Placeholder Content Image

Police investigate the welfare of re-homed autistic child of YouTube influencers

<p><span>Police have confirmed they are looking into the welfare and whereabouts of the adopted son of YouTube couple Myka and James Stauffer, who they admitted they “re-homed” with another family.</span><br /><br /><span>Myka sparked fury online when she came forward on her YouTube channel to announce she had sent her adopted son Huxley, five, to live with another family after his special needs meant that they could no longer provide the best support for him.</span><br /><br /><span>The couple adopted Huxley from China in 2016, and did not shy away from sharing the process on Myka's YouTube channel.</span><br /><br /><span>Though they were told the boy suffered from brain tumours, it was later revealed to the family that the young boy has level three autism and a sensory processing disorder, the result of having a stroke in utero.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836396/myka-stauffer-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/410fbb6f9d404221ac32968c2f25ddaf" /></p> <p><em>Image: Instagram</em><br /><br /><span>Myka and James announced that they had sent Huxley to live with a family better equipped to handle his needs in a video that went viral last week.</span><br /><br /><span>Fans promptly accused the pair of "re-homing" him because of his autism.</span><br /><br /><span>It has also since raised questions about Huxley's whereabouts since leaving the Stauffer family.</span><br /><br /><span>The Delaware, US County Sheriff's Office is looking into the case alongside “several other agencies”, according to BuzzFeed News.</span><br /><br /><span>Tracy Whited, the office's community and media relations manager, said that the case is ongoing but was able to confirm that the five-year-old boy “is not missing”.</span><br /><br /><span>“All adoption cases are confidential, and must go through a thorough process, with specific requirements and safeguards,” Whited said.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836397/myka-stauffer-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/64ab6f6e927345fa9b1eb7f6f5a2bda8" /></p> <p><em>Myka and her husband took to Youtube to reveal they had "rehomed" their son Huxley. </em><br /><br /><span>“In private adoptions there are the same legal requirements that must be adhered to. These include home studies as well as background checks on the adopting parent(s).”</span><br /><br /><span>She added that both parties are being represented by attorneys.</span><br /><br /><span>Last week lawyers for the Stauffer family released a statement addressing the backlash surrounding Myka and James' video.</span><br /><br /><span>“We are privy to this case, and given the facts at hand, we feel this was the best decision for Huxley,” lawyers Thomas Taneff and Taylor Sayers said.</span><br /><br /><span>“In coming to know our clients, we know they are a loving family and are very caring parents that would do anything for their children. Since his adoption, they consulted with multiple professionals in the health care and educational arenas in order to provide Huxley with the best possible treatment and care.</span><br /><br /><span>“Over time, the team of medical professionals advised our clients it might be best for Huxley to be placed with another family.”</span><br /><br /><span>Fans and critics asked to know how little Hux had been “re-homed”, as the details were never made clear.</span><br /><br /><span>Myka appears to have since removed all photos of Huxley from her Instagram account while images of her other four children remain.</span></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Meghan Markle addresses Black Lives Matter movement in new video: “The only wrong thing to say is to say nothing”

<p><span>Meghan Markle has delivered a moving speech on racism in light of the Black Lives Matter movement recently re-lit by George Floyd’s death in police custody.</span><br /><br /><span>In a powerful video message to the graduating class of the Los Angeles high school she attended, the royal member called the events of the past week “absolutely devastating”, admitting she “wasn’t sure what to say” at first.</span><br /><br /><span>“I wasn't sure what I could say to you. I wanted to say the right thing and I was really nervous that it would get picked apart,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>“I realised the only wrong thing to say is to say nothing,” she told the Immaculate Heart High School students.</span><br /><br /><span>“Because George Floyd's life mattered and Breonna Taylor's life mattered and Philando Castile's life mattered and Tamir Rice's life mattered … and so did so many other people whose names we know and whose names we do not know.”</span><br /><br /><span>The Duchess of Sussex was born and raised in Los Angeles, where she now resides with her husband Prince Harry and their son Archie.</span><br /><br /><span>In the new video shared to social media, the royal recounted her memories of the riots that occurred in the city in 1992, which she described as similarly triggered by “a senseless act of racism”.</span><br /><br /><span>“I remember seeing men in the back of a van just holding guns and rifles. I remember pulling up the house and seeing the tree, that had always been there, completely charred,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>“Those memories don't go away, and I can't imagine that at 17 or 18 years old, which is how old you are now, that you would have to have a different version of that same type of experience. That's something you should have an understanding of as a history lesson, not as your reality.”</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">“We are going to rebuild and rebuild and rebuild until it is rebuilt. Because when the foundation is broken, so are we.” - Meghan Markle <a href="https://t.co/km7j5Gu7Bv">pic.twitter.com/km7j5Gu7Bv</a></p> — shondaland tv (@shondaland) <a href="https://twitter.com/shondaland/status/1268604404434755590?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 4, 2020</a></blockquote> <p><br /><span>She went on to apologise that the world isn’t “in a place where you deserve it to be”.</span><br /><br /><span>“I am so sorry that you have to grow up in a world where this is still present,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>The former Suits actress finished off her powerful five-minute speech by urging students of her former highschool take action and be leaders in inspiring change as they forge a path outside high school.</span><br /><br /><span>“We are going to rebuild and rebuild and rebuild until it is rebuilt. Because when the foundation is broken, so are we,” she said to the students.</span><br /><br /><span>“You are going to lead with love, you are going to lead with compassion, you are going to use your voice in a stronger way than you've ever been able to, because most of you are 18, or you're going to turn 18, and you're going to vote.</span><br /><br /><span>“I know you know that black lives matter, so I am already excited for what you are going to do in the world. You are equipped, you are ready, we need you and you are prepared.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CBCIojaDggp/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CBCIojaDggp/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by El Universo Vida y Estilo (@eluniversovidayestilo)</a> on Jun 4, 2020 at 5:30pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>Both Meghan and Harry have maintained a low profile during the Black Lives Matter protests, having stayed offline during Black Out Tuesday this week on their Sussex Royal Instagram page.</span><br /><br /><span>The Queen's Commonwealth Trust, which is overseen by the Queen, Harry and Meghan, this week shared on Instagram and Twitter a Martin Luther King Jr quote, saying “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”</span></p>

Beauty & Style

Placeholder Content Image

Bindi Irwin shares touching wedding anniversary tribute to Steve and Terri

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Daughter Bindi Irwin shared a sweet tribute to her late father Steve Irwin and her mother Terri Irwin on their 28th wedding anniversary.</p> <p>She shared the tribute on Instagram, which showed Terri cradling a baby kangaroo and Steve has his arm around Terri in his signature khaki outfit.</p> <p>“Mum &amp; Dad, Happy Anniversary. There are no words to describe how much I love you both. Thank you for teaching me and Robert the meaning of unconditional love,” Bindi wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CBAo2TehMse/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CBAo2TehMse/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">‪Mum &amp; Dad,‬ Happy Anniversary.‬ There are no words to describe how much I love you both. Thank you for teaching me and Robert the meaning of unconditional love. ❤️‬</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bindisueirwin/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Bindi Irwin</a> (@bindisueirwin) on Jun 4, 2020 at 3:33am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Steve and Terri were married in Terri’s hometown of Eugene, Oregon on June 4th, 1992.</p> <p>The pair were married for 14 years before Steve was killed after being pierced in the chest by a stingray barb while filming a wildlife documentary in 2006.</p> <p>Bindi has spoken about how the pair are still soulmates despite her father’s passing.</p> <p>"My dad is still very much my mum's soul mate. And I think that no matter what, Mum always says that they'll always be married," Bindi told<span> </span><em>E! News</em><span> </span>in 2017, on what would've been her parents' 25th wedding anniversary.</p> <p>Terri also made a tribute, explaining that Steve asked her to marry him in Australia Zoo.</p> <p>"It was 28 years ago today, here at @AustraliaZoo, that Steve asked me to marry him. Life is constantly changing. Love is forever," she tweeted.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">It was 28 years ago today, here at <a href="https://twitter.com/AustraliaZoo?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@AustraliaZoo</a>, that Steve asked me to marry him. Life is constantly changing. Love is forever. <a href="https://t.co/KKBRjEQwvq">pic.twitter.com/KKBRjEQwvq</a></p> — Terri Irwin (@TerriIrwin) <a href="https://twitter.com/TerriIrwin/status/1223870032502906880?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 2, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Bindi followed in her father’s footsteps as she was married in Australia zoo and her husband Chandler Powell proposed at the wildlife park in 2019.</p> </div> </div> </div>

Relationships

Placeholder Content Image

Love lockdown: How to tell if your relationship will survive the pandemic

<p>Life in lockdown has been tough on many relationships. But negotiating the transition back to “normal” as restrictions continue to lift could also be a challenge for couples.</p> <p>So what are some of the key factors that affect how relationships fare during such times?</p> <p>To answer this, I’m going to draw on an important model in relationship science called the <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1995-36558-001">vulnerability stress adaptation model</a>.</p> <p><strong>3 important factors</strong></p> <p>As its name suggests, the <a href="http://sk.sagepub.com/reference/humanrelationships/n554.xml">model</a> proposes three broad factors that affect relationship outcomes: vulnerabilities, stressors and adaptions.</p> <p><strong>Vulnerabilities</strong> are any kind of factor that makes it harder for a person to maintain enduring and satisfying relationships. Vulnerabilities can include mental health issues, personality traits (such as neuroticism), past bad relationships, addiction, and the like.</p> <p><strong>Stressors</strong> are challenging life events and experiences external to the relationship, but which put a strain on maintaining a lasting and satisfying bond. These can include financial hardship, work stress, and difficult relationships with extended family or friends.</p> <p><strong>Adaptations</strong> reflect the skills and capabilities couples possess to effectively deal with and adapt to challenging circumstances. Adaptations can include a couple’s sense of fun or humour, constructive ways of handling conflict and solving problems, and supporting one another.</p> <p>Stressors and vulnerabilities increase negative relationship behaviours (such as criticism and insensitivity), and in turn increase negative relationship outcomes (dissatisfaction and relationship breakdown).</p> <p>On the other hand, adaptations buffer the effects of stress and reduce the risk of relationship dissatisfaction and breakdown.</p> <p><strong>Framing this model around COVID-19</strong></p> <p>The social distancing rules enforced during the pandemic have seen couples spending long periods of time together, often in close quarters.</p> <p>Accounts from across the world show us not all couples have adjusted well. China reported an increase in the number of married couples <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-03-31/divorces-spike-in-china-after-coronavirus-quarantines">filing for divorce</a>. Worryingly, incidents of <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-52157620">domestic abuse</a> may also have increased.</p> <p>Lengthy periods of close contact may have acted as a stressor which intensified negative relationship behaviours and dissatisfaction, particularly for people with existing personal vulnerabilities.</p> <p>The changes associated with social distancing rules, such as working from home and supervising home schooling, are additional stressors. These too are likely to have exacerbated personal vulnerabilities and destructive relationship behaviours for some couples.</p> <p>Some vulnerable couples may be able to keep their relationship stable, provided that the stress of social isolation and other COVID-19-related stressors remain low, or that supports are in place to minimise stress.</p> <p>However, these same couples may encounter problems if stressors increase (for example, one partner suddenly loses their job) or supports are removed (such as from friends or family).</p> <p>Similarly, high-functioning couples may cope well with the challenges of social restriction and other COVID-19 hardships. But, if the stressors become too great, they’re likely to experience declines in relationship satisfaction.</p> <p><strong>What’s the ideal?</strong></p> <p>People in loving and supportive relationships are likely to cope more effectively with the enforcement and relaxation of social distancing guidelines (and other challenges, whether related to the pandemic or not).</p> <p>These are typically couples who constructively deal with conflict by working together towards solving issues, take on each others’ perspectives, and respond sensitively when the other is feeling stressed.</p> <p>That’s not to say these couples never argue and don’t sometimes get frustrated with one another. But their adaptive ways of communicating and supporting each other mean these couples are likely to fare better.</p> <p><strong>There’s help if you need it</strong></p> <p>Some couples may benefit from <a href="https://guilfordjournals.com/doi/abs/10.1521/jscp.2007.26.5.609">relationship education programs</a> that teach communication skills and how to manage conflict constructively.</p> <p>For couples that require more intensive support, couple therapy can be <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2016-03880-001">effective</a>.</p> <p>These options are available online.</p> <p>As well as working on the relationship itself, the alleviation of stressors can help a relationship.</p> <p>Studies have found that for couples and families experiencing stressors such as economic hardship or housing instability, providing them with financial aid, jobseeker programs and affordable housing can <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352250X16300057">improve relationship satisfaction</a> and reduce family breakdown to a similar extent as relationship education or counselling.</p> <p>Hopefully, some of the measures the government has put in place, such as JobKeeper, have reduced stress for couples.</p> <p>The easing of social distancing restrictions may also significantly reduce stress in some couples, shrinking “relationship cracks” that emerged during lockdown.</p> <p>You may need to address these cracks if they resurface, but reductions in coronavirus-related stressors may well see transient relationship problems disappear.</p> <p><strong>A return to normal won’t be the answer for all relationships</strong></p> <p>Unfortunately, for some couples, the easing of restrictions may intensify relationship conflicts and dissatisfaction.</p> <p>For example, if one person has health anxieties and the other is highly impulsive, they may hold very different attitudes on how to navigate situations such as social gatherings.</p> <p>These differences are likely to create conflict that may increase dissatisfaction and relationship difficulties, particularly if both members of the couple typically respond to conflict in destructive ways.</p> <p>So the easing of social restrictions may not have the same outcome for all. It depends in part on a couple’s existing vulnerabilities and their way of handling conflict and supporting one another.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/135824/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/gery-karantzas-178159">Gery Karantzas</a>, Associate professor in Social Psychology / Relationship Science, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/deakin-university-757">Deakin University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/love-lockdown-the-pandemic-has-put-pressure-on-many-relationships-but-heres-how-to-tell-if-yours-will-survive-135824">original article</a>.</em></p>

Relationships

Placeholder Content Image

Miguel’s mushroom sweet potato gnocchi

<p>When it comes to cooking, celebrity chef Miguel Maestre has a surprising favourite ingredient – mushrooms.</p> <p>“Mushrooms are a brilliant and versatile ingredient that make meal times tastier and healthier,” the restaurateur and TV presenter said.</p> <p>Here’s one of Miguel’s mushroom recipes.</p> <p><strong>Recipe by: </strong>Miguel Maestre for Australian Mushrooms</p> <p><em>Serves 2-3</em></p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 medium sweet potatoes</li> <li>2 cups all purpose flour</li> <li>2 teaspoons salt flakes</li> <li>flour for dusting</li> <li>250g Swiss brown and button mushrooms, chopped in quarters</li> <li>10 sage leaves</li> <li>2 tbsp toasted pinenuts (optional)</li> <li>1/2 lemon</li> <li>50g butter</li> <li>Grated Parmesan</li> </ul> <p> <strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius. Poke a few holes in the sweet potatoes with a fork, and then bake them for at least 1 hour on a bed of rock salt in the oven until they are tender and the skin starts to look wrinkly.</li> <li>While the potato is still warm, peel the skin away from the flesh and set aside to cool slightly.</li> <li>If you have a potato ricer, put the sweet potatoes through this. Otherwise you can use a fine sieve and push the potato through with a ladle or wooden spoon.</li> <li>Place the flour on a board, or your kitchen bench. Make a well in the centre and add the riced / sieved sweet potatoes to the well.  Season with salt and pepper.</li> <li>Using your hands, work the sweet potato into the flour until it’s fully combined. You don’t want the dough to be sticky so keep adding flour gradually until you get a nice dry dough. This could take quite a bit of extra flour.</li> <li>Once fully combined, roll the dough into a ball and cut it into 4 even pieces. Roll each piece into a long sausage, each about a finger in thickness.</li> <li>Cut the rolls of dough into 2cm little pillows of gnocchi, and gently toss each piece into some flour on your work bench to ensure that it’s dry. At this point you could also use a gnocchi board or fork to press grooves into each piece of gnocchi to make it more professional looking but this is optional and tastes just as good without!</li> <li>To cook the gnocchi, bring a large pot of water to the boil and add the salt. Blanch the sweet potato gnocchi in salted boiling water until they all float. Then drain, reserving a little of the cooking water.</li> <li>In a large frying pan, over a high heat, add a splash of olive oil and a teaspoon of butter, add the quartered mushrooms and cook for a few minutes until golden. Spoon out the mushrooms into a bowl.</li> <li>Using the same frying pan, add the cooked gnocchi and sear until crispy. Add the remaining butter, pine nuts, sage leaves and mushrooms you just set aside. Cook until the butter starts to burn.</li> <li>Then add lemon juice and Parmesan and serve.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Tip: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Putting the potatoes through a sieve or potato ricer is a vital step to making gnocchi, as this breaks down the starch.</li> <li>If you make gnocchi often, a potato ricer is a fairly inexpensive kitchen tool that is handy to have.</li> </ul>

Food & Wine

Placeholder Content Image

Pregnant New Zealand woman dies after drinking 3 litres of soft drink a day

<p>A pregnant woman who drank an excessive amount of Coca-Cola and energy drinks has passed away, and according to recent coroner reports, this caffeine consumption may have contributed to her death.</p> <p>Amy Louise Thorpe died of an epileptic seizure at her home on December 4, 2018.</p> <p>According to findings released by coroner David Robinson, Thorpe, who was 15 weeks pregnant at the time of her death, had a history of epilepsy and other conditions.</p> <p>Since she was pregnant, her seizures had increased in frequency to about once a week.</p> <p>She was also consuming two litres of Coca-Cola and between 500mls to one litre of energy drinks per day.</p> <p>Thorpe’s partner said that she was “addicted” to soft drink and a friend told police in a statement after her death that she consumed “more energy drinks in a day than people have coffee”.</p> <p>A month before her death, Thorpe was referred to a neurologist, Graeme Hammond-Tooke, who recommended she change her epilepsy medication.</p> <p>However, according to the coronial inquest, Thorpe was reluctant to change medication or undergo testing.</p> <p>Associate Professor Hammond Took provided advice for the coroner’s report, saying that it was possible that her excessive caffeinated drink intake had contributed to her death.</p> <p>“In the case of Ms Thorpe, I think it is possible that excessive caffeine contributed to poor seizure control,” he told<span> </span><em>The Sun</em>.</p> <p>“While modest intake of caffeine contained in drinks is not likely to affect seizure control, large amounts probably do increase seizures, and may have other adverse effects on health.”</p> <p>Robinson said that making Thorpe’s case public should serve to raise awareness of the consequences of excessive caffeine use, especially for people who had epilepsy.</p> <p><em>Hero photo credits:<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&amp;objectid=12337029" target="_blank"> Otago Daily Times</a></em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

French princess in coma after “serious” crash

<p>A French royal is reportedly in a coma after suffering a “serious” motorcycle crash.</p> <p>Princess Hermine of Clermont-Tonnerre is believed to have been injured in a road accident on Monday, June 1, as reported by French news outlet <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.lavoixdunord.fr/760743/article/2020-06-03/hermine-de-clermont-tonnerre-princesse-et-jet-setteuse-dans-le-coma-apres-un" target="_blank">La Voix du Nord</a>.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836378/hermine-de-clermont-tonnerre-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/63db7f99f8c948c3b982b4c4a0ee0989" /></p> <p>The 54-year-old actor and renowned Parisian jetsetter is the daughter of Charles Henri, the 11th Duke of Clermont-Tonnerre, and Anne Moranville.</p> <p>Though she is not technically considered a princess, the royal author is dubbed by French press as “Princesse Hermine de Clermont-Tonnerre”</p> <p>She has two children, Allegra and Calixte, from her decade-long marriage to French businessman Alastair Cuddeford which ended in 2009.</p> <p>French film producer and friend Thierry Klemeniuk posted about news of the accident in a post on Facebook that has since been deleted.</p> <p>“Let us all pray for our princess,” he said, according to La VDN.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836380/hermine-de-clermont-tonnerre.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e4ec81db71bc43268e07ca3bf652a2b8" /></p> <p>In a separate post, event manager Viviane Zaniroli asked others to join her in prayer.</p> <p>“For our Mimine, Hermine de Clermont-Tonnerre, in a coma following a motorcycle accident, we think of Allegra and Calixte her children. My darling princess you are a warrior, fight,” she said.</p> <p>Ms Zaniroli is the creator of the Princesses’ Rally – a women-only car rally in which Hermine has raced multiple times.</p> <p>The royal is also renowned for her passionate love of Harley Davidson motorcycles.</p> <p>French celebrity magazine <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gala.fr/l_actu/news_de_stars/video-hermine-de-clermont-tonnerre-dans-le-coma-cest-tres-grave-confie-jean-luc-lahaye_449361" target="_blank">Gala</a> reported she is in a “worrying” state after the crash.</p>

Travel Trouble

Placeholder Content Image

Australian lawyer allegedly sacked for refusing to lie

<p>A <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/corporations-act/">corporate lawyer</a> has commenced proceedings in the Federal Circuit Court after he was terminated from his position as a senior legal adviser with Meriton Property Services for allegedly refusing to lie in an affidavit.</p> <p>Sydney lawyer Joseph Callahan is claiming $556,500 in compensation and costs after being terminated from his $350,000 a year position in February 2020.</p> <p>He claims that during a meeting on 3 February 2020, his employer, billionaire property developer Harry Triguboff, demanded that he falsely state in an affidavit that Sydney Council had taken three years to approve a development application.</p> <p>According to his statement of claim, the lawyer responded by stating, “I’m a solicitor and can’t include something in an affidavit which I know isn’t true”.</p> <p>He says his employer then said, “Listen my friend, you write it my way or you can fuck off”, and “Fuck you. I pay you to win cases do you understand?”.</p> <p>Mr Callahan says he then told his employer, “I understand I am here to win cases, but it did not take three years to get the building approved, so I can’t give evidence to the Court that it did”, to which Mr Triguboff responded, “Enough crap from you. Write it my way or you are no good to me”.</p> <p>The lawyers says he stood his ground, telling his employer “Harry I won’t do it. It’s a lie”.</p> <p>He says his employer emailed him on 13 February 2020 to advise that his position had been terminated.</p> <p>Meriton Property Services refutes the allegations, filing a defence which states:</p> <p>“All allegations that suggest otherwise are strongly denied. Meriton disputes the sequence and nature of the events set out in the court filing”.</p> <p>The case is listed for hearing on 17 June 2020.</p> <p><strong>The offence of swearing a false affidavit</strong></p> <p>Swearing a False Affidavit is a crime under <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/oaths-act/swearing-falsely-in-affidavits/">Section 29 of the Oaths Act 1900</a>.</p> <p>The offence carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.</p> <p><strong>For the offence to be established, the prosecution must prove beyond reasonable doubt that:</strong></p> <ol> <li>The defendant swore or affirmed an affidavit,</li> <li>The affidavit was affirmed or sworn before a person authorised to do so,</li> <li>The affidavit was false in any respect, and</li> <li>The defendant knew the affidavit was false in that or those respects.</li> </ol> <p>In addition to this, <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/oaths-act/false-statement/">section 33 of the Oaths Act 1900</a> prescribes a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison for the offence of making a false statement in an affidavit.</p> <p><strong>To establish that offence, the prosecution must prove beyond reasonable doubt that the defendant:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Swore or affirmed an affidavit,</li> <li>Made a false statement within that affidavit, and</li> <li>Knew the statement was false.</li> </ol> <p>Swearing to false information in an affidavit may also amount to perverting the course of justice, which is an offence under <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/crimes-act/perverting-course-of-justice/">section 319 of the Crimes Act 1900</a> carrying a maximum penalty of 14 years in prison.</p> <p><strong>To establish that offence, the prosecution must prove beyond reasonable doubt that the defendant:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Engaged in an act or made an omission, and</li> <li>Did so with the intention of perverting the course of justice.</li> </ol> <p>‘Perverting the course of justice’ is defined as ‘obstructing, preventing, perverting or defeating the course of justice or the administration of law’.</p> <p><strong>Defendants have been found guilty of the offence for the following conduct:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Falsely swearing or declaring that another person was responsible for an offence,</li> <li>Attempting to bribe a police or judicial officer to avoid being prosecuted or punished,</li> <li>Using a victim’s phone or email in an attempt to create a defence to a crime,</li> <li>Encouraging or bribing another person to plead guilty to an crime they did not commit, to provide a false alibi and to give false testimony in court.</li> </ol> <p>Where it is alleged that a false affidavit was used in connection with judicial proceedings – such as court proceedings – a person can be charged of perjury, which is an offence under <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/crimes-act/perjury/">Section 327 of the Crimes Act 1900</a> carrying a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.</p> <p><strong>To establish the offence, the prosecution must prove beyond reasonable doubt that:</strong></p> <ol> <li>The defendant made a false statement under oath or affirmation,</li> <li>The statement was in, or in connection with, judicial proceedings,</li> <li>The statement concerned a matter that was material to those proceedings, and</li> <li>The defendant knew the statement was false or did not believe it was true.</li> </ol> <p>The maximum penalty increases to 14 years in prison where the prosecution proves that the defendant intended to procure the conviction or acquittal of a person for a ‘serious indictable offence’, which is one that carries a maximum penalty of at least 5 years in prison.</p> <p><strong>Defences to the charges</strong></p> <p>In addition to prove each ‘element’ (or ingredient) the charges, the prosecution must disprove beyond reasonable doubt any legal defence which a defendant validly raise in court.</p> <p><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/defences/">Legal defences</a> which apply to these offences include:</p> <ol> <li>Duress</li> <li>Necessity, and</li> <li>Self-defence</li> </ol> <p><strong>Professional obligations</strong></p> <p>In addition to obligations under the general law, a solicitor or barrister who falsely swears to information in a legal statement such as a statutory declaration or affidavit is liable to disciplinary action by the Law Society of New South Wales, including being <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/lawyers-struck-off-for-professional-misconduct/">‘struck off’ for professional misconduct</a>.</p> <p>Going to court for an offence against justice?</p> <p>If you have been charged with an offence against justice such as swearing a false affidavit, contempt of court, perverting the course of justice or perjury, call Sydney Criminal Lawyers anytime on (02) 9261 8881 to arrange a free first conference with an experienced criminal defence lawyer who will advise you of your options and the best way forward.</p> <p><em>Written by Ugur Nedim. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/lawyer-allegedly-sacked-for-refusing-to-lie/"><em>Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</em></a></p>

Legal

News

Placeholder Content Image

New prime suspect identified in Madeleine McCann case

<p><span>In a rare update, British police have revealed they are investigating a German prisoner as a suspect in the disappearance of Madeleine McCann.</span><br /><br /><span>At the time of the three-year-old’s disappearance, the 43-year-old German national is known to have been in and around Praia da Luz on Portugal's Algarve coast around May 3, 2007.</span><br /><br /><span>The child had been on holiday with her parents Kate and Gerry McCann, along with her twin siblings, Sean and Amelie.</span><br /><br /><span>A half-hour long phone call was made to the German man's Portuguese mobile phone around an hour before Madeleine is assumed to have gone missing.</span><br /><br /><span>The suspect who remains behind bars in a German prison for an unrelated matter, has been linked to a camper van that was photographed in the Algarve in 2007.</span><br /><br /><span>Scotland Yard said he was driving the vehicle in the Praia da Luz area just days before Madeleine's disappearance.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836368/madeleine-mccann-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9ac7da3229cf482181bbd874f2a424ff" /><br /><br /><span>The suspect has additionally been linked to a 1993 Jaguar XJR6 that had a German number plate seen in Praia da Luz and surrounding areas in 2006 and 2007.</span><br /><br /><span>The day after young Madeleine went missing, the man got the car re-registered in Germany under someone else's name. However, it is believed the vehicle was still in Portugal.</span><br /><br /><span>Both vehicles have been seized by German police.</span><br /><br /><span>Scotland Yard is in the process of launching an appeal with the Federal Criminal Police Office of Germany (BKA) and the Portuguese Policia Judiciaria (PJ), which will include a STG20,000 ($A36,000) reward for information leading to the conviction of the person responsible for Madeleine's disappearance.</span><br /><br /><span>The Met's investigation has revealed that there are more than 600 people who may be significant to the case and were tipped off about the German national, already known to detectives, following a 2017 appeal 10 years after she went missing.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/ZOc2z_llQX/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/ZOc2z_llQX/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Nomi Cooper-Rosenberg (@nomicr)</a> on May 12, 2013 at 1:53pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>Madeleine vanished just a short while before her fourth birthday and would have turned 17 in May.</span><br /><br /><span>Madeleine’s parents issued a statement, read by Detective Chief Inspector Mark Cranwell, welcoming the new police appeal with open arms.</span><br /><br /><span>"All we have ever wanted is to find her, uncover the truth and bring those responsible to justice," the statement said.</span><br /><br /><span>"We will never give up hope of finding Madeleine alive, but whatever the outcome may be, we need to know as we need to find peace."</span><br /><br /><span>Det. Chief Insp. Cranwell took the unusual step of releasing two mobile phone numbers as part of the appeal.</span><br /><br /><span>The first, (+351) 912 730 680, is believed to have been used by the suspect.</span><br /><br /><span>The second is suspected to have received a call from another Portuguese mobile, (+351) 916 510 683, while in the Praia da Luz area on the night of May 3, 2007.</span><br /><br /><span>The caller is not thought to have been in the Praia da Luz area but is not being treated as a suspect.</span><br /><br /><span>Police say the person may be a "key witness" in the case.</span><br /><br /><span>Det. Chief Insp. Cranwell are appealing to anyone who knows the suspect and who may have information in relation to Madeleine's case to come forward.</span><br /><br /><span>"You may know, you may be aware of some of the things he has done. He may have confided in you about the disappearance of Madeleine," the police officer said.</span></p>

News

Placeholder Content Image

Justin Trudeau’s 21-second pause after Donald Trump question

<p>Justin Trudeau paused for 21 seconds when asked Tuesday about Donald Trump’s use of tear gas against protesters to make way for a photo opportunity.</p> <p>During a press conference at Rideau Cottage, the Canadian Prime Minister was asked for comments on the US President’s call for military action against protesters demonstrating police brutality and the killing of George Floyd.</p> <p>Trudeau, who is usually quick in answering questions, paused and made several false starts before giving his response.</p> <p>“We all watch in horror and consternation at what is going on in the United States,” he said.</p> <p>“It is a time to pull people together… but it is a time to listen. It is a time to learn, when injustices continue despite progress over years and decades.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">‘We all watch in horror and consternation what's going on in the United States,’ said Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, reacting to U.S. federal police removing protesters from outside the White House. Follow our live updates here: <a href="https://t.co/8f7EFQVqWs">https://t.co/8f7EFQVqWs</a> <a href="https://t.co/gwuibxOa3o">pic.twitter.com/gwuibxOa3o</a></p> — Reuters (@Reuters) <a href="https://twitter.com/Reuters/status/1267902555176292353?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 2, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Trudeau went on to talk about the need to fight racism in Canada.</p> <p>“It is a time for us as Canadians to recognize that we, too, have our challenges – that black Canadians and racialized Canadians face discrimination as a lived reality every single day,” he said.</p> <p>On Monday, police forcibly removed several thousands of peaceful protesters from Lafayette Square across the White House ahead of Trump’s visit to St John’s Episcopal Church.</p> <p>In his speech in the Rose Garden, Trump declared he would be a “law and order president” as tear gas guns were fired in the background.</p> <p>He said if state governors refuse to deploy the National Guard to “dominate the streets”, he would call on the military to “quickly solve the problem for them”.</p> <p>Protests have taken place across the US after 46-year-old Floyd died in custody on May 25, when officers responded to a call from a grocery store claiming he had used a forged $20 bill.</p> <p>A video shows police officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd’s neck, pinning him down for more than eight minutes, while three other officers watched as Floyd pleaded that he could not breathe.</p>

News

Placeholder Content Image

World erupts in protest following George Floyd murder

<p><span>The world has refused to stand still after watching in horror as US citizens took to the streets to protest the vicious death of George Floyd, a black man who died when a white police officer pressed his knee into his neck until he could no longer breathe.</span><br /><br /><span>The civil unrest came to its breaking point this week after a number of deaths left Americans feeling helpless.</span></p> <p><span>Floyd's death on May 25 in Minneapolis was the latest in a series of deaths of black men and women at the hands of police in the US.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3thNJA07j/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3thNJA07j/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by george floyd justice (@georgefloydjustise)</a> on May 31, 2020 at 4:23pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>Protestors gathered together in central London on Sunday to offer support to all the American demonstrators. They held signs including "No justice! No peace!" and waving placards with the words "How many more?" at Trafalgar Square.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836306/trafalgar-square-central-london.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/efba07d54d354c25a1c68d8b839982d2" /><em>Trafalgar Square, Central London</em><br /><br /><span>Protestors then marched to the US Embassy, where a long line of officers surrounded the building.</span><br /><br /><span>Protesters in Denmark also converged on the US Embassy on Sunday carrying placards with messages including “Stop Killing Black People”.</span><br /><br /><span>Several hundred more people took to the streets on Sunday in the capital's Kreuzberg of Berlin, Germany with signs saying "Silence is Violence," "Hold Cops Accountable," and "Who Do You Call When Police Murder?"</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836307/copenhagan.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7bb215669d644ad5bdd3ce11ab61eebe" /></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><em>Copenhagan, Denmark</em><br /><span>In Italy, the Corriere della Sera newspaper's senior US correspondent Massimo Gaggi said that the reaction to Floyd's killing was "different" than other cases of black Americans killed by police and the ensuing violence.</span><br /><br /><span>"There are exasperated black movements that no longer preach nonviolent resistance," Gaggi wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>He went on to note that the Minnesota governor is warning that "anarchist and white supremacy groups are trying to fuel the chaos.''</span><br /><br /><span>Russia denounced Floyd’s death as the latest murder in a series of police violence cases against African American people. The country has accused the United States of "systemic problems in the human rights sphere.''</span><br /><br /><span>"This incident is far from the first in a series of lawless conduct and unjustified violence from US law enforcement,'' the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.</span><br /><br /><span>"American police commit such high-profile crimes all too often.''</span></p>

News

Placeholder Content Image

“Sorry, not sorry”: Wedding videographer refuses to issue refund after bride-to-be dies

<p>A man who lost his fiancée in a car crash has been threatened with a lawsuit after he requested a refund from the wedding videography company the couple had hired.</p> <p>Justin Montney, 24, was forced to cancel his May wedding after his 22-year-old bride-to-be Alexis-Athena Wyatt died in February.</p> <p>Montney said the Texas, US-based videography company Copper Stallion Media refused to refund his US$1,800 deposit, saying it was non-refundable.</p> <p>The man told <em><a href="https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/skbaer/wedding-videographer-refuses-refund-fiance-death">Buzzfeed News</a> </em>he reached out to the company again last week, informing them he planned to share the dispute on social media. The company threatened to sue him and Wyatt’s family in response to a review her mother wrote on wedding website The Knot.</p> <p>“They should have been able to [issue a refund] because they didn’t render any services,” Montney told KRDO-TV.</p> <p>He said the company offered to extend their service to his next wedding, which was “a very a very insensitive thing to tell me”.</p> <p>Montney said other vendors did not hesitate to refund their money after learning about Wyatt’s death. “They obviously felt terrible for what had happened,” he said.</p> <p>After Montney went public with his experience, Copper Stallion Media created a website using Montney’s name – JustinMontney.com – to rebut his claims, accusing him of driving a “smear campaign”.</p> <p>“We understand a death occurred, but it’s not right for people to turn to the internet and sodomize the reputation of a company,” read the text, which has since been removed on the website.</p> <p>“He could have quietly filed a small claim to ‘try’ to recoup the non-refundable deposit. Instead, he chose the internet to shake us down.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836261/jm2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/42c8a0c6a3154718a7ebc539453dc355" /></p> <p>On May 23, the company posted a photo of the couple with the caption: “Today would have been the day where we would have filmed Justin and Alexis’ wedding in Colorado Springs.</p> <p>“After what Justin pulled with the media stunt to try and shake us down for a refund, we hope you sob and cry all day for what would have been your wedding day.</p> <p>“Sorry, not sorry.”</p> <p>Copper Stallion Media has since shut down their pages on Facebook and The Knot.</p> <p>Videographer Alex Murphy, who used to work for the company, told <em><a href="https://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/contact7/wedding-videographer-refuses-to-provide-refund-after-brides-death-harasses-her-family">The Denver Channel</a></em> he left because they refused to pay him.</p> <p>He said his final paycheck came from Las Vegas-registered company Organized Weddings LLC, which is associated with a man named Jesse J Clark.</p> <p>Clark was sued by Massachusetts’ attorney general in 2013 for defrauding 90 couples by accepting payments and failing to provide their wedding videos, according to the <em><a href="https://www.telegram.com/article/20130426/NEWS/104269782">Telegram &amp; Gazette</a></em>.</p>

News

Travel

Placeholder Content Image

Climate change is the most important mission for universities of the 21st century

<p>Universities are confronting the possibility of <a href="https://melbourne-cshe.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/3392469/Australian-Universities-COVID-19-Financial-Management.pdf">profound sector-wide transformation</a> due to the continuing effects of COVID-19. It is prompting much needed debate about what such transformation should look like and what kind of system is in the public interest.</p> <p>This is now an urgent conversation. If universities want a say in what the future of higher education will look like, they will need to generate ideas quickly and in a way that attracts wide public support.</p> <p>This will involve articulating their unique role as embedded, future-regarding, ethical generators of crucial knowledge and skills, well-equipped to handle coming contingencies and helping others do the same.</p> <p>And this means higher education changes are entangled with another major force for transformation – climate change.</p> <p>How can universities credibly claim to be preparing young people for their futures, or to be working with employers, if they do not take into account the kind of world they are helping to bring about?</p> <p><strong>A vital role in a climate changed world</strong></p> <p>Whether indexed by the continual climb in <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/heat-and-humidity-are-already-reaching-the-limits-of-human-tolerance/">extreme heat and humidity</a>, the <a href="http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/">melting of Arctic ice</a>, the eruption of <a href="https://www.science.org.au/news-and-events/news-and-media-releases/australian-bushfires-why-they-are-unprecedented">unprecedented mega-fire events</a> or the <a href="https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/blog/2019/05/nature-decline-unprecedented-report/">rapid degradation of ecosystems</a> and <a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/05/26/2008198117">disruption of human settlements</a>, climate change is here.</p> <p>It is rapidly exacerbating environmental and social stress across the globe, as well as directly and indirectly impacting all institutions and areas of life. And worse still, global greenhouse gas concentrations are moving in exactly the opposite direction to what we need, with <a href="https://www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/energy-economics/statistical-review-of-world-energy.html">carbon emissions growing by 2.0% in 2019, the fastest growth for seven years</a>.</p> <p>Much-needed transitions towards low carbon and well-adapted systems are emerging. But they are too piecemeal and slow relative to what is needed to avoid large scale <a href="https://www.deepsouthchallenge.co.nz/projects/climate-change-cascade-effect">cascading</a> and <a href="https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/resources/compound-costs-how-climate-change-damages-australias-economy/">compounding impacts to our planet</a>.</p> <p>Universities, along with all other parts of our society, will feel the effects of climate change. The cost of the devastation at the Australian National University due to the summer’s fires and hailstorm, for instance, is estimated to <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-27/coronavirus-hail-bushfires-cause-225m-loss-at-anu/12290522">be A$75 million dollars</a>.</p> <p>Failure to appropriately adapt to the increasing likelihood of such events <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-020-0715-2">threatens to undermine research of all sorts</a>.</p> <p>Whether due to climate impacts (such as <a href="https://www.mprnews.org/story/2018/09/06/npr-coastal-labs-studying-increased-flooding-consider-moving-due-to-increased-floodin">the effects of sea level rise on coastal laboratories</a>) or policy and market shifts away from carbon-intensive activities (such as coal powered energy), research investments face the risk of becoming <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-stranded-assets-matter-and-should-not-be-dismissed-51939">stranded assets</a>. Not only could expensive infrastructure and equipment be rendered redundant, but certain skills, capabilities and projects could too.</p> <p>Universities are key to enabling Australian society to transition to a safer and lower emissions pathway. They are needed to provide the knowledge, skills and technologies for this positive transition. And they are also needed to <a href="https://climateoutreach.org/system-change-vs-behaviour-change-is-a-false-choice-covid-19-shows-how-theyre-connected/">foster the social dialogue and build the broad public mandate</a> to get there.</p> <p>This means old ideas of universities as isolated and values-free zones, and newer notions of them as cheap consultants to the private sector, fundamentally fail to fulfil the role universities now need to play.</p> <p>They must become public good, mission-driven organisations devoted to rapidly progressing human understanding and action on the largest threat there has ever been, to what they are taken to represent and advance – human civilisation.</p> <p><strong>Universities must become more sustainable…</strong></p> <p>Inaction will erode the trust on which universities rely, especially among the key constituencies universities are meant to serve – young people and the private, community and public sectors.</p> <p><a href="https://globalclimatestrike.net/">Students</a>, <a href="https://www.asyousow.org/report/clean200-2019-q1">businesses</a>, <a href="https://en.unesco.org/events/climate-change-and-ngos-eight-international-forum-ngos-official-partnership-unesco">not-for-profit organisations</a> and certain <a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/09/climate-change-report-card-co2-emissions/">governments</a> are already acting far more forcefully than universities, even as the latter claim to be intellectual leaders.</p> <p>Who universities invest in, fund, partner with and teach, and how, will increasingly be judged through a climate change lens. All actors in the fossil fuel value chain – including <a href="https://www.marketforces.org.au/marsh-mclennan-present-greenwash-at-agm/">insurance brokers</a> and <a href="https://gofossilfree.org/australia/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/2017/09/ExposeTheTies_digital.pdf?_ga=2.89096216.248025022.1590905170-1969762787.1590905170">researchers</a> – are coming under pressure to stop facilitating a form of production that enriches a few while endangering all.</p> <p>Networks such as the <a href="https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/04/03/universities-form-global-network-climate-change">International Universities Climate Alliance</a>, the <a href="http://www.gauc.net/about/about.html">Global Alliance of Universities on Climate</a> and <a href="https://www.acts.asn.au/">Australasian Campuses Towards Sustainability</a> are pushing for change in and by the sector.</p> <p>In 2019, <a href="https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=20190710141435609">three global university networks organised an open letter</a> signed by more than 7,000 higher and further education institutions. It called for the sector to reduce emissions and invest in climate change research, teaching and outreach. Even more have signed the <a href="https://www.sdgaccord.org/climateletter">SDG (sustainable development goals) Accord’s climate emergency declaration</a>, which calls for:</p> <ul> <li>mobilising more resources for action-oriented climate change research and skills creation</li> <li>committing to going carbon neutral by 2030 or 2050 at the very latest</li> <li>increasing the delivery of environmental and sustainability education across curriculum, campus and community outreach programs.</li> </ul> <p>Some universities are already starting to build aspects of climate change into their operations. Most prominent have been efforts to divest university finances from direct support of fossil fuels. While some institutions are still dragging their feet, the University of California has announced it will <a href="https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-05-19/uc-fossil-fuel-divest-climate-change">fully divest </a> its US$126 billion endowment from fossil fuels.</p> <p>Pressure is similarly growing for <a href="https://unisuperdivest.org/">Unisuper to stop investing</a> Australian university staff superannuation into corporations that endanger the very future staff are saving for.</p> <p>University campuses are being refigured as sites of energy production and consumption. <a href="https://www.strathmore.edu/serc/">Strathmore University in Kenya </a>and <a href="https://www.rmit.edu.au/news/all-news/2019/nov/rmit-leads-the-way-on-renewable-energy">RMIT University in Australia</a> are among those who produce their own renewable energy.</p> <p>Although <a href="https://theconversation.com/australias-universities-are-not-walking-the-talk-on-going-low-carbon-72411">few universities are working towards absolute reductions in emissions</a>, or have appropriate climate adaptation plans, initiatives such as the <a href="https://www.timeshighereducation.com/student/best-universities/top-universities-climate-action">Times Higher Education Impact Index</a> are increasing interest in visible climate action.</p> <p><strong>… and they must change teaching and research</strong></p> <p>Teaching and research too must change. University students can <a href="https://study.curtin.edu.au/offering/course-pg-masters-of-environment-and-climate-emergency--mc-envclm/">choose programs and optional modules dedicated to climate change</a>. But this isn’t enough. Climate change has to be integrated in all disciplines.</p> <p>It is essential universities do not quarantine climate change as some kind of specialist topic. A <a href="https://journals.aom.org/doi/full/10.5465/amp.2018.0183.summary">recent analysis of management studies</a> found a profound lack of engagement across the discipline with the implications of climate change.</p> <p>As Cornell University’s Professor of Engineering Anthony Ingraffea argues, when it comes to educating the future generation, <a href="https://www.enr.com/articles/48389-a-call-to-action-for-engineers-on-climate-change">“doing the right thing on climate change should be baked into an engineer’s DNA”</a>.</p> <p>This means recognising the strong overlap between work that has instrumental value for climate change action and work that celebrates the intrinsic value of human understanding. The intellectual and social challenges presented by climate change are perhaps the greatest justification yet for why we need open-minded, open-ended exploration and dialogue of the sort universities can provide.</p> <p>Universities produce the knowledge galvanising others to act. It is time for them to act too. It is time for all of us who work in or with universities to reappraise our institutions in light of the changes needed, the changes coming, and the changes already here.</p> <p>This is the public mission of universities in the 21st century. And it is the most pressing mission there is.</p> <p><em>Written by Lauren Richards and Tamson Pietsch. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/climate-change-is-the-most-important-mission-for-universities-of-the-21st-century-139214"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

Cruising

Placeholder Content Image

Prince Harry wants to “return” to role after resigning as senior royal

<p>Prince Harry is reportedly interested in returning to a role he had to relinquish after stepping down as a senior member of the British royal family.</p> <p>The Duke of Sussex wanted to return to his role as the Captain General Royal Marines, a former soldier and friend has claimed.</p> <p>“He simply said he misses his role with the Marines and would like one day to return to the appointment,” the unnamed former Invictus Games soldier told <em><a href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/prince-harry-misses-role-ceremonial-22128440">The Mirror</a></em>.</p> <p>The conversation took place shortly after lockdown began, the outlet reported.</p> <p>Another military source said Harry’s departure was a “shock” to his colleagues.</p> <p>“Harry was a breath of fresh air, the lads could relate to him and he was a very popular figure who took a keen interest in his job,” the source said.</p> <p>Harry, who took over the ceremonial head role from Prince Philip in December 2017, left the appointment on March 31, his final day as a working member of the royal family.</p> <p>He also lost his positions as Honorary Air Commandant Royal Air Force Honington and Commodore-in-Chief of Small Ships and Diving, while retaining his rank of Major and honorary ranks of Lieutenant Commander and Squadron Leader.</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s new roles would be reviewed in 12 months’ time.</p> <p>The Sussexes’ website stated: “During this 12-month period of review, The Duke’s official military appointments will not be used as they are in the gift of the Sovereign. No new appointments will be made to fill these roles before the 12-month review of the new arrangements is completed.”</p> <p>Harry’s military service began in 2005. He attended the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst for training before being commissioned into the Blues and Royals cavalry regiment.</p> <p>He also completed two tours in Afghanistan, for which he was awarded an Operational Service Medal.</p> <p>Harry and Meghan are now residing in California in the US.</p>

International Travel

Placeholder Content Image

Four countries offering incredible coronavirus travel deals

<p>With many industries being hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, it appears that the tourism industry is no exception. Although non-essential travel is currently prohibited, countries around the world are getting ready for visitors to appear on their shores this summer.</p> <p>In an impressive effort to entice tourists, some countries are offering discount vouchers for spas, museums and theme parks. Others are offering free hotel stays. Here are four countries that are offering incentives to travel there.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA4YKXAnewW/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA4YKXAnewW/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Discover our Sicily (@_discoveringsicily_)</a> on May 31, 2020 at 10:34pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>1.</strong><span> </span><strong>Sicily, Italy</strong></p> <p>The small southern Italian island has announced that the country is offering to pay half of visitors’ flight costs and a third of hotel expenses to entice tourists to return after the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>There are also free tickets being offered to many of the museums on the island as well as free tickets to archaeological sites.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7rZVtnJpFK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B7rZVtnJpFK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Iceland Naturally (@icelandnatural)</a> on Jan 23, 2020 at 1:57pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>2.</strong><span> </span><strong>Iceland</strong></p> <p>Iceland has a plan to entice tourists by offering travellers free COVID-19 tests upon arrival at the airport. If you test negative, you’re free to enjoy your time in the country. If not, you’re required to self-isolate for 14 days.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.insider.com/all-places-offering-discounts-freebies-incentives-entice-tourists-post-coronavirus-2020-6#iceland-free-coronavirus-tests-5" target="_blank"><em>Insider</em></a><span> </span>is aware that the new border process is still being finalised, so it’s not known whether the tests will remain free for an initial two week trial period or beyond that.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_qKxMqJu6p/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_qKxMqJu6p/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Cancun (@cancun)</a> on May 1, 2020 at 1:36pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>3.</strong><span> </span><strong>Cancun, Mexico</strong></p> <p>Mexico is very keen to welcome back tourists from mid-June, as a new tourism campaign called #Come2MexicanCaribbean or #VenAlCaribeMexicanoX2 has been launched. The campaign boasts a lot of perks for tourists.</p> <p>Some of these perks include two free nights for every two nights paid by guests, two free days of car rentals for every two days paid for, free stays for up to two children when two adults book as well as 20 per cent off at participating theme parks, golf courses and spas.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_6oFguD4Rk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_6oFguD4Rk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Visit Cyprus (@visitcypruscom)</a> on May 7, 2020 at 11:00pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>4.</strong><span> </span><strong>Cyprus</strong></p> <p>Cyprus is also being generous with their highly anticipated tourists, as the country has promised to cover the costs of tourists who fall ill with COVID-19 while visiting.</p> <p>Authorities of the island have said that they will pay for any accommodation, food and medicine used by patients and their families if any tourists test positive for the virus.</p>

International Travel

Placeholder Content Image

Turn off the porch light: 6 easy ways to stop light pollution from harming our wildlife

<p>As winter approaches, marine turtle nesting in the far north of Australia <a href="https://www.environment.gov.au/system/files/resources/2eb379de-931b-4547-8bcc-f96c73065f54/files/national-light-pollution-guidelines-wildlife.pdf">will peak</a>. When these baby turtles hatch at night, they crawl from the sand to the sea, using the relative brightness of the horizon and the natural slope of the beach as their guide.</p> <p>But when artificial lights outshine the moon and the sea, these hatchlings become disorientated. This leaves them vulnerable to predators, exhaustion and even traffic if they head in the wrong direction.</p> <p>Baby turtles are one small part of the larger, often overlooked, story of how light pollution harms wildlife across the <a href="https://theconversation.com/getting-smarter-about-city-lights-is-good-for-us-and-nature-too-69556">land</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/bright-city-lights-are-keeping-ocean-predators-awake-and-hungry-68965">underwater</a>.</p> <p>Green Turtle’s Battle For Survival | Planet Earth | BBC Earth.</p> <p>Today, more than 80% of people – and 99% of North American and European human populations – <a href="https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/6/e1600377">live under light-polluted skies</a>. We have transformed the night-time environment over substantial portions of the Earth’s surface in a very short time, relative to evolutionary timescales. Most wildlife hasn’t had time to adjust.</p> <p>In January, Australia released the <a href="https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/publications/national-light-pollution-guidelines-wildlife">National Light Pollution Guidelines for Wildlife</a>. These guidelines provide a framework for assessing and managing the impacts of artificial light.</p> <p>The guidelines also identify practical solutions that can be used globally to manage light pollution, both by managers and practitioners, and by anyone in control of a light switch.</p> <p>The guidelines outline six easy steps anyone can follow to minimise light pollution without compromising our own safety.</p> <p>Although light pollution is a global problem and true darkness is hard to come by, we can all do our part to reduce its impacts on wildlife by changing how we use and think about light at night.</p> <p><strong>1. Start with natural darkness. Only add light for a specific purpose</strong></p> <p>Natural darkness should be the default at night. Artificial light should only be used if it’s needed for a specific purpose, and it should only be turned on for the necessary period of time.</p> <p>This means it’s okay to have your veranda light on to help you find your keys, but the light doesn’t need to stay on all night.</p> <p>Similarly, indoor lighting can also contribute to light pollution, so turning lights off in empty office buildings at night, or in your home before you go to sleep, is also important.</p> <p><strong>2. Use smart lighting controls</strong></p> <p>Advances in smart control technology make it easy to manage how much light you use, and adaptive controls make meeting the goals of Step 1 more feasible.</p> <p>Investing in smart controls and LED technology means you can remotely manage your lights, set timers or dimmers, activate motion sensor lighting, and even control the colour of the light emitted.</p> <p>These smart controls should be used to activate artificial light at night only when needed, and to minimise light when not needed.</p> <p><strong>3. Keep lights close to the ground, directed and shielded</strong></p> <p>Any light that spills outside the specific area intended to be lit is unnecessary light.</p> <p>Light spilling upward contributes directly to artificial sky glow – the glow you see over urban areas from cumulative sources of light. Both sky glow and light spilling into adjacent areas on the ground can disrupt wildlife.</p> <p>Installing <a href="https://www.ledlightexpert.com/Light-Shields-Explained--Outdoor-Parking-Lot-Light-Shielding_b_42.html">light shields</a> allow you to direct the light downward, which significantly reduces sky glow, and to direct the light towards the specific target area. Light shields are recommended for any outdoor lighting installations.</p> <p><strong>4. Use the lowest intensity lighting</strong></p> <p>When deciding how much light you need, consider the intensity of the light produced (lumens), rather than the energy required to make it (watts).</p> <p>LEDs, for example, are often considered an “environmentally friendly” option because they’re relatively energy efficient. But because of their energy efficiency, LEDs produce between two and five times as much light as incandescent bulbs for the same amount of energy consumption.</p> <p>So, while LED lights save energy, the increased intensity of the light can lead to greater impacts on wildlife, if not managed properly.</p> <p><strong>5. Use non-reflective, dark-coloured surfaces.</strong></p> <p>Sky glow has been shown to <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/srep01722">mask lunar light rhythms</a> of wildlife, interfering with the celestial navigation and migration of <a href="https://science.sciencemag.org/content/313/5788/837">birds</a> and <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/424033a">insects</a>.</p> <p>Highly polished, shiny, or light-coloured surfaces – such as structures painted white, or polished marble – are good at reflecting light and so contribute more to sky glow than darker, non-reflective surfaces.</p> <p>Choosing darker coloured paint or materials for outdoor features will help reduce your contribution to light pollution.</p> <p><strong>6. Use lights with reduced or filtered blue, violet and ultra-violet wavelengths</strong></p> <p>Most animals are sensitive to short-wavelength light, which creates blue and violet colours. These short wavelengths are known to suppress melatonin production, which is known to disrupt sleep and interfere with circadian rhythms of many animals, <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/11/22/6400/htm">including humans</a>.</p> <p>Choosing lighting options with little or no short wavelength (400-500 nanometres) violet or blue light will help to avoid unintended harmful effects on wildlife.</p> <p>For example, compact fluorescent and LED lights have a high amount of short wavelength light, compared low or high-pressure sodium, metal halide, and halogen light sources.</p> <p><em>Written by Emily fobert, Katherine Dafforn and Mariana Mayer-Pinto. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/turn-off-the-porch-light-6-easy-ways-to-stop-light-pollution-from-harming-our-wildlife-132595">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

Cruising

Health

Placeholder Content Image

Why Prince William warns not to call healthcare workers “heroes”

<p>Prince William has cautioned against calling health care workers “heroes” amid the coronavirus outbreak, saying it might put undue pressure on those working on the frontline to appear “strong” and deter them from seeking support.</p> <p>In an appearance on the BBC’s <em>One Show</em>, the Duke of Cambridge said some hospital staff and care workers he chatted with through video calls found it difficult to talk about their problems.</p> <p>“I think we’ve got to be very careful with the language that we use,” William said.</p> <p>“[Healthcare workers] should rightly be hailed as superstars, and brave, and wonderful staff – but I’m very conscious from a mental health point of view that we don’t alienate some of them.”</p> <p>The “hero” label might lead healthcare staff to believe they have to be “this strong pillar of strength” and prevent them from asking for mental health support, the duke said.</p> <p>He urged the United Kingdom’s National Health Service workers to look after themselves so that they could emerge from the pandemic “in one piece”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAvkP3oFEMq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAvkP3oFEMq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (@kensingtonroyal)</a> on May 28, 2020 at 12:26pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>William’s comments came ahead of the airing of the documentary <em>Football, Prince William and Our Mental Health</em>, where the royal discussed why “it’s OK to not be OK”.</p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Mummy blogger who "rehomed" adopted autistic son speaks out after backlash

<p><span>The mummy blogger who “rehomed” her adopted son has been dumped by multiple brand deals after receiving huge backlash for the decision.</span></p> <p><span>Myka Stauffer was heavily criticised after revealing she and husband James had given up their son Huxley, four.</span></p> <p><span>The couple said the decision came after discovering he had “medical needs” that they weren’t aware of when they adopted him from China in 2017.</span></p> <p><span>Soon after justifying their decision, Stauffer defended their decision, saying her former son – who has autism and is non-verbal – “wanted” a new home and hinted at problems between him and their four other kids. </span></p> <p><span>Now, many brands have chosen to drop Stauffer.</span></p> <p><span>Stauffer who has a following of 162,000 on Instagram and 700,000 on YouTube, had formed partnerships with big-name companies like Big Lots, TJ Maxx and Danimals yoghurt.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4S4hBJgwI_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4S4hBJgwI_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">My favorite Starbucks barista 🧜🏻‍♀️☕️ You hold such a special place in my heart sweet boy! 💚#happyhalloween #halloween2019 #halloweencostume</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/mykastauffer/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Myka Stauffer</a> (@mykastauffer) on Oct 31, 2019 at 12:54pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span>But according to </span><em>People</em><span>, many have dumped the mummy blogger over the incident.</span></p> <p><span>Stauffer hit a second wave of backlash when she responded to a critic in the comments section of her video titled “an update on our family”.</span></p> <p><span>“We would never just give up a child with special needs, this is a personal matter to Hux. It had nothing to do with he just had Autism,” Stauffer wrote, defending the backlash.</span></p> <p><span>“Multiple scary things happened inside the home towards our other children, and if these events happened with one of my biological kids, after all the help and after the behaviours we witnessed sadly we would have no other choice then to seek help and get their needs met.”</span></p> <p><span>She goes on to say Huxley “wanted this decision 100%” explaining she “saw” it when he was with his new “family” as the child was not able to communicate with speech.</span></p> <p><span>“He constantly chose them and signed and showed tons of emotion to show us and let us know he wanted this,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>However, not many were convinced, branding the defence as “disgusting”.</span></p> <p><span>“Oh yes. Non-verbal Huxley told you I don’t want to live with you guys no more send me to these strangers so that I can be traumatised even more in my little life,” one wrote.</span></p> <p><span>“It’s so disgusting. Why adopt a child you knew was going to have problems just to toss them away?” another said.</span></p> <p><span>“OMG she’s so delusional,” one scoffed.</span></p> <p><span>While one said: “Obviously having a child with disabilities is incredibly challenging and can certainly present difficulties with other children but to say that this kid is some kind of sinister, dangerous figure is so irresponsible.”</span></p> <p><span>Some of Stauffer’s subscribers accused her of using Huxley solely to gain a bigger following and earn more money on her YouTube channel.</span></p> <p><span>Some declared the decision “awful” for both Huxley and the pair’s four other children: Kova, Jaka, Radley and Onyx.</span></p> <p><span>“@MykaStauffer adopted an autistic child from China and after years of having him, she gave him up for adoption because he had ‘bad behaviour’ after using him for $$$ on her YouTube channel,” wrote one user.</span></p> <p><span>“What Myka Stauffer and her husband did is awful. You don’t just give a child back … “ one tweeted.</span></p> <p><span>“She adopted a child for views and then got rid of him and treated him like a brand deal,” another said.</span></p> <p><span>There are even calls to have the family’s sponsors pulled, with angry internet justice seekers calling to #cancelstauffers.</span></p> <p><span>In the video where the Stauffer’s talk about “rehoming” Huxley, the pair said the child had autism and brain damage.</span></p> <p><span>“Numerous medical professionals have felt that he needed a different fit. He needed more,” Stauffer says while fighting back tears in the video filmed in the couple’s bed.</span></p> <p><span>She added that an adoption agency had helped place Huxley with his “forever family.”</span></p> <p><span>“He’s thriving, he’s doing really well, and his new mummy has medical, professional training,” she added.</span></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

The potato trick to help get rid of neck pain and migraines

<p>An expert has revealed an unlikely item that serves to relieve neck pain and migraines.</p> <p>Those dealing with neck stiffness could use humble potatoes to treat themselves, said Stephen Makinde, the clinical director of Perfect Balance Clinic in London.</p> <p>“We’ve seen an increase in the number of clients with neck problems and migraines associated with neck stiffness since the start of the coronavirus lockdown,” Makinde told the <em><a href="https://www.dailystar.co.uk/health/bizarre-baking-potato-trick-could-22096583">Daily Star</a></em>.</p> <p>The problem could be attributed to increased use of electronic devices during the pandemic, which affects the upper back, he said.</p> <p>“If you are looking down, which you do when working on a laptop, what tends to happen is the head starts to hang forward and that puts a lot of strain on the upper back,” he said.</p> <p>“This can often cause a burning sensation in the trapezius muscles and affects other muscles in the neck, the spine and the nerves.”</p> <p>Makinde said lying down with tennis balls placed underneath the back of the head can help loosen muscles, release tension and help “reset the neck position”.</p> <p>“Tennis balls are really useful for this, but most people don’t have tennis balls at home,” he said.</p> <p>“So baking potatoes work well, too. You just sellotape them together and lie down flat, with the potatoes placed underneath the back of your head.</p> <p>“This is a really easy and useful thing people can do at home to release their neck tension and the pressure around there themselves.”</p> <p>In an interview with <em><a href="https://7news.com.au/sunrise/on-the-show/coronavirus-australia-how-to-prevent-back-and-neck-pain-when-working-from-home-c-1059473">Sunrise</a></em>, Australian Chiropractors Association President Dr Anthony Coxon also recommended getting up and moving every half an hour as well as increasing the height of the screens we are using.</p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Could taking hydroxychloroquine for coronavirus be more harmful than helpful?

<p>A <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)31180-6/fulltext">paper published in <em>The Lancet</em></a> has cast fresh controversy on the use of the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a potential treatment for COVID-19.</p> <p>The study’s authors reported they were “unable to confirm a benefit” of using the drug, while also finding COVID-19 patients in hospital treated with hydroxychloroquine were more likely to die or suffer life-threatening heart rhythm complications.</p> <p>The publication prompted the World Health Organisation to <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-26/who-pauses-trial-of-hydroxychloroquine-for-coronavirus-patients/12285652">suspend its testing of hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19</a>, while a <a href="https://www.ascot-trial.edu.au/blogs/news/statement-on-the-status-of-australasian-covid-19-trial-ascot">similar Australian trial</a> has paused recruitment.</p> <p><strong>A bit of background</strong></p> <p>Hydroxychloroquine has been used since the 1940s to treat malaria, but has been making headlines as a <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/media/hydroxychloroquine-and-covid-19">potential treatment for COVID-19</a>. US President Donald Trump recently declared <a href="https://theconversation.com/donald-trump-is-taking-hydroxychloroquine-to-ward-off-covid-19-is-that-wise-139031">he was taking it daily</a>, while Australian businessman and politician Clive Palmer <a href="https://www.sbs.com.au/news/the-feed/clive-palmer-has-bought-30-million-doses-of-an-anti-malaria-drug-to-fight-covid-19-but-experts-warn-this-may-not-be-the-cure-all">pledged to create a national stockpile</a> of the drug.</p> <p>The drug alters the human immune system (it’s an <a href="https://www.nps.org.au/hcq-and-covid-19">immunomodulator, not an immunosuppressant</a>) and has an important role in helping people with rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.</p> <p>It does have a range of serious <a href="https://www.tga.gov.au/alert/new-restrictions-prescribing-hydroxychloroquine-covid-19">possible side-effects</a>, including eye damage and altered heart rhythm, which require monitoring.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41421-020-0156-0">Laboratory studies</a> suggest hydroxychloroquine may disrupt replication of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19. It’s also possible hydroxychloroquine could reduce “<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7161506/">cytokine storm</a>” – the catastrophic immune system overreaction that happens in some people with severe COVID-19.</p> <p>A huge global effort is underway to investigate whether hydroxychloroquine is safe and effective for preventing or treating COVID-19, especially to improve recovery and reduce the risk of death. Previous studies have been inconclusive as they were anecdotal, observational or small randomised trials.</p> <p>Doubts about hydroxychloroquine’s effectiveness have been increasing, with a large observational study from New York <a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2012410">showing it had no benefit</a> in treating people with COVID-19.</p> <p>The new <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)31180-6/fulltext"><em>Lancet</em> study</a>, published last week, has found it could increase the risk of death among COVID-19 patients in hospital. But there’s more to the story.</p> <p><strong>What did the new study do?</strong></p> <p>The <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)31180-6/fulltext"><em>Lancet</em> study</a> collected real-world data on more than 96,000 hospitalised patients with COVID-19 from more than 600 hospitals across six continents.</p> <p>About 15,000 patients were treated with hydroxychloroquine (or a closely related drug, chloroquine) alone or in combination with an antibiotic.</p> <p>Using a global registry the researchers investigated the safety of these treatments. They looked at whether people died in hospital, as well as the risk of developing life-threatening heart rhythm problems (called ventricular arrhythmias).</p> <p><strong>What did the study find?</strong></p> <p>Treatment with hydroxychloroquine was associated with increased rates of death in people with COVID-19, even after the researchers adjusted for other factors (age, other health conditions, suppressed immune system, smoking, and severity of the COVID-19 infection) that might increase the risk of death.</p> <p>About 18% of people who received hydroxychloroquine died in hospital, compared with 9% of people with COVID-19 who did not receive these treatments. The risk of death was even higher (24%) in people receiving hydroxychloroquine in combination with either of the antibiotics azithromycin or clarithromycin.</p> <p>Hydroxychloroquine (6%) and chloroquine (4%) treatment was also associated with more cases of dangerous heart rhythm problems when compared with untreated people with COVID-19 (0.3%).</p> <p>Any evidence of benefit, while not the focus of this study, was unclear.</p> <p><strong>How can we interpret the results?</strong></p> <p>This was an observational study, so it can only explore the association between treatments and death – rather than telling us hydroxychloroquine <em>caused</em> these patients to die.</p> <p>It is <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(20)31174-0/fulltext">unclear</a> why the death rate for patients treated with hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine was double that of those who weren’t, as the cause of death was not reported in this study.</p> <p>Importantly, the study cannot account for all the factors that might contribute to death in these hospitalised patients and how these factors interact with each other. However, the researchers did a good job of “<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3144483/">matching</a>” the characteristics of people who were receiving hydroxychloroquine with those who were not receiving the drug, which makes the results more reliable.</p> <p>But there may still be other factors, or medicines, that contributed to these findings. So there remains uncertainly about whether hydroxychloroquine causes, or even contributes to, the death of people with COVID-19.</p> <p>Further, it was not possible to have careful control over the hydroxychloroquine dose people received – or other medicines people might be taking such as antivirals or other medicines for heart conditions (which potentially interact in sick hospitalised patients).</p> <p>The average dose of hydroxychloroquine in this study was at the upper end of the regular recommended dose range for rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. But the wide range of hydroxychloroquine (and chloroquine) doses in this study makes interpretation of the findings difficult, especially when we know <a href="https://www1.racgp.org.au/ajgp/coronavirus/hydroxychloroquine-use-during-the-covid-19-pandemi">harmful effects</a> are associated with larger doses.</p> <p><strong>Broader implications</strong></p> <p>This study provides important information about the safety of hydroxychloroquine in treating vulnerable people with COVID-19 receiving hospital care.</p> <p>While the implications for using hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19 in the community or for prevention of COVID-19 remain unclear, if nothing else this study highlights the need to carefully monitor people receiving the drug.</p> <p>Some hydroxychloroquine trials are continuing, such as the very large <a href="https://www.recoverytrial.net/for-site-staff/site-staff/#alert">RECOVERY trial</a> in the UK.</p> <p>This new information must be considered when balancing harm and potential benefit of these trials and will likely result in renewed safety monitoring.</p> <p>We’ll need to see results from <a href="https://www.mja.com.au/journal/2020/clinical-trials-prevention-and-treatment-coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19-current">ongoing</a> high-quality randomised controlled trials to truly know if hydroxychloroquine is effective and safe in treating or preventing COVID-19.</p> <p>Further questions about what dose should be used, and which patients will benefit most, are topics under active investigation.</p> <p>You <a href="https://www.tga.gov.au/alert/new-restrictions-prescribing-hydroxychloroquine-covid-19">should not take hydroxychloroquine</a> for COVID-19 unless you’re part of a clinical trial. <strong>– Andrew McLachlan and Ric Day</strong></p> <p><strong>Blind peer review</strong></p> <p>This is a fair and reasonable review of the Lancet paper, its relationship to previous studies, and its impact on ongoing clinical trials.</p> <p>As stated in the review the Lancet article adds to the body of knowledge, including recent substantial studies in the <em><a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2012410">New England Journal of Medicine</a> </em>and the <em><a href="https://www.bmj.com/content/369/bmj.m1849">British Medical Journal</a></em>, that hydroxychloroquine is without significant effect in treatment trials.</p> <p>The high death rate is concerning but not unprecedented, given that a clinical trial in Brazil was <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2765499">halted</a> because of adverse effects on the heart. However, recent <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/may/28/questions-raised-over-hydroxychloroquine-study-which-caused-who-to-halt-trials-for-covid-19?CMP=share_btn_tw">media reports</a> suggest the data may have to be revised due to <a href="https://statmodeling.stat.columbia.edu/2020/05/25/hydroxychloroquine-update/">misclassification</a> of the participating hospitals. <strong>– Ian Musgrave</strong></p> <hr /> <p><em>Research Checks interrogate newly published studies and how they’re reported in the media. The analysis is undertaken by one or more academics not involved with the study, and reviewed by another, to make sure it’s accurate.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/139309/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/andrew-mclachlan-255312">Andrew McLachlan</a>, Head of School and Dean of Pharmacy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ric-day-14406">Ric Day</a>, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/unsw-1414">UNSW</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/could-taking-hydroxychloroquine-for-coronavirus-be-more-harmful-than-helpful-139309">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

Lifestyle

Placeholder Content Image

Are your grandkids using headphones more during the pandemic? Here’s how to protect their ears

<p>During the coronavirus pandemic, have your kids been using headphones more than usual? Maybe for remote schooling, video chats with relatives, or for their favourite music and Netflix shows?</p> <p>We have to be careful about both the volume and duration of headphone use. Listening too loudly or for too long can do permanent damage to hearing. The good news is there are ways to prevent long-term harm relatively easily.</p> <p><strong>Hearing loss in children may be increasing</strong></p> <p>Our hearing needs to be protected throughout life, because damage to hearing cannot be reversed. This is why we have workplace noise exposure <a href="https://www.worksafe.vic.gov.au/noise-safety-basics">standards and guidelines</a>, which tell workers when to use protection such as earplugs or ear defenders.</p> <p>Unfortunately though, hearing loss in children may be increasing. A <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30872125/?from_single_result=Prevalence+of+Childhood+Hearing+Loss+and+Secular+Trends%3A+A+Systematic+Review+and+Meta-Analysis&amp;expanded_search_query=Prevalence+of+Childhood+Hearing+Loss+and+Secular+Trends%3A+A+Systematic+Review+and+Meta-Analysis">study</a> from last year, in which both of us were involved, reviewed the hearing of more than 3.3 million children from 39 countries across a 20-year period.</p> <p>We found around 13% of children had measurable hearing loss by 18 years of age that may impact their ability to decipher sounds important for understanding speech. The study suggested hearing loss in kids is rising – but we don’t yet know why.</p> <p>Not many studies have examined whether headphone use is directly linked to hearing loss in children. But in one <a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaotolaryngology/article-abstract/2684510">study of 9-11-year-old Dutch children</a>, where 14% had measurable hearing loss, around 40% reported using portable music devices with headphones. Could headphones be contributing? Possibly, but unfortunately we don’t know for sure, and more studies are needed.</p> <p><strong>How do we know whether our children’s hearing is being affected?</strong></p> <p>Adults typically first notice a hearing problem by struggling to hear higher-pitched sounds clearly. Sounds may seem muffled, or the ears may feel “blocked”, or they may notice a ringing or buzzing sound, called tinnitus.</p> <p>Unlike adults, children won’t necessarily know how to describe these symptoms. Instead they may use terms they do know, like a bee buzzing, a whistle, or the wind blowing. Parents should treat any reported ear symptom as serious and get their child’s hearing tested. It’s best to visit a hearing clinic first, and then a GP if necessary, although this will depend on your location.</p> <p><strong>Excessive noise damages hearing</strong></p> <p>Our inner ear (cochlea) contains tiny hair cells, which change sounds we hear into electrical signals for our brain. These hair cells are finely tuned and are responsible for different pitches of sound, like keys on a piano.</p> <p>Exposure to loud noise can damage these hair cells and perhaps the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2812055/">nerve</a> that connects the cochlea to the brain. Repeated excessive noise exposure can lead to permanent hearing loss. Unfortunately, by the time someone experiences hearing problems, some irreversible damage has already happened.</p> <p><strong>What should we do to protect kids’ hearing?</strong></p> <p>The risk of hearing damage depends on both loudness and duration of sound exposure. Limiting both helps to reduce the risk of hearing damage.</p> <p><strong>Limiting loudness</strong></p> <p>We measure the loudness of sound in decibels (dB). But it’s important to note that the dB scale is logarithmic rather than linear. That means a 110dB sound (similar to a chainsaw) is actually much more than 10% louder than a 100dB sound. Parents can download free sound meter apps that help with understanding the volume of different environments and activities.</p> <p>A more difficult task for parents is monitoring the loudness within their children’s headphones. Some headphones leak sounds out, while others insulate the sound into the ear. So a child using “leaky” headphones at a safe volume may appear to be listening to sounds that are too loud, but a child with tightly sealed headphones could be playing sounds at potentially damaging levels without parents noticing.</p> <p>To understand their child’s specific usage, parents can:</p> <ul> <li><strong>listen to their child’s headphones</strong> to understand how loud sounds can become</li> <li>check to see if children can <strong>hear you talk at a normal volume from an arm’s length away</strong>, over the sounds playing on the headphones. If they can, their headphone use is more likely to be at a safe volume.</li> </ul> <p>There are headphones designed for children that limit the maximum loudness – usually to 85dB. While a limit is great, listening to 85dB sounds all day every day is not risk-free.</p> <p>Noise-cancelling headphones are another option, albeit expensive. By reducing the intrusion of outside noise, it should mean children can keep headphone volume lower.</p> <p><strong>Managing duration</strong></p> <p>We should also monitor how long we’re exposed to sound. Everyday conversation is around 60dB, which will not be a problem regardless of the duration of exposure. However, <a href="http://dangerousdecibels.org/education/information-center/decibel-exposure-time-guidelines/">guidelines</a> say we can be exposed an 85dB sound (like a rubbish truck) for up to 8 hours at a time. But if the loudness of the sound is increased by just 3 decibels to 88dB, the sound energy is doubled, and safe exposure time would drop to just 4 hours. Operating a chainsaw at 110dB would then be limited to around 1 minute before damage is likely to occur.</p> <p>Exposure to noise is cumulative. Noise can also come from other sources in the child’s environment. Consider a child’s activities throughout a day. Parents should try to avoid consecutive noisy exercises, like headphone use, music practice, then noisy toys or games. Considering the total “doses” of sound in the day means parents should schedule some breaks to allow the ears time to recover.</p> <p>Of course, parents should practise what they preach! Modelling responsible use of headphones and awareness of the enjoyment of being able to hear well into adulthood is key.</p> <p><em>Written by Pater Carew and Valerie Sung. </em><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/are-your-kids-using-headphones-more-during-the-pandemic-heres-how-to-protect-their-ears-139392"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

Beauty & Style

Placeholder Content Image

The breastfeeding debate with a major twist

<p>A woman has sparked an online debate after revealing that she breastfed her sister’s baby.</p> <p>In a post on <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.reddit.com/r/AmItheAsshole/comments/gvqkpx/aita_for_breastfeeding_my_sisters_baby_while_he/" target="_blank">Reddit</a>, the woman said she breastfed her sister’s five-month-old son while he was in her care.</p> <p>The sisters had their babies months apart, and both were still breastfeeding.</p> <p>“My sister had to go to an appointment in the hospital and because of all the Covid she didn’t want to take [her son] so she asked if I could care for him,” the woman said.</p> <p>She explained that her sister expressed a day’s worth of milk ahead of her appointment so that the baby could be bottle-fed.</p> <p>But she found a problem. “I fed sister’s baby the amount she said he could eat at each time, and he always seemed hungry still afterwards,” she said.</p> <p>“I tried my best to make the milk last but I was down to 6oz [177 mL] left and I wasn’t expecting my sister back for another 5 hours.”</p> <p>She decided her sister’s baby “just needed another nibble” and fed him from her breast.</p> <p>“I was feeding my baby already so I just put sister’s baby on my other boob,” she said. “Sister’s baby drank a little bit then fell asleep. The same thing happened a couple of hours later and again, I ran out of milk. My sister had been delayed with her procedure and wasn’t back yet so I just fed sister’s baby from the breast.”</p> <p>Her sister was enraged to learn about the breastfeeding upon her return home, describing the woman’s action as “disrespectful” and “crossing a line”.</p> <p>“She said it was so disrespectful and I should have given formula if it wasn’t enough. I would never give my kid formula if I could help it and I don’t have any in the house,” the woman reasoned.</p> <p>“I can see why she is upset, it’s a very personal thing to feed your baby, but I’m not a stranger, sister’s baby is my nephew and he was hungry.”</p> <p>Some criticised the woman in the comment section, saying the woman overstepped her sister’s boundaries.</p> <p>“You should have asked her permission first since you understand that it’s a very personal thing to do and went ahead with it anyway,” one wrote.</p> <p>Another user claiming to be a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurse commented: “A baby fed slightly less than it can take is not starving, and won’t be harmed. In fact, babies can be very poor judges of how much food they can take without spitting. As long as this baby was being given adequate fluid and calories across the span of the day, he was in no danger, and was far from starving.”</p> <p>However, others were more supportive of the woman, saying the infant needed to be fed.</p> <p>“If your sister didn’t express enough milk you can’t be expected to let the baby go hungry, that would be cruel. I think asking first would be better but women donate milk for premature babies all the time,” one chimed in.</p> <p>“She didn’t give you enough milk and no supplemental formula. What were you supposed to do... take two infants to the grocery store in the middle of a pandemic?” another added.</p>

Family & Pets

Placeholder Content Image

Grandma bans grandchild, 5, from visiting her home

<p>A shocked mum has lashed out at her husband’s family after the grandmother banned their five-year-old daughter from visiting.</p> <p>The reason for the ban is due to a nickname given to the grandchild by the grandmother.</p> <p>The couple’s daughter is named Collette, but her mother-in-law has given her a nickname called “Letters”.</p> <p>Mum admits that “it’s not the greatest nickname in the world”, but it hasn’t been a problem until now.</p> <p>Her daughter recently asked her mum why grandma calls her letters.</p> <p>“Why does grandma call me letters? My name is Colette," she said.</p> <p>Mum explained that it was a nickname, but Colette quickly decided that it was weird and didn’t like it being used.</p> <p>Mum took charge and politely said to Colette that she can asked to be called by her name if she doesn’t like the nickname.</p> <p>Shortly after the exchange, her husband took their daughter Colette to visit his family, but received an angry phone call from her mother-in-law after the visit.</p> <p>"She tells me that it was really rude for Colette to say she didn't like her nickname and that I shouldn't have told her to say that,” the mum explained.</p> <p>"She said I was raising her to be bratty. She also said that Colette couldn't come over until she apologised and says that she likes being called Letters."</p> <p>"That last part p***ed me off. I told her 'what the f***? You're banning a five-year-old from your house for not liking a stupid nickname'. Then I hung up on her."</p> <p>Asking if she had overreacted to what happened, one Reddit user was quick to defend her daughter’s choice.</p> <p>"Good for you for teaching your daughter to stand up for herself and for doubling down by standing up for her. MIL needs to apologise to the 5-year old for not respecting her name request,” one commenter said.</p> <p>A second commented: "Your daughter is being more mature than her."</p> <p>"I’m honestly just sort of in disbelief your mother-in-law could be old enough to be a grandma and act like that,” a third commenter said.</p>

Relationships

Placeholder Content Image

Queen Elizabeth makes her first appearance since leaving the public eye

<p><span>It has been a long while since fans have been able to see Her Majesty, but the royal has been spotted in public for the first time since coronavirus lockdown restrictions began in the United Kingdom. </span></p> <p><span>The Queen was photographed riding her 14-year-old Fell Pony, Balmoral Fern, within the grounds of her Windsor Castle residence. </span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">🐴 The Queen is pictured riding Fern - a 14 year old Fell Pony - in Windsor Home Park this weekend. <a href="https://t.co/z9DUnW9yB3">pic.twitter.com/z9DUnW9yB3</a></p> — The Royal Family (@RoyalFamily) <a href="https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily/status/1267207217515806729?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 31, 2020</a></blockquote> <p><span>The Windsor Grounds have long been a personal favourite of the Queen, who has been a passionate horse keeper and breeder of thoroughbred racehorses for many decades. </span></p> <p><span>A Buckingham Palace spokesperson said Her Majesty has enjoyed riding since childhood and has been actively involved with the welfare of the horses she owns for breeding, riding and racing.</span></p> <p><span>Her Majesty has not been spotted in public since when she was driven from Buckingham Palace in London to her Windsor Castle property. </span></p> <p><span>The royal has delayed all of her official duties but has been keeping up with her weekly audiences with the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson via phone call. </span></p> <p><span>The Queen has also made two televised addresses to the public to address concerns over the new virus lockdown.</span></p>

Family & Pets

Finance

Placeholder Content Image

George Floyd killing: All four police officers charged

<p><span>The former Minneapolis police officer who pressed his knee into the neck of George Floyd has had his charge upgraded to second-degree murder.</span></p> <p><span>The three other police officers present during the killing have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder.</span></p> <p><span>Derek Chauvin, the man at the forefront of the investigation, had previously been charged with third-degree murder.</span></p> <p><span>This is the first time police have announced any charges against the three officers who were present at the scene. They are now being taken into custody and will face the same potential maximum sentence as Chauvin.</span></p> <p><span>“We are working together on this case with only one goal — justice for George Floyd,” Minnesota Attorney-General Keith Ellison said at a media conference.</span></p> <p><span>He thanked the community for giving prosecutors “the time and space we needed” to investigate Mr Floyd’s death and settle on the correct charges.</span></p> <p><span>“I now ask for continued patience. This case continues to be under investigation. We will not be able to say very much publicly, except that we encourage anyone who believes they have evidence to come forward and be cooperative,” Mr Ellison said.</span></p> <p><span>“Our job is to seek justice and to obtain a conviction, not to make statements to the press.</span></p> <p><span>“I also ask for your trust that we are pursuing justice by every legal and ethical means available to us.</span></p> <p><span>“The investigation is ongoing, we are following the path of all the evidence, wherever it leads.”</span></p> <p><span>He said while prosecutors would aim to work as “quickly and thoroughly” as possible, it may take “months” to come to a conclusion.</span></p> <p><span>“The reason thoroughness is important is because every single link in the prosecutorial chain must be strong,” he said, pointing out that only once before has a police officer from Minnesota been successfully tried for murder.</span></p> <p><span>“Trying this case will not be an easy thing. Winning a conviction will be hard.</span></p> <p><span>“I say this not because we doubt our resources or our ability. In fact, we’re confident in what we’re doing. But history does show that there are clear challenges here.</span></p> <p><span>“It is better to make sure that we have a solid case, fully investigated, before we go to trial than to rush it.”</span></p> <p><span>Reporters asked why Chauvin wasn’t charged with the higher offence of first-degree murder, to which Mr Ellison explained that such a charge would require premeditation to be proven.</span></p> <p><span>The second-degree charge will be easier, because it covers an “unintentional” death caused during an underlying felony offence – in this case assault.</span></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Kate and William to take legal action against magazine for “cruel and disgusting” story

<p>Kate Middleton and Prince William are taking legal action against UK magazine, Tatler, for publishing a “cruel, sexist and woman-shaming” about the Duchess.</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have legal letters to the magazine demanding its profile of Kate be removed from the internet, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8372889/Kate-William-sue-Tatler-cruel-sexist-woman-shaming-article.html" target="_blank">the Mail on Sunday newspaper claims.</a></p> <p>As of Sunday, however, the story which was headlined<span> </span>Catherine The Great,<span> </span>remained online.</p> <p>While the article does initially appear as flattering, Kensington Palace issued a rare statement bashing the publication for its “inaccuracies and false representations.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836329/kate-middleton.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/962562a548a941bc914524b1033fa32d" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Tatler Magazine</em></p> <p>It is widely reported the royal family felt particularly enraged by the suggestion that Duchess Catherine was feeling exhausted and trapped by an increased workload after Prince Harry and Meghan Markle withdrew from being senior members for The Firm.</p> <p>They were also infuriated at the “disgusting” line about her being “perilously thin.”</p> <p>The story compared the Duchess’ figure to eating disorders Princess Diana suffered from.</p> <p>“That is such an extremely cruel and wounding barb,” a royal source told the UK paper.</p> <p>“It’s sexist and woman-shaming at its very worst.”</p> <p>The source says that the William and Kate were only taking legal action because the article was “full of lies.”</p> <p>“It’s ironic that the Royals’ favourite magazine is being trashed by them,” the source noted.</p> <p>“Tatler may think it’s immune from action as it’s read by the Royals and on every coffee table in every smart home, but it makes no difference.”</p> <p>Tatler’s Editor-in-Chief, Richard Dennen says he “stands behind the reporting” although Kensington Palace slammed the UK magazine for its “inaccuracies”.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Kmart worker spills three secrets that’ll save you cash

<p>A Kmart worker has spilled three shopping “secrets” she claims will get you better discounts and treatment in store.</p> <p>Georgia Cook from Sydney shared three tips on TikTok, where it received a lot of attention from bargain hunters.</p> <p>The 23-year-old answered questions from those who wanted to know more, much to the delight of bargain hunters.</p> <p>“We give a 20 per cent or more if something is damaged, just ask,” Georgia said in the video, which was her first tip.</p> <p>She went on to say that “half the workers don’t know where stuff is either”, which is the second tip.</p> <p>The third and final tip was the one that delighted bargain hunters the most, with Georgia saying that “if you ask us if something is out of stock, we will say yes if you’re rude and annoying”.</p> <p>One woman was quick to dispute Georgia’s claims, saying that she was only given a 5 percent discount for her damaged goods.</p> <p>“All Kmarts are different for damaged items, that’s what we do with ours. It’s more if you accidentally bring a damaged item up and you still want it, you can ask for a discount,” Georgia replied.</p> <p>Not everyone was happy with the tips, saying that it was “your job” to show people where items are, even if they were unkind.</p> <p>“I worked retail and even if someone was rude I’d check because that’s what I was getting paid to do,” one said.</p> <p>Others warned she could “lose her job over this” to which she replied: “I didn’t expect it to blow up.”</p> <p>Georgia’s TikTok is now on private and it is unknown if she has lost her job due to the popularity of the video.</p>

Money & Banking

Placeholder Content Image

Keep your nose out of it: why saliva tests could offer a better alternative to nasal COVID-19 swabs

<p>Saliva is one of our biggest foes in the COVID-19 pandemic, because of its role in spreading the virus. But it could be our friend too, because it potentially offers a way to diagnose the disease without using invasive nasal swabs.</p> <p>Our research review, <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4418/10/5/290">published in the journal Diagnostics</a>, suggests saliva could offer a readily accessible diagnostic tool for detecting the presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and might even be able to reveal whether someone’s immune system has already encountered it.</p> <p>COVID-19 testing is a crucial part of the pandemic response, especially now countries are gradually lifting social distancing restrictions. This requires widespread, early, accurate and sensitive diagnosis of infected people, both with and without symptoms.</p> <p>Our review looked at the results of three different studies, in Hong Kong, the nearby Chinese mainland city of Shenzhen, and Italy. All three studies found SARS-CoV-2 is indeed present in the saliva of COVID-19 patients (at rates of 87%, 91.6%, and 100% of patients, respectively). This suggests saliva is a potentially very useful source of specimens for detecting the virus.</p> <p>Saliva <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016041202031254X">spreads the SARS-CoV-2 virus</a> via breathing, coughing, sneezing, and <a href="https://www.nap.edu/catalog/25769/rapid-expert-consultation-on-the-possibility-of-bioaerosol-spread-of-sars-cov-2-for-the-covid-19-pandemic-april-1-2020">conversation</a>, which is why guidelines suggest we maintain a distance of at least 1.5 metres from one another. We also know <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7094991/">SARS-CoV-2 can survive in tiny droplets of saliva</a> in an experimental setting.</p> <p>Saliva is an attractive option for detecting SARS-CoV-2, compared with the <a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/coronavirus-covid-19-seeing-a-doctor-getting-tested-faqs#diagnosis">current tests</a> which involve taking swabs of mucus from the upper respiratory tract. Saliva is easy to access, which potentially makes the tests cheaper and less invasive. Saliva can hold up a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19726214">mirror to our health</a>, not just of our mouth but our whole body.</p> <p>For this reason, saliva has already been widely investigated as a diagnostic tool for chronic systemic diseases, as well as for oral ailments such as periodontal disease and oral cancers. But less attention has been given to its potential usefulness in acute infectious diseases such as COVID-19, perhaps because researchers and clinicians don’t yet appreciate its full potential.</p> <p><strong>What a mouthful</strong></p> <p>When we get sick, much of the evidence is present in our saliva – from the germs themselves, to the antibodies and immune system proteins we use to fight them off. Saliva also contains genetic material and other cellular components of pathogens after we have broken them down (for the full biochemical breakdown of the weird and wonderful things in our saliva, see pages 51-61 of our <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4418/10/5/290">review</a>).</p> <p>Saliva is also hardy. It can be <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=High-yield+RNA-extraction+method+for+saliva">stored at –80℃ for several years with little degradation</a>.</p> <p>This means it would be relatively straightforward to track the progression of COVID-19 in individual patients, by collecting saliva at various times during the disease and recovery. Saliva tests from recovered patients could also tell us if they have encountered the disease for a second time, and how strong their immune response is.</p> <p>However, there is no research yet available on using saliva to monitor immune responses. This will be well worth investigating, given the pressing need for a reliable and cost-effective way to monitor the population for immunity to COVID-19 as the outbreak continues.</p> <p><strong>Could saliva testing replace nasal swabs?</strong></p> <p>An ideal saliva test would be a disposable, off-the-shelf device that could be used at home by individuals, without exposing them or others to the risk of visiting a clinic.</p> <p>One drawback with the research so far is that it has involved small numbers of patients (each of the three studies we reviewed involved no more than 25 people), and there is little published detail on exactly how these studies collected the saliva – whether from the mouth or throat, whether by spitting, drooling or swabbing, and whether collected by the patient or by a clinician.</p> <p>Nevertheless, based on the modest amount of research done so far, saliva looks like a promising candidate for COVID-19 testing. More research is now needed, in larger groups of people, to learn more about how to confidently test for SARS-CoV-2 in the saliva of both symptomatic and non-symptomatic people.</p> <p>Earlier this month the US Food and Drug Administration <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/08/health/fda-coronavirus-spit-test.html">approved the sale</a> of saliva-based COVID-19 test kits that will allow people to collect their own samples and send them to a lab for analysis.</p> <p>A reliable test would offer a cheaper, less invasive and potentially even more accurate way to detect the virus, which would also reduce the risk posed by routine COVID-19 checks to both patients and front-line medical professionals.</p> <p><em>Written by Pingping Han. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/keep-your-nose-out-of-it-why-saliva-tests-could-offer-a-better-alternative-to-nasal-covid-19-swabs-138816"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p> <p><em> </em></p>

Legal

Entertainment

Placeholder Content Image

International film archives are streaming up a storm during lockdown: Australia’s movie trove isn’t even online

<p><a href="https://www.cinetecamilano.it/">Cineteca Milano</a> is renowned for its silent film holdings. With a collection of more than 35,000 Italian and international films dating back to the 1890s, it was both coincidental and fortuitous that, in December 2019, the archive began digitalisation.</p> <p>Part of a national <a href="http://www.cinema.beniculturali.it/Notizie/5188/66/contributi-per-il-piano-di-digitalizzazione-anno-2018/">digitalisation program</a>, the Cineteca decided rather than merely deposit their digitised materials into the holdings of the Cineteca Nazionale in Rome, they would release films online.</p> <p>Matteo Pavesi, the director of the Cineteca Italiana, tells me they wanted to “make our oldest archival materials visible; we wanted to publish these holdings for everyone to enjoy”.</p> <p>Since the Cineteca was shut in February, Cineteca’s staff of six have been releasing 20 films a week on their free streaming service.</p> <p>Pre-coronavirus, Cineteca Milano attracted around 300 users to its site each day.</p> <p>In March, the online archive attracted more than 4 million users.</p> <p><strong>Saving history</strong></p> <p>Film archives began to <a href="https://www.fiafnet.org/pages/History/FIAF-Timeline.html">be established in 1933</a> as archivists realised films needed to be safeguarded for their own sake, rather than for military or religious purposes.</p> <p>Nitrate film used from the early 1890s through the mid-1950s, and magnetic tape used from the mid-1940s to the early 2000s, cannot survive the test of time. So, in addition to managing storage environments, archives <a href="https://www.nfsa.gov.au/corporate-information/publications/deadline-2025">preserve films digitally</a>.</p> <p>Commercial streaming services offer access to films, but they do not ensure this content is stored, saved and contextualised. They are not custodians of history or culture. Archives ensure recordings of the past remain meaningfully embedded in our contemporary life.</p> <p>In a time when the audiovisual is our primary mode of communication, the archive as an institution protecting and championing our shared history is more important than ever.</p> <p><strong>Making history</strong></p> <p>Since the <a href="https://www.bfi.org.uk/">British Film Institute</a> (BFI) shut its London doors on March 17, Bryony Dixon, their curator of silent film, tells me they have seen a 200% increase in online traffic.</p> <p>Short, punchy films are popular, and Dixon says these early silent films are like TikTok: “designed to just go ‘Here I am, I look at this’”.</p> <p>The BFI is also working to document the period of the COVID-19 crisis.</p> <p><a href="https://www.bfi.org.uk/archive-collections/archive-projects/britain-on-lockdown">Britain on Lockdown</a> asks the public to send in videos to chart the national development of the coronavirus crisis.</p> <p><a href="https://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/announcements/these-hands-michael-rosen-poem-nhs">These Are The Hands</a> is a short and emotive found-footage film using archival public health movies and contemporary footage of NHS staff. We see hands touching the newborn, the young, the aged, the disabled, and the sick. At every stage of our lives, the film reminds us health-care workers are essential.</p> <p>These Are The Hands was released the day I spoke with Dixon.</p> <p>“There won’t be a dry eye in the house,” she says. “It is very powerful.”</p> <p><strong>A quiet archive</strong></p> <p>While use of these archives in Milan and London has increased under lockdown, Australia’s <a href="https://www.nfsa.gov.au/">National Film and Sound Archive</a> (NFSA) has not seen a significant change.</p> <p>Meg Labrum, general manager of collections, tells me in Europe people “appreciate, celebrate, use, know about their archive”.</p> <p>In Australia, she says the film archive is “a kind of interesting, slightly odd, cultural provider”.</p> <p>Although the NFSA has a significant collection in Canberra, it does not release 20 films a week like the Milan archive, nor does it boast a dedicated streaming service like the BFI.</p> <p>The NFSA’s online presence is focused on curation, rather than the delivery of streaming material. It frames small samples of screen content into topical themes and exhibitions. With rare exception, users cannot watch films, but they can (for example) listen to producers Jocelyn Moorhouse and Lynda House speak about <a href="https://www.nfsa.gov.au/collection/curated/muriels-wedding">the making</a> of Muriel’s Wedding.</p> <p>Australia was once the <a href="https://apnews.com/e8187ca922bbc63541581ace1535a769">end-of-the-line</a> for global film distribution. Films sent around the globe for viewing would often remain in Australia – it made no financial sense to return bulky film reels to their country of origin. This means the NFSA has an internationally important collection, including items such as the most complete version of the French actress <a href="https://wfpp.columbia.edu/pioneer/sarah-bernhardt/">Sarah Bernhardt</a>’s Camille (1911).</p> <p>As a film historian, I am frustrated by <a href="https://online.ucpress.edu/fmh/article/2/1/135/106359/Interview-in-Melbourne-with-Meg-Labrum-National">licensing issues</a> in Australia blocking our access to film heritage. Local copyright laws and an aversion to copyright risks have meant these <a href="http://www.unswlawjournal.unsw.edu.au/article/digital-access-the-impact-of-copyright-on-digitisation-practices-in-australian-museums-galleries-libraries-and-archives/">legal issues</a> seem to haunt the NFSA far more than they do in comparable institutions abroad.</p> <p>With staff working from home, Labrum sees the COVID-19 crisis consolidating the NFSA’s drive towards the digital: “an experiment […] testing just how far we can keep the collection open in a purely existing digital content context.”</p> <p>While not streaming films, the NFSA has nevertheless focused on digital preservation, continuing the digitisation of magnetic tapes during shutdown.</p> <p><strong>Films to the people</strong></p> <p>Two days after our interview, Dixon was put on furlough, her pay reduced by 20% and unsure about her future employment. For now, her team “split work. […] We’ll cover a skeleton service”.</p> <p>But she remains optimistic about the impact of COVID-19 on the BFI and its operations.</p> <p>The pandemic has “proved the worth of digitising material and putting it online in a massive way,” she says.</p> <p>“If it means that the people don’t go to the films, we need to take the films to the people.”</p> <p>The increased traffic to the BFI and Cineteca Milano shows there is a want to engage with our film histories – coronavirus makes obvious how hampered Australians are in the access to ours.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Victoria Duckett. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/international-film-archives-are-streaming-up-a-storm-during-lockdown-australias-movie-trove-isnt-even-online-137169">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Movies

Placeholder Content Image

Resurfaced video shows Meghan Markle detailing her experiences with racism

<p>An old video of Meghan Markle candidly talking about her experiences in racism has resurfaced in light of the Black Lives Matter protests.</p> <p>In the 2012 clip, which was filmed as part of the “I Won’t Stand For…” campaign for not-for-profit organisation Erase the Hate, Markle discussed her biracial heritage and detailed racist behaviour she witnessed and experienced.</p> <p>In the video, Markle says that she hopes that by the time she has children that “people are even more open-minded to change”.</p> <p>The video was filmed well before she had met her now-husband Prince Harry and had their son Archie.</p> <p>“For me I think it hits a really personal note,” began Markle in the video.</p> <p>“I'm biracial, most people can't tell what I'm mixed with and so much of my life has felt like being a fly on the wall.</p> <p>“And so some of the slurs I've heard, the really offensive jokes or the names, it has just hit me in a really strong way. A couple of years ago I heard someone call my mom the N-word.</p> <p>“So I think for me beyond being personally affected by racism, to see the landscape of what our country is like right now and certainly the world and to want things to be better.”</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2qGRGSc4ncA"></iframe></div> <div class="body_text "> <p>Markle also discussed her heritage in the old video.</p> <p>“I am really proud of my heritage on both sides, I'm really proud of where I've come from and where I'm coming.</p> <p>“But I hope by the time I have children that people are even more open-minded to how things are changing and that having a mixed world is what it's all about.</p> <p>“Certainly it makes it a lot more beautiful and a lot more interesting.”</p> <p>The video has resurfaced online and on social media in the wake of the death of George Floyd, who passed away in police custody after a white officer knelt on his neck for eight minutes during an arrest.</p> </div>

TV

Placeholder Content Image

Trump’s presidency is sinking deeper into crisis – but will he still get re-elected?

<p>Violence has <a href="https://www.thestar.com.my/news/world/2020/05/30/protests-flare-around-the-united-states-over-minneapolis-killing">erupted across several US cities</a> after the death of a black man, George Floyd, who was shown on video gasping for breath as a white police officer, Derek Chauvin, knelt on his neck. The unrest poses serious challenges for President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden as each man readies his campaign for the November 3 election.</p> <p>If the coronavirus had not already posed a threat to civil discourse in the US, the latest flashpoint in American racial politics makes this presidential campaign potentially one of the most incendiary in history.</p> <p>COVID-19 and Minneapolis may very well form the nexus within which the 2020 campaign will unfold. Trump’s critics have assailed his handling of both and questioned whether he can effectively lead the country in a moment of crisis.</p> <p>And yet, he may not be any more vulnerable heading into the election.</p> <p><strong>A presidency in crisis?</strong></p> <p>As the incumbent, Trump certainly faces the most immediate challenges. Not since Franklin Roosevelt in the second world war has a US president presided over the deaths of so many Americans from a single cause.</p> <p>The Axis powers and COVID-19 are not analogous, but any presidency is judged by its capacity to respond to enemies like these. With <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/america-at-boiling-point-how-one-death-rocked-a-nation-numbed-by-100-000-20200529-p54xpw.html">pandemic deaths now surpassing 100,000</a>, Trump’s fortunes will be inexorably tied to this staggering (and still rising) figure.</p> <p>Worse, the Minneapolis protests are showing how an already precarious social fabric has been frayed by the COVID-19 lockdowns.</p> <p>Americans have not come together to fight the virus. Rather, they have allowed a public health disaster to deepen divisions along racial, economic, sectional and ideological lines.</p> <p>Trump has, of course, often sought to gain from such divisions. But the magnitude and severity of the twin crises he is now facing will make this very difficult. By numerous measures, his is a presidency in crisis.</p> <p>And yet.</p> <p>Trump, a ferocious campaigner, will try to find ways to use both tragedies to his advantage and, importantly, makes things worse for his challenger.</p> <p>For starters, Trump did not cause coronavirus. And <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-21/trump-accuses-china-of-coronavirus-mass-killing/12270140">he will continue to insist</a> that his great geo-strategic adversary, the Chinese Communist Party, did.</p> <p>And his is not the first presidency to be marked by the conflagration of several US cities.</p> <p>Before Minneapolis, <a href="https://www.history.com/topics/1960s/1967-detroit-riots">Detroit</a> (1967), <a href="https://www.britannica.com/event/Los-Angeles-Riots-of-1992">Los Angeles</a> (1992) and <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/08/08/ferguson-missouri-riots-5-years-since-shooting-race-tensions-worse/1952853001/">Ferguson, Missouri</a> (2014) were all the scenes of angry protests and riots over racial tensions that still haven’t healed.</p> <p>And in the 19th century, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/03/science/civil-war-toll-up-by-20-percent-in-new-estimate.html">750,000 Americans were killed in a civil war</a> that was fought over whether the enslavement of African-Americans was <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/09/how-the-constitution-was-indeed-pro-slavery/406288/">constitutional</a>.</p> <p>Trump may not have healed racial tensions in the US during his presidency. But, like coronavirus, he did not cause them.</p> <p><strong>How Trump can blame Democrats for Minneapolis</strong></p> <p>Not unhappily for Trump, Minneapolis is a largely Democratic city in a reliably blue state. He will campaign now on the failure of Democratic state leaders to answer the needs of black voters.</p> <p>Trump will claim that decades of Democratic policies in Minnesota – including the eight years of the Obama administration – have caused Minneapolis to be one of the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2020/05/30/minneapolis-racial-inequality/">most racially unequal cities</a> in the nation.</p> <p>Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis will never be mistaken for the late, great General Douglas McArthur or great fighter General George Patton. How come all of these places that defend so poorly are run by Liberal Democrats? Get tough and fight (and arrest the bad ones). STRENGTH!</p> <p>In 2016, Trump <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-jasg-_E5M">famously asked African-Americans</a> whether Democratic leaders have done anything to improve their lives.</p> <p><em>What do you have to lose by trying something new, like Trump?</em></p> <p>He will repeat this mantra in the coming months.</p> <p>It also certainly helps that his support among Republican voters has never wavered, no matter how shocking his behaviour.</p> <p>He has enjoyed a stable <a href="https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/coronavirus-polls/">80% approval rating</a> with GOP voters throughout the coronavirus crisis. This has helped keep his approval rating among all voters steady as the pandemic has worsened, <a href="https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/coronavirus-polls/">hovering between 40 and 50%</a>.</p> <p>These are not terrible numbers. Yes, Trump’s leadership has contributed to a series of disasters. But if the polls are correct, he has so far avoided the kinds of catastrophe that could imperil his chances of re-election.</p> <p><strong>Why this moment is challenging for Biden</strong></p> <p>Biden should be able to make a good case to the American people at this moment that he is the more effective leader.</p> <p>But this has not yet been reflected in polls, most of which continue to give the Democrat <a href="https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/polls/president-general/">only a lukewarm advantage</a> over Trump in the election.</p> <p>The other problem is that the Democratic party remains discordant. And Biden has not yet shown a capacity to heal it.</p> <p>Race has also long been a <a href="https://www.history.com/topics/us-politics/democratic-party">source of division</a> within Biden’s party. Southern Democrats, for instance, <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/znycnrd/revision/4">were the key agents of slavery</a> in the 19th century and the segregation that followed it into the 20th.</p> <p>After the 1960s, Democrats sought to make themselves the natural home of African-American voters as the <a href="https://www.history.com/news/how-the-party-of-lincoln-won-over-the-once-democratic-south">Republican party courted</a> disaffected white Southern voters. The Democrats largely succeeded on that front – <a href="https://press.princeton.edu/ideas/why-are-blacks-democrats">the party routinely gets around 85-90% of black votes</a> in presidential elections.</p> <p>The challenge for Biden now is how to retain African-American loyalty to his party, while evading responsibility for the socio-economic failures of Democratic policies in cities like Minneapolis.</p> <p>He is also a white northerner (from Delaware). Between 1964 and 2008, <a href="https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-makes-southern-democrats-unique/">only three Democrats were elected president</a>. All of them were southerners.</p> <p>To compensate, Biden has had to rely on racial politics to separate himself from his primary challenger – <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2020/03/bernie-sanders-black-voters/607789/">Bernie Sanders struggled to channel black aspirations</a> – and from Republicans. And this has, at times, caused him to court controversy.</p> <p>In 2012, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYtEuuhFRPA">he warned African-Americans</a> that then-Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney would put them “all back in chains”. And just over a week ago, <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/05/28/heres-why-black-americans-were-mad-bidens-comment-even-if-theyd-say-same-thing-themselves/">he angered black voters</a> by suggesting those who would support Trump in the election “<a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-23/joe-biden-apologises-for-aint-black-comment/12279428">ain’t black</a>”.</p> <p>Biden is far better than Trump on racial issues and should be able to use the current crises to present himself as a more natural “consoler-in-chief”, but instead, he has appeared somewhat flatfooted and derided for being racially patronising.</p> <p>The opportunities COVID-19 and the Minneapolis unrest might afford his campaign remain elusive.</p> <p><strong>There is reason for hope</strong></p> <p>America enters the final months of the 2020 campaign in a state of despair and disrepair. The choice is between an opportunistic incumbent and a tin-eared challenger.</p> <p>But the US has faced serious challenges before – and emerged stronger. Neither the civil war in the 19th century or the Spanish flu pandemic in the early 20th halted the extraordinary growth in power that followed both.</p> <p>Moreover, the US constitution remains intact and federalism has undergone something of <a href="https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2020/05/04/covid-federalism/">a rebirth</a> since the start of the pandemic. And there is a new generation of younger, more diverse, national leaders being forged in the fire of crisis to help lead the recovery.</p> <p><em>Written by Timothy J. Lynch. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/as-minneapolis-burns-trumps-presidency-is-sinking-deeper-into-crisis-and-yet-he-may-still-be-re-elected-139739">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Art

Placeholder Content Image

A beginner’s guide to reading and enjoying poetry

<p>One of the things you get asked most when people find out that you’re a poet is whether you can recommend something that could be read at an upcoming wedding, or if you know something that might be suitable for a funeral. For most people, these occasions – as well as their schooldays – are the only times they encounter poetry.</p> <p>That feeds into this sense that poetry is something formal, something which might stand to attention in the corner of the room, that it’s something to be studied or something to “solve” rather than something to be lounged with on the sofa. Of course, this needn’t be true.</p> <p>We’ve seen over the past couple of months how important poetry can be to people. It’s forming a response in advertisements and marketing campaigns, it’s becoming a regular part of the public’s honouring of frontline heroes and, for people who write poetry more often, it’s becoming a way to create a living historical document of these unprecedented times – this latter point was the aim of the new <a href="https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/write/">Write where we are Now project</a>, spearheaded by poet Carol Ann Duffy and Manchester Metropolitan University.</p> <p>In years to come, alongside medical records and political reporting, historians and classes of schoolchildren will look to art and poetry to find out what life was like on a day-to-day basis – what things seemed important, what things worried people, how the world looked and felt and was experienced. Write where we are Now will, hopefully, be one such resource, with poets from all over the world contributing new work directly about the Coronavirus pandemic or about the personal situations they find themselves in right now.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/407507872" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>So the crisis has perhaps brought poetry – with its ability to make the abstract more concrete, its ability to distil and clarify, its ability to reflect the surreal and strange world we now find ourselves in – back to the fore.</p> <p>Many of you might be thinking now is the time to try and get to grips with poetry, maybe for the first time. A novel might feel too taxing, watching another film just involves staring at another screen for longer, but a poem can offer a brief window into a different world, or simply help to sustain you in this one.</p> <p><strong>How to enjoy poetry</strong></p> <p>If you’re nervous around poetry or are scared it might not be for you, I wanted to offer up some tips.</p> <p><strong>1. You don’t have to like it</strong></p> <p>Poetry is often taught in very strange ways: you’re given a poem and told that it’s good – and that if you don’t think it’s good then you haven’t understood it, and you should read it again until you have, and then you’ll like it. This is nonsense. There are poets and poems for every taste. If you don’t like something, fine. Move on. Find another poet. Anthologies are great for this, and a good place to start with your poetry journey.</p> <p><strong>2. Read it aloud</strong></p> <p>Poetry lives on the air and not on the page, read it aloud to yourself as you walk around the house, you’ll get a better understanding of it, you’ll feel the rhythms of the language move you in different ways – even if you’re not quite sure what’s going on.</p> <p><strong>3. Don’t try and solve it</strong></p> <p>This is something else that goes back to our educational encounters with poetry – poems are not riddles that need solving. Some poems will speak to you very plainly. Some poems will simply move you through their language. Some poems will baffle you but, like an intriguing stranger, you’ll want to step closer to them. Poems aren’t a problem to be wrestled with – mostly poems are showing you one small thing as a way of talking about something bigger. Poems aren’t a broken pane of glass that you need to painstakingly reassemble. They’re a window, asking you to look out, trying to show you something.</p> <p><strong>4. Write your own</strong></p> <p>The best way to understand poetry is to write your own. The way you speak, the street you live on, the life you’ve lived, is as worthy of poetry as anything else. Once you begin to explore your own writing, you’ll be able to read and understand other people’s poems much better.</p> <p>I would say this as a poet, but poetry is going to be even more central to how we rebuild after this current crisis. Poetry, especially the teaching of how we might write it, has this wonderful ability to create a new language, to imagine new ways of seeing things, to help people to articulate what it is that they’ve just been through. The way we move forward, as a community, as a society and, in fact, as a civilisation, is to push language to new frontiers, to use language to memorialise, reimagine and rebuild, but also to remember that poetry can be an escape, something to be enjoyed, something to cherish.</p> <p>With that in mind here is a poem I wrote for Write where we are Now.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/137321/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/331106/original/file-20200428-110779-1fegtkr.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=237&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <span class="caption"></span></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/andrew-mcmillan-535042">Andrew McMillan</a>, Senior Lecturer, Department of English, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/manchester-metropolitan-university-860">Manchester Metropolitan University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-beginners-guide-to-reading-and-enjoying-poetry-137321">original article</a>.</em></p>

Books

Property

Placeholder Content Image

“Works awesome!”: New cleaning hack will get rid of tough shower stains

<p>A new shower cleaning hack has gone viral, much to the delight of people who clean around the world.</p> <p>The new trick sees people using a magic sponge with a dishwasher tablet inside the sponge which helps remove tough stains.</p> <p>One mum shared her impressive results with the popular Facebook group<span> </span><em>Mums Who Clean</em>.</p> <p>“My husband is a mechanic, so our shower cops a lot from all his hand washes to get the grease off,” Lauren said.</p> <p>“I tried the magic sponge and dishwasher tablet. Five minutes and not much effort!”</p> <p>She revealed her technique, explaining that she lets the magic sponge get very wet before removing part of the sponge and inserting the dishwasher tablet into the sponge.</p> <p>Lauren explained that she removed the “power ball” part of the dishwasher tablet.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836176/body-shower.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c465a27f9a174cbaa03c3359a3a28a69" /></p> <p>Other group members excitedly revealed that they had tried the hack with exciting results.</p> <p>“I did the same thing tonight! Amazing results here too!” said one.</p> <p>Added another: “Works awesome! Did mine today with the same trick, it’s never been this clean before!”</p> <p>Wrote a third: “I gave it a go and worked a dream. Didn’t even have to scrub hard.”</p> <p>Said one more: “I used this as well on shower I had scrubbed with everything. Worked like a charm.”</p> <p><em>Photo credits:<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/mumswhoclean/" target="_blank">Facebook / Mums Who Clean</a></em></p>

Home Hints & Tips

Placeholder Content Image

Catherine Zeta-Jones shows off inside beautiful New York mansion

<p>Catherine Zeta-Jones and her family can definitely say they are one of the lucky families that get to relax and self-isolate during lockdown in their New York mansion.</p> <p>While she nor the rest of her family give many details away about their beautiful home, fans have been given a glimpse of the rooms, including their spectacularly regal black and white theme.</p> <p>Recently, Catherine shared a photograph of her husband Michael relaxing on their gorgeous cream sofa.</p> <p>The Darling Buds of May actress shared the picture on Instagram over the weekend, revealing that her puppy, Taylor, had taken over the sofa.</p> <p>The actress lives in a gorgeous Georgian mansion in Irvington, New York, which is not too far away from Manhattan.</p> <p>Her and Michael share their home with their two children, Dylan, 19, and Carys, 17.</p> <p>Their stunning property boasts magnificent views of the Hudson river and has a sprawling garden, complete with an impressive outdoor kitchen.</p> <p>The home also includes an indoor swimming pool, a library, a gym, and a games room, where Catherine has been spending a lot of time learning how to play pool during the lockdown.</p> <p>There are also ten bathrooms in the house, which are all themed differently, ranging from a gothic all-black design to a spa-like area complete with a roll-top bath.</p> <p>The family has an expansive property portfolio, including a spacious apartment overlooking Central Park on New York's Central Park West, as well as a large family home in Catherine's hometown of Swansea, Wales.</p> <p>While in quarantine, the family have been enjoying spending quality time together and fans have been able to indulge virtually with the family.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Catherine and Michael’s incredible mansion.</p>

Real Estate