“It shouldn't go missing, you know, the thing is that you've got this in your hands. It should be really looked after.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836998/couple-ring-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/931cf7b7b37c4e139b79e1cfe96cd2d6" /><br /><br /><span>Andrew Gavrielatos from the NSW Fair Trading's customer service department has the following advice for customers.</span><br /><br /><span>"Everyone places a value on their items, and they do expect to be compensated for that,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>Certainly a consumer should expect to be put into that place before the item was handed over. Where there is a sentimental value, obviously that becomes a lot more difficult, because what is that value? It's much harder to determine.”</span><br /><br /><span>"When you do hand an item over make sure you have a photograph of the item, make sure you get a receipt, for the item you've handed over and tell the business it does have that sentimental value, to keep them focused on that."</span></p>

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