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Absolutely devastated: Man's punishment for 5-year-old turns fatal

<p>A man has been arrested after his attempt to discipline his fiancé’s son took a turn for the worst.</p> <p>The soldier in the US state of Alabama was charged with reckless murder after he allegedly forced his girlfriend’s five-year-old son to get out of a car at night along a road.</p> <p>The young child died when he was struck by a vehicle.</p> <p>Army Sgt Bryan Starr, 35, went on to surrender himself to Russell County sheriffs after he was charged with 5-year-old Austin Birdseye’s death.</p> <p>Starr admitted to investigators that the boy began acting up in the car as they travelled on a highway near their home Sunday night.</p> <p>He went on to punish the boy by pulling his vehicle over into a church parking lot and making the boy stand outside in the rain.</p> <p>The child’s mother was not in the vehicle, he added.</p> <p>Starr lost sight of Austin but knew something was wrong when cars stopped in the middle of the road, as there the little boy had been struck by an oncoming Toyota Avalon.</p> <p>Sheriff Heath Taylor said the road was dark and the driver who struck him is not at fault, in a press conference on Monday.</p> <p>“We have their information and we’ve spoken to them and will speak to them again. But at this point, there’s no indication that they had any chance of not hitting the little guy,” Taylor said,<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ledger-enquirer.com/news/local/crime/article247505815.html" target="_blank"> as reported by the Ledger-Enquirer</a>.</p> <p>The child died in hospital and Starr was charged with murder because he showed reckless disregard for the child’s safety, police said.</p> <p>An online campaign that was created to raise funds for Austin’s death said the little boy often sang loud “at the top of his lungs” to songs but the sheriff says he still could not understand his would-have been stepfathers’ actions.</p> <p>“What do you say to that? What is your thought process when you tell a five-year-old to get out of the car on a rainy night, because they were being loud in the car?” he said.</p> <p>“It’s just heartbreaking.”</p> <p>The GoFundMe set up to support the family has far eclipsed its $5,000 target.</p> <p>“Austin was always the centre of any impromptu living room dance party, the wonderful little boy who would chat about almost anything and with anyone in the grocery store, was the one who knew all the words to every song,” the page says.</p> <p>“He was always loving and never let any opportunity pass him by to enjoy fun. We are absolutely devastated by Austin’s passing.”</p>

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Mum who killed her six children released early from jail

<p>WARNING: Graphic content.</p> <p>A mum who killed her six children has been freed after she served half of her 17-year jail term.</p> <p>The release of Mairead Philpott, 39, of the UK, sparked outrage with crime prevention campaigners saying: “Justice has not been done”.</p> <p>Philpott’s children died in an arson attack she and husband Mick plotted at their Derbyshire, England home in 2012.</p> <p>She was released from prison on Sunday after serving only eight and a half years for manslaughter.</p> <p>On Friday, David Spencer, of the Centre of Crime Prevention, said: “It makes an absolute mockery of the UK’s criminal justice system. Justice has not been done”.</p> <p>“Child killers like Mairead Philpott should not be free to roam the streets.</p> <p>“She has served barely more than a year for each of the six innocent lives she callously took away.</p> <p>“She is back on the streets while the taxpayer coughs up for her to get a new identity, protection, ­counselling and a place to live.</p> <p>“The Home Secretary has promised a review of sentencing. This needs to be delivered urgently to ensure killers like Philpott serve the long sentences their horrific crimes deserve.”</p> <p>Tory MP for mid-Derbyshire Pauline Latham said: “Mairead Philpott should be serving a whole life sentence instead of being freed halfway through it.”</p> <p>She described the crime as “horrifying” and said that “it will never, ever be forgotten in Derby”.</p> <p>Philpott’s mother Vera, who is no longer in contact with her daughter, said she was furious by her early release.</p> <p>Speaking at her home in Derby — less than two kilometres from where her grandchildren died — she said: “I don’t want her near my door.</p> <p>“The sentence is not nearly long enough and we disown her after what she’s done.”</p> <p>Philpott was freed from HMP Send in Surrey on the first day she was eligible to be released on licence.</p> <p>“They launched a massive operation to make sure she was safe and not seen,” a source said.</p> <p>“Her convoy was like one given to a celebrity rather than a mum who killed her six children.</p> <p>“Heaven knows how much it all cost, and it all seemed a bit much at a time of tight budgets.”</p> <p>Philpott is currently staying at a halfway house, where she will be offered counselling, life coaching, yoga and therapy sessions before being helped to find new accommodation.</p>

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Royal thief pleads guilty to stealing 77 valuable items

<p>A Buckingham Palace employee has pleaded guilty to stealing a total of 77 items from the royal residence between 11 November 2019 and 7 August 2020.</p> <p>Adamo Canto, from North Yorkshire in the UK reportedly stole multiple items, including an official signed photo of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, a signed photo of the Duke of Sussex and a royal state banquet photo album of US President Donald Trump’s state visit.</p> <p>Some of the items were incredibly valuable, with an approximate worth of thousands of dollars in resale value.</p> <p>Other items stolen by the 37-year-old including a Companion of Bath medal belonging to Vice Admiral Master Tony Johnstone-Burt, who is the Master of the Household.</p> <p>The medal was sold on eBay for £350.</p> <p>The theft came to light when Vice Admiral Johnstone-Burt noticed his medal was missing as he was required to wear it for Trooping the Colour, the Queen’s birthday celebration, this year.</p> <p>"I discovered my Companion of Bath medal and box for sale," his court statement read. "It was up for sale for £500. However, it had been sold for £350."</p> <p>When Police searched his home they realised Canto had stolen the items as he was carrying out his cleaning duties, as due to the pandemic, he was allowed access to areas he normally would be barred from.</p> <p>In total, 77 items were taken including royal memorabilia stolen from the linen room, the Royal Collection ticket office, the Queen’s Gallery shop, the Duke of York’s storeroom as well as things belonging to staff members.</p> <p>The court heard Canto began selling off the stolen items on eBay and while they were being sold for "well under" their real value, he tallied up £7,741. The value of some of the items taken is thought to be between £10,000 and £100,000.</p> <p>Canto has now pleaded guilty and is out on conditional bail. He will be sentenced at a later date.</p>

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Madeleine McCann suspect injured while awaiting trial

<p><span>A suspect involved in the disappearance of the British toddler who vanished from a Portugese holiday resort 13 years ago has suffered two broken ribs in an incident at a German court.</span><br /><br /><span>Christian Brueckner is serving time on a drug conviction and was taken to Braunschweig state court on Monday for a hearing on that case.</span><br /><br /><span>Court spokeswoman Jessica Knab-Henrichs told <em>The Associated Press</em> that he was treated in hospital for two broken ribs.</span><br /><br /><span>He was then returned to the court where the hearing was carried out.</span><br /><br /><span>While details have not been released yet, the spokeswoman says the incident is under investigation.</span><br /><br /><span>Brueckner is a suspect in the disappearence of Madeleine but prosecutors say they do not have enough evidence to hold him on the McCann case alone.</span><br /><br /><span>Brueckner will finish serving his drug trafficking charge in January, but he has been convicted in of the 2005 rape of a 72-year-old American woman in Portugal and sentenced to another seven years.</span><br /><br /><span>That conviction is under appeal.</span><br /><br /><span>McCann was 3 at the time of her 2007 disappearance from an apartment while vacationing with her parents and siblings in the seaside town of Praia da Luz in Portugal's Algarve region.</span><br /><br /><span>German authorities in June said they had identified the 43-year-old German citizen as a suspect in the case and were looking into him on suspicion of murder.</span></p>

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"Do not lose heart": Trump party plea after finding uncounted votes

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Thousands of votes have been discovered on memory cards in Georgia, with the majority believed to be voting for President Donald Trump.</p> <p>However, the amount of votes was not enough to overcome Trump's deficit in the state.</p> <p>Trump continues to contest the results of the 2020 presidential election, which saw Joe Biden elected as President instead of Trump.</p> <p>Chairman of the Georgia Republican Party David Schafer said election monitors had discovered a memory card containing votes that had not been uploaded.</p> <p>“Walton County election officials have found a memory card that was apparently not uploaded. The number of uncounted votes is not as large as in Floyd or Fayette but the President will pick up votes,” he said.</p> <p>The head of Arizona's Republican Party has insisted that the election is "far from over".</p> <p>“Do not lose heart,” Arizona <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/topics/us-republican-party" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Republican</a> Party chairwoman Dr Kelli Ward said in a video message on Monday.</p> <p>“Do not allow the negativity and the fake news to bring you down. Arizona is in this fight 100 per cent. We are out to make sure that our elections in our state have integrity.”</p> <p>Dr Ward said she was working "hand-in-hand" with the Trump campaign.</p> <p>“So stay strong, stay firm, understand that this election is far from over,” she said.</p> <p>“We do not have a president-elect at this time. States have not certified elections, and that’s what makes a president-elect – not the media, not the pundits, not the talking heads, not the fake news.”</p> <p>On Monday, Trump hailed a “big victory” in Clark County, Nevada after election officials threw out the results of a county commissioner race due to voting “discrepancies”.</p> <p>“Big victory moments ago in the state of Nevada,” the President tweeted.</p> <p>“The all Democrat County Commissioner race, on same ballot as President, just thrown out because of large scale voter discrepancy. Clark County officials do not have confidence in their own election security. Major impact!”</p> <p>The Clark County Commission cited the narrow 10-vote margin between Democrat Ross Miller and Republican Stavros Anthony as well as a range of discrepancies, including people who voted twice.</p> <p>“We have found discrepancies that we can’t explain that would cast a doubt on whether or not that margin of victory is solid,” Registrar of Voters Joe Gloria told commissioners.</p> <p>“That’s the only race in the entire election we have any concern related to the outcome. And it’s because of the margin.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Nurse arrested for third time after death of 17 babies

<p>A UK nurse previously arrested twice during investigations into the deaths of infants at a neonatal unit has been arrested again - this time on suspicion of the murder of eight babies and the attempted murder of another nine.</p> <p>Countess of Chester Hospital nurse Lucy Letby was originally arrested in 2018 and 2019 on suspicion of murder in relation to the deaths of eight babies and the attempted murder of six others.</p> <p>The 30-year-old has been questioned in the past by detectives for two days while her Chester home in northwest England was searched, but was released without charge.</p> <p>Police have revealed that Letby, who was once the face of a £3 million fundraising campaign, had been arrested again after new information came to light.</p> <p>Detectives described the investigation as “extremely challenging”.</p> <p>“It has been more than three years since we first launched an investigation into a number of baby deaths and non-fatal collapses at the neonatal unit at The Countess of Chester Hospital,” Detective Chief Inspector Paul Hughes said.</p> <p>“In that time a dedicated team of detectives have been working extremely hard on this highly complex and very sensitive case, doing everything they can as quickly as they can to identify what has led to these baby deaths and collapses.</p> <p>“Today, as part of our ongoing enquiries, the healthcare professional has been rearrested on suspicion of murder in relation to the deaths of eight babies and the attempted murder of nine babies.</p> <p>“The woman is currently in custody helping officers with their enquiries.”</p> <p>Cheshire Police has been investigating the deaths of infants and non-fatal collapses at the UK hospital for a long time now, after the hospital reported 17 infant deaths and 16 non-fatal collapses between March 2015 and July 2016.</p> <p>“Parents of all the babies have been kept fully updated on this latest development and they are continuing to be supported throughout the process by specially trained officers,” Hughes said.</p> <p>“This is an extremely difficult time for all the families and it is important to remember that, at the heart of this, there are a number of bereaved families seeking answers as to what happened to their children.”</p> <p>A friend of Letby has described the nurse as being dedicated to her “dream job” and insisted that she ”wouldn’t hurt a fly”.</p> <p>“We’re still reeling from it to be honest,” she told the Daily Mail.</p> <p>“Even after sleeping on it I think everybody around here is still in a state of shock and disbelief.</p> <p>“Lucy was doing the job she dreamed of doing and appeared nothing but dedicated and professional. You can’t imagine her hurting a fly let alone defenceless babies.”</p> <p>A resident who lives on the same street as Letby told the Daily Mail said she was shocked when she heard of her arrest.</p> <p>“I can’t add much more to what’s been already said about her,” she said.</p> <p>“I knew her when she was a little girl and she was as sweet as anything. I’ve seen her grow up and she seemed a lovely woman.</p> <p>“So this is news is deeply and utterly shocking. I can’t fathom it.”</p> <p>A spokesman for the Countess of Chester Hospital said it was “co-operating fully” with the investigation.</p>

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Awful truth behind explosive Princess Diana interview

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>The BBC is investigating the tactics used to obtain an interview with the late Princess Diana where she uttered the tragic statement about her marriage to Prince Charles: "There were three of us in this marriage".</p> <p>The interview between journalist Martin Bashir and Diana aired in 1995 but 25 years on, new evidence suggests that the reporter may have used forged bank statements and other unethical methods to convince Diana to agree to the interview.</p> <p>The incident is now being properly investigated, but it's complicated as Bashir, 57, is now gravely ill with COVID-19.</p> <p>Over the weekend, the BBC apologised to Princess Diana's brother Charles Spencer after he brought forward the evidence.</p> <p>The network admitted that Bashir showed Spencer bank statements doctored by a staff graphic designer. Spencer had alleged that Bashir told his sister “fantastical stories to win her trust” and showed him fake bank records that reportedly helped land Bashir the interview.</p> <p>Charles said he found a letter sent to him by Bashir that brought up rumours of an affair between Charles and the family nanny.</p> <p>At the time, Diana was allegedly deeply worried she was being spied on and Bashir's "evidence" made her confident to do the interview.</p> <p>“There were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded,” Diana said in the interview, referring to Charles’ affair with Camilla Parker Bowles.</p> <p>Weeks after Diana uttered that sentence, the royals began divorce proceedings.</p> <p>“Suggesting that mocked-up documents were genuine was wrong then and it’s wrong now; the BBC of today is happy to apologise for this. The BBC’s editorial processes are now even tougher and this would not happen today,” said a statement from a BBC spokesperson sent to the <em>New York Post</em>. “The BBC’s records say that the Princess of Wales said she hadn’t seen the mocked-up documents and they had played no part in her decision to take part in the interview.”</p> <p>The BBC is now investigating the interview.</p> <p>“The BBC has apologised. We are happy to repeat that apology. And while this was a quarter of a century ago, we absolutely will investigate – robustly and fairly – substantive new information,” a spokeswoman told Deadline. “We have asked Earl Spencer to share further information with the BBC.</p> <p>“Unfortunately, we are hampered at the moment by the simple fact that we are unable to discuss any of this with Martin Bashir, as he is seriously unwell. When he is well, we will of course hold an investigation into these new issues.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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What if a US President won’t leave office?

<p class="p1"><strong>Convention and tradition</strong></p> <p class="p1">The peaceful transfer of power is one of the fundamental tenets of American democracy. When George Washington, the first American president, had completed his second term, he voluntarily stepped down and John Adams, who had won the election, took over office.</p> <p class="p1">“That was not a constitutional requirement at the time,” says Jon Michaels, a professor in the UCLA School of Law, author of Constitutional Coup: Privatization’s Threat to the American Republic, and noted authority on constitutional law, presidential powers, government ethics, and conflicts of interest. In fact, it’s still not. The 20th Amendment stipulates that a president’s term – outlined in the nation’s Constitution as a four-year period – ends at noon on January 20 at the end of those four years. But, the Constitution does not spell out how it is to be handled. Rather, it’s a matter of tradition.</p> <p class="p1">When Thomas Jefferson ran a politically heated campaign against John Adams in 1800, the Electoral College was tied and the outcome had to be decided by the House of Representatives. Even so, once the matter was settled, Adams peacefully vacated the office, setting the precedent for the next 220 years.</p> <p class="p1"><strong>Challenging the norms</strong></p> <p class="p1">On September 23, 2020, President Donald Trump, when asked during a news conference, wouldn’t commit to following the two-centuries’ old custom. It wasn’t the first time he suggested as much: In March 2018, he praised China’s move to abolish presidential term limits, joking that the US might “have to give that a shot someday.”</p> <p class="p1">Now that we are less than a month away from the election, such rhetoric is being taken more seriously. Dr Russell Riley, professor and co-chair of the Presidential Oral History Program at the Miller Center, a nonpartisan affiliate of the University of Virginia that specialises in presidential scholarship, notes that questions of what happens if a president should refuse to leave office involves “an extraordinarily arcane area of presidential politics.”</p> <p class="p1"><strong>Presidential protocol</strong></p> <p class="p1">There is a proscribed sequence of events that happens when the incumbent president’s term expires at the dot of noon on January 20. These include:</p> <ul class="ul1"> <li class="li1"><span class="s1"></span>The nuclear codes, which allow the president to order a nuclear attack, expire. The military aide who carries the “nuclear football” containing the codes leaves the departing president’s side and joins the president being inaugurated.</li> <li class="li1"><span class="s1"></span>The US military switches its allegiance from the outgoing president to the incoming president. Any military orders issued by the outgoing president would be refused. Any officers who obeyed such orders could be arrested and tried on charges of mutiny and sedition.</li> <li class="li1"><span class="s1"></span>Likewise, the Secret Service moves to protect the new president and abandons the electoral loser, except for a small unit that will protect him and his family for the remainder of their lives, one of the perks presidents get to keep after leaving office.</li> </ul> <p class="p1">These actions make it highly unlikely that a president could go rogue and refuse to leave office. Even if he tried, the new president’s acting attorney general could draw up arrest warrants for charges ranging from criminal trespassing to insurrection.</p> <p class="p1"><strong>Legal challenges</strong></p> <p class="p1">That doesn’t mean a candidate couldn’t try to steer the election outcome, or delay its determination, through other means.</p> <p class="p1">If the popular vote indicates that a candidate has won the election by a narrow margin, the results could be contested with lawsuits and other manoeuvres. Some would say Trump has laid the groundwork for this by challenging the legitimacy of mail-in ballots, which are expected to comprise more than half of this year’s votes. If election night returns show Trump in the lead – a distinct possibility, as surveys show Trump supporters are more likely to vote in person than Biden backers – he may try to claim victory and stop the counting of mail-in ballots.</p> <p class="p1">Meanwhile, Republican and Democratic parties have already launched dozens of lawsuits each, and other groups have filed hundreds more, primarily focused on mail-in ballot technicalities. Many are hopeful attempts to answer questions before the election, but it’s likely many legal questions will remain well into November and beyond. But, you really don’t have to worry about mail-in ballot safety – one mail carrier explains why.</p> <p class="p1">In the event of a slim popular vote margin, a candidate could also try to leverage the Electoral College and its deadlines. Electors must be chosen no later than 41 days after Election Day. On that date, which is December 14 this year, the electors meet to cast their votes – typically for the candidate who won the popular vote in their state. Then, on December 23, each state submits an electoral certificate to Congress, and on January 6 Congress counts the votes.</p> <p class="p1">However, it’s not always so cut-and-dried. If the electors are selected after December 8, the so-called “safe harbor” date, their validity – and their votes – could be challenged.</p> <p class="p1">Another consideration: In 17 states, electors are not required to vote for the winner of the popular vote. Candidates could pressure those state legislatures in several of those states – including the hotly contested Pennsylvania, Florida, Michigan, and Wisconsin – to certify electors who would vote in their favour. If governance of those states is split – say, a Republican legislature with a Democratic governor – states could end up submitting conflicting electoral certificates to Congress and muddying the vote.</p> <p class="p1"><strong>The Electoral Count Act</strong></p> <p class="p1">If that happens, the Electoral Count Act would be triggered. This legislation was created after the 1876 Rutherford B. Hayes-Samuel J. Tilden contest, when three states submitted conflicting electoral certificates, preventing an Electoral College majority. The ECA states that in such circumstances, the two houses of Congress vote on which slate of electors to approve. With the Senate currently under Republican control and the House of Representatives currently under Democratic control (though that could change by the time Congress is seated on January 3), a stalemate is possible. However, the act is quite vague on how different scenarios should be resolved, and challenges to the law are expected. The issue could even be sent to the Supreme Court. But, Riley takes issue with this approach, especially given the hasty appointment and confirmation of Justice Amy Coney Barrett on 27 October – one week before election day. “No justice appointed under these circumstances under any prevailing standard of judgment should agree to issue a ruling on this election. Justices recuse themselves when they are parties to issues coming before the court,” Riley says.</p> <p class="p1"><strong>The Presidential Succession Act</strong></p> <p class="p1">This legislation, crafted in 1947, outlines what happens when the office of the president is vacant. If no president or vice president can be selected before January 20, when the current president’s term expires, the Speaker of the House becomes acting president until the situation can be resolved.</p> <p class="p1">According to Riley, this nearly happened in 2000 when voting irregularities in Florida caused election results to be contested. Dennis Hastert, then Speaker of the House, told Riley in a later interview, “The CIA would come and start to brief me. I was going to be the temporary president if the decision wasn’t made by some date in January.” Nevertheless, the situation was resolved and no one except the vice president has ever succeeded the president since the act was signed into law.</p> <p class="p1"><strong>Democracy prevails</strong></p> <p class="p1">Riley remains optimistic that none of this will come to pass this year, thanks to the much-maligned Electoral College. “One of the virtues of the Electoral College is that it has the effect of exaggerating the popular vote and accentuates the authority of the person who wins,” he explains. As an example, he says a 4 or 5 per cent popular vote win can look like an Electoral College rout. “However in instances where there is a question about the outcome of an election, it cabins the contest to a very narrow area.” He predicts that in the vast majority of states, it’s going to be reasonably clear who won in the upcoming election. “The contest is going to come down to two or three ugly situations.”</p> <p class="p1">But, as Riley notes, many Republicans in power, as well as Democrats, are “openly saying there needs to be a calm and reasoned transfer of power…It helps that you’ve got people in both parties who are saying they’re going to pay careful attention to these things and try to broker a peaceful transition.”</p> <p class="p1">The fact that the US doesn’t have explicit rules or tools to enforce the unwritten pact guaranteeing a peaceful transition is, according to Michaels, a testament to the republic’s collective integrity, Michaels says. “If we have to add it now, it will forever mark this moment as the nadir of our republic.”</p> <p class="p1">Expert Sources: Jon Michaels, a professor in the UCLA School of Law; Russell Riley, PhD, professor and co-chair of the Presidential Oral History Program at the Miller Center; Pew Research Center:”Americans’ expectations about voting in 2020 presidential election are colored by partisan differences”; and Lawrence R. Douglas, a professor in Amerhest College</p> <p class="p1"><em>Source: <a href="https://www.rd.com/article/what-happens-if-a-president-wont-leave-office/"><span class="s2">rd.com</span></a></em></p>

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120-year prison sentence for cult leader

<p>Keith Raniere, who ran a cult-like group that kept women as virtual sex prisoners to service him in upstate New York was sentenced to 120 years prison on Tuesday.</p> <p>Reniere was convicted on federal sex trafficking, racketeering and possession of child pornography charges last year for his role in the alleged sex cult called NXIVM (pronounced “nexium”).</p> <p>The sentence was issued by the US District Judge Nicholas Garaufis, who presided over the six-week trial last year that ended in Raniere convicted on all counts.</p> <p>Acting US Attorney Seth DuCharme said he hopes the sentence will serve as a warning to any aspiring cult leaders.</p> <p>“When justice catches up to you, as it did today, it is severe," DuCharme told reporters outside court in Brooklyn. "Keith Raniere will not be able to victimize people anymore after today's sentence and we’re very grateful for that."</p> <p>Marc Elliot, a former NXIVM member and supporter of Raniere's, said the defendant didn't get a fair trial.</p> <p>"We all should be fighting for due process no matter how much you don't like it or how inconvenient it is," Elliot said. "Because if someone or society ever turns on you, you better hope to God that due process and laws are still standing to protect you."</p> <p>Appearing on Dateline NBC from jail, Raniere apologised for the “tragedy” and “hurt” he caused the victims but also claimed he was not guilty.</p> <p>"I am innocent," Raniere said.</p> <p>"This is a horrible tragedy with many, many people being hurt," he added. "There is a horrible injustice here. And whether you think I'm the devil or not, the justice process has to be examined."</p> <p>NXIVM is the subject of the HBO docuseries “The Vow”, which is set to feature Raniere in its second season next year.</p>

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"Justice for Chloe": Unbearable choice for grandfather accused of cruise ship fatal fall

<p>A grandfather accused in the fatal fall of his granddaughter Chloe from an 11th storey window of a cruise ship pleaded guilty on Thursday to negligent homicide.</p> <p>Salvatore "Sam" Anello said that he wanted to help end "this nightmare" for his family.</p> <p>His 18-month-old granddaughter Chloe slipped from his grip and fell 46 metres from an open window on a Royal Caribbean Cruises' Freedom of the Seas ship in July 2019 as the ship docked in Puerto Rico.</p> <p>Puerto Rico prosecutor Laura Hernandez said Anello would be sentenced on December 10th.</p> <p>“We have found justice for Chloe,” she said.</p> <p>A representative for Anello’s attorney, Michael Winkleman, said in a statement to America’s NBC TODAY that Anello will not serve any jail time and will serve his probation in Indiana.</p> <p>“This decision was an incredibly difficult one for Sam and the family, but because the plea agreement includes no jail time and no admission of facts, it was decided the plea deal is in the best interests of the family so that they can close this horrible chapter and turn their focus to mourning Chloe and fighting for cruise passenger safety by raising awareness about the need for all common carriers to adhere to window fall prevention laws designed to protect children from falling from windows,” Winkleman said in a statement.</p> <p>Winkleman also added that the family would continue its civil suit against Royal Caribbean with the goal of discovering why the window was allowed to be open.</p> <p>Anello, 51, said that he did not know that the window in the children's play area was open.</p> <p>“I wasn’t drinking and I wasn’t dangling her out of a window,” he said in a previous statement. He said he is colourblind and might not have realized the tinted window was open.</p> <p>“We will continue the fight for justice for Chloe and to hold Royal Caribbean accountable for its brazen failure to follow the standards designed precisely to prevent children from falling out of windows,” Winkleman said in his statement.</p>

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8-year-old dies after being forced to “jump on trampoline”

<p>A young girl who allegedly was forced to jump on a trampoline as punishment in sweltering heat has died of dehydration.<span> </span><br /><br />Daniel and Ashley Schwarz - aged 44 and 34 - have been charged over the death of eight-year-old Jaylin in Odessa, Texas, CBS7 has reported.<br /><br />Jaylin was pronounced dead at a home on August 29, after police were called.<br /><br />Investigators found the young girl had allegedly been punished by the couple. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838276/parents-abuse.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f3f3238b2e544b8eaaea978f0049b4fc" /></p> <p>“[The] investigation revealed that the 8-year-old child had been punished and was not allowed to eat breakfast and was required to jump on the trampoline without stopping for an extended period of time,” the Odessa Police Department said in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.odessapd.com/Home/Components/News/News/10518/820" target="_blank">a statement</a>. <span></span></p> <p><span>“Further investigation revealed that the 8-year-old child was not allowed to drink any water because she was not jumping.”</span></p> <p>They reportedly forced her to jump on a trampoline nonstop.<br /><br />Police said the eight-year-old was also not allowed to drink any water.<br /><br />The temperature of the trampoline reached about 43 degrees, while the ground was 65 degrees.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838275/parents-abuse-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/80956067076045b5b09a67769c925cbd" /><br /><br />An autopsy ruled Jaylin’s death a murder and said the cause of death was dehydration.<br /><br />The Schwarzs have been arrested and charged following the autopsy results.<br /><br />Family members said the pair were not her parents, but her “guardians”.</p>

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Novak Djokovic accused of cheating at French Open

<p>Novak Djokovic had to come from behind to make the French Open semi-finals and the Serbian star has been accused of using dodgy tactics to get there.</p> <p>Djokovic earned his spot in the final four after beating Spaniard Pablo Carreno Busta 4-6 6-2 6-3 6-4, but he asked for a medial timeout while losing his only set of the tournament.</p> <p>The world No.1 had his arm and neck treated but Busta suspected foul play and questioned whether he was really injured after the match concluded.</p> <p>“Every time the match gets complicated, he asks for medical assistance,” Busta said.</p> <p>“It’s something that he has been doing for years. When he is down, he asks for the trainer.</p> <p>“The last (few) years, he’s always doing this when he has problems on court.</p> <p>“Maybe it’s the pressure or something that he needs to do it.</p> <p>“But, he continues playing normal. I don’t know if he’s in pain really. Ask him.”</p> <p>Djokovic refuted the accusation and emphasised he needed treatment.</p> <p>“No, it wasn’t that at all,” he said.</p> <p>“I had to deal with that. I told you guys many times I’m over it. I’m not thinking about it at all. I mean, zero percent.”</p> <p>“As the match went on, I felt better, didn’t feel as much pain.</p> <p>“I had some neck issues and some shoulder issues. I’ll just say that. I don’t want to get really too much into it.”</p> <p>Djokovic next faces Greek young gun Stefanos Tsitsipas, while Rafael Nadal takes on Argentina’s Diego Schwartzman in the other semi-final.</p>

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Killer dad reveals sick details of how he murdered his family

<p><span>Chris Watts’ has bared all the horrific details in new letters written from his prison cell.</span><br /><br /><span>They have resurfaced as a Netflix documentary reveals more details about the murders of his pregnant wife and two daughters.</span><br /><br /><span>Watts, 35, from the US state of Colorado, was jailed for murdering his pregnant wife, Shanann Watts, 34, and two daughters, Bella, 4, and Celeste, 3, back in August 2018.</span><br /><br /><span>After killing his wife, Watts drove her body and his daughters to an oil worksite owned by a previous employer over 65 kilometres from the family home and smothered the girls with a blanket.</span><br /><br /><span>His letters have resurfaced after they were published last year in Letters From Christopher.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838194/prince-harry-chris-watts-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8611ac6ab50e41e08d5048b7c55113cd" /><br /><br /><span>The book was written by Cheryln Cradle after she struck up correspondence with him while he began his life sentence.</span><br /><br /><span>In one of the letters shown to Daily Mail TV, Watts revealed the moments leading up to his family’s death.</span><br /><br /><span>“August 13th, morning of, I went to the girls’ room first, before Shanann and I had our argument,” he wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>“I went to Bella’s room, then Cece’s room and used a pillow from their bed (to kill them). That’s why the cause of death was smothering. After I left Cece’s room, then I climbed back in bed with Shanann and our argument ensued.</span><br /><br /><span>“After Shanann had passed, Bella and Cece woke back up. I’m not sure how they woke back up, but they did. Bella’s eyes were bruised and both girls looked like they had been through trauma.”</span><br /><br /><span>Following the deaths of his wife and children, Watts claimed he murdered his wife as revenge after she killed their two girls.</span><br /><br /><span>However, he later debunked his own story in the letters to Cradle and confessed he had been planning the murders.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838193/prince-harry-chris-watts-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b5d7e7bf918f418eaaebc2f4f8d7301b" /><br /><span>It is believed he plotted the killings in order to be with his mistress Nichol Kessinger.</span><br /><br /><span>“August 12th when I finished putting the girls to bed, I walked away and said, ‘That’s the last time I’m going to be tucking my babies in’. I knew what was going to happen the day before and I did nothing to stop it,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>According to Daily Mail TV, the convicted killer also admitted to giving Shanann Oxycodone.</span><br /><br /><span>He did it in an attempt to cause her to miscarriage.</span><br /><br /><span>In the moments before Watts killed his wife, he told her he did not love her anymore.</span><br /><br /><span>“Isn’t it weird how I look back and what I remember so much is her face getting all black with streaks of mascara?” he wrote in the letters.</span><br /><br /><span>“All the weeks of me thinking about killing her, and now I was faced with it. When she started to get drowsy, I somehow knew how to squeeze the jugular veins until it cut off the blood flow to her brain, and she passed out.</span><br /><br /><span>“I knew if I took my hands off of her, she would still keep me from Nikki. They asked me why she couldn't fight back, it's because she couldn't fight back. Her eyes filled with blood; as she looked at me and she died. I knew she was gone when she relieved herself.”</span><br /><br /><span>The new Netflix documentary, American Murder: The Family Next Door, revealed new CCTV footage.</span><br /><br /><span>It follows the tense moment Watts, his neighbour Nate Trinastich and a police officer look over CCTV to try and determine what happened on the night Shanann and her daughters disappeared.</span><br /><br /><span>Watts appears fidgety and nervous as the three men watch the footage together.</span><br /><br /><span>The CCTV which was recorded from Mr Trinastich’s driveway, shows Watts parking in a different spot to where he usually parked.</span><br /><br /><span>The footage also showed Watts backing into the driveway at 5.17 am and he then appears to load items into his car.</span><br /><br /><span>Watts explained in the moment that he normally parks outside on the street because it makes it easier “to lug everything with all the tools [he] had to bring in”.</span><br /><br /><span>He then went on to say that the reason he parked in a different spot is because he had issues with people trying to break in and steal stuff from his home.</span><br /><br /><span>Police now can confirm the footage shown in the documentary was actually the horrifying moment Watts loafed his family into the car.</span></p>

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Dream holiday turns into horror: Family sues after baby loses legs and fingers

<p>A British family is suing the Royal Caribbean cruise line after their nine-month-old daughter left their trip a triple amputee following a major misdiagnosis onboard.</p> <p>Phoebe Moon and her parents boarded the Symphony of the Seas in February, and found that their baby girl had become ill after they had settled in.</p> <p>“We had never taken her away before and we thought we would have the time of our lives in America, but sadly, it didn’t turn out that way,” said Phoebe’s mother Aimee.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838022/phoebe-baby-amputee-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f23261177ed24fb184dfd8d9c75adf58" /></p> <p>“We actually visited the infirmary five times that day and she just got worse and worse throughout the day,” she said.</p> <p>“Every time we went down (the infirmary), we were sent back to our cabin.”</p> <p>When they refused to leave, the parents say Phoebe was handed antibiotics.</p> <p>Eventually they got off the ship mid-cruise in St Martin to seek help.</p> <p>“When we got to St Martin’s hospital, they said they’ve got about 15 minutes to save her life,” explained Phoebe’s father, Luke.</p> <p>“They said to prepare for the worst because she’s very sick.”</p> <p>Phoebe’s feet, legs, and hands were handed swollen and purple - caused by a severe form of meningitis.</p> <p>“We were just in utter shock to think you left to go on holidays with your daughter and the prospect that you’re not going to be going home with her is unimaginable,” Aimee said.</p> <p>The family say that doctors in Fort Lauderdale had to amputate to save her life.</p> <p>Phoebe lost her feet and the fingers of her left hand.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838023/phoebe-baby-amputee-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/94a00cd7e23d46218b7bc82551f82bd8" /></p> <p>The family has since filed a lawsuit against Royal Caribbean in Miami, with the family alleging that the cruise line’s doctors misdiagnosed Phoebe with “a stomach bug” despite her showing “classic signs of a life-threatening meningococcal meningitis infection”.</p> <p>Some of those symptoms included lethargy and high fever.</p> <p>Thomas Scolaro is the attorney for the family and told NBC 6: “Listening to their story just breaks my heart every time.</p> <p>“This would otherwise be the world’s most horrific case of medical negligence and damage to the world’s sweetest little child, but it gets substantially worse.”</p> <p>Her parents say every day is a struggle following their daughter’s life-changing surgery.</p> <p>“Even now all she wants to do is get down and walk, and it’s so difficult that she is unable to do that,” Aimee said.</p> <p>“And these challenges are just going to get harder as she gets older.”</p> <p>The family has given a message for other families planning to sail in the future.</p> <p>“We were always under the impression that the medical facilities and staff on a ship were world class and world leading,” Luke said.</p> <p>“We now think that isn’t the case. You are on your own at sea.”</p>

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A computer can guess more than 100,000,000,000 passwords per second. Still think yours is secure?

<p>Passwords have been used for thousands of years as a means of identifying ourselves to others and in more recent times, to computers. It’s a simple concept – a shared piece of information, kept secret between individuals and used to “prove” identity.</p> <p>Passwords in an IT context <a href="https://www.wired.com/2012/01/computer-password/">emerged in the 1960s</a> with <a href="https://www.techopedia.com/definition/24356/mainframe">mainframe</a> computers – large centrally operated computers with remote “terminals” for user access. They’re now used for everything from the PIN we enter at an ATM, to logging in to our computers and various websites.</p> <p>But why do we need to “prove” our identity to the systems we access? And why are passwords so hard to get right?</p> <p><strong>What makes a good password?</strong></p> <p>Until relatively recently, a good password might have been a word or phrase of as little as six to eight characters. But we now have minimum length guidelines. This is because of “entropy”.</p> <p>When talking about passwords, entropy is the <a href="https://www.itdojo.com/a-somewhat-brief-explanation-of-password-entropy/">measure of predictability</a>. The maths behind this isn’t complex, but let’s examine it with an even simpler measure: the number of possible passwords, sometimes referred to as the “password space”.</p> <p>If a one-character password only contains one lowercase letter, there are only 26 possible passwords (“a” to “z”). By including uppercase letters, we increase our password space to 52 potential passwords.</p> <p>The password space continues to expand as the length is increased and other character types are added.</p> <p>However, the problem with depending on password complexity is that computers are highly efficient at repeating tasks – including guessing passwords.</p> <p>Last year, a <a href="https://www.cbronline.com/news/stolen-user-credentials">record was set</a> for a computer trying to generate every conceivable password. It achieved a rate faster than 100,000,000,000 guesses per second.</p> <p>By leveraging this computing power, cyber criminals can hack into systems by bombarding them with as many password combinations as possible, in a process called <a href="https://www.kaspersky.com/resource-center/definitions/brute-force-attack">brute force attacks</a>.</p> <p>And with cloud-based technology, guessing an eight-character password can be achieved in as little as 12 minutes and cost as little as US$25.</p> <p>Also, because passwords are almost always used to give access to sensitive data or important systems, this motivates cyber criminals to actively seek them out. It also drives a lucrative online market selling passwords, some of which come with email addresses and/or usernames.</p> <p><strong>How are passwords stored on websites?</strong></p> <p>Website passwords are usually stored in a protected manner using a mathematical algorithm called <a href="https://www.wired.com/2016/06/hacker-lexicon-password-hashing/">hashing</a>. A hashed password is unrecognisable and can’t be turned back into the password (an irreversible process).</p> <p>When you try to login, the password you enter is hashed using the same process and compared to the version stored on the site. This process is repeated each time you login.</p> <p>For example, the password “Pa$$w0rd” is given the value “02726d40f378e716981c4321d60ba3a325ed6a4c” when calculated using the SHA1 hashing algorithm. Try it <a href="https://passwordsgenerator.net/sha1-hash-generator/">yourself</a>.</p> <p>When faced with a file full of hashed passwords, a brute force attack can be used, trying every combination of characters for a range of password lengths. This has become such common practice that there are websites that list common passwords alongside their (calculated) hashed value. You can simply search for the hash to reveal the corresponding password.</p> <p>The theft and selling of passwords lists is now so common, a <a href="https://haveibeenpwned.com/">dedicated website</a> — haveibeenpwned.com — is available to help users check if their accounts are “in the wild”. This has grown to include more than 10 billion account details.</p> <p>If your email address is listed on this site you should definitely change the detected password, as well as on any other sites for which you use the same credentials.</p> <p><strong>Is more complexity the solution?</strong></p> <p>You would think with so many password breaches occurring daily, we would have improved our password selection practices. Unfortunately, last year’s annual <a href="https://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/91461-the-worst-passwords-of-2019">SplashData password survey</a> has shown little change over five years.</p> <p>As computing capabilities increase, the solution would appear to be increased complexity. But as humans, we are not skilled at (nor motivated to) remember highly complex passwords.</p> <p>We’ve also passed the point where we use only two or three systems needing a password. It’s now common to access numerous sites, with each requiring a password (often of varying length and complexity). A recent survey suggests there are, on average, <a href="https://www.newswire.com/news/new-research-most-people-have-70-80-passwords-21103705">70-80 passwords per person</a>.</p> <p>The good news is there are tools to address these issues. Most computers now support password storage in either the operating system or the web browser, usually with the option to share stored information across multiple devices.</p> <p>Examples include Apple’s <a href="https://www.computerworld.com/article/3254183/how-to-use-icloud-keychain-the-guide.html">iCloud Keychain</a> and the ability to save passwords in Internet Explorer, Chrome and Firefox (although <a href="https://www.howtogeek.com/447345/why-you-shouldnt-use-your-web-browsers-password-manager/">less reliable</a>).</p> <p><a href="https://tech.co/password-managers/what-is-a-password-manager">Password managers</a> such as KeePassXC can help users generate long, complex passwords and store them in a secure location for when they’re needed.</p> <p>While this location still needs to be protected (usually with a long “master password”), using a password manager lets you have a unique, complex password for every website you visit.</p> <p>This won’t prevent a password from being stolen from a vulnerable website. But if it is stolen, you won’t have to worry about changing the same password on all your other sites.</p> <p>There are of course vulnerabilities in these solutions too, but perhaps that’s a story for another day.</p> <p><em>Written by Paul Haskell-Dowland and Brianna O’Shea. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-computer-can-guess-more-than-100-000-000-000-passwords-per-second-still-think-yours-is-secure-144418">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Shocking twist after parents make public appeal to find missing daughter

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The parents of a missing teenager have been charged with her murder after they appealed for help to find her.</p> <p>Bernadetta Walker was reported missing 7 weeks ago by her 37-year-old mum, Sarah and 57-year-old father Scott from their home in the east of England.</p> <p>Police declared that detectives would be pursuing the case as a "no body" investigation as they continued their search for the 17-year-old who was last seen by her parents on July 18th. </p> <p>Ms Walker asked the public for help in distributing flyers and claimed she “couldn’t eat or sleep properly”, saying that she hoped her daughter was “hiding” at a friend’s home.</p> <p>“I know my baby girl wouldn't be out in the open. She's scared of being out in the dark alone, that's what makes me think she's at a friend's house,” she said, according to The Sun.</p> <p>Bernadette’s dad also appealed for help, writing on Facebook: “You can imagine how much we are both worried. We miss you. We need to know that you're safe. We love you.”</p> <p>Police have said that "significant progress" has been made in the investigation, but they are yet to find the missing teenager.</p> <p>“Therefore our plea is for anyone who has information on what has happened to her, or where she might be, to get in touch as a matter of urgency,” Policing Peterborough wrote to Facebook.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Facebook</em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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Parents receive $5 million over bungled baby birth

<p><span>A couple in Perth will keep their $5.2 million in damages after their child suffered severe and lifelong brain injuries during birth after a court challenge.</span><br /><br /><span>It has been revealed that during Cooper Ellis' birth at Bentley Hospital in August 2009, doctor Hamza Amira repeatedly tried to use an instrumental delivery, specifically one using vacuum extraction devices.</span><br /><br /><span>Cooper was eventually delivered via a combination of techniques.</span><br /><br /><span>However it was during the birthing process he was deprived of oxygen and his heart rate flatlined.</span><br /><br /><span>The young boy required resuscitation and also suffered other injuries.</span><br /><br /><span>His parents Chris Ellis and Michelle Hoglin launched legal action against the East Metropolitan Health Service and claimed that Cooper's injuries were a result of the horrifying circumstances of his birth.</span><br /><br /><span>WA District Court Judge Michael Gething sided with the family in 2018, saying Dr Amira's negligence caused Cooper's birth injuries.</span><br /><br /><span>He also acknowledged that his subsequent developmental and cognitive impairments were due to the birthing process.</span><br /><br /><span>The EMHS took the case to the WA Court of Appeal, but on Thursday the application was thrown out.</span><br /><br /><span>The appeal judges said the birth was "prolonged and difficult".</span><br /><br /><span>"(Cooper) did not take his first breath until five minutes after birth and underwent resuscitation for 20 minutes," they said.</span><br /><br /><span>The infant did not start moving his legs until an hour after birth, the judge added.</span><br /><br /><span>Slater and Gordon principal lawyer Jeffrey Potter said in a statement the firm was pleased to have assisted the family to succeed with the complex case.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Potter said Cooper's parents were relieved their "long and hard-fought battle" was finally over.</span><br /><br /><span>Now they will continue to focus on their 11-year-old son's ongoing care.</span><br /><br /><span>The $5.2 million will go towards ensuring Cooper has the support he will need for the rest of his life.</span></p>

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Facebook blocks terminally ill man from live streaming his death

<p>Facebook said it would block the livestream of a Frenchman suffering from an incurable condition who wanted to broadcast his death on the social media platform. </p> <p>Alain Cocq recently announced that he was refusing all food, drink and medicine after President Emmanuel Macron declined his request for euthanasia.</p> <p>The 57-year-old suffers from a rare medical condition which causes the walls of his arteries to stick together.</p> <p>Cocq believed he had less than a week to live and said he would broadcast his death from Saturday morning.</p> <p>"The road to deliverance begins and believe me, I am happy," he wrote on Facebook shortly after midnight in a post announcing he had "finished his last meal".</p> <p>"I know the days ahead are going to be difficult but I have made my decision and I am calm," he added.</p> <p>Facebook has been heavily criticised over the way it monitors content and said it was against their rules to portray suicide.</p> <p>"Although we respect  (Cocq's) decision to want to draw attention to this complex question, following expert advice we have taken measures to prevent the live broadcast on Alain's account," a Facebook spokesman told AFP.</p> <p>"Our rules do not allow us to show suicide attempts." </p> <p>Cocq is trying to gather supporters saying: "Facebook is blocking my video broadcast until September 8."</p> <p>"It is up to you now," he said in a message to supporters before giving out Facebook's French address "so you can let them know what you think about their methods of restricting free speech".</p> <p>"There will be a back-up within 24 hours" to run the video, he added.</p> <p>Cocq had asked Macron for permission after he wanted to die in peace by taking a substance, but the president refused, saying it was not allowed under French law.</p> <p>Cocq has used his plight to draw attention to the situation of terminally ill patients in France who are unable to be allowed to die in line with their wishes.</p> <p>"Because I am not above the law, I am not able to comply with your request," Macron said in a letter to Cocq, which the patient published on his Facebook page.</p> <p>"I cannot ask anyone to go beyond our current legal framework... Your wish is to request active assistance in dying which is not currently permitted in our country."</p>

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