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“Bizarre” Home and Away impersonator loses court appeal

<p dir="ltr"><em>Content warning: This article includes mentions of suicide.</em></p> <p dir="ltr">A female ‘catfish’ who impersonated a <em>Home and Away </em>star to attract women online and was found guilty of stalking has failed in her bid to overturn her conviction.</p> <p dir="ltr">Lydia Abdelmalek was found guilty of six counts of stalking three years ago after she impersonated Lincoln Lewis, the star who played Geoff Campbell in the popular soap.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though she first launched her appeal in 2019, the guilty verdict was upheld in Victoria’s County Court on May 26, as reported by <em><a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7754837/home-and-away-catfish-loses-court-appeal/?cs=14231" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Canberra Times</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I find the appellant was responsible for the stalking behaviour,” Judge Claire Quin told the court.</p> <p dir="ltr">Judge Quin described the case as “bizarre” and rejected evidence presented by Ms Abdelmalek.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I found her account confusing, deliberate and that she was deliberately evasive,” Judge Quin said. “Her account does not make sense.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The court also heard that a phone seized from Ms Abdelmalak’s home during the appeal in relation to another case contained “incriminating” evidence against her, according to the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-05-26/lydia-abdelmalek-lincoln-lewis-catfish-appeal/101099416" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ABC</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">The court heard that the phone contained a wealth of material that “supported the accounts provided by the victims”, including hundreds of texts and pictures sent to the women she stalked, intimate photos, and Mr Lewis’ real voicemail.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Much of this material was not available at the time of the Magistrates’ hearing,” Judge Quin said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The enormity of this behaviour could not be over exaggerated.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Abdelmalek impersonated the TV star and used other aliases to stalk seven people over a four-year period starting from May 2011, in what one victim called “sick mind games”.</p> <p dir="ltr">One of Ms Abdelmalek’s victims who died by suicide wrote a statement prior to her death where she outlined the trauma she experienced from being tricked into believing the actor was in love with her.</p> <p dir="ltr">She said she felt tortured for the “sick fascination, perverse pleasure and unhealthy satisfaction” of her tormentor.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another victim said she went from being the life of the party to a recluse after what the sentencing magistrate described as a “calculated and cruel” offence.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>If you are experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide, you can call Lifeline 131 114 or beyondblue 1300 224 636 or visit <a href="https://www.lifeline.org.au/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lifeline.org.au</a> or <a href="https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/national-help-lines-and-websites" target="_blank" rel="noopener">beyondblue.org.au</a>.</em></p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-809f9e68-7fff-e3b1-a053-0cfcec6ba428"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Heidelberg Magistrates Court</em></p>

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Kevin Spacey charged with four counts of sexual assault

<p>Kevin Spacey has been charged with four counts of sexual assault.</p> <p>The former Hollywood megastar, 62, was charged by London’s Metropolitan Police and is due to appear in court. All of the counts are alleged to have happened between 2005 and 2013.</p> <p>Four of the alleged offences are said to have taken place in London, while the other is alleged to have happened in Gloucestershire, in the south-west of England.</p> <p>Robert Ainslie, head of the UK Crown Prosecution Service’s (CPS) special crime division, said: “The CPS has authorised criminal charges against Kevin Spacey, 62, for four counts of sexual assault against three men.</p> <p>“He has also been charged with causing a person to engage in penetrative sexual activity without consent. The charges follow a review of the evidence gathered by the Metropolitan Police in its investigation.</p> <p>“The Crown Prosecution Service reminds all concerned that criminal proceedings against Mr Spacey are active and that he has the right to a fair trial.”</p> <p>Police opened an investigation into the House of Cards star in 2017, following this Spacey was interviewed under caution by the police in 2019.</p> <p>His House of Cards character, Frank Underwood, had to be killed off after he was booted from the series as allegations emerged. Shortly after Spacey was ordered to pay the studio that created the show $US43.7million ($A61.62m) last year over breach of contract following sexual harassment claims.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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“How to Murder Your Husband” author convicted for murdering husband

<p dir="ltr">An author who wrote an essay about “How to Murder Your Husband” has been convicted of murdering her husband.</p> <p dir="ltr">Nancy Crampton Brophy, 71, was found guilty on Wednesday of second-degree murder for shooting dead her chef husband Daniel Brophy, 63, back in June 2018. </p> <p dir="ltr">Prosecutors told the court that Crampton Brophy killed her husband to claim her husband’s $1.4 million life insurance policy. </p> <p dir="ltr">They said that she was collecting gun pieces in the moments leading to Daniel’s death before killing him at the Oregon Culinary Institute. </p> <p dir="ltr">Footage presented to the Multnomah County courtroom showed that Crampton Brophy in fact owned the same make and model of the gun that killed her husband.</p> <p dir="ltr">She was also seen driving to and from the culinary institute when Daniel was killed and found by his students. </p> <p dir="ltr">Her defence team argued that she was collecting them for a new book she was writing - about a woman who slowly collected gun parts to complete a weapon and get back at her abusive husband.</p> <p dir="ltr">They said that Crampton Brophy and Daniel were in a loving relationship for almost 25 years. </p> <p dir="ltr">The jury of five men and seven women deliberated the case for eight hours before delivering the guily verdict.</p> <p dir="ltr">One of Crampton Brophy’s attorneys, Lisa Maxfield said they are looking to appeal.</p> <p dir="ltr">Crampton Brophy is due to be sentenced on June 13.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Twitter</em></p>

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Pensioner catches closet thief red-handed

<p dir="ltr">A pensioner has caught his neighbour stealing money from him after installing a camera in his wardrobe. </p> <p dir="ltr">John Rennie is legally blind and thought he was going insane when his money kept disappearing from his wardrobe.</p> <p dir="ltr">After installing a camera, the 79-year-old was shocked to find his neighbour, rummaging through his wardrobe and safe stealing his money. </p> <p dir="ltr">"I was gutted when I saw who was coming into my home and taking my cash," he told <a href="https://9now.nine.com.au/a-current-affair/cairns-mans-awful-discovery-neighbour-cctv/ba5cd542-70b7-4d7e-a2d7-4dd03be2f804" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A Current Affair</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Pav Taak, his 47-year-old neighbour who would occasionally come look after him, was caught four times stealing money. </p> <p dir="ltr">John said that he would forget his key sometimes and left a spare in the garden and believes that’s how Taak was able to get in.</p> <p dir="ltr">The passcode for the safe was also written down which gave Taak easy access.</p> <p dir="ltr">One hundred dollars that was put aside for John’s daughter’s birthday was stolen, as well as $400 that was left inside a suit pocket. </p> <p dir="ltr">John and his son presented the CCTV footage to police and Taak was charged with three counts of entering a premises with intent and one count of burglary.</p> <p dir="ltr">Taak pleaded guilty and was given a nine-month prison sentence that was immediately suspended. He was also ordered to pay back $200 in compensation. </p> <p dir="ltr">John said that “that’s no justice” and that Taak got away “scott-free”. </p> <p dir="ltr">"He's shown no remorse at all and he's still out there driving a cab, even though his family told me he'd lose his licence because of the conviction.” </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: A Current Affair</em></p>

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“I want my story to be heard”: Detained woman’s chilling words before her death revealed

<p><em>Content warning: This article includes mentions of suicide and mental health struggles.</em></p> <p>A woman who died of a suspected suicide in an Australian immigration detention centre has been identified as a New Zealand mum of two, who had her mental health medication restricted and pleaded with fellow detainees to tell her story just hours before she died.</p> <p>It is understood the woman was a 53-year-old from Christchurch (Ōtautahi), as reported by <em>TeAoMāori.news</em>.</p> <p>It has also been reported that the woman’s cell was raided by guards, who removed a stray cat she had adopted during her time at the centre, hours before her death on Saturday.</p> <p>She had been held at Sydney’s Villawood Immigration Detention Centre for six months under the controversial <a href="https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/2-when-can-visa-be-refused-or-cancelled-under-section-501" target="_blank" rel="noopener">501 deportation program</a> - which allows for non-Australian citizens to be subject to deportation if their criminal record includes a prison sentence of 12 months or more.</p> <p>During the woman’s stay, fellow detainees said her mental state rapidly deteriorated.</p> <p>“The treatment she received was not human,” a source inside the facility who was familiar with its operations and her situation, told <em>Māori TV</em>.</p> <p>The source said Serco, the centre’s private operator, is failing to tackle mental illness among detainees.</p> <p>“With mental health concerns, basically it’s the same approach for everyone. Heavily sedate them so they shut up.”</p> <p>Ian Rintoul, a member of the advocacy group Refugee Action Coalition, told <em>Māori TV</em> the fellow detainees and the woman herself pleaded with Serco to get her help.</p> <p>Both she and a few other detainees had told Serco and Border Force (that) she needed help and should not be in detention. Her mental illness was very obvious,” Rintoul said.</p> <p>Friends of the woman have remembered her as “gorgeous, with a beautiful wairua”, per <a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/501-deportee-who-died-in-australian-custody-was-christchurch-mother-of-two/I2TQLNEHOLVNWN7KVVIVZBOYZA/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>NZ Herald</em></a>.</p> <p>“I was concerned about her, about her mental health, especially in that place,” one said.</p> <p>The day after her death, detainees told The Guardian that she had been fighting to get access to her mental health medication earlier in the day and that she wanted her story to be told.</p> <p>“She told me that she needs to have some medication at 8am in the morning but they’d give her medication like at 11am or 11.30am. And that makes her feel bad,” one detainee told the publication.</p> <p>“She was telling us last night, ‘I want my story herald. I want the people to know what happened to me. I want to tell the people what these detention centres do to people,” another recalled.</p> <p>One detainee said one of the likely “final straws” was when guards took the cat she adopted, which had been roaming the facility.</p> <p>“She was pretty obsessive, attached, and they knew that. They broke her spirit,” they said.</p> <p>Her fellow deportees also said the woman was trying to get in touch with her two sons, one of whom lives in Sydney, but she believed guards were preventing her from doing so.</p> <p>According to Māori TV, the Australian Border Force took more than 12 hours to get in touch with the woman’s family after she died, while Aotearoa’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade said on Monday night that it hadn’t been notified of a death of a New Zealand woman in an Australian detention centre.</p> <p>Her death also comes within days of Australia’s change in leadership, wth incoming Prime Minister Anthony Albanese signalling that the 501 program would continue but that there might be more consideration for the time someone has lived in Australia and whether they have ties to New Zealand.</p> <p>New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has welcomed potential reforms to the program, which disproportionately affects Māori, and said she will raise the grievances related to the program “no matter whom the leader is in Australia”.</p> <p>“We accept because we do it too, circumstances under which people will be deported … we have always reserved the right for New Zealand to do that,” Ms Ardern said in her weekly post-Cabinet press conference.</p> <p>“The area we have had grievance is where individuals are being deported who have little or no connection to New Zealand.</p> <p>“I will be utterly consistent no matter whom the leader is in Australia with raising that grievance.”</p> <p><em>If you are experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide, you can call Lifeline 131 114 or beyondblue 1300 224 636 or visit <a href="https://www.lifeline.org.nz/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lifeline.org.nz</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Lynette’s former colleague “saw bruises” on her throat

<p dir="ltr">Lynette Dawson’s former colleague has claimed she saw bruises on the nurse's throat before she disappeared 40 years ago. </p> <p dir="ltr">Chris Dawson has pleaded not guilty to murdering his wife Lynette, who went missing from the family home in Sydney's Northern Beaches in January 1982. </p> <p dir="ltr">Annette Leary, Lynette’s former colleague, told the NSW Supreme Court that she had asked Lynette about the bruises on her neck after the pair had attended a couple’s counselling session. </p> <p dir="ltr">"She said that Chris had grabbed her throat and shook her a little and said 'if this doesn't work, I'm getting rid of you...I am only doing it once'," Leary told the court, Nine News reported.</p> <p dir="ltr">A few days after their conversation, Lynette’s contract with the hospital ended following a phone call from Dawson saying she needed time away.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Lyn had gone away, she needed some time out and he didn't know when she was coming back,” centre director Barbara Cruise recalled at court.</p> <p dir="ltr">Cruise told the judges that she was doubtful that Lynette had left on her own accord and looked up her mother’s phone number before raising the alarm. </p> <p dir="ltr">It comes as the former babysitter, who became Dawson's mistress and then his wife, has taken the stand at his murder trial.</p> <p dir="ltr">The woman, who has been known only as JC throughout the high-profile trial, first met Dawson in 1980 when he was her Year 11 sports teacher at Cromer High School.</p> <p dir="ltr">The following year, the teenager had moved in with Dawson, his wife Lynette, and their two children to work as their live-in babysitter.</p> <p dir="ltr">She told the judges that Dawson had driven her to a pub in western Sydney, claiming to have wanted to hire a hitman to kill Lynette. </p> <p dir="ltr">"I went inside to get a hitman to kill Lyn and then I decided I couldn't do it because innocent people could be hurt,” JC said.</p> <p dir="ltr">The conversation was kept private until 1990, when Dawson and JC split - she rejects claims that she made it up during the divorce and custody battle. </p> <p dir="ltr">The trial continues. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Nine News</em></p>

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Alcohol marketing has crossed borders and entered the metaverse – how do we regulate the new digital risk?

<p>The World Health Organization’s newly <a href="https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789240046504" target="_blank" rel="noopener">released report</a> on regulating cross-border alcohol marketing raises the alarm for countries like Australia and New Zealand, given their light touch towards alcohol advertising.</p> <p>Alcohol is widely consumed in Australasia but there is ongoing tension over how much restraint, if any, should be placed on the marketing of these products.</p> <p>Australia and New Zealand are at the unrestrained end of the marketing continuum. Both countries rely on industry-led policy in the form of voluntary codes – an approach identified as insufficient by the WHO report.</p> <p><strong>What is cross-border alcohol marketing?</strong></p> <p>Alcohol marketing, created and disseminated in one country and spread across borders into others, is commonly used by multinational corporations striving to increase sales and normalise alcohol as an everyday product. Much of this advertising is taking place in the digital media sphere.</p> <p>The increased use of these media platforms by alcohol corporations allows them access to cheap advertising opportunities. For as <a href="https://au.reset.tech/uploads/resettechaustralia_profiling-children-for-advertising-1.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">little as US$2</a>, an advertising campaign based in Australia could reach a thousand young people profiled as interested in alcohol, for example.</p> <p>Marketing across digital media has also increased the impact of those messages.</p> <p>Brands interact with users on social media platforms, encouraging the posting, sharing and liking of <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33573719/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">branded images and messages</a>. Higher user engagement is associated with <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32079562/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">more drinking</a>.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="AB InBev logo behind a smartphone also showing the logo" /><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Multinational corporations like AB InBev have been quick to embrace digital platforms as a new way to advertise alcohol products.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.gettyimages.com.au/detail/news-photo/in-this-photo-illustration-an-ab-inbev-logo-is-seen-on-a-news-photo/1234971135?adppopup=true" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Pavlo Gonchar/Getty Images</a></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>Targeting the individual</strong></p> <p>The increased power of these advertisements reflects the effectiveness of “personalised marketing”. Companies can now target individuals and “look alike” audiences.</p> <p>This approach is made possible thanks to the enormous amount of data collected as we interact together, purchase products and indicate our interests and passions through our clicks and likes.</p> <p>This data is extremely valuable to marketers and alcohol corporations. It gives them insight into the best time of day, the best brand of alcohol and the best type of marketing message to send our way.</p> <p>All groups across society are vulnerable to being bombarded by messages encouraging the purchase and consumption of alcohol.</p> <p>Digital advertising can target everyone: teenagers looking for brands which exemplify their identity; young adults, the heaviest “occasion drinkers” in Australia and New Zealand, some of whom are developing drinking habits that may be hard to change in later life; and adults of all ages who wish to reduce their consumption, often for health reasons.</p> <p>Digital media has become an all-encompassing marketing environment in which the “buy” button – with home delivery and often no checks on age or intoxication – provides a seamless marketing and distribution system.</p> <p>In New Zealand, <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/dar.13222" target="_blank" rel="noopener">online sales</a> increased significantly during the COVID-19 lockdowns, particularly among heavier drinkers.</p> <p><strong>Entering the metaverse</strong></p> <p>The alcohol industry is now showing its initiative by entering the emerging <a href="https://www.ypulse.com/article/2022/02/03/metaverse-mansions-more-tiktok-how-brands-are-marketing-for-this-years-super-bowl/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">metaverse</a>. To understand the metaverse, <a href="https://thedecisionlab.com/insights/technology/brave-new-world-how-the-metaverse-may-shape-our-psychology" target="_blank" rel="noopener">according to one commentator</a>, you should</p> <blockquote> <p>take today’s social media, add a splash of sophisticated 3D, fold in a plethora of options for entertainment and gaming, garnish it all with data-driven personalisation, and you are all set to take away your order of a supersized social media network, the metaverse.</p> </blockquote> <p>In terms of marketing, this provides a new opportunity. The biometric data essential to a virtual reality experience is also available to develop “<a href="https://scholarship.law.vanderbilt.edu/jetlaw/vol23/iss1/1/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">biometric psychographics</a>”, allowing for the even greater personalisation of advertising.</p> <p>Virtual alcohol brands created and used by avatars in the metaverse support the development of brand allegiance in real life, and virtual reality will transform e-commerce experiences and increase the power of sponsorship.</p> <p>AB InBev, the largest global alcohol corporation, was an early adopter of the metaverse. One of its brands, <a href="https://sifted.eu/articles/metaverse-brands-nft/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stella Artois</a>, is sponsoring the Australian Zed Run platform on which virtual horses can be raced, bred and traded. The Zed Run platform experienced 1,000% growth in early 2021.</p> <figure class="align-center "><em><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="Two people stand in front of a screen with a digital image of a horse." /></em><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Digital horse racing game Zed Run has exploded in popularity, with alcohol companies using the digital platform to reach a new audience.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.gettyimages.com.au/detail/news-photo/performers-tyra-cartledge-and-kendall-drury-takes-part-in-a-news-photo/1329475903?adppopup=true" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images</a></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>Regulating to reduce alcohol harm</strong></p> <p>The digital world is extremely dynamic. It is also opaque to most policy makers and public health practitioners. It is telling that there is no reference to the metaverse as a cross-border alcohol marketing opportunity in the WHO report.</p> <p>There is an urgent need for debate regarding how policy makers should better understand the risks involved with the targeted marketing of hazardous products such as alcohol.</p> <p>The WHO report outlines various partial and unsuccessful approaches to regulating marketing in the digital media.</p> <p>Attempts, such as <a href="https://helda.helsinki.fi/bitstream/handle/10138/303690/Alcohol_marketing_on_social_media_sites_in_Finland_and_Sweden_2019.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Finland’s</a> regulation of user-shared branded material, have failed because they did not interfere with the basic architecture of the social media platforms, which is predicated on engagement via sharing and liking.</p> <p>The most successful examples offered by the WHO report have been countries like Norway, which have imposed a complete ban on alcohol marketing including in the digital media.</p> <p>The report emphasises the need for surveillance and enforcement, suggesting ways in which alcohol companies could be penalised for marketing breaches.</p> <p>The support provided by international agreements such as the <a href="https://fctc.who.int/who-fctc/overview" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Framework Convention on Tobacco Control</a> is identified as a possible template for future discussions.</p> <p>The response to tobacco marketing provides a good and largely effective model for officials and policy makers. That said, the public health goal for alcohol is not equivalent to the smokefree goal. Advocates are not trying to eliminate alcohol altogether.</p> <p>However, there are parallel arguments in favour of creating a healthier media environment through regulation to prevent the promotion of alcohol products via increasingly sophisticated technological and psychological tools.</p> <p>These products are significant causes of reduced well-being, and this marketing increases consumption and therefore harm. The messages of the WHO report are timely and should be heeded.<img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/183334/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/sally-casswell-862029" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sally Casswell</a>, Professor of public health policy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/massey-university-806" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Massey University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/alcohol-marketing-has-crossed-borders-and-entered-the-metaverse-how-do-we-regulate-the-new-digital-risk-183334" target="_blank" rel="noopener">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Three men handed jail sentences after careless, drunken act in a national park

<p>Three tourists who were filmed getting too close to feeding brown bears in the wild have been handed prison sentences and the additional punishment of thousands of dollars worth of fines.</p> <p>David Engelman, 56, from Sandia Park, New Mexico, and Ronald J. Engelman, 54, and Steven Thomas, 30, both from King Salmon, Alaska, pleaded guilty to leaving the trail in Alaska’s Katmai Park to get closer to the animals.</p> <p>The men were identified after they were captured on a park webcam as they waded out into a salmon run to take selfies as the bears were feeding.</p> <p>All three men were fined $US3000 each ($A4260) and given a year probation. David and Ronald Engelman were sentenced to one week in prison, while Steven Thomas received a 10-day sentence.</p> <p>In addition, each man is prohibited from entering any national park for one year.</p> <p>Judge Matthew Scoble called their behaviour “drunken capering, and a slap in the face to those who were there”.</p> <p>The proceeds from the fines would go towards the Katmai Conservancy, a non-profit that looks after the running of the park.</p> <p>The incident happened in Autumn of 2018, causing outage. The men were eventually identified by the National Park Service Investigative Services, with help of the livestream footage.</p> <p><iframe title="YouTube video player" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/F8qkHl18xf0" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>“The conduct of these three individuals not only endangered other visitors and wildlife officers at Brooks Falls, they also potentially endangered the life of the bears,” lawyer S. Lane Tucker said.</p> <p>Had the incident resulted in death or injury, Mr Tucker argued it would have had a huge impact on tourism to the area and the animals would have had to be killed.</p> <p>The National Park Service were alerted to the incident by viewers of their ‘bear cam’ which was being broadcast live to YouTube.</p> <p><em>Images: YouTube</em></p>

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Guy Sebastian questioned over home intruder head-butt

<p>Guy Sebastian has been grilled in court over claims he head-butted an intruder who broke into his Sydney home while his wife and newborn son were sleeping. </p> <p>The singer recalled the incident while being cross-examined at the embezzlement trial of his former manager Titus Day.</p> <p>“I had a newborn who was sleeping, I was at my recording studio … I received a call from my wife about this person who was trying to get into our house through my little boy’s window and as a result I arrived home,” Mr Sebastian told the court on Tuesday.</p> <p>“By the time I got home the guy trying to break in was still there. I chased after him.”</p> <p>However, the court heard different stories about what the singer told people happened next. </p> <p>When asked repeatedly if he head-butted the intruder, Mr Sebastian said he had not.</p> <p>But he agreed with Dominic Toomey SC, who is acting for Mr Day, that’s what he told people afterwards.</p> <p>“While I was holding him he was trying to grab me … elbowing and kicking me … he grabbed my [motorbike] helmet,” Mr Sebastian said.</p> <p>“I’ve told people that I knocked him out … I didn’t head-butt him … I agree I’ve told people that I head-butted him."</p> <p>“You’re implying I head-butted him as an intentional act but it just didn’t happen like that.”</p> <p>The incident was brought up in relation to its inclusion in an Apprehended Violence Order taken out by Titus Day.</p> <p>Mr Sebastian was served with the AVO application two days before he reported Mr Day to police over the allegations of embezzlement.</p> <p>Mr Sebastian said his former manager was trying to “weaponise” the incident by including it in his AVO.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Marvel actress and husband sentenced to 8 and 14 years jail

<p dir="ltr"><em><strong>Content warning: This article includes descriptions of child sexual abuse.</strong></em></p> <p dir="ltr">Actress Zara Phythian, who appeared in Marvel’s 2016 film <em>Doctor Strange</em>, has received an eight-year prison sentence for child sexual abuse offences.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 38-year-old was <a href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/finance/legal/doctor-strange-star-and-husband-found-guilty-of-child-abuse" target="_blank" rel="noopener">found guilty</a> by a jury last week of historical sexual abuse of a girl, aged between 13 and 15, and sentenced in the UK on Monday.</p> <p dir="ltr">Her 59-year-old husband, Victor Marke, was also found guilty of jointly abusing the same girl, as well as indecently assaulting a second, and sentenced to 14 years in prison.</p> <p dir="ltr">Both Phythian and Marke will be on the sex offender’s register for life and will be referred to the disclosure and barring service to prevent them from working with children ever again.</p> <p dir="ltr">Judge Mark Watson, who presided over the proceedings and handed down the sentences, said he believed Marke and Phythian’s abuse of the victim was pre-planned.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I regard you as the driving force behind the abuse,” Judge Watson told Marke.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Most people have held, and continue to hold you in high esteem. That’s due to the positive impact of your work [as martial arts instructors].</p> <p dir="ltr">“Whilst that may help in mitigation, that is also why you were able to groom and corrupt the victims in this case and why you got away abusing them for so long.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Marke reportedly cried during the sentencing and paced the court in a tracksuit, while Phythian reportedly smiled and waved to someone in the public gallery, though her face was said to be pale and tear-streaked, per <em><a href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/breaking-doctor-strange-actress-zara-26975792" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Mirror</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Judge Watson also said Phythian’s “deviance” was influenced by the hold Marke had on her from an early age - with the couple marrying when she was in her 20s after Marke had been her martial arts instructor from when she was a young teen.</p> <p dir="ltr">During the trial, the couple denied the accusations they were jointly convicted of, and the survivor, who they abused before Phythian found acting fame, gave testimony from behind a curtain in the witness stand.</p> <p dir="ltr">She said what happened to her, which the couple repeatedly told her not to tell anyone about, was her “deepest, darkest secret”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I think they saw a vulnerability in me and preyed on that,” she said in a police interview.</p> <p dir="ltr">The second survivor of Marke’s assaults, said that he touched her leg after she accidentally touched his leg, before kissing her on the lips and neck and causing her feelings of confusion, according to her police interview.</p> <p dir="ltr">At other times, Marke also kissed her, before having sex with her when she was 16.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though the age of consent in the UK is 16, under section 15.3 of the <a href="https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/44/notes" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 2000</a> a person over the age of 18 who is in a “position of trust” to someone under 18 - such as being a martial arts instructor - would be committing an offence by having sex with them.</p> <p dir="ltr">Prior to sentencing, prosecutor Ahmed Hossain QC read out victim statements, where the survivor abused by Phythian and Marke said they “corrupted my development” and “robbed me of my innocence”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You showed you liked a very advanced naughty side that satisfied your urges,” she said in the statement via Hossain.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also spoke of feeling intimidated and scared by the couple and stated that she didn’t want to keep being “[their] puppet”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I have become an adult now. All the pain, anger and disgust and shame I felt is now on you. Both of you.”</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-61edcadd-7fff-e407-ec99-7a1d210505bf"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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New medical emergency hits Guy Sebastian trial

<p dir="ltr">Guy Sebastian’s trial against his former manager faces more delays after another medical emergency unfolded just days after the presiding judge suddenly passed away.</p> <p dir="ltr">One of the jurors was rushed to hospital after suffering a severe allergic reaction during the lunch break - prompting the new judge to question whether it is practical for the trial to continue, as reported by <em><a href="https://7news.com.au/entertainment/celebrity/guy-sebastians-ex-manager-trial-resumes-c-6811553" target="_blank" rel="noopener">7News</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Judge Timothy Gartelmann announced that he would be taking over the trial on Monday, and with several jurors handing him notes raising concerns about future commitments, he said he would deliberate overnight once he found out about the welfare of the ill juror.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I will then make a decision about whether or not it is practical for individual jurors and indeed the trial itself to continue,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sebastian’s former manager, Titus Emmanuel Day, has pleaded not guilty to 50 charges, including allegedly embezzling money owed to Sebastian through royalties and performance fees, as well as 50 alternative counts of larceny.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/guy-sebastian-fronts-court" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Beginning his testimony</a> on Wednesday, May 4, the <em>Voice </em>judge testified that Day promised him 10 percent equity in his company 6 Degrees - which Day managed him through for nearly a decade - in recognition of his importance as a “foundation client” in the company’s success.</p> <p dir="ltr">Email exchanges tendered in court also showed that Day told Sebastian he would give him 10 percent ownership of Solar D, a sunscreen brand Day created.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sebastian said he then became an informal ambassador for the brand, conducting interviews and participating in a rowing event and photoshoot among other duties.</p> <p dir="ltr">He said he didn’t expect any payment for the work because the emails made it clear he was part-owner of the company.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sebastian said “there were requests for intros”, and when asked about Day’s character in relation to the company, he gave “him a wrap”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He’s a good bloke, and I’m involved as well. There’s nothing to worry about,” he recalled saying.</p> <p dir="ltr">The trial is expected to continue under Judge Gartelmann on Tuesday.</p> <p dir="ltr">The funeral for Judge Peter Zahra, who presided over the trial until his sudden passing and was a highly respected and senior judge in the NSW District Court, will be held on Friday.</p> <p dir="ltr">In a statement, Judge Zahra’s family said he would be remembered as a “special soul”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We have received many lovely messages and memories that demonstrate the type of person he was, he had a big heart and wanted to see everyone achieve more than what they ever thought possible,” the statement said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“In honour of our Dad and his life, we encourage everyone to have a hot chocolate and share a dad joke in his honour!”</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-0cdb885f-7fff-00d9-e8aa-0b79dacde790"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Guy Sebastian (Facebook)</em></p>

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Witness accused of painting Chris Dawson in “most monstrous” way possible

<p dir="ltr">A witness has claimed that Chris Dawson allegedly pushed his wife Lynette against a trampoline and screamed at her before she disappeared.</p> <p dir="ltr">Lynette Dawson disappeared from the family home in Bayview in Sydney’s northern beaches, leaving behind her two children in January 1982.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 33-year-old has not been heard from since then and her remains have not yet been found.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dawson, a former professional rugby league player and teacher is accused of killing his wife Lynette. </p> <p dir="ltr">He appeared in the NSW Supreme Court on Monday where he claimed he was in fact the victim of improper police investigations following the disappearance of his wife. </p> <p dir="ltr">In the judge-alone trial, witness and former neighbour Julie Andrew alleged that Dawson was “shaking” his wife moments leading up to her death. </p> <p dir="ltr">"He was screaming at her and she was crying. He was towering over her … he was roaring at her,” she said in court, <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-05-16/witness-tells-court-she-saw-chris-dawson-screaming-at-lynette/101069734" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ABC</a> reported. </p> <p dir="ltr">A few hours after the alleged incident, Julie went to check in on Lynette who informed her that Dawson was going to make room for the babysitter to move in because he was infatuated with her. </p> <p dir="ltr">Julie told the court that she tried to explain to Lynette that it was her house and she should not allow that to happen.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also recalled the moment Lynette revealed that she came home from work one day to find Dawson and the babysitter in bed together. </p> <p dir="ltr">"She said, 'I'm sure she just wasn't feeling well and he was looking after her'," Julie said.</p> <p dir="ltr">She noted that that was the last time she saw Lynette and would try calling the home phone to which no one responded.</p> <p dir="ltr">Julie only spotted Dawson, the babysitter, and the two children in the house - claiming she was too scared to go to the house and check on the situation. </p> <p dir="ltr">Defence barrister Pauline David accused Julie of painting Dawson in the "most monstrous" way possible. </p> <p dir="ltr">Julie denied the accusation saying she was there to tell the truth and said she didn’t go to the house after noticing bruises on Lynette’s arm, ABC reported.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dawson continues to claim his innocence after being arrested for the murder of Lynette. </p> <p dir="ltr">The trial continues.  </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Nine News</em></p>

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US Senate to vote on abortion rights bill – but what would it mean to codify Roe into law?

<p><em>The U.S. Senate is <a href="https://www.npr.org/2022/05/11/1097980529/senate-to-vote-on-a-bill-that-codifies-abortion-protections-but-it-will-likely-f">expected to vote on May 11, 2022</a>, on a bill that would enshrine the right to an abortion into law.</em></p> <p><em>The Democrats’ bill, the <a href="https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/3755/text">Women’s Health Protection Act</a>, isn’t expected to pass – a previous attempt was blocked by the Senate. But it reflects attempts by abortion rights advocates to find alternative ways to protect a woman’s right to the procedure following the publication of a <a href="https://www.politico.com/news/2022/05/02/supreme-court-abortion-draft-opinion-00029473">leaked draft opinion</a> from Justice Samuel Alito indicating that a majority on the Supreme Court intend to overturn Roe v. Wade.</em></p> <p><em>But is enshrining abortion rights via legislation feasible? And why has it not been done before? The Conversation put these questions and others to <a href="https://www.bu.edu/law/profile/linda-c-mcclain/">Linda C. McClain</a>, an expert on civil rights law and feminist legal theory at Boston University School of Law.</em></p> <p><strong>What does it mean to ‘codify’ Roe v. Wade?</strong></p> <p>In simple terms, to <a href="https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/codify#:%7E:text=To%20codify%20means%20to%20arrange,by%20subject%2C%20into%20a%20code.">codify something</a> means to enshrine a right or a rule into a formal systematic code. It could be done through an act of Congress in the form of a federal law. Similarly, state legislatures can codify rights by enacting laws. To codify Roe for all Americans, Congress would need to pass a law that would provide the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/03/us/what-is-roe-v-wade.html">same protections that Roe</a> did – so a law that states that women have a right to abortion without excessive government restrictions. It would be binding for all states.</p> <p>But here’s the twist: Despite some politicians saying that they want to “codify Roe,” Congress isn’t looking to enshrine Roe in law. That’s because <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1971/70-18">Roe v. Wade</a> hasn’t been in place since 1992. The Supreme Court’s <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1991/91-744">Planned Parenthood. v. Casey</a> ruling affirmed it, but also modified it in significant ways.</p> <p>In Casey, the court upheld Roe’s holding that a woman has the right to choose to terminate a pregnancy up to the point of fetal viability and that states could restrict abortion after that point, subject to exceptions to protect the life or health of the pregnant woman. But the Casey court concluded that Roe too severely limited state regulation prior to fetal viability and held that states could impose restrictions on abortion throughout pregnancy to protect potential life as well as to protect maternal health – including during the first trimester.</p> <p>Casey also introduced the “<a href="https://reproductiverights.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/WWH-Undue-Burden-Report-07262018-Edit.pdf">undue burden” test</a>, which prevented states from imposing restrictions that had the purpose or effect of placing unnecessary barriers on women seeking to end a pregnancy prior to viability of the fetus.</p> <p><strong>What is the Women’s Health Protection Act?</strong></p> <p>Current efforts to pass federal legislation protecting the right to abortion center on the proposed <a href="https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/3755/text">Women’s Health Protection Act</a>, introduced in Congress by Rep. Judy Chu and sponsored in the Senate by Sen. Richard Blumenthal in 2021. It was passed in the House, but was <a href="https://time.com/6152473/abortion-roe-v-wade-democrats/">blocked in the Senate</a>. Democrats put the bill forward for a procedural vote again after Alito’s draft opinion was made public. Supporters of the bill are still expected to fall short of the votes they need. Rather, the vote is being used, in the <a href="https://www.npr.org/2022/05/10/1097820801/senate-democrats-plan-a-vote-on-abortion-rights-but-its-unlikely-to-pass">words of Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar</a>, “to show where everyone stands” on the issue.</p> <p>The legislation would build on the undue burden principle in Casey by seeking to prevent states from imposing unfair restrictions on abortion providers, such as insisting a <a href="https://www.vice.com/en/article/vbnqw4/abortion-clinics-are-closing-because-their-doorways-arent-big-enough">clinic’s doorway is wide enough</a> for surgical gurneys to pass through, or that <a href="https://www.guttmacher.org/state-policy/explore/targeted-regulation-abortion-providers">abortion practitioners need to have admitting privileges</a> at nearby hospitals.</p> <p>The Women’s Health Protection Act uses the language of the Casey ruling in saying that these so-called TRAP (Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers) laws place an “undue burden” on people seeking an abortion. It also appeals to Casey’s recognition that “the ability of women to participate equally in the economic and social life of the Nation has been facilitated by their ability to control their reproductive lives.”</p> <p><strong>Has the right to abortion ever been guaranteed by federal legislation?</strong></p> <p>You have to remember that Roe was very controversial from the outset. At the time of the ruling in 1973, most states had restrictive abortion laws. Up to the late 1960s, a <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1973/01/28/archives/gallup-poll-finds-public-divided-on-abortions-in-first-3-months.html">majority of Americans opposed abortion</a>. A poll at the time of Roe found the public evenly split over legalization.</p> <p>To pass legislation you have to go through the democratic process. But if the democratic process is hostile to what you are hoping to push through, you are going to run into difficulties.</p> <p>Under the U.S. system, certain liberties are seen as so fundamental that protecting them should not be left to the whims of changing democratic majorities. Consider something like interracial marriage. Before the Supreme Court ruled in <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1966/395">Loving v. Virginia State</a> that banning interracial marriages was unconstitutional, a number of states still banned such unions.</p> <p>Why couldn’t they pass a law in Congress protecting the right to marry? It would have been difficult because at the time, the <a href="https://news.gallup.com/poll/163697/approve-marriage-blacks-whites.aspx">majority of people were against</a> the idea of interracial marriage.</p> <p>When you don’t have sufficient public support for something – particularly if it is unpopular or affects a non-majority group – appealing to the Constitution seems to be the better way to protect a right.</p> <p>That doesn’t mean you can’t also protect that right through a statute, just that it is harder. Also, there is no guarantee that legislation passed by any one Congress isn’t then repealed by lawmakers later on.</p> <p><strong>So generally, rights have more enduring protection if the Supreme Court rules on them?</strong></p> <p>The <a href="https://www.supremecourt.gov/about/constitutional.aspx">Supreme Court has the final word</a> on what is and isn’t protected by the Constitution. In the past, it has been seen as sufficient to protect a constitutional right to get a ruling from the justices recognizing that right.</p> <p>But this leaked opinion also points out that one limit of that protection is that the Supreme Court may overrule its own precedents.</p> <p>Historically, it is unusual for the Supreme Court to take a right away. Yes, they said the <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/163us537">Plessy v. Ferguson ruling</a> – which set up the legal basis for separate-but-equal – was wrong, and overruled it in <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483">Brown v. Board of Education</a>. But Brown recognized rights; it didn’t take rights away.</p> <p>If Alito’s draft ruling is to be the final word, the Supreme Court will be taking away a right that has been in place since 1973. For what I believe is the first time since the end of the Lochner era, the Supreme Court would be overriding precedent to take away a constitutional right from Americans. While Justice Alito notes that, in 1937, the Court overruled “an entire line” of cases protecting “an individual liberty right against federal health and welfare legislation,” that “right” to economic liberty and freedom of contract was as much one of businesses as much as for individuals. The Court has not overruled of the long line of cases (in which Roe and Casey fit) protecting “liberty” in making significant decisions about intimacy, sexuality, family, marriage, and reproduction.</p> <p>Moreover, the leaked opinion is dismissive of the idea that women have to rely on constitutional protection. “Women are not without electoral or political power,” <a href="https://www.politico.com/news/2022/05/02/read-justice-alito-initial-abortion-opinion-overturn-roe-v-wade-pdf-00029504">Alito writes</a>, adding: “The percentage of women who register to vote and cast ballots is consistently higher than the percentage of men who do so.”</p> <p>But this ignores the fact that women <a href="https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/roe-v-wade-overturned-supreme-court-abortion-draft-alitos-legal-analys-rcna27205">rarely make up close to half</a> of the members of most state legislative bodies.</p> <p><strong>So are the promises to get Congress to protect abortion rights realistic?</strong></p> <p>Republicans in the Senate successfully blocked the proposed Women’s Health Protection Act. And unless things change dramatically in Congress, there isn’t much chance of the bill becoming law.</p> <p>There has been talk of trying to <a href="https://www.reuters.com/legal/government/us-supreme-court-abortion-move-sparks-calls-ending-senates-filibuster-2022-05-04/">end the filibuster rule</a>, which requires 60 votes in the Senate to pass legislation. But even then, the 50 votes that would be needed might not be there.</p> <p>What we don’t know is how this Supreme Court leak will affect the calculus. Maybe some Republican senators will see that the writing is on the wall and vote with Democrats. Republican senators Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski <a href="https://www.collins.senate.gov/newsroom/senators-collins-and-murkowski-introduce-bill-to-codify-supreme-court-decisions-on-reproductive-rights_roe-v-wade-and-planned-parenthood-v-casey">introduced legislation</a> earlier this year that would codify Roe in law, but isn’t as expansive as the Women’s Health Protection Act. Senator Collins has <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2022/05/05/sen-collins-voices-opposition-legislation-that-would-create-statutory-right-abortion/">recently indicated</a> that she will not support the Act out of concern for religious liberty of anti-abortion health providers.</p> <p>And then we have the midterm elections in November, which might shake up who’s in Congress. If the Democrats lose the House or fail to pick up seats in the Senate, the chances of pushing through any legislation protecting abortion rights would appear very slim. Democrats will be hoping that the Supreme Court ruling will mobilize pro-abortion rights voters.</p> <p><strong>What is going on at a state level?</strong></p> <p>Liberal states like Massachusetts have <a href="https://www.boston.com/news/policy/2020/12/29/massachusetts-senate-override-abortion-access/">passed laws that codify Roe v. Wade</a>. Now that the Supreme Court’s apparent intentions are known, expect similar moves elsewhere. Massachusetts and other states are looking to go a step further by <a href="https://www.npr.org/2022/05/01/1095813226/connecticut-abortion-bill-roe-v-wade">protecting residents who help out-of-state women</a> seeking abortion. Such laws would seemingly counter moves by states like Missouri, which is seeking to <a href="https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2022-03-11/editorial-missouri-might-make-it-illegal-to-help-a-woman-get-an-abortion-elsewhere-thats-ridiculous">push through legislation that would criminalize helping women</a> who go out of state for abortions.</p> <p><strong>Wouldn’t any federal law just be challenged at the Supreme Court?</strong></p> <p>Should Congress be able to pass a law enshrining the right to abortion for all Americans, then surely some conservative states will seek to overturn the law, saying that the federal government is exceeding its authority.</p> <p>If it were to go up to the Supreme Court, then conservative justices would presumably look unfavorably on any attempt to limit individual states’ rights when it comes to abortion. Similarly, any attempt to put in place a federal law that would restrict abortion for all would seemingly conflict with the Supreme Court’s position that it should be left to the states to decide.</p> <p><em>This is an updated version of an article <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-would-it-mean-to-codify-roe-into-law-and-is-there-any-chance-of-that-happening-182406">originally published on May 5, 2022</a>.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/182908/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/linda-c-mcclain-1343287">Linda C. McClain</a>, Professor of Law, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/boston-university-898">Boston University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/us-senate-to-vote-on-abortion-rights-bill-but-what-would-it-mean-to-codify-roe-into-law-182908">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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"So hurtful": Greg Norman in hot water over "seriously misguided remarks"

<p dir="ltr">The fiancée of a journalist murdered in the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul has slammed Australian entrepreneur Greg Norman’s comments on the incident, describing his comments as “so hurtful”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Last year, a classified intelligence report from the United States government concluded that Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, was responsible for the murder of <em>Washington Post </em>reporter Jamal Khashoggi in 2018.</p> <p dir="ltr">Norman, who is the head of the Saudi-funded LIV Golf series set to rival the PGA Tour per <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/sport/golf/wealth-and-lies-furious-fiancee-of-murdered-journalist-slams-greg-norman/news-story/8d4cf5ae2252dacfbcc0ffeea00f0d04" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a></em>, caused a stir when he weighed in on the involvement of the Crown Prince in Khashoggi’s death, saying that “we’ve all made mistakes”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The whole thing about Saudi Arabia and Khashoggi and human rights, talk about it, but also talk about the good that the country is doing in changing its culture,” Norman said of the murder on Thursday, as reported by the <em>New York Post</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Look, we’ve all made mistakes and you just want to learn by those mistakes and how you can correct them going forward.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Norman was the subject of widespread criticism online and from Hatice Cengiz, Khashoggi’s fiancée, who told the UK <em>Telegraph </em>that those responsible should be held accountable.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Would you say that if it was your loved one? How can we go forward when those who ordered the murder are still unpunished, and continue to try and buy back their legitimacy?” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We should not fall for their wealth and lies, and lose our morals and common humanity. We should all be insisting on the truth and justice; only then can we look forward with hope and dignity.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Amnesty International also criticised the entrepreneur for his “wrong and seriously misguided” remarks, while Felix Jakens, the organisation’s UK head of campaigns said Norman’s rival golf tour was an example of “sportswashing”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Greg Norman’s remarks that the Saudi government’s brutal murder of Jamal Khashoggi and its attempted cover-up were a ‘mistake’ are wrong and seriously misguided,” Mr Jakens said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Far from trying to ‘move on’, the Saudi authorities have attempted to sweep their crimes under the carpet, avoiding justice and accountability at every turn.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The regime’s human rights record is an abomination - from its murder of Khashoggi to recent mass executions and the situation for LGBTI+ people, which continues to be dire.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The LIV Golf Invitational Series is yet one more event in a series of sportswashing exercises that the Saudi authorities are using to clean its blood-soaked image.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Norman’s comments also come after he slammed the PGA Tour the day prior for “perpetuating its illegal monopoly” after it emerged that officials won’t grant releases for players to compete in the opening event of the LIV Tour in London.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-4f8c3c05-7fff-e84b-42f5-eb32d48a7600"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Getty Images</em></p>

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Doctor Strange star and husband found guilty of child abuse

<p><em><strong>Warning: This article contains graphic content that some readers may find distressing. </strong></em></p> <p>Zara Phythian, star of Marvel's latest movie <em>Doctor Strange</em>, has been arrested alongside her husband Victor Marke , with the pair now facing jail. </p> <p>The couple have been found guilty of sexually abusing a 13-year-old girl multiple times between 2005 and 2008. </p> <p>According to The Sun, Phythian plied the teen with rum before making her perform a sex act on her husband, which occurred once or twice a month until the teen was finally able to free herself. </p> <p>Jurors heard that the couple were working as martial arts experts at the time, and Marke had sex with the victim at least 20 times on different occasions. </p> <p>Marke, 59, branded the allegations “paedophile sh*t” when quizzed by officers after his arrest, Nottingham Crown Court was told.</p> <p>He said he was “really angry” to be accused, and told officers, “If you’re trying to say I’m a paedophile, I’m not.”</p> <p>Marke claimed he had consensual sex with the teen when she was 18 – something his wife only discovered during her police interview.</p> <p>Phythian, 38, told detectives she’d never had any form of sexual contact with the girl, calling it “bulls**t”.</p> <p>Upon discovering her husband had revealed he’d had sex with her accuser, she said she felt “confused”, adding that she’d “liked to have known about it”.</p> <p>The victim said she “would never have come forward” and planned to “die with my shame”, but as she recently became a mother, she said she felt she had “no option to speak my truth”.</p> <p>Despite denying all allegations of abuse, the couple were found unanimously guilty by the jury. </p> <p>Judge Mark Watson will decide later when the pair will be sentenced.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Poverty isn’t a temporary experience in Australia. We need urgent policy tackling persistent disadvantage

<p>We often hear a job is the best way to get someone out of poverty. In many cases this is true, and anti-poverty strategies should prioritise improving people’s access to jobs.</p> <p>But this isn’t the complete solution. For many – particularly those with disability or substantial caring responsibilities that limit their scope to work – the income support system remains crucial to avoiding persistent poverty.</p> <p>It may not feel like it at a time of rising living costs, but the incomes of Australians have on average risen substantially over the last three decades and continue to trend upwards – we have never been richer.</p> <p>However – <a href="https://www.pc.gov.au/research/supporting/deep-persistent-disadvantage" target="_blank" rel="noopener">as highlighted by the Productivity Commission</a> – some in the community continue to be left behind.</p> <p>Our new <a href="https://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/4107629/Breaking-Down-Barriers-Report-4-May-2022.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">study of income poverty</a> shows persistent poverty remains a significant problem in Australian society.</p> <p>Looking back over the first two decades of this century, we found around 13% of the population are persistently poor.</p> <p>We defined these as people who persistently have to live on incomes that are <a href="https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=Glossary:At-risk-of-poverty_rate" target="_blank" rel="noopener">less than 60% of</a> the median income in Australia (a definition employed by Eurostat for European Union member countries).</p> <p>Poverty then isn’t simply a temporary experience in Australia, and tackling persistent disadvantage needs to be a policy imperative.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461194/original/file-20220504-21-epehk7.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461194/original/file-20220504-21-epehk7.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461194/original/file-20220504-21-epehk7.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461194/original/file-20220504-21-epehk7.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461194/original/file-20220504-21-epehk7.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461194/original/file-20220504-21-epehk7.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461194/original/file-20220504-21-epehk7.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461194/original/file-20220504-21-epehk7.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="" /></a><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Poverty isn’t simply a temporary experience in Australia.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>Why do people descend in poverty – and often stay there?</strong></p> <p>Understanding what drives poverty and its persistence is an essential first step to alleviating it.</p> <p>Using data from the longitudinal Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (<a href="https://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/hilda" target="_blank" rel="noopener">HILDA</a>) Survey, we examined the extent and nature of persistent poverty among the same sample of Australians tracked over time.</p> <p>Specifically, we looked at</p> <ul> <li>why do people descend into poverty?</li> <li>why do some people remain in poverty, while others escape it?</li> <li>why some of those who escape poverty remain out of poverty while others fall back into it.</li> </ul> <p>We also examined the degree to which the depth of poverty (how far someone’s income is below the poverty line) impacts on the likelihood of staying in poverty.</p> <p>We found persistent poverty is more prevalent among:</p> <ul> <li>women</li> <li>single-parent families</li> <li>older people</li> <li>Indigenous Australians</li> <li>people with a disability</li> <li>less-educated people, and</li> <li>people living in more disadvantaged regions.</li> </ul> <p>This is consistent with <a href="https://povertyandinequality.acoss.org.au/poverty-in-australia-2020-overview-html-version/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">previous studies of poverty</a> made at a single point in time.</p> <p>Perhaps unsurprisingly, those in deep poverty – the poorest of the poor – are the most likely to be persistently poor (up to five times more likely than the average person in the community).</p> <p>The very poor are therefore a policy priority – not only because they are very poor now, but because they are more likely to remain poor.</p> <p><strong>‘Falling’ into poverty</strong></p> <p>Similarly, among those initially not in poverty, those with incomes closest to the poverty line – the poorest of the non-poor – are at greater risk of falling into persistent poverty.</p> <p>Another policy priority therefore needs to be preventing those close to the poverty line falling into actual poverty.</p> <p>When we examined the “trigger events” for people falling into poverty or rising out of it, we found the household’s success in the labour market is critical. In other words, people need to be able to get a job.</p> <p>An increase in the number of employed people in the household is strongly associated with lifting people out of poverty.</p> <p>There is also a strong association between a lack of work and the risk of persistent poverty.</p> <p>Clearly, then, policy measures geared towards increasing employment, and retaining employment for those already employed, are key to reducing persistent poverty.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461457/original/file-20220505-24-cgvjbn.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461457/original/file-20220505-24-cgvjbn.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461457/original/file-20220505-24-cgvjbn.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461457/original/file-20220505-24-cgvjbn.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461457/original/file-20220505-24-cgvjbn.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461457/original/file-20220505-24-cgvjbn.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461457/original/file-20220505-24-cgvjbn.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461457/original/file-20220505-24-cgvjbn.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="" /></a><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Another policy priority needs to be preventing those close to the poverty line falling into actual poverty.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>It’s not just about jobs, though</strong></p> <p>But employment isn’t the only factor of importance. Any change in family type, but particularly becoming a single-parent family, increases the risk of poverty.</p> <p>More broadly, the household context plays a crucial role in determining individuals’ poverty experiences.</p> <p>Who you live with, what they do, and what happens to them are important. The household perspective then is critical to understanding poverty and designing appropriate policy responses.</p> <p>The onset of disability or substantial caring responsibilities is also much more likely to tip you into poverty and keep you there.</p> <p>Put simply, those who are more likely to experience persistent poverty tend to be constrained in their ability to participate in the labour market. Having a job may not be an option at all.</p> <p>Focusing only on labour market-related anti-poverty policy measures therefore isn’t enough to fully address persistent poverty in the Australian community.</p> <p>Many of those highly exposed to persistent poverty have very constrained access to paid work, because of factors such as:</p> <ul> <li>long-term health conditions</li> <li>high caring responsibilities for young children or</li> <li>significant disabilities.</li> </ul> <p>Even among couple-parent households, we found the more dependent children in the household, the lower the probability of exiting poverty.</p> <p>This highlights the importance of child care assistance to facilitate employment participation and sustained income adequacy for families with young children.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461458/original/file-20220505-26-km89qo.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461458/original/file-20220505-26-km89qo.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/461458/original/file-20220505-26-km89qo.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=338&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461458/original/file-20220505-26-km89qo.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=338&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461458/original/file-20220505-26-km89qo.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=338&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461458/original/file-20220505-26-km89qo.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=425&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461458/original/file-20220505-26-km89qo.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=425&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/461458/original/file-20220505-26-km89qo.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=425&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="" /></a><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Many of those highly exposed to persistent poverty have very constrained access to paid work, because of factors such as long-term health conditions.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>An unavoidable conclusion</strong></p> <p>But even improvements in child care assistance aren’t enough. The simple fact is that, for a significant number of people, income support will continue to determine their living standards.</p> <p>The unavoidable conclusion is that boosting income support payments beyond their current austere levels remains a crucial pillar of policy for governments genuinely committed to reducing persistent disadvantage.</p> <p>Unfortunately, this does not appear to be on the agenda of either of the major parties.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/181343/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/esperanza-vera-toscano-788145" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Esperanza Vera-Toscano</a>, Senior research fellow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The University of Melbourne</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/roger-wilkins-95906" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Roger Wilkins</a>, Professorial Fellow and Deputy Director (Research), HILDA Survey, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/poverty-isnt-a-temporary-experience-in-australia-we-need-urgent-policy-tackling-persistent-disadvantage-181343" target="_blank" rel="noopener">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Wordle changes answer amid abortion rights debate

<p dir="ltr"><em>The New York Times</em> has swiftly changed the answer to its daily Wordle puzzle out of fear it would be interpreted politically amid the debate on abortion rights in the US.</p> <p dir="ltr">The wildly-popular browser-based game, which was bought by the masthead in January, gives users six attempts to guess a five letter word each day which is chosen in advance and at random by a computer program.</p> <p dir="ltr">On Monday, the <em>Times </em>scrambled to change Monday’s word which was “fetus”, using the American spelling.</p> <p dir="ltr">The word could have been seen as a controversial choice given the <a href="https://oversixty.co.nz/finance/legal/america-s-roe-v-wade-abortion-law-could-be-overturned" target="_blank" rel="noopener">recent leaked report</a> of a draft decision from the Supreme Court to overturn two laws that grant women the right to access abortions.</p> <p dir="ltr">In a message to readers on the same day, the newspaper said the word choice was “entirely unintentional and a coincidence”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“At New York Times Games, we take our role seriously as a place to entertain and escape, and we want Wordle to remain distinct from the news,” the message said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Monday’s word was changed and a spokesman said a “vast majority” of users saw that, save some who hadn’t refreshed their page and saw “fetus” instead.</p> <p dir="ltr">Many New Zealand users reported seeing “fetus”, according to the <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/wordle-answer-changed-to-avoid-fraught-word-ny-times-says/2ZONMXP5ZTIXJGVZR2YMJWHZPI/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZ Herald</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Cohen wouldn’t say whether the <em>Times </em>received any complaints about the word choice.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-b785097e-7fff-bb06-db17-866418a92032"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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The plot thickens in Amber Haigh case

<p dir="ltr">Less than a week after the <a href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/caring/million-dollar-reward-offered-20-years-after-woman-disappeared" target="_blank" rel="noopener">million-dollar reward for information was announced</a>, a couple has been arrested in relation to the disappearance of Amber Haigh in 2002.</p> <p dir="ltr">Robert Samuel Greves and Anne Margaret Greeves appeared in Cowra Local Court on charges for murder, with a second charge laid against Mr Geeves for aggravated sexual assault of someone with a serious intellectual disability, as reported by the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-05-05/couple-accused-of-murdering-amber-haigh-appear-in-court/101039800" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ABC</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">The court heard that police would tender evidence that Mr Geeves bought a chainsaw shortly after the alleged murder, along with phone intercepts that included the words, “Have you taken the rest of her up there?”</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Geeves appealed for bail, with his lawyer arguing that the case against him was circumstantial and that he would need time to find his own witnesses if he was refused.</p> <p dir="ltr">With 17 pages of evidence, 20 witnesses, and phone intercepts of the couple talking about how to dispose of the body around the time of Ms Haigh’s disappearance, Magistrate Jillian Kiely refused Mr Geeves’ application.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There’s a very strong circumstantial case based on the facts before me,” she said, as reported by <em><a href="https://www.centralwesterndaily.com.au/story/7727013/bail-refused-in-strong-circumstantial-case-in-alleged-murder-of-amber-haigh/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Central Western Daily</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There is a very lengthy and detailed background of events leading up to certain behaviours allegedly displayed by the defendant towards the young woman.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There are telephone intercept materials very soon after her disappearance suggestive of potential discussions of disposal of remains or disposal of property.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Conversations where he is asking the co-accused not to roll on him and saying he doesn’t want to go to jail.”</p> <p dir="ltr">In one recorded conversation, Ms Kiely said Ms Geeves said: “Where are we going to take the rest of her now?”, to which Ms Kiely said Mr Geeves replied: “Somewhere close to here”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Geeves, who separated from Mr Geeves eight years ago but remained friends with him, appeared separately and didn’t apply for release, with her case then adjourned until May 17.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Haigh, who was 18 at the time, disappeared on June 5, 2002 and was reported missing two weeks later after she didn’t return to her home in Kingsvale, NSW.</p> <p dir="ltr">A 2011 Coronial inquest found Amber to have died, but a review of the case in 2020 resulted in the investigation re-commencing.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-8192ef9d-7fff-b5aa-ae44-c5c78a7f4ed2"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: NSW Police</em></p>

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Kyrgios' classy response to parking furore

<p dir="ltr">After being the subject of some car-related naming and shaming, tennis champion Nick Kyrgios has parked the drama and attempted to “make amends”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kyrgios took to Instagram to assure fans he is parking in “the right spot” after he was called out by a fellow resident of the inner Sydney suburb of Zetland via Facebook.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve parked in the right spot, I’ve made amends,” he said in the clip.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-cb74e5f5-7fff-c8b8-3ebd-e2b798888a0f"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“Sorry for my inconvenient parking for one day, I’ve parked in the right spot. We’re in the middle of an NRL season guys so let’s talk about other sporting athletes, not where I’m parking … it’s all good now.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/kyrgios-car.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Nick Kyrgios shared a clip on Instagram confirming he had parked in a different spot and that it was “all good now”. Images: @k1ngkyrg1os (Instagram)</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Though the other resident didn’t directly name the star athlete, he heavily implied that Kyrgios was the “famous and quite notorious tennis player” who had been repeatedly parking their lime green Tesla in a car share zone.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Looking for some advice here, it’s a tricky one, we have a car share allocated spot right out the front of our apartment building,” the neighbour began his Facebook post, which was accompanied by a series of photos of the car.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-82e07ca5-7fff-ed13-d566-2e04c5d20164"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“Recently a very well known famous and quite notorious tennis player has decided that he is somehow entitled to park in it with his own vehicle.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/zetland.jpg" alt="" width="960" height="664" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>The Zetland local also shared photos of the culprit’s car parked in the car share zone. Image: <a href="https://au.sports.yahoo.com/tennis-2022-nick-kyrgios-under-fire-entitled-parking-job-030301447.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Yahoo News</a></em></p> <p dir="ltr">“I don’t want to name and shame the guy but he’s very famous and parks in this car share space almost nightly, meaning that anybody that has a Go Get or Car Next Door vehicle has no option to park there, as you can see the other night our friends had to park their Car Next Door vehicle illegally behind him as he had parked his car in the dedicated car share space?”</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d213b36-7fff-0ca1-9eb9-49c5a7606287"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">The neighbour went on to ask whether he should “just let this guy go” because he’s an athlete, adding that it was more about the “principle and setting a good example” than the $400 fine that Kyrgios - who has earned $9 million in prize money during his career.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CZ304XEJLxv/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CZ304XEJLxv/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Nick Kyrgios (@k1ngkyrg1os)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Among the mix of commenters who defended or criticised Kyrgios, his partner, Costeen Hatzi, also shared her two cents, writing that he “didn’t realise” what kind of spot he was parking in.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Hey all, to be fair, he didn’t realise it was a car share spot,” she commented.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He parked there to allow other car spots for those who can’t find parking in the area.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Nick understands and will move his car. Thank you all for your kind messages.” </p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-21dfdfd4-7fff-6ff9-1d55-a698d7ee9863"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: @k1ngkyrg1os (Instagram) / Yahoo News</em></p>

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