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Travelling through the heart of Australia on the Bollinger and Brims

<p>Guests riding on The Ghan in August will enjoy exclusive Bollinger champagne tastings and personalised Akubra hat fittings.</p> <p>The famous train, which travels through the heart of Australia, will add the ‘Bollinger and Brims’ carriage for six special August departures in celebration of the train’s 90th-anniversary.</p> <p>The experience is free for guests travelling aboard The Ghan on these departures.</p> <p><strong>Adelaide – Darwin:<br /></strong>Sunday 4 August<br />Sunday 11 August<br />Sunday 18 August</p> <p><strong>Darwin – Adelaide:</strong><br />Wednesday 7 August<br />Wednesday 14 August<br />Wednesday 21 August</p> <p>“By bringing two well-loved Australian brands together in The Ghan and Akubra and then adding to it the sophisticated global appeal of Bollinger, we are creating a unique experience for our guests,” Journey Beyond Rail Expeditions Managing Director, Steve Kernaghan said.</p> <p>Bollinger Marketing Manager Danika Windrim says the champagne company was proud to celebrate The Ghan’s uniquely adventurous spirit.<span> </span></p> <p>“We hope to bring a true sense of occasion reminiscent of the golden age of travel and create unforgettable moments for guests of The Ghan,” said Windrim.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/the-ghan-brims-and-bollinger/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>. </em></p>

International Travel

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Why Prince Charles' meeting with Donald Trump could be controversial

<p>On a controversial state visit to the UK next month, US President Donald Trump is going to meet with Prince Charles.</p> <p>Trump and the Prince of Wales could turn the meeting into an awkward one due to a diplomatically awkward exchange over climate change.</p> <p>The pair are expected to meet for afternoon tea at Clarence House, which is the official residence of the Prince and his wife Camilla.</p> <p>A state visit usually guarantees an audience with the Queen but visiting leaders don’t automatically get access to the Prince of Wales.</p> <p>With Prince Charles’ office declining to comment publicly on the meeting or the agenda, there’s no official word from the Palace as to what the royal thinks about the upcoming meeting.</p> <p>However, given Charles’ passionate and lifelong stance on environmentalism and Trump’s well-documented climate change scepticism, it’s likely that the issue is going to be discussed.</p> <p>Prince Charles warned against "potentially catastrophic global warming" in a speech during a tour of the Caribbean in March.</p> <p>"We demand the world's decision-makers take responsibility and solve this crisis," he said.</p> <p>The most likely date for the afternoon tea between Trump and Prince Charles is June 3, which is the first day of the US President’s visit.</p> <p>According to tradition, a state banquet is hosted by Queen Elizabeth and will take place on the first evening.</p> <p>However, whether or not Charles even brings up the issue with politics isn’t certain. He recently promised in a <a rel="noopener" href="https://edition.cnn.com/2018/11/08/uk/prince-charles-on-becoming-king-bbc-documentary-intl/index.html" target="_blank">BBC documentary</a> to not meddle in matters of public debate.</p> <p>"You know I've tried to make sure whatever I've done has been nonparty political, but I think it's vital to remember there's only room for one sovereign at a time, not two. So, you can't be the same as the sovereign if you're the Prince of Wales or the heir," said Charles.</p> <p>"But the idea somehow that I'm going to go on exactly the same way if I have to succeed is complete nonsense because the two ... the two situations are completely different. You only have to look at Shakespeare plays, 'Henry V' or 'Henry IV, Part 1 and 2,' to see the change that can take place – because if you become the sovereign, then you play the role in the way that it is expected," he said.</p> <p>"So, clearly ... I won't be able to do the same things I've done, you know, as heir, so of course you operate within the ... the constitutional parameters. But it's a different function."</p> <p>This is, of course, once he takes on the role of the monarch. As he’s still a Prince, he’s going to give his opinion as freely as he already has been.</p>

News

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Downton Abbey movie sneak peak: The King and Queen are coming!

<p>It’s 1927 and the King and Queen are coming to stay. Welcome back to <em>Downton Abbey</em>.</p> <p>Much to fans disappointment, the wildly successful show ended its reign in 2015, but now, four years later, the trailer for the highly anticipated movie has been released, and it’s everything you hoped for and more.</p> <p>The trailer gives a sneak peak into what you can expect, showing Robert Crawley, 7th Earl of Grantham, reading a letter from the royal family, announcing that George V and Queen Mary are staying over.</p> <p>With all the magic and original cast returning, the movie is sure to be a hit. Dame Maggie Smith will reprise her role as Lady Violet Crawley, Dowager Countess of Grantham, Michelle Dockery as Lady Mary Talbot and Hugh Bonneville as Robert Crawley.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tu3mP0c51hE" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>The movie seems to include all of the banter and wit of the original TV series, with the announcement met with plenty of excitement and sarcasm from Lady Violet – “Here we go …” she says.</p> <p>Despite the film heavily focusing on the royal visit, <em>Downton Abbey</em> isn’t complete without romance and secrets.</p> <p>The trailer shows a moment where Thomas (Rob James-Collier) is kissing a mystery man, adding intrigue to the entire story.</p> <p>Guess we’ll just have to wait and see how the movie plays out.</p> <p><em>Downton Abbey<span> </span></em>the movie will be premiering in Australian cinemas on September 12.</p>

TV

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Why you should set your phone to black and white

<p><span>Feeling more glued to your phone than you should be? According to a <a href="https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2017/02/smartphone-habits-and-pet-peeves-of-australians/">2017 study</a>, the average person in Australia spends 2.5 hours each day on their smartphones, with three out of four men (74 per cent) admitting to having their phone at hand throughout the whole day compared with 60 per cent of women. </span></p> <p><span>If you are concerned about your screentime, setting your phone to grayscale may help.</span></p> <p><span>Replacing the saturated colours with black-and-white tones may help make the apps look less enticing, saving you from endless checking and scrolling. Switching to grayscale can also help you save battery life and make it easier on your eyes, especially if you have visual impairments such as colour blindness.</span></p> <p><span>Here’s how you can change your phone to black and white.</span></p> <p><strong><span>iPhone</span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Open Settings &gt; General &gt; Accessibility &gt; Display Accommodations.</li> <li>Select Color Filters, then toggle the switch on.</li> <li>Select Grayscale.</li> </ol> <p><span>To set it back to the colourful setting, simply switch the toggle back.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Android</span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Open Settings &gt; About device &gt; Software info.</li> <li>Tap on the Builder number several times until a notification appears that you are now a developer.</li> <li>Go back to Settings and choose Developer options on the bottom of the list. Toggle on the switch at the top if it is not already on.</li> <li>Open Simulate color space.</li> <li>Select Monochromacy.</li> </ol>

Books

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Why do we have a QWERTY keyboard?

<p><em>"Why are the letters on the keyboard not in alphabetical order??" – Baker, age 9, Arrowtown, New Zealand.</em></p> <p>Great question! That question really puzzled me when I was a kid. And so as a grown-up, I decided to research it and write a <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002073738480070X">paper</a> about it.</p> <p>Let’s turn the clock back. About 150 years ago, all letters and business papers were written by hand. Most likely they were written using a pen that had to be dipped in ink every word or two. Writing was slow and messy.</p> <p>Then some clever inventors built a machine for typing. The first typewriters were big heavy metal machines that worked a bit like a piano.</p> <p>Have you ever seen the inside of a real piano? You press a key and some clever levers make a felt hammer hit just the right piano string to make a note.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XlcZ7WGRbJw?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span class="caption">Inside a piano.</span></em></p> <p>Early typewriters were similar. They had all these levers with a metal alphabet letter at the end of it. You had to press a letter key quite hard to make the metal lever fly across and hit the paper. Hit the A key and the A lever would hit the paper and type A. The paper then shifted a bit to the left, so the next key would hit in just the right place next to the A. Press more keys and you could type a word, or even a whole book.</p> <p>The first machine had the letter keys in alphabetical order. The trouble was that if you hit two keys quickly the levers would jam. Jams were most likely when the two keys were close together on the keyboard. Rearranging the letters could reduce jams.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WEyCINkkR-Q?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span class="caption">Rearranging the letters reduced the risk that two levers would jam.</span></em></p> <p><a href="http://www.typewritermuseum.org/history/inventors_sholes.html">Christopher Sholes</a> was an American inventor who was most successful in reducing jams. He tried various arrangements, always trying to reduce the need to type two keys that were close together. The best arrangement he could find was similar to the QWERTY keyboard we all use today. (Look at the top row of a keyboard to see why it’s called QWERTY.)</p> <p>He sold his invention to the Remington Company in the United States. In the 1870s, that company built and sold the first commercially successful typewriters. They used the QWERTY keyboard.</p> <p>For 100 years or so after the Remington typewriter arrived, vast numbers of people all over the world <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Wgu5hnrAnI">trained to become touch typists</a> (meaning they could type even without looking much at the keyboard). They were employed to type letters and all other kinds of things for business and government. Because so many people became so skilled at using QWERTY, it became very difficult to get everyone to change to any other key arrangement.</p> <p>Many other key arrangements have been tried. Some are claimed to be easier to learn or faster to use than QWERTY. But none has proved good enough to beat QWERTY. It seems that we are stuck with this layout, even if jams are no longer a problem.</p> <p>QWERTY was developed for the English language. Some other languages use variations. For example, AZERTY is commonly used for French, QWERTZ for German, and QZERTY for Italian. Perhaps you can find someone from India, Thailand, Japan, Korea, or China. Ask them to show you the keyboard they use in their language.</p> <p><strong>You’ll never regret being able to touch type</strong></p> <p>Now, on any keyboard, feel the F and J keys carefully and find some tiny bumps. Place your first fingers on those keys, and your other fingers along the same row. Your left fingers should be on ASDF and your right on JKL;. These are called the “home keys”.</p> <p>Keep your fingers resting lightly on the home keys. Type other letters by moving just one finger up or down and perhaps a little sideways. Learn how to do that quickly, without watching your fingers, and you can touch type!</p> <p>When I was a teenager, I owned a typewriter. I made a cardboard shield to stop me seeing my fingers as I typed. I used clothes pegs to fix it to the typewriter. Then I found a touch-typing book and started to practise, making sure that I kept my fingers on the home keys and always used the correct finger to type each letter. After lots of practice, I could touch type. I love being able to touch type. It has helped me all my life, first as a student, then in everything I have done since.</p> <p>Now with computers it’s easier than ever to learn to touch type, even if QWERTY at first seems strange. There’s lots of good software to help (your school may have some), some of it feeling like a game.</p> <p>Find software that you like, and put in some practice. It may seem hard at first, but persist and you will soon get good at it. Find a friend or two and do it together. Perhaps make it a competition. You’ll never regret being able to touch type.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/116069/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Geoff Cumming, Emeritus Professor, La Trobe University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-do-we-have-a-qwerty-keyboard-instead-of-putting-the-letters-in-alphabetical-order-116069"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Mind

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Health check: Why do we get motion sickness and what’s the best way to treat it?

<p>Motion sickness can be mild, but in some people it’s debilitating, and takes the fun out of a holiday.</p> <p>We think it’s caused by <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/02/the-mysterious-science-of-motion-sickness/385469/">temporary dysfunction</a> of our brain’s balance centres.</p> <p>The perception of motion of any sort can bring on <a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/motion-sickness">symptoms of travel sickness</a>. These include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, excessive saliva, rapid breathing and cold sweats.</p> <p>The good news is, there are strategies and medicines you can use to <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html">prevent motion sickness</a>, or to help you ride it out.</p> <p><strong>Ears and eyes disconnect</strong></p> <p>As we move through space, multiple sensors in our middle ear, limbs and eyes feed information to our balance centre in our brains to orientate us. It’s when these sources of information are in apparent conflict that we may experience motion sickness.</p> <p>For example, in those who are particularly susceptible, watching certain movies can induce motion sickness as our eyes indicate we are moving, although other sensors confirm we are stationary.</p> <p>A boat trip in rocky seas or a car trip on winding roads means our head and body will be moving in unusual ways, in two or more axes at once, while sensing accelerations, decelerations and rotations. Together these are strong stimuli to bring on an attack of motion sickness.</p> <p><strong>Motion sickness is common</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7430.long">Around 25-30% of us</a> travelling in boats, buses or planes will suffer – from feeling a bit off all the way to completely wretched; pale, sweaty, staggering, and vomiting.</p> <p>Some people are extremely susceptible to motion sickness, and may feel unwell even with minor movements such as “head bobbing” while snorkelling, or even <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/02/the-mysterious-science-of-motion-sickness/385469/">riding a camel</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7430">Susceptibility</a> seems to increase with age, while women are more prone to travel sickness than men. There is a <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/02/the-mysterious-science-of-motion-sickness/385469/">genetic influence</a> too, with the condition running in families. It often co-exists with a history of migraines.</p> <p><strong>Preventing motion sickness</strong></p> <p>Sufferers quickly work out <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/hi-res/afp20140701p41-t2.gif">what to avoid</a>. Sitting in the back seat of the car, reading in a car or bus (trains and planes are better), facing backwards in a bus or train or going below deck on a boat in rough conditions are all best avoided if you’re prone to travel sickness.</p> <p>Medicines that control vomiting (antiemetics) and nausea (anti-nauseants) are the <a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7430">mainstay of medicines</a> used for motion sickness and are effective. But as there are unwanted side effects such as drowsiness, it’s reasonable to try behavioural techniques first, or alongside medicines.</p> <p>More time “on deck”, keeping an eye on the horizon if there’s a significant swell, and focusing on other things (for example looking out for whales) are <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html">good examples</a>.</p> <p>Desensitisation or habituation also <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html">work for some</a>. For example, increasing experience on the water in relatively smooth conditions in preparation for longer and potentially rougher trips can help.</p> <p>There tends to be a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25077501">reduction in symptoms</a> after a couple of days at sea. Medicines can then be reduced and even stopped. Symptoms often return when back on dry land, usually for just a day or two.</p> <p>Chewing hard ginger has been <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=3277342">claimed to work</a> for naval cadets, but other studies have <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2062873">not confirmed</a> its effectiveness.</p> <p>Some people find wrist bands that provide acupressure to be effective, although when these have been studied in controlled trials, <a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/343/bmj.d7430">the proof is lacking</a>.</p> <p>Glasses with a built-in horizon to combat motion sickness were <a href="https://patents.google.com/patent/US20190079314A1/en">patented in 2018</a>, so watch this space.</p> <p><strong>How medications work</strong></p> <p>Travel sickness medications are more effective when taken pre-emptively, so before your journey begins.</p> <p>Antiemetics and anti-nauseants act on the brain and nervous system. Medicines used to prevent and treat travel sickness most commonly are either sedating antihistamines or anticholinergics. They block the effects of neurotransmitters (molecules that transmit information) such as histamine, acetylcholine and dopamine in our <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0165017394000049">balance control centres</a>.</p> <p>But these sorts of medicines are not very specific. That is, they block the effects of acetylcholine and histamine wherever these neurotransmitters act throughout the body. This explains <a href="https://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0701/p41.html">unwanted side effects</a> such as sedation, drowsiness, dry mouth, constipation and confusion (in older, vulnerable people).</p> <p>Drowsiness is more likely to reach dangerous levels if other central nervous system depressants are taken at the <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/consumers/understanding-drug-interactions">same time</a>. This includes opioids (morphine, oxycodone, codeine), alcohol, sleeping pills and some antidepressants.</p> <p><strong>So what’s the best option?</strong></p> <p>A <a href="https://www.cochrane.org/CD002851/ENT_scopolamine-for-preventing-and-treating-motion-sickness">comprehensive review</a> of clinical trials in 2011 compared the medicine scopolamine as a preventative with other medicines, placebos, behavioural and complementary therapies.</p> <p>Most of the 14 studies reviewed were in healthy men serving in the Navy with history of travel sickness. Women have rarely been subjects, and there are no studies in <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/australian-prescriber/articles/preventing-motion-sickness-in-children">children</a>.</p> <p>Although scopolamine was found to be marginally more effective than the alternatives, there’s not much to go on to recommend one travel medicine over another.</p> <p>If you’re somebody who experiences motion sickness, speak to your doctor or pharmacist. Most medicines for motion sickness are <a href="https://ajp.com.au/news/travel-health-pharmacy/">available over the counter</a>. You may need to try a few different medicines to find the one that works best for you, but always follow dosage instructions and professional advice.</p> <p>Once motion sickness is established, the only option is to ride it out. Lying down where possible, getting fresh air and focusing on the horizon can all help alongside appropriate medications. Importantly, for prolonged episodes, try to keep your fluids up to avoid dehydration (especially if vomiting occurs).</p> <p>If you experience motion sickness for the first time, and if it’s associated with a migraine-like headache, you should seek the advice of a doctor to rule out other neurological conditions.</p> <p><em>Written by Ric Day and Andrew McLachlan. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-why-do-we-get-motion-sickness-and-whats-the-best-way-to-treat-it-112861"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Body

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What happens to your poop on a cruise ship?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Each year tens of millions of people around the world sail away by boat to their cruise destinations. Not many people know what happens when they flush the toilet though. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re one of the many people who cruise every year then you should know what happens each time you flush the toilet. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It is easy to assume the sewage is just dumped out straight into the ocean, even kept below deck in septic tanks to be released somewhere else or even left until we get off the boat at the end of our holiday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the answer isn’t far off. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Not so long ago, cruise passengers’ remnants were thrown overboard through “storm valves” attached to the ship. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These days, cruise lines must follow strict international maritime laws which requires vessels to be three nautical miles (5km) away from land before letting go of treated sewage, according to the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollutions from ships via MARPOL (Marine Pollution). </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The environmental manager for Carnival Cruise Lines, Natalia Vecchione told </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-ideas/cruises/what-really-happens-to-your-poo-when-staying-on-a-cruise-ship/news-story/c4f45391a07a51863efc3d5633d51c8e"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that each ship has a wastewater treatment system as well as an environmental officer on-board to make sure all matters run smoothly. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So, while it may seem like the answer to where our bodily fluids go on a cruise ship is difficult, it actually turns out it is not all that different to our home sewage systems. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“When you flush the toilet, the wastewater is sent to the wastewater treatment systems on-board. The systems on-board treat the wastewater similarly to how it is treated on land. It goes through a multistage process including biological treatment and disinfection,” Ms Vecchione explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Also, the treatment units are designed and approved to stringent International Maritime Organisation standards and they’re installed and operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s rigorous instructions and procedures.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To put it more simply, when a passenger or staff member flushes the loo, all the sewage goes directly to the treatment plan on the ship, which treats and disinfects it until it is safe to drink and pump it back into the ocean – far, far away from dry land. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Vecchione said Carnival Cruise Lines goes the distance, choosing to dump their sewage 12 nautical miles (22km) away rather than the expected three nautical miles. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Once treated, when the ship is far enough from land, the treated water is discharged. And, once it’s discharged, the sea water one metre behind a ship is chemically indistinguishable from the water one metre in front of the ship,” Ms Vecchione said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Respecting and protecting the waters we sail in and the environment of the destinations we visit goes beyond being an operating necessity, it is also the right thing to do.”</span></p>

Cruising

News

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English rose! Duchess Kate's flawless style – pretty in pink

<p>The royal family hosted the second annual garden party of the season and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were in attendance alongside their grandmother, the Queen.</p> <p>Duchess Kate looked absolutely stunning in a classic and regal look for the special occasion, choosing a summer baby pink.</p> <p>The royal member paired a coat-dress from one of her favourite designers, Alexander McQueen, along with a gorgeous matching headpiece by Juliette Botterill.</p> <p>The 37-year-old also adorned a pair of delicate pearl earrings which once belonged to the late Princess Diana.</p> <p>To tie the look altogether, the royal threw on a pair of classic nude suede pumps by Gianvito Rossi and a clutch by Loeffler Randall.</p> <p>The Queen dressed in a powder blue Stuart Parvin coat with a flora silk dress in shades of pink, blue and taupe. On her head, the royal member adorned a gorgeous hat by Rachel Trevor Morgan.</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge chatted with Jonathan Jenkins and Lindsey Dixon from London’s Air Ambulance while at the event.</p> <p>The annual Buckingham palace garden parties began in the 1860s by Queen Victoria as a way to recognise and reward the hard work of those in public service jobs.</p> <p>While discussing the Chelsea Flower Show, Ms Dixon shared a hearty congratulations while the Duchess replied: “Oh no, it was a real family affair, I couldn’t have done it without William and the children. We were all very involved.”</p> <p>Royal fans have been spoilt the last few days by the Duchess of Cambridge, who has appeared at a number of events in breathtaking looks, thanks to the Chelsea Flower Show.</p> <p>The magnificent event involved a special garden the Duchess co-designed alongside other landscape designers to create a “back to nature” theme and yesterday after months of planning it was finally unveiled.</p> <p>Every year the Queen invited over 30,000 people to attend the parties, and while men are asked to wear morning or lounge suits, women are requested to dress in a “day” dress and usually with a hat or fascinator.</p> <p>Also present at the event was the Duke of York, the Earl and Countess of Wessex, The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, The Duke of Kent and Princess Alexandra.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the royal family’s gorgeous looks for the royal garden party.</p>

News

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Jacinda Ardern's heartwarming letter rejecting girl's cheeky $5 "bribe"

<p>New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has returned a $5 “bribe” from an 11-year-old girl who asked her government to conduct research into dragons and psychics.</p> <p>“Turns out my littlest sister (11yo) tried to bribe Jacinda,” the girl’s sibling posted on Reddit alongside a picture of a letter from the PM’s office.</p> <p>In it, Ardern thanked the girl – who is only identified as Victoria – for getting in touch with the government, but rejected her suggestions.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7827115/redditl.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4f644fd6c6f64308a0811a8943324a15" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Source: Reddit (u/<a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/newzealand/comments/bmwpmp/received_this_in_the_post_turns_out_my_littlest/">honeybee6992</a>)</em></p> <p>“We were very interested to hear your suggestions about psychics and dragons, but unfortunately we are not currently doing any work in either of these areas!” the letter read. “I am therefore returning your bribe money, and I wish you all the very best in your quest for telekinesis, telepathy, and dragons.”</p> <p>However, the PM promised to “keep an eye out for those dragons”.</p> <p>Victoria’s sibling explained that the young girl “wanted the government to make her telekinetic when they are able”, and was looking to see “what they know about dragons and if they had found any yet, so she could train them”.</p> <p>The girl took inspiration from her favourite film and TV show. </p> <p>“She does love <em>How to Train Your Dragon</em>,” the sibling wrote. “She also loves <em>Stranger Things</em>, that’s where the request for telepathy and telekinesis comes from.”</p> <p>The prime minister office confirmed to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-48262955" target="_blank">BBC</a> that the letter – which was dated April 30, 2019 – was genuine.</p> <p>This is not the first time Ardern’s office replied to a letter from a young constituent. In March, a Twitter user posted a letter from Ardern to an eight-year-old girl who had said it was “a good idea to ban dangerous guns” after the Christchurch terror attacks.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Thank you, <a href="https://twitter.com/jacindaardern?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@jacindaardern</a>, from the bottom of my heart, and that of my 8-year-old. 💕 <a href="https://t.co/h8rSUWOhIX">pic.twitter.com/h8rSUWOhIX</a></p> — Rachel Prozac (@rachelz) <a href="https://twitter.com/rachelz/status/1111780754294333440?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 30, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“I can tell from your letter that you are a kind and compassionate girl, Lucy, and I would just like to encourage you to keep spreading that kindness through your life,” wrote Ardern.</p>

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Prince Louis' first steps caught on camera in stunning new royal photo album

<p>Prince William, Duchess Kate and their young royal family have been captured in a completely new light, after spending a day out in the garden, which resembled somewhat of an enchanted forest.</p> <p>In the private images newly released by the royal family, the two doting parents are seen playing with their three children, Prince George, 5, Princess Charlotte, 4, and Prince George, 1, as Duchess Kate unveiled her Back to Nature garden.</p> <p>Royal fans were also able to see Prince Louis walking for the first time on camera.</p> <p>In one picture, 36-year-old future heir Prince William is seen holding onto tiny Louis while he sits on a rope swing, while Charlotte showed the cameras she can swing all by herself.</p> <p>In another photograph, the Duke is pictured helping his eldest son George build a den while sitting on a wooden bridge in the tranquil gardens co-designed by the Duchess at the RHS Back to Nature Garden at the Chelsea Flower Show.</p> <p>The sweet images were posted to the Royal Family official Instagram page where the caption explained all three children had helped their mother “gather moss, leaves and twigs to help decorate” the stunning garden.</p> <p>“Hazel sticks collected by the family were also used to make the garden’s den.”</p> <p>Duchess Kate told the BBC: “I really feel that nature and being interactive outdoors has huge benefits on our physical and mental wellbeing, particularly for young children.</p> <p>“I really hope that this woodland that we have created really inspires families, kids and communities to get outside, enjoy nature and the outdoors, and spend quality time together.”</p> <p>See the gorgeous photographs taken of the royal family by scrolling through the gallery above.</p>

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“He’s keeping us on our toes”: Duchess Kate reveals what Prince Louis is really like

<p>As Prince Louis has turned one on April 23, Duchess Kate has revealed that he is a handful to keep up with and hinted that he’s already walking.</p> <p>Duchess Kate spoke about Louis during an outing to Bletchley Park on Tuesday afternoon.</p> <p>She spoke to former Bletchley Park worker Georgina Rose, and then the Duchess admitted he is keeping her and Prince William “on their toes”.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7031393/Kate-reveals-boisterous-Prince-Louis-one-keeping-toes.html" target="_blank">The<span> </span><em>Daily Mail</em></a><em> </em>reported that Rose, who was a teleprinter operator in WWII, offered Duchess Kate her “congratulations” on her “beautiful family”.</p> <p>The Duchess replied: “Thank you so much. Louis is keeping us on our toes. I turned around the other day and he was at the top of the slide – I had no idea!”</p> <p>The duchess also revealed in March that the little prince was “cruising”, which is when a child pulls themselves up and uses furniture to move around.</p> <p>“Louis just wants to pull himself up all the time. He has got these little walkers and is bombing around in them.”</p> <p>Louis has already appeared to be a handful due to the outtakes of Prince Charles’ royal portrait for his 70th birthday.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwlmzlbh9Z6/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwlmzlbh9Z6/" target="_blank">Here’s to Prince Louis, here’s to moments like this 📸 - Happy Birthday!!! 🥳 🎁 #princelouis #happybirthdayprincelouis</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/chrisjacksongetty/" target="_blank"> Chris Jackson</a> (@chrisjacksongetty) on Apr 22, 2019 at 11:14pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>As Prince Louis has now reached his first year birthday milestone, it’s clear he’s eager to get up to more mischief and explore.</p>

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3 hotels in Perth to suit every budget

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Perth, despite being the capital city of Western Australia, is a country town that woke up one day and realised it was a city. That’s how the residents describe it, but Ryan Mossny agrees. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He told </span><a href="https://www.escape.com.au/destinations/australia/western-australia/best-new-hotels-in-perth-for-every-budget/news-story/538a9e7d07dda1092d0f4ebb14f90ebb"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Escape</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The appeal of Perth is near perfect weather, pristine beaches, an amazing restaurant and bar scene,” he explains</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“(There’s) lots of things to do.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ryan says the highlights can be found within the city in Fremantle and Scarborough.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The city for obvious reasons,” he says. “Freo [Fremantle] is spectacular with its convict-built buildings, bohemian lifestyle and the only licensed beach in the country. With the Scarborough redevelopment, you now have lots of cool places to eat and drink, night-time markets and the pool.”</span></p> <p><strong>1. Budget</strong></p> <p><strong>Hostel G, Northbridge</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bq84rIOnhhG/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bq84rIOnhhG/" target="_blank">It's a treat! 50% off all beds | Soft opening . . . . . #softopening #discount #50% #glife #perth #hostelgperth #hostel #perthlife #perthcity #igperth #hostellife #design #modern #graphic #pattern #backpacking #backpackers #hostelworld #travelforlife #comingsoon #backpackerlife #traveladdicts #discoverhostel #exploringaus #seeaustralia #studio #coworking #coliving #travelaustralia #aussiestyle</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/hostelgperth/" target="_blank"> Hostel G Perth</a> (@hostelgperth) on Dec 3, 2018 at 8:04pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although your view of hostels might be soured by one bad experience, the Northbridge-based Hostel G was designed by architecture expert Woods Bagot. With a focus on stylish accommodation, a private twin room which comes complete with an en-suite, twin beds and bed lockers, costing you $96 per night.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The hostel is a fifteen-minute drive from Perth Airport and only a four-minute drive from the CBD, so you’re close to the vibrant restaurant life that Perth has to offer.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Mid-range</strong></p> <p><strong>DoubleTree by Hilton, Northbridge</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwWj-XoDndv/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwWj-XoDndv/" target="_blank">Mother's Day is just around the corner... how about treating Mum and the family to an indulgent Mother's Day Brunch at the James St Bar + Kitchen?⁣ ⁣ With a huge selection of cold, hot and even dessert brunch options, every Mum (and everyone else) will be spoiled for choice. Plus, all the Mums get a complimentary glass of bubbles.⁣ ⁣ Adults $45, Children $20 and those under 6 eat free. ⁣ ⁣ Call us on 08 6148 2000 to book.⁣ ⁣⁣📸@jru4real⁣ ⁣ #doubletreenorthbridge #doubletree #jamesstbarkitchen #northbridge #northbridgeperth #northbridgeeats #perth #perthisok #perthlife #perthfood #pertheats #westernaustralia #perthtodo #perthcity #mothersday #mothersday2019 #happymothersday #mum #giftideas #family #instagood #breakfast #foodstagram #breakfastinperth #perthfoodies #perthbrunch #perthgram #instafood #brunch</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/doubletreenorthbridge/" target="_blank"> DoubleTree Northbridge</a> (@doubletreenorthbridge) on Apr 17, 2019 at 3:00am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The new DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel opened in December in the cultural district of Northbridge. Guests are welcomed with a warm DoubleTree cookie upon check-in before heading to their room of choice, with prices starting from $175 for a King Room.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Each room is fitted with Crabtree &amp; Evelyn bath products, and the entry level king room comes with an LCD TV, king bed and desk. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Guests are also able to enjoy Western Australian produce on site at James St Bar + Kitchen, which offers food such as tapas and big plates. The hotel is an eighteen-minute drive from the airport and a five-minute walk from the CBD.</span></p> <p><strong>3. High-end</strong></p> <p><strong>QT Perth, Perth</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo8sDHhDvD2/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo8sDHhDvD2/" target="_blank">Welcome to a world of relaxation...🖤</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/qt_perth/" target="_blank"> Perth/Hotel/Restaurant/Bar</a> (@qt_perth) on Oct 15, 2018 at 2:11am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">QT hotels offer creative flair, out-there style and on-point design for those who are looking to enjoy the heart of Perth’s shopping hub.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With an industrial but glamorous aesthetic that’s reinforced by a range of onsite luxuries, including an LCD HDTV, ensuite bathroom with double rain shower, WiFi and coffee machine access being complimentary.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Guests are also able to enjoy the Mediterranean-inspired Santini Bar &amp; Grill. QT Perth is a twenty minute drive from Perth Airport and a seven-minute walk from the CBD.</span></p>

International Travel

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Good news for New Zealand passport holders: No more queues at Heathrow!

<p>New Zealanders who travel to British airports are now able to skip the long immigration queues due to UK authorities giving the all clear to go through the ePassport gates.</p> <p>The British High Commission announced that electronic passport gates are now available for New Zealanders who carry electronically enabled passports.</p> <p>The self-serve terminals, which are similar to the ones that are used at Australian airports, significantly speed up the processing of arriving travellers due to the use of facial recognition.</p> <p>The facial recognition software matches the traveller with the image printed in their passport, which eliminates the need to come face-to-face with border officials.</p> <p>British Home Secretary Sajid Javid said that the change offers New Zealand travellers a “smooth” arrival into the UK.</p> <p>“Our new global immigration and border system will improve security and fluidity for passengers coming to visit or work in the UK,” he said in a statement.</p> <p>“Expanding the use of ePassport gates is a key part of this and allows us to improve passenger experience arriving in the UK while keeping our border secure.</p> <p>The change is also applicable to eligible Australian nationals.</p> <p>With Heathrow being the busiest airport in Europe and having 80 million passengers passing through it last year alone, anything that speeds up the arrival process is a good thing.</p>

International Travel

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Indulging in the wonders of Victoria Falls in Zambia

<p>The natural consequence of being a 60-plus traveller is that you become a bucket list basher, racing to tick off as many items as possible before time and health run out.</p> <p>Victoria Falls was a list topper, but I was determined not to hurry this visit. The world’s largest curtain of water had intrigued me for decades, and I would wallow in the wider experience of it like a great, fat Zambezi River hippo.</p> <p>When explorer David Livingstone discovered the Falls, he described them as ‘the most wonderful sight I have seen in Africa’, marking the occasion by carving his initials and the date on a nearby tree. He then introduced them to the world through his writings, thus generating myriad stories of romance and adventure around them.</p> <p>A lover of all things African, I wanted to see that most wonderful sight and soak up the romance and adventure at my own pace and in comfort. Victoria Falls is an ideal and popular place for a safari wind-in or wind-down, so I booked a week of its thrills, frills and animals before my own safari departed.</p> <p>Most centre around the region’s physical, scenic and economic artery, the Zambezi River, Mosi-Oa-Tunya National Park and the Falls themselves. Daredevils fly above them in microlights, small planes or helicopters, or get a closer view by jet boat, cruise, canoe or fishing adventure. Adrenaline junkies bungy, flying fox, swing or zip line from Victoria Falls Bridge, or whitewater raft beneath it.</p> <p>My days of scaring myself silly long gone, my first view of Victoria Falls was by walking the rainforest section of Mosi-Oa-Tunya National Park. Donning a hired yellow raincoat and with a quick salute to Livingstone’s statue at the Park entrance, I walked reverently towards the ‘thick, unbroken fleece falling all the way to the bottom’ of Livingstone’s description, its thunderous noise, cumulus mist and legendary rainbow.</p> <p>It exceeded my imaginings and I returned many times during the week to gaze again at this marvel of nature. That’s when I wasn’t soaking up the other delights of the Park, River and Falls area, especially the wildlife. Steering clear of the cheetah and lion walks with reports of dodgy conservation practices, I instead created life highlights from a rhino walk and elephant interaction.</p> <p>Two rangers guided the rhino walk, picking up spoor an hour into the park. The trail led to a lone male on the scent of a female, so we crept quietly in the direction he was headed until we found her – and baby. Our guides positioned us to watch the age-old scenario of male approaches female, female rebuffs him, male tries again, female leaves him in no doubt, male slinks away, mum and baby get on with life. I delighted in this opportunity to be part of my own dramatic wildlife documentary, as I did with its sequel at The Elephant Café.</p> <p>An exciting 10-kilometre jet boat ride from the Falls, The Elephant Café’s herd of ten rescued elephants filled our hearts, and its incredible African chefs, our bellies. The Café supports these mainly orphaned elephants who wander freely in the spacious park but scurry to the Café at tourist time to be fed treats.</p> <p>The elephants aren’t the only ones getting a treat. Feeding them, and then watching them interact, play in the Zambezi and wander back into the park, was a mammoth privilege, as was the magnificent lunch that followed. Elephant Café chefs have revived traditional recipes using locally-sourced ingredients to create heavenly, Africa-style haute cuisine, which they serve at their beautiful Zambezi-side restaurant.</p> <p>I topped this pleasurable afternoon with a genteel Zambezi cruise, wildlife viewing and canapes on the Lady Livingstone. This stately river boat departs the David Livingstone Safari Lodge and Spa every evening in time for the reliably stunning African sunset, which was handy because I was staying there.</p> <p>Victoria Falls accommodation is the stuff of exotic dreams, the African decor, Zambezi views and ultra comfort of The Royal Livingstone Hotel, David Livingstone Safari Lodge and Spa, and The River Club totally blowing my Afrophile mind.</p> <p>Each offered exemplary fine living and dining, infused with its own stand-out character. I thought I had died and gone to romance heaven at the Royal Livingstone Hotel, just a few minutes’ walk from Victoria Falls. I couldn’t have imagined more magical al-fresco dining, a more opulent suite or delightful aspect, Falls’ mist framing the Zambezi as giraffe, antelope and zebra wandered the expansive grounds at will.</p> <p>Not far upriver at the David Livingstone Safari Lodge and Spa, sumptuous grandeur met tasteful safari chic. The cultured grounds, charming rooms and character-filled dining areas oozed Africa. After an exquisite dinner of monumental proportions in one of them, I sank into my luxurious four-poster bed, listened to hippos and elephants across the Zambezi, and once more thanked Dr. David for his extraordinary legacy to the world.</p> <p>It was almost cruel to take this ‘Out of Africa’ obsessive to The River Club and expect her to leave again. Around 18 kilometres by road transfer from Victoria Falls, this oasis of tree-filled tranquility on a sweeping curve of the Zambezi had me captivated. At any moment I expected a pith-helmetted Robert Redford to stride through the colonial grace of the lounge and al-fresco dining areas, or up the dark-wooded stairs of our multi-storeyed, elegantly furnished chalet, to whisk me upriver in search of wildlife and a wild time. That pretty much described the sunset cruise on our second evening at The River Club, although the animals took the starring roles due to Robert’s disappointing no-show.</p> <p>Another Victoria Falls evening saw me transported back in time on the painstakingly restored Royal Livingstone Express. Steam billowed, whistles tooted and drinks flowed as we chugged to the Victoria Falls Bridge and back in this magnificent piece of Zambian railroad history with its five courses of silver-serviced dinner.</p> <p>The area’s rich and fascinating history gets broad coverage on the daily cultural tours starting and finishing in nearby Livingstone Town. While there, I also recommend visiting Wayawaya on Livingstone’s main Mosi-oa-Tunya Road, a vibrant collective of local ladies being taught to design, make and market high quality leather and cotton products. Their showroom and workshop are open most days, and by making a purchase you support a project aimed at empowering vulnerable women.</p> <p>Meeting these beautiful women was my final Victoria Falls indulgence. Like Livingstone, I had seen ‘scenes so lovely they must have been gazed upon by angels in their flight’, although unlike him, I wouldn’t be marking any trees to commemorate them. Rather, I would be marking off the bucket list and extracting this old lady hippo from her happy Zambezi wallow for the next adventure.</p>

International Travel

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Royals likes we've never seen them! The Queen and Duchess Kate's garden date

<p>The Duchess of Cambridge was joined by the Queen and other members of the royal family, for the opening of the Chelsea Flower Show.</p> <p>The royal took a tour around the incredible displays on Monday evening, as well as took a look at her granddaughter-in-law’s very own creation, a garden design titled Back to Nature.</p> <p>While the Queen and the Duchess walked alongside each other at the event, she pointed out several key features as her grandmother-in-law smiled and nodded in approval.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxsUAe7hEYo/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxsUAe7hEYo/" target="_blank">A post shared by Catherine Duchess Of Cambridge (@katemiddleton_kurdistan)</a> on May 20, 2019 at 10:17am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The Queen was wearing a vibrant green jacket paired with a floral dress – perfect for the occasion.</p> <p>The Duchess wore a gorgeous floor-length frock for the occasion, with her hair pulled back in a regal style.</p> <p>Kate Middleton told journalists her three children, Prince George, 5, Princess Charlotte, 4, and Prince George, 1, enjoyed playing in her very own co-designed garden alongside her and her husband, Prince William.</p> <p>“The children played last night in a way I hadn’t imagined... They were throwing stones.</p> <p>“I hadn’t actually thought that that was what they would be doing. They kicked their shoes off and wanted to paddle in the stream… using it in a way that I hadn’t anticipated.”</p> <p>The Duchess and Queen were joined by Prince William, the Countess of Wessex and Princess Beatrice at the lively event.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the royal family members at the Chelsea Flower Show.</p>

International Travel

Health

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Not just for babies: Study reveals adults sleep better with rocking

<p><span>Sometimes, no tricks would help in getting a baby to sleep other than rocking them. Now, a new <a href="https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)31662-2?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982218316622%3Fshowall%3Dtrue">study</a> has found that the same approach still works for the grown-ups.</span></p> <p><span>“Having a good night’s sleep means falling asleep rapidly and then staying asleep during the whole night,” said Laurence Bayer, co-author of the study from the University of Geneva, Switzerland in a statement.</span></p> <p><span>“Our volunteers – even if they were all good sleepers – fell asleep more rapidly when rocked and had longer periods of deeper sleep associated with fewer arousals during the night. We thus show that rocking is good for sleep.”</span></p> <p><span>In the study, 18 participants were asked to spend a night sleeping in the laboratory. Half of them rested on a rocking bed that was moving on a gentle arc of 10.5 centimetres, while the rest slept on a stationary bed. Their brain activities throughout the night were recorded and monitored with an electroencephalogram (EEG).</span></p> <p><span>Those who slept on the rocking bed were found to not only sleep more deeply and wake up less, but they also performed better on the morning memory test than those who spent the night on a normal bed.</span></p> <p><span>“This increase in overnight memory accuracy was supported by a decrease in the number of errors and an increase in the number of correct responses only during the rocking night,” the researchers wrote.</span></p> <p><span>The method has been proven on animals, too. In another <a href="https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(18)31608-7?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0960982218316087%3Fshowall%3Dtrue">study</a>, Dr Paul Franken from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland experimented rocking mice to sleep. Although “mice had to be rocked four times faster than humans”, the motion was found to help mice fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.</span></p> <p>The two studies “provide new insights into the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of rocking stimulation on sleep”, wrote Bayer and co-author Aurore Perrault. The findings may be used in development of new treatment approaches for people with insomnia and mood disorders as well as older people, who often experience poor sleep and memory impairment.</p>

Mind

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True crime: Grace was her name

<p> </p> <p>I have never met Grace Monte. But not a day goes by when I don’t think about her and what her life was like, her few happy moments along with her many difficult ones. I’ve always wondered about the sound of her voice and the kind of life she had once imagined having before she married my father. Her actual life was short and troubled, stuck on a dead-end path with a deadbeat man, with a child to raise and the threat of physical violence a constant presence.</p> <p>In late October 1946, Grace was 24, and my father, Mario Carcaterra, was 29 and already set in his troubled ways. Their daughter, Phyllis, was six. Grace and my father were separated for the third or fourth time – their few friends couldn’t keep track of the on-again, off-again marriage. Grace had taken a small room in a third-rate hotel about 1.6km from the cramped New York apartment they’d shared. She was weary of the unpaid bills, angry outbursts, and painful blows that were inflicted on her and then followed by tearful apologies and pleas for forgiveness. She could no longer tolerate the affairs my father carried on with a string of women – some of them her friends – and the near-daily interference from her mother-in-law, a domineering figure with a hypnotic hold over her son.</p> <p>Grace opened the hotel-room door after my father’s second knock. She stood there in a slip, her dark hair covering one side of her face. He barged in and began the routine that she was all too familiar with: he spoke of a new job coming through, a new place to live, a better life for them. His words had worked in the past but not on this cold autumn morning. Years of lies, abuse, and frustration weighed on Grace, and she wanted so much to be free of them. She lashed out at my father, telling him their marriage was over, the love she’d once felt for him had dissipated, and this time their separation was final.</p> <p>Then Grace said she was in love with another man.</p> <p>The short leash that barely held my father’s temper in check snapped. He tossed her on the bed. They struggled, Grace scratching, kicking, and clawing at him, but my father was much too strong a man. Straddling her thin body, he grabbed a pillow. He saw the fear in his wife’s eyes, pushed the pillow against her face, and held it there, his hands and arms keeping it tight.</p> <p>Within several minutes that must have felt like hours, my father, his body drenched in sweat, removed the pillow and stared down at the woman he loved.</p> <p>Grace Monte was dead.</p> <p>My father was no longer a wayward husband and a gambler. He was no longer a man dominated by his mother. My father was a murderer.</p> <p>I was 14 years old in 1969 when I heard the name Grace Monte. I was in Italy, visiting relatives on Ischia, an island off the coast of Naples. It was there on a beautiful beach in the middle of a sun-soaked morning, the two of us walking along the shore, that my mother shared with me the dark secret she carried in her heart. She was concerned that I was spending too much time in my father’s company and that of his friends. She dreaded the possibility that I would become who he was, a man she lived with and feared. She felt that this spot, far from our Manhattan neighbourhood, was the safest place to tell me the truth about my father.</p> <p>In short order, I learned he had confessed to the crime and was convicted of second-degree murder. He served nearly eight years in prison. Shortly after his release, he married my mother in an arrangement brokered by their families. She was a widow with a son – my half-brother, Anthony. She knew that my father had been in prison but claimed to have not known about the murder until the first night of their honeymoon.</p> <p>I have no choice but to believe her, to be convinced that even in her loneliness, in her desire to offer a better life for her son, she would not have married a wife killer. She said that she felt numb when he told her of the homicide in a manner as relaxed as if he were ordering a late-night meal. From that moment, she knew she had made the gravest mistake of her life.</p> <p>I spent the rest of the day alone and in stunned silence. I sat on that beach until well into nightfall. I had thought I knew my father as well as any son my age could. But after that day, I would never think of him in the same way again.</p> <p>I had, to that point, not been close to my mother. At best, she and I had had a frosty relationship. I couldn’t understand why she harboured such anger toward me. She seemed to resent the fact that I resembled my father. A deeply religious woman, she had few friends, detested my father’s family, and never learned to speak English. Yet she was dependent on an undependable man for all her needs.</p> <p>As I grew older, I came to understand her anger. She had made a horrific choice and was a prisoner in a loveless marriage for 34 years, not to be freed until my father’s death from cancer in 1988. She then moved back to Italy, where she lived, a shell of a once-vibrant woman, until her death in 2004. We spoke regularly during that time, and I sent her money whenever I could. But our relationship had been poisoned from birth.</p> <p>Years passed before I spoke to my father about the murder. But my knowing about it altered our close bond. I no longer felt at ease in his company, and I looked for excuses not to spend time with him. Our laughter-filled days at the racetrack and nights cheering on fighters at Madison Square Garden became distant memories. Instead, I devoted the bulk of my free time to finding out what I could about the woman he had killed and the child he’d left behind.</p> <p>My father’s family shut the door to any questions I had about Grace. To them, her murder was a shame and a horror that they did not want to relive. Over the years, a few pieces of the stained puzzle of my father’s past slipped out. Once, at a relative’s house, I spotted a copy of a true-crime magazine from the 1940s. The cover story was about my father and Grace, with a headline that blared “No Other Man Could Have Her”. And there was the photo that fell out of a family album. I didn’t have to be told whose picture it was; all I needed to see was the reaction of the other people at the table, frantically hiding it. But I had seen enough. She was as beautiful as I’d imagined her to be, her eyes filled with passion and with a smile as bright as any light.</p> <p>I did meet my half-sister once at a wedding reception I attended with my father. I was ten, and she was 24. We were introduced by a cousin who told me she was a family friend, but as drinks were poured, lips became looser. An old woman from the neighbourhood pulled me aside, smiled, pointed at her, and said, “That young girl is your sister. You’re not supposed to know about her, and that’s wrong. But you should know – a brother deserves to know.” I was struck by how much she resembled my father.</p> <p>My most lingering memory of my half-sister occurred at the end of the evening. She and I were sitting in the backseat of a crowded car. With one arm around my shoulders, she leaned down and kissed me gently on the top of my head. “I hope we see each other again,” she whispered.</p> <p>After the car pulled to a stop, she got out and walked away. I wanted to jump out and hug her. I felt a connection to her, a bond. I was later told by relatives that she was prohibited by law from having anything to do with her father or his family. But she and my father secretly kept in contact and, I came to learn, met once or twice a year. Later still, I found out that she had five children and had moved numerous times. Although I want answers, my half-sister has wanted peace. At the very least, I feel I owe her that much.</p> <p>I was a married man with two children of my own by the time I finally spoke to my father about Grace Monte. Although I had tried numerous times to broach the subject, I could never muster the words or the courage. In 1988, he was dying of cancer, in the late stages of a disease that had sapped him of his strength and forced him to direct his anger at his illness instead of at others. He knew that I had been told about his crime, and he wanted to tell me that while he had loved my mother in his own way, Grace Monte was his one true love.</p> <p>His powerful sense of loss, the emptiness and loneliness he had endured in silence for all those years since that horrible day in the hotel room in 1946 – that was his real punishment. “I ask myself one question every day,” my father said. “The same question. Why? Why? Why did I kill her? Why?” He had mourned for Grace every day since her death. My father was a tortured man, sentenced to live and die under the weight of an unforgivable crime.</p> <p>Grace Monte is as much a part of my life as she was a part of my father’s. Even now, I try to learn as much about her as I can. I know she loved to dance and heard Frank Sinatra sing live at the Rustic Cabin in New Jersey. She enjoyed going to the movies and, like my father, preferred James Cagney to Humphrey Bogart. She had a sharp sense of humour and a quick temper, and she doted on her only child. She didn’t care much for religion or neighbourhood gossip. She liked reading, and despite her lack of money, she always looked stylish.</p> <p>Grace Monte is my constant shadow, a woman never known but always seen, a woman I will never be able to forget. I have come to think of her in the same way that one thinks of an old friend long gone or a first love. We are linked – Grace and I – and we always will be. It is a link forged by murder and blood, but it exists, and nothing can sever it.</p> <p>Not now.</p> <p>Not ever.</p> <p><em>Written by Lorenzo Carcaterra. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/survival/Grace-Was-Her-Name"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Caring

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5 misleading foods that claim to be healthy

<p>Food gives us the nutrients we need to survive, and we know a balanced diet <a href="https://www.who.int/behealthy/healthy-diet">contributes to good health</a>.</p> <p>Beyond this, many people seek out different foods as “medicines”, hoping eating certain things might prevent or treat particular conditions.</p> <p>It’s true many foods contain “<a href="https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/bioactive-compound">bioactive compounds</a>” – chemicals that act in the body in ways that might promote good health. These are being studied in the prevention of cancer, heart disease and other conditions.</p> <p>But the idea of food as medicine, although attractive, is easily oversold <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4404/How-cloves-garlic-guard-cancer.html">in the headlines</a>. Stories tend to be based on studies done in the lab, testing concentrated extracts from foods. The effect seen in real people eating the actual food is going to be different to the effects in a petri dish.</p> <p>If you do the maths, you’ll find you actually need to eat enormous amounts of particular foods to get an active dose of the desired element. In some cases, this might endanger your health, rather than protecting it.</p> <p>These four foods (and one drink) show the common healing claims around the foods we eat don’t always stack up.</p> <p><strong>1. Cinnamon</strong></p> <p>Cinnamon, which contains a compound called cinnamaldehyde, is claimed to <a href="https://www.ibtimes.sg/cinnamon-your-best-companion-fight-obesity-study-suggests-side-effects-20788">aid weight loss and regulate appetite</a>.</p> <p>There is evidence cinnamaldehyde <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24019277">can reduce cholesterol in people with diabetes</a>. But this is based on studies of the chemical in large doses – not eating the spice itself.</p> <p>These studies give people between 1 and 6 grams of cinnamaldehyde per day. Cinnamon is about <a href="http://www.orientjchem.org/vol30no1/extraction-of-essential-oil-from-cinnamon-cinnamomum-zeylanicum/">8% cinnamaldehyde</a> by weight – so you’d have to eat at least 13 grams of cinnamon, or about half a supermarket jar, per day. Much more than you’d add to your morning porridge.</p> <p><strong>2. Red wine</strong></p> <p>The headlines on the health benefits of red wine are usually because of a chemical in grape skins called resveratrol. Resveratrol is a <a href="https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/79/5/727/4690182">polyphenol</a>, a family of chemicals with <a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-the-untrue-story-of-antioxidants-vs-free-radicals-15920">antioxidant</a> properties.</p> <p>It’s been <a href="https://theconversation.com/resveratrol-in-a-red-wine-sauce-fountain-of-youth-or-snake-oil-12743">claimed resveratrol</a> protects our cells from damage and reduces the risk of a range of conditions such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and heart disease.</p> <p>There is some limited evidence that resveratrol has benefits in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4942868/">animal models</a>, although studies done in humans <a href="https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article/71/12/822/1833632">have not shown a similar effect</a>.</p> <p>It varies by wine, but red wine contains about 3 micrograms (about 3 millionths of a gram) of resveratrol <a href="https://www.ajevonline.org/content/43/1/49">per bottle</a>. The studies that have shown a benefit from resveratrol use at least 0.1 grams per day (that’s 100,000 micrograms).</p> <p>To get that much resveratrol, you’d have to drink roughly 200 bottles of wine a day. We can probably all agree that’s not very healthy.</p> <p><strong>3. Blueberries</strong></p> <p>Blueberries, like red wine, are a <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf034150f">source of resveratrol,</a> but at a few micrograms per berry you’d have to eat more than 10,000 berries a day to get the active dose.</p> <p>Blueberries also contain compounds called anthocyanins, which <a href="https://academic.oup.com/advances/article/2/1/1/4591636">may improve some markers of heart disease</a>. But to get an active dose there you’re looking at 150-300 blueberries per day. More reasonable, but still quite a lot of fruit – and expensive.</p> <p><strong>4. Chocolate</strong></p> <p>The news that dark <a href="https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1114811/high-blood-pressure-diet-foods-dark-chocolate-lower-reading">chocolate lowers blood pressure</a> is always well-received. Theobromine, a chemical in chocolate has been shown to lower blood pressure in doses of about <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20823377">1 gram of the active compound</a>, but not at lower doses. Depending on the chocolate, you could be eating 100g of dark chocolate before you reached this dose.</p> <p>Chocolate is a discretionary food, or “junk food”. The <a href="http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/resource/australian-dietary-guidelines-standard-serves">recommended serve for discretionary foods</a> is no more than 600 kilojoules per day, or 25g of chocolate. Eating 100g of chocolate would be equivalent to more than 2,000kJ.</p> <p>Excess kilojoule consumption leads to weight gain and being overweight increases risk of heart disease and stroke. So these risks would likely negate the benefits of eating chocolate to lower your blood pressure.</p> <p><strong>5. Turmeric</strong></p> <p>Turmeric is a favourite. It’s good in curries, and recently we’ve seen hype around the tumeric latte. Stories pop up regularly about its healing power, normally based on <a href="https://theconversation.com/science-or-snake-oil-can-turmeric-really-shrink-tumours-reduce-pain-and-kill-bacteria-76010">curcumin</a>.</p> <p>Curcumin refers to a group of compounds, called curcuminoids, that might have some health benefits, like reducing inflammation. Inflammation helps us to fight infections and respond to injuries, but too much inflammation is a problem in diseases like <a href="https://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/inflammatory-arthritis/">arthritis</a>, and might be linked to other conditions like <a href="https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/01.CIR.0000129535.04194.38">heart disease or stroke.</a></p> <p>Human trials on curcumin have <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261561413002501">been inconclusive</a>, but most use curcumin supplementation in very large doses of 1 to 12 grams per day. Turmeric is about 3% curcumin, so for each gram of tumeric you eat you only get 0.03g of curcumin. This means you’d have to eat more than 30g of tumeric to get the minimum active dose of tumeric.</p> <p>Importantly, curcumin in turmeric is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3918523/">not very bioavailable</a>. This means we only absorb about 25% of what we eat, so you might actually have to eat well over 100g of turmeric, every day, to get a reasonable dose of curcumin. That’s a lot of curry.</p> <p><strong>What to eat then?</strong></p> <p>We all want food to heal us but focusing on single foods and eating mounds of them is not the answer. Instead, a balanced and diverse diet can provide foods each with a range of different nutrients and bioactive compounds. Don’t get distracted by quick fixes; focus instead on enjoying a variety of foods.</p> <p><em>Written by Emma Beckett and Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/these-5-foods-are-claimed-to-improve-our-health-but-the-amount-wed-need-to-consume-to-benefit-is-a-lot-116730"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

Body

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4 life changing TED Talks

<p><span>Hearing words of inspiration and enlightenment can be truly empowering – which explains why TED Talks have amassed so many fans across the world. Here are some of the best TED Talks that people say have transformed their perspectives and changed their lives.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>My year of saying yes to everything</span></em><span> by Shonda Rhimes</span></strong></p> <div style="max-width: 854px;"> <div style="position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/lang/en/shonda_rhimes_my_year_of_saying_yes_to_everything" width="854" height="480" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> </div> <p><span>Television titan Shonda Rhimes may be one of the world’s busiest women – but when work started to define her, her decision to say “yes” to the things that scared her turned out to enrich her life in unexpected ways and help her find fulfilment outside of her career.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>The power of vulnerability </span></em><span>by Brené Brown </span></strong></p> <div style="max-width: 854px;"> <div style="position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability" width="854" height="480" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> </div> <p><span>Shame and vulnerability might seem like a weakness in today’s world, but author and researcher Brené Brown argued that they are essential in enabling us to love, empathise and belong. “In order for connection to happen, we have to allow ourselves to be seen, really seen,” she said.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>The art of asking</span></em><span> by Amanda Palmer</span></strong></p> <div style="max-width: 854px;"> <div style="position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/amanda_palmer_the_art_of_asking" width="854" height="480" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> </div> <p><span>Ever felt hesitant to ask for a favour? Musician Amanda Palmer made an argument for forgoing shame, opening up and expressing your needs. “Through the very act of asking people, I'd connected with them, and when you connect with them, people want to help you,” said Palmer. “When we really see each other, we want to help each other.”</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>The danger of a single story</span></em><span> by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie</span></strong></p> <div style="max-width: 854px;"> <div style="position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story" width="854" height="480" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> </div> <p><span>Putting ourselves in other people’s shoes is often easier said than done, especially when we only know what Adichie described as “the single story”. In this talk, the Nigerian author emphasised the importance of narratives as a way to connect and empathise with other people, as well as to humanise and empower the stigmatised.</span></p>

Mind

Lifestyle

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Why you should date your best friend

<p>Being someone’s BFF is a big deal – you don’t hand over the other half of your “Best Friends” necklace to just anyone. Having a romantic partner who is also your best friend potentially sounds perfect. With your BFF as your romantic partner, you get the best of both worlds, someone with whom you can laugh, share your life and cuddle. When you look at seemingly happy celebrity couples like Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis, or Leslie Mann and Judd Apatow, not only do they appear to be in love, but they also seem to genuinely enjoy hanging out together.</p> <p>How many people feel as though they have attained that type of ideal? And do psychologists confirm this new paradigm is a good one to strive for? I enlisted the help of <a href="https://www.monmouth.edu/polling-institute/">Monmouth University Polling Institute</a> to investigate.</p> <p><strong>How many have two-in-one relationships?</strong></p> <p>To help figure out how many best-friend couples are out there, we asked 801 adults across the United States the <a href="https://www.monmouth.edu/polling-institute/reports/MonmouthPoll_US_020917/">following question</a>: “Do you consider your partner to be your best friend or do you call somebody else your best friend?”</p> <p><iframe src="https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/SCoCT/2/" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" oallowfullscreen="oallowfullscreen" msallowfullscreen="msallowfullscreen" width="100%" style="min-height: 415px;" height="400"></iframe></p> <p>Among adults currently in a romantic relationship, the vast majority (83 percent) considered their current partner to be their best friend. For those who are currently married, the rate was even higher. Men and women had similar rates, while younger respondents were slightly less likely than older respondents to view their partner as their best friend.</p> <p>The overall numbers from this recent poll <a href="http://doi.org/10.1177/0265407593103011">dwarf the earlier reported rate of best-friend romantic partners</a>. In a 1993 study, only 44 percent of college students indicated their romantic partner was also their best bud. The difference in best-friend/love rates – almost doubling over the past 20 years – could just be an artifact of the published research’s college student sample.</p> <p>But expectations for modern relationships have evolved in the intervening years. Compared to previous generations, today’s heterosexual men and women are more accustomed to thinking of each other as friends on equal footing, even outside of the romantic realm. Once a romantic couple forms, we’re more likely to look for more <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=O9hBQ_GJ6XYC&amp;pg=PA64&amp;lpg=PA64#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">egalitarian splits of power and divisions of labor</a>. We hold <a href="http://doi.org/10.1080/1047840X.2014.863723">our relationships to higher standards</a> than we have in previous decades.</p> <p>In particular, couples now expect their relationships to promote personal growth and help individuals fulfill their own goals. For example, your partner should help you become a better person by teaching you new things like how to make the perfect creme brulee, taking you places like the cool new trampoline park and opening your eyes to new perspectives such as the benefits of eating a more vegetarian-based diet. Although this expectation for growth could conceivably place an unwieldy burden on your relationship, researchers believe that <a href="http://doi.org/10.1080/1047840X.2014.878683">modern relationships are up to the task</a>. In fact, the idea that a relationship can help an individual become a better person, <a href="https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&amp;lr=&amp;id=wUcGAQAAQBAJ&amp;oi=fnd&amp;pg=PA90&amp;dq=The+self+expansion+model+of+motivation+and+cognition+in+close+relationships.&amp;ots=Y9AFoA14oe&amp;sig=KEDm0E2v5GYma63XPgJ-bcdwiRw#v=onepage&amp;q=The%20self%20expansion%20model%20of%20motivation%20and%20cognition%20in%20close%20relationships.&amp;f=false">a phenomenon that researchers call self-expansion</a>, is a useful one; relationships that provide more expansion are also of higher quality.</p> <p>In order to hit all these self-improvement targets, you may need more from a spouse or romantic partner than was expected in years past – and a partner who is also your best friend may be a step in the right direction.</p> <p>To see if those who consider their partner their best friend also expect more from them, the Monmouth University Poll asked, “For an ideal relationship, how much should you expect your partner to help you grow and expand as a person?” Our poll results indicated generally high expectations overall, and individuals with best-friend romantic partners expected a bit more from them.</p> <p>Of course, while individuals can expect more, that won’t automatically translate into better results. Think of it this way: Simply because you want more from your job, it doesn’t guarantee you’re going to get what you want.</p> <p><strong>Are best-friend partners better partners?</strong></p> <p>We wanted to see if these best-friend romances were really better. To do that, we asked poll respondents, “How satisfied are you with your current relationship – extremely, very, somewhat, not too, or not at all satisfied?” We then compared those who said their partner was their best friend to those who responded it was someone else.</p> <p><iframe src="https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/Haw47/1/" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" oallowfullscreen="oallowfullscreen" msallowfullscreen="msallowfullscreen" width="100%" height="225"></iframe></p> <p>Those who considered their partner their best friend were indeed much more satisfied in their relationship than those who didn’t. This finding is consistent with research showing that relationships with more companionate love – based on friendship, feelings of affection, comfort and shared interests – <a href="http://doi.org/10.1177/0265407513515618">last longer</a> and are <a href="http://doi.org/10.1177/0265407594111002">more satisfying</a>. In fact, companionate love is more closely associated with relationship satisfaction <a href="http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-682X.1998.tb00459.x">than is passionate love</a> – the type of romantic love based on intense feelings of attraction and preoccupation with one’s partner.</p> <p>Other research shows that those in <a href="http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-6811.1994.tb00066.x">friendship-based love relationships</a> feel they have a highly likable partner, and that shared companionship is an important part of the love. A study of 622 married individuals revealed that those with higher scores on the friendship-based love scale also reported more relationship satisfaction, greater perceived importance of the relationship, greater respect for their spouse, and felt closer to their spouse. More recently, across two studies with nearly 400 participants in relationships, those who place <a href="http://doi.org/10.1177/0265407512453009">more value on the friendship aspect</a> of their relationship also report more commitment, more love and greater sexual gratification. In addition, valuing friendship also decreased the chances of the couple breaking up. Best-friend love is starting to sound better and better.</p> <p>All of these benefits are backed up by accounts from a special type of relationship expert: <a href="http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/49838503/marriages-made-last">couples who’ve been happily married for over 15 years</a>. When researchers asked over 350 of these couples about their secret to relationship success and longevity, what was the number one reason? Simple: their partner was their best friend. The second most common response was liking their spouse as a person, another key facet of friendship-based love.</p> <p><strong>Why are best-friend partners so beneficial?</strong></p> <p>These findings demonstrating the benefits of dating or marrying your best friend make perfect sense when you consider the <a href="http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-6811.2007.00173.x">type of relationship best friends share</a>. Friends enjoy spending time together, share similar interests, take care of each other, trust each other and feel a lasting bond between them. It isn’t a coincidence that these all happen to be <a href="http://doi.org/10.1177/0265407507081451">qualities that also define successful intimate relationships</a>.</p> <p>By recognizing the parallels between best friends and romantic partners, you can benefit from holding both types of relationships to the same standards. All too often it seems individuals are overly forgiving of a relationship partner’s bad behavior, when they would never accept similar behaviors from a friend. For example, if your friend was mean, rude, perpetually grumpy, nagging, dishonest, argumentative, emotionally unstable, ignored your texts, called you names or didn’t want to have meaningful conversations with you, would you still want to be friends? If not, it’s fair to hold similar expectations for your romantic partner. Take the time to find a romantic partner who truly is your best friend.</p> <p>To be clear, the argument here isn’t that you should try to convert an existing best friend into a romantic partner. You may not want to run the risk of compromising that friendship, anyway. Rather, the data here point out the importance of your romantic partner also being one of your best friends.</p> <p>Ultimately, the best way to have true love forever may be to be best friends forever first.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/72784/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Gary W. Lewandowski Jr., Chair and Professor of Psychology, Monmouth University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/why-you-should-date-your-best-friend-72784"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Relationships

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Tying the knot again? Fergie sends fans into a frenzy with wedding post

<p>It’s the rumour that keeps making the rounds, and it’s back once again.</p> <p>After the Duchess of York, also known as “Fergie ”, took to Twitter to post a photo of herself standing alongside a beautiful lace wedding dress, fans began to speculate whether she was remarrying Prince Andrew.</p> <p>The caption read: “I visited the pop-up boutique of @brides_do_good @bicesterVillage and was moved by their mission.</p> <p>“Brides do Good is a social enterprise that sells designer wedding dresses and donates up to two thirds of the proceeds to projects that provide safe education for girls.</p> <p>“Their vision is a world without child marriage #bicestervillage.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">I visited the pop-up boutique of <a href="https://twitter.com/BridesDoGood?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@BridesDoGood</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/bicestervillage?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@bicestervillage</a> and was moved by their mission. Brides do Good is a social enterprise that sells designer wedding dresses and donates up to two thirds of the proceeds to projects that provide safe education for girls <a href="https://t.co/WhXuOHid9B">pic.twitter.com/WhXuOHid9B</a></p> — Sarah Ferguson (@SarahTheDuchess) <a href="https://twitter.com/SarahTheDuchess/status/1129657046415138816?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 18, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Despite the post having a clear purpose, royal fans couldn’t help but question the true intention behind the tweet.</p> <p>“Thought you might be tying the knot again for a second,” said one user.</p> <p>“Andrew will love seeing you walking towards him again in that dress,” wrote another.</p> <p>“Wishing you and the Duke of York will remarry soon, you’re such a great couple to watch, still very close after being divorced for decades,” commented a fan.</p> <p>“Sarah get remarried to your Prince and then you can buy a dress,” said another.</p> <p>The former couple have remained extremely close to one another despite their divorce, and also attend many events together.</p> <p>Fergie once told the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/auhome/index.html" target="_blank"><em>Daily Mail</em></a><span> </span>that they are the “happiest divorced couple in the world.”</p> <p>After separating in 1992 and divorcing in 1996, the couple still remain living together.</p>

Relationships

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Want to know if your partner's cheating on you? Just listen to their voice

<p>Picture Morgan Freeman, Donald Trump or Margaret Thatcher. Most likely you can hear their voices in your mind, and the characteristic inflections that they put on certain words, as well as their tone and pitch. Even without listening to the words, when you hear someone speak you can pick up important information about them from characteristics such as how loud or deep their voice is.</p> <p>At the most basic level, voices convey biological characteristics such as whether someone is <a href="http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/279/1728/601">male or female</a>, their <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347204003987?via%3Dihub">body size</a> and <a href="http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/277/1699/3509">physical strength</a>, <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/s15327027hc0803_2">age and sexual maturity</a>. For example, Donald Trump’s voice can signal to you that he is a man, and that he has passed middle age. But did you know that voices can also signal a person’s attractiveness, fertility and even the likelihood of them being unfaithful?</p> <p>A popular theory with evolutionary psychologists, known as <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12110-003-1008-y">“cads versus dads</a>”, suggests that more masculine, dominant men are not as paternal and generally invest less in their children and grandchildren than less masculine men. Yet research shows women generally prefer <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347204003987?via%3Dihub">deeper voiced, more masculine-sounding men</a>, especially when these women are <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0018506X05001704">near ovulation</a>.</p> <p>This may be because partnering with deeper-voiced men could lead to genetically healthier children. Deeper voices have been linked to having more <a href="http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/3/6/682">surviving children and grandchildren</a>, <a href="http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1829/20152830">higher testosterone and</a> lower stress hormones, and longer-term survival in men.</p> <p>On the other hand, deeper-voiced men are also rated by women as more likely to <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/147470491100900109">cheat on a partner</a> and as <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090513816300368?via%3Dihub#f0005">less trustworthy</a> in general. Women who judge men with lower-pitched voices as more likely to cheat also <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886913012324?via%3Dihub">prefer those men for short-term</a> rather than long-term partners. Meanwhile, when women <a href="https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2008.1542">are breastfeeding</a> and so currently taking care of a child, they are more likely to prefer men with higher-pitched voices than at other times.</p> <p>This suggests women use something in men’s voices to try to assess how likely to cheat they are, as well as their general trustworthiness. This in turn can affect their attractiveness as a partner, depending on whether the women are drawn towards the paternal care of a potential long-term mate or just good genes.</p> <p><strong>Spotting a cheater</strong></p> <p>But can our voices really indicate whether we are likely to cheat? A <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/1474704917711513">recent study</a> from researchers in the US suggests that they can. Participants were played recordings of people speaking and given no other background information about them, and successfully rated cheaters as “more likely to cheat” than non-cheaters. Interestingly, women were better at this task than men.</p> <p>The recordings were taken from people with voices of similar pitch and attractiveness, who were of similar size and shape, and had similar sexual histories (aside from cheating). This means that none of these factors affected the results. So we currently don’t know what cues the participants used to judge whether the voices came from cheaters.</p> <p>It is not only women who can pick up on men’s vocal cues of good genes and likelihood to cheat, and use it to their benefit. A woman’s voice changes during her menstrual cycle when she is not using contraceptive pills. Perhaps unsurprisingly, men find women’s voices most attractive when the women are <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090513808000263?via%3Dihub">near ovulation</a> (most fertile), than at other times of the month. This information is important to pick up on, as women do not display very explicit signals that they are fertile (unlike baboon females whose bottoms turn red, or female deer who release scents to advertise their fertility).</p> <p>Voices can also signal whether someone is <a href="http://www.ehbonline.org/article/S1090-5138(14)00078-6/fulltext">interested in you</a>. In one clever study, participants were asked to judge the voices of individuals who spoke in a different language to attractive or unattractive potential partners or competitors.</p> <p>The researchers found that, when talking to attractive people, men’s voices tend to reach a deeper pitch, and both men and women increase how varied their pitch is so their voices sound more dynamic than monotonous. Practically speaking, picking up on these types of cues could allow someone to decide whether a person they are talking to might be attracted to them or not.</p> <p>In these ways, the non-verbal characteristics of voices can play a significant role in signalling health, fertility, attraction and potential infidelity, to name a few. Picking up on these cues, alongside the many other cues we receive when talking to someone, can help us make more informed and well-rounded choices about who to spend time with and who to avoid. But the next time you find yourself listening to and judging someone’s voice for these subtle cues, remember that they are judging yours, too.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/92387/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Viktoria Mileva, Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology, University of Stirling and Juan David Leongómez, Assistant Professor of Evolutionary Psychology, El Bosque University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/want-to-know-if-your-partners-cheating-on-you-just-listen-to-their-voice-92387"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Relationships

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Princess Diana’s niece is dating a 60-year-old millionaire

<p>Lady Kitty Spencer is a well-known face, not just for her successful career as a high-fashion model, but for being the niece of the beloved Princess Diana.</p> <p>However, the model has come to attention again for her love life.</p> <p>The 28-year-old was seen leaving a hotel in Manhattan, New York with her 60-year-old millionaire “boyfriend” Michael Lewis who is the head of the high-end fashion brand, Whistles.</p> <p>The couple have managed to keep a pretty low profile since their relationship went public in August of 2018, and despite rumours of the couple’s 32-year age gap being the main reason for wanting to be unseen by paparazzi, others insist both Lewis and Spencer want to keep their matters together private.</p> <p>Spencer has managed to live a fairly low-profile life, except for her connections to royalty and her successful modelling career until last year when she attended one of the biggest events of 2018 – Prince Harry and Meghan's royal wedding. </p> <p>The princess look-alike blew royal fans away for her striking appearance, stealing the show in her emerald and floral Dolce &amp; Gabbana gown.</p> <p>Spencer signed on as an ambassador with Bulgari who also became aware of her stunning appearance after photos of Princess Di’s niece caused a storm online.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw6gQ6BBQvd/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw6gQ6BBQvd/" target="_blank">A post shared by Kitty Spencer (@kitty.spencer)</a> on May 1, 2019 at 2:01am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Kitty touched down in Australia this week, surprising her own fans down under.</p> <p>“I love you Sydney! So happy to be back,” she wrote to social media.</p> <p>“Australia is the best! Welcome back darling one,” a fan commented.</p> <p>Another added: “Your Aunt Diana loved Sydney, so I’m glad you do too!”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Lady Kitty Spencer’s stunning outfit worn at the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s wedding.</p>

Relationships

Finance

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5 tips to ensure your supermarket is listening to you on social media

<p>Making yourself heard by big businesses can be tricky. Even when companies have a presence on social media, you might question whether they are genuinely interested in providing opportunities for meaningful dialogue. Is anyone really listening, or are we just talking to ourselves?</p> <p>There have been refreshing signs that supermarkets can be persuaded to listen to the demands of their customers.</p> <p>So how do you make yourself heard by retailers on social media? After qualitatively examining over <a href="https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/publications/the-never-ending-story-discursive-legitimation-in-social-media-di">68,000 supermarket social media posts</a> with colleagues at the University of Nottingham, here are my five tips for communicating with corporations – and getting noticed.</p> <p><strong>1. Introduce yourself</strong></p> <p>There are countless posts vying for attention in the virtual world of social media, so you need to carve out a unique voice. Why should the retailer listen to you?</p> <p>Begin by making it clear who you are. Start with: “As a loyal customer…”, “As a farmer…”, “As a woman…” or “As a dad…” and you give yourself an identity. Do you live near a polluted river that is full of discarded plastic bags? Are you a parent who volunteers in the local community and needs help? Have you been a loyal consumer for years? This is a strategy used particularly well by the #stopfundinghate campaign, which is targeting retailers who advertise in <em>The Sun</em>, <em>Daily Mail</em> and <em>Daily Express</em>:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/coopuk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@coopuk</a> As a member &amp; regular shopper i would 💙 to see you <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/stopfundinghate?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#stopfundinghate</a>. Jars with <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/thecoopway?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#thecoopway</a> ethics?? Make a stand! <a href="https://twitter.com/StopFundingHate?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@StopFundingHate</a></p> — Dominique Wedge (@MistyWedge) <a href="https://twitter.com/MistyWedge/status/833970051111870464?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 21, 2017</a></blockquote> <p>Building authority is key to establishing a legitimate base upon which to launch your argument. Do not underestimate the voice of experience.</p> <p>2. Back up your argument</p> <p>You may well have a valid point to make. But no amount of ANGRY CAPITAL LETTERS, repeated exclamation marks or sad face emojis will communicate a reasoned argument. Instead, a strong case can be built by linking to the content of the organisation’s own policy, relevant legislation, a news article, or even a key image or video:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Tesco <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesco?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesco</a>, I wanted to buy Organic produce from you today but I kept walking. I bought my produce elseware today just because of your needless plastic packaging. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/refusingplastic?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#refusingplastic</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/organic?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#organic</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/tesco?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#tesco</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/plasticfree?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#plasticfree</a> <a href="https://t.co/AKL8WOclCv">pic.twitter.com/AKL8WOclCv</a></p> — Betty's Garden 🌻 (@BettyInCork) <a href="https://twitter.com/BettyInCork/status/957305468594065408?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 27, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>In lobbying supermarkets to stop stocking <em>The Sun</em> newspaper back in 2012, the <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/no-more-page-3-our-grassroots-campaign-took-on-a-huge-corporation-and-we-won-9992371.html">“No More Page 3” (#NMP3) campaign</a> provided a masterclass in rational argument of an emotive issue. Through a whole host of <a href="https://twitter.com/NoMorePage3?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor">social media discussions</a>, campaigners skilfully drew on <a href="http://proceedings.aom.org/content/2015/1/16085.short">facts, figures and feelings</a> to persuade retailers such as Tesco, Sainbury’s and the Co-op to stop selling <em>The Sun</em> newspaper until it removed Page 3.</p> <p>In a world of fake news, make sure you are armed with facts.</p> <p><strong>3. Go compare</strong></p> <p>Competition between UK supermarkets is stiff – so holding retailers to account against their rivals is a great way to galvanise action. Back in 2013, Co-op bowed to social media pressure and announced that it would only sell “lads mags” that were covered by <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/jul/29/loaded-owner-cooperative-lads-mags-ban">“modesty wraps”</a>. Days later, Tesco did the same, saying it had <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23558211">“listened carefully”</a> to consumer suggestions (and perhaps those of its competitors). Today, we have seen a similar approach taken to the under-16 energy drink ban:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">VICTORY for <a href="https://twitter.com/jamieoliver?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@jamieoliver</a> and the <a href="https://twitter.com/DailyMirror?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@DailyMirror</a> on our energy drinks campaign that can make the nations children healthier. <br /><br />All these supermarkets have now banned the sale of energy drinks to under 16s<br /><br />✅ Waitrose<br />✅ Aldi<br />✅ Asda<br />✅ Tesco<br />✅ Sainsburys<br />✅ Morrisons <br />✅ Lidl</p> — Johnny Goldsmith (@MirrorJohnny) <a href="https://twitter.com/MirrorJohnny/status/956841243438469120?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 26, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>You can even compare supermarkets to themselves. Does the talk match the walk? Are there inconsistencies between what the supermarket said it would do, and what it actually did?</p> <p><strong>4. Tell a story</strong></p> <p>On social media, arguments should be short and concise. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have a narrative. Making an emotional connection is key and what better way to do this than setting the scene with a dramatic plot, personal triumph, unresolved mystery, happy ending or tale of woe?</p> <p>On the topic of <a href="https://theconversation.com/whatever-happened-to-bans-on-gm-produce-in-british-supermarkets-51153">genetically modified organisms</a>, for example, we found evidence of retailers being construed both as villains (“I will no longer be shopping in your stores now you are to use GMO fed meat”) and heroes (“Thank you for your reassurance, I will continue to happily shop in your stores”). Characterisation helps to convey an opinion:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Thanks for the heads up <a href="https://twitter.com/ProfTimLang?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ProfTimLang</a>, will start building my own network of trusted suppliers now, don't trust supermarkets anymore. not interested in <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GMO?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#GMO</a> corn fed chicken and all that crap. Sorry <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesco?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesco</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/asda?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@asda</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/LidlUK?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@LidlUK</a> etc. <a href="https://t.co/E7pT9vMAvE">https://t.co/E7pT9vMAvE</a></p> — Anna Lehmann (@BusterOnAir) <a href="https://twitter.com/BusterOnAir/status/951141308093075456?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 10, 2018</a></blockquote> <p><strong>5. Play devil’s advocate</strong></p> <p>Social media is seen by some as something of a <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/nov/29/vortex-online-political-debate-arguments-trump-brexit">vortex</a> – a negative time drain that consumes far too much emotional energy. But there is a benefit to online rage, in that it makes conversations continue.</p> <p>The more vibrant and charged discussions involve a plurality of perspectives and some healthy antagonism, particularly around complex socio-political topics such as gender objectification or animal welfare. Keep fuelling the fire and stoking the debate with original and divisive opinions. Keep disagreeing with each other – and the companies. It is when organisational boundaries are truly tested that the real learning can occur.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">why is it going to take 5 years to replace plastic packaging with card or paper packaging? especially when compared with much larger stores like asda or tesco you do not have as many own label products as them? would be nice if could be done in 2 years</p> — Kev (@kevcampbell) <a href="https://twitter.com/kevcampbell/status/955018179499188224?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 21, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>So whether it’s consumer reward schemes, customer convenience or issues of social responsibility, every comment in supermarket social media adds to the rich tapestry of online debate. There are ways to make yourself heard, and to improve the way retailers serve their customers. Social media channels can be effective online petri dishes for organisational learning – the companies just have to keep listening.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/90634/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Sarah Glozer, Senior Lecturer in Marketing, Business &amp; Society, University of Bath</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/five-tips-to-ensure-your-supermarket-is-listening-to-you-on-social-media-90634"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Retirement Income

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Want to live to 100? Follow these 18 simple rules

<p>Follow these 18 simple rules and you won’t just live longer—you’ll make those (many, many) years count.</p> <p><strong>1. Stop smoking</strong></p> <p>Four years after doing so, your chance of having a heart attack falls to that of someone who has never smoked.</p> <p>After ten years, your lung cancer risk drops to nearly that of a nonsmoker.</p> <p><strong>2. Exercise daily</strong></p> <p>Thirty minutes of activity is all that’s necessary. Three ten-minute walks will do it.</p> <p><strong>3. Eat your produce</strong></p> <p>Fruit, vegetables … whatever your favourites are, just make sure you eat them every day.</p> <p><strong>4. Get screened</strong></p> <p>No need to go test-crazy; just get the health screenings recommended for your stage of life.</p> <p>Check with your doctor to make sure you’re up-to-date.</p> <p>Just be honest. How much you smoke, drink, eat, exercise and whether you use protection during sex or while out in the sun matters.</p> <p><strong>5. Make sleep a priority</strong></p> <p>For most adults who want to live to 100, that means seven to eight hours every night.</p> <p>If you have a tough time turning off the light, remember that sleep deprivation raises the risk of heart disease, cancer, and more.</p> <p><strong>6. Ask your doctor about low-dose aspirin</strong></p> <p>Heart attack, stroke, even cancer—a single 81 mg tablet per day may fight them all.</p> <p>(Aspirin comes with risks, though, so don’t start on your own.)</p> <p>If you’re older, you are at risk from the major problem of over-prescribing.</p> <p><strong>7. Know your blood pressure numbers</strong></p> <p>It’s not called the silent killer just to give your life a little more drama.</p> <p>Keep yours under 120/80 if you want to live to 100.</p> <p><strong>8. Stay connected</strong></p> <p>Loneliness is another form of stress.</p> <p>Friends, family, and furry pets help you feel loved.</p> <p><strong>9. Cut back on saturated fat</strong></p> <p>It’s the raw material your body uses for producing LDL, bad cholesterol.</p> <p>For decades, doctors and medical organisations have viewed saturated fat as the raw material for a heart attack.</p> <p><strong>10. Get help for depression</strong></p> <p>It doesn’t just feel bad; it does bad things to your body.</p> <p>In fact, when tacked onto diabetes and heart disease, it increases risk of early death by as much as 30 percent.</p> <p><strong>11. Manage your stress</strong></p> <p>The doctors we surveyed say that living with uncontrolled stress is more destructive to your health than being 30 pounds overweight.</p> <p><strong>12. Have a higher purpose</strong></p> <p>As one physician advised, “Strive to achieve something bigger than yourself.”</p> <p>By giving back, you give to yourself.</p> <p>Just try to keep your energy levels up for the personal journey ahead.</p> <p><strong>13. Load up at breakfast</strong></p> <p>People in “Blue Zones”—areas with high life expectancies—eat the most at breakfast, then have little or nothing for dinner.</p> <p>Front-loading calories can ward off hungry all day, keeping your weight in check.</p> <p><strong>14. Start fasting</strong></p> <p>You don’t need to go days without food.</p> <p>Simply limiting eating to eight hours of the day gives your body more time to finish its six to twelve hours of digestion.</p> <p>After that, it goes into “fasting” mode, burning stored fat.</p> <p><strong>15. Cook at home</strong></p> <p>Not only do you get to control the ingredients and make healthier choices, but the act of cooking is a mini workout.</p> <p>New to the kitchen and want to save some money?</p> <p><strong>16. Have a sit-down meal</strong></p> <p>Multi-tasking during meals, such as while driving or rushing to get out the door, can put stress hormones in the way of your body’s ability to digest, which won’t help you live to 100.</p> <p>Sit down, or better yet, gather the family together to get the bonus of social time while enjoying a meal together.</p> <p><strong>17. Save up</strong></p> <p>Most people who live to 100 are financially secure.</p> <p>Worrying about money (and how to pay for healthcare) could get in the way of a long, healthy life.</p> <p><strong>18. Focus on the good stuff</strong></p> <p>Research shows people who live to 100 tend to complain less than younger adults.</p> <p>Their lack of gripes could mean they’re better at handling bad situations.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/want-live-100-follow-these-18-simple-rules?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Legal

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"We're waiting for you": Madeleine McCann’s parents pay tribute on her 16th birthday

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Madeleine McCann’s parents have marked her 16th birthday with a touching message.</p> <p>Earlier this month marked 12 years since Madeleine disappeared from the family’s resort apartment room in Praia da Luz, Portugal on May 3, 2007, just days before her fourth birthday.</p> <p>On Madeleine’s birthday, which falls on May 12, parents Kate and Gerry McCann marked the date with a message to their daughter on a Facebook page.</p> <p>“Happy 16th Birthday, Madeleine!” they wrote alongside a photograph of Madeleine. “We love you and we’re waiting for you and we’re never going to give up. #ForAsLongAsItTakes”</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FOfficial.Find.Madeleine.Campaign%2Fposts%2F10157177274719931&amp;width=500" width="500" height="645" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe> <p>In an 2017 interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-39757287" target="_blank">BBC</a>’s Fiona Bruce, the parents said they still celebrated Madeleine’s birthday with presents. </p> <p>“I obviously have to think about what age she is and something that, whenever we find her, will still be appropriate,” said Kate.</p> <p>“But I couldn’t not, you know; she’s still our daughter, she’ll always be our daughter.”</p> <p>In her 2011 book <em>Madeleine: Our Daughter’s Disappearance and the Continuing Search for Her</em>, Kate also wrote about how her family would leave presents in Madeleine’s bedroom.</p> <p>“As we’ve continued to do since, we had a tea party at home with balloons, cake, cards and presents,” she wrote, as reported by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1124423/madeleine-mccann-disappearance-netflix-documentary-birthday-kate-mccann-gerry-mccann-spt" target="_blank"><em>Express</em></a>.</p> <p>“The presents go into Madeleine’s room to await her return. Her pink bedroom remains exactly as it was when she left it but it’s a lot busier now.”</p> <p>On the 12th anniversary of Madeleine’s disappearance, Kate and Gerry shared a statement expressing their gratefulness for the support they received from around the world. </p> <p>“There is comfort and reassurance though in knowing that the investigation continues and many people around the world remain vigilant,” they wrote.</p> <p>“Thank you to everyone who continues to support us and for your ongoing hope and belief.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

Legal

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3 ways to be generous on a budget

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When it comes to spending on your loved ones, it can be easy to go overboard. But giving does not have to be expensive – after all, it’s the thought that counts. Here are the various ways you can show your love and generosity to those around you without breaking the bank.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Buy in bulk</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instead of coming up with ideas on a unique present for each recipient, buying items in bulk can help you save more and simplify your gift-giving plans. It can be thoughtful, too – a touch of personalisation can make a big difference. For example, you can get plain mugs and add your drawing or handwriting with permanent markers along with small, affordable extras like chocolate, soap bars or cards. </span></p> <p><strong>2. Do it yourself</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is nothing like receiving gifts that have been handmade from scratch. Try to look into the things you already love doing, and go from there. If you like to spend your time baking, prepare a special batch of brownie or pie to share. Enjoy knitting? A handmade sweater or pair of gloves could go the distance. You can also appeal to the shared memories between the two of you through sentimental DIY projects such as photo albums, mixtapes, scrapbooks, drawings and more.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Spend time, not money</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your presence can truly be a present. Instead of getting some gifts off the store, you can try giving more of yourself – be it by helping in the kitchen, reorganising old cabinets and closets, or taking care of the overgrown lawn. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apart from giving your service, you can also suggest a gathering where family members and/or friends can spend time and have fun with low-cost food and activities, such as hiking, playing games, or simply chatting over toasted marshmallow and a hot cuppa. Spending some quality time and creating new memories together can indeed be the true gift.</span></p>

Retirement Income

Entertainment

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Grandparents vs Parents: Who will win in the battle against screens?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New concerns surrounding screen time and mobile phone usage is causing rifts between parents and grandparents.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Parents, who want to limit their children’s screen time, can lay down the law, but it can be difficult if the grandparents are giving the children a bit more screen time than they’re allowed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Both parties don’t want to rock the boat, despite their differing opinions. Grandparents don’t want to miss out on time with the kids and parents don’t want to miss out on work as they scramble to find a replacement babysitter.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, when instructions are repeatedly ignored, this can cause rifts. A mother told </span><a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/its-grandparents-v-parents-in-the-battle-over-kids-screens-11556011800"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Wall Street Journal</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that she limits screen time at home, but when the kids go to grandma’s, the rule is significantly relaxed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Every time I talk to her about it, she’s like, ‘Well, I never get to see my grandkids, and they need to have fun with me.’ To her, watching a movie together is connecting. To me, that’s not connecting,” the mother explained. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the grandmother explained that she didn’t see a problem. She told </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">TWSJ</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that she let her granddaughter stay on the iPad until 2 in the morning on a school night playing games.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I told my granddaughter to turn it [the iPad] off. I didn’t want to get busted.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The tension between the pair has frustrated the mother so much, she’s hired a babysitter to take care of her children on the weekends. Despite the tension, she’s reluctant to push the issue too much as she realises how lucky she is to have her mother still around.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I don’t know how much time I have on this earth and I want them to have memories of how fun Mimi was,” Ms. Kapsi Potter said of her grandchildren. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That’s what’s important to me. If there’s something they want to watch, I’ll let them. I let them stay up late. They can do whatever they want but set the house on fire.”</span></p>

Technology

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New Prince memoir to be released this October

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The unfinished memoir of Prince, titled </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Beautiful Ones</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, will finally be released this October just three years after the iconic musician’s passing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Publisher Random House confirmed to </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Associated Press</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Beautiful Ones</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> will be released in October.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The memoir will go into detail from Prince’s childhood to his final days as one of the world’s most successful musicians. The memoir will also contain Prince’s unfinished manuscript as well as photos from his personal collection, scrapbooks and lyrics.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is also original handwritten treatment for his 1984 hit </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Purple Rain.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Prince first announced the book in 2016, when he told the audience in New York City that the publishers had made him “an offer I can’t refuse”.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw531T9lCRv/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw531T9lCRv/" target="_blank">"When you don't talk down to your audience, then they can grow with you. I give them a lot of credit to be able to hang with me this long, because I've gone through a lot of changes, but they've allowed me to grow, and thus we can tackle some serious subjects and try to just be better human beings, all of us."</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/prince/" target="_blank"> Prince</a> (@prince) on Apr 30, 2019 at 8:07pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is my first [book]. My brother Dan is helping me with it. He’s a good critic and that’s what I need. He’s not a ‘yes’ man at all and he’s really helping me get through this,” he said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’re starting from the beginning from my first memory and hopefully we can go all the way up to the Super Bowl.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Random House has described the book as: “The deeply personal account of how Prince Rogers Nelson became the Prince we know: the real-time story of a kid absorbing the world around him and creating a persona, an artistic vision, and a life, before the hits and the fame that would come to define him”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The book’s editor, Chris Jackson, has also called the book, “a beautiful tribute to his life … It’s a treasure not just for Prince fans but for anyone who wants to see one of our greatest creative artists and original minds at work on his greatest creation: himself.”</span></p>

Music

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Adele splurges $16.4 million on second home in Beverly Hills

<p>Not long after her 31st birthday – and following her separation from husband Simon Konecki, whom she married in 2017 and shares six-year-old son Angelo with – Adele has celebrated with some brand-new real estate on the west coast of America.</p> <p>The new home in Beverly Hills is a stunning five-bedroom, six-bathroom mid-century style home that’s located next to some A-list neighbours, including Katy Perry, Jennifer Lawrence and Cameron Diaz.</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://homes.nine.com.au/home-tours/adele-buys-second-home-in-beverly-hills/6aeb95fb-addc-402b-a918-4ca4788d59ac" target="_blank">9Honey Homes</a>, the home was built in the 1960s and spans 6,045 square feet.</p> <p>The home looks low-key from the outside, due to a plain exterior, a garage and three broad steps that lead up to the front door. However, step inside and have your mind blown due to the high ceilings and the abundance of natural light.</p> <p>With an airy sunken living room with a wood-burning fireplace in one corner and an entire wall of glass doors on the other, this home is inviting and light.</p> <p>The real star of the home is a library on the ground floor that boasts an impressive collection of floor-to-ceiling bookshelves that can hold approximately 2,000 volumes.</p> <p>The master suite has a sitting area with a fireplace, a walk-in closet, as well as a carpeted bathroom with spa bath.</p> <p>There’s also a small art studio, a custom-fitted crafts room, a home office, as well as a wall-to-wall carpeted fitness suite.</p> <p>The backyard has a swimming pool, as well as a large well-kept green lawn.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to take a look inside the grand home.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Zillow</em></p>

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