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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle blasted for "inappropriate video"

<p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been slammed for imploring Americans to vote in the 2020 US election on November 3rd.</p> <p>In a video that unveiled the 2020 TIME 100, <em>TIME's</em> list of the world's 100 most influential people, Markle spoke of the importance of voting.</p> <p>“Every four years we are told the same thing, that this is the most important election of our lifetime,” Markle said. “But this one is. When we vote, our values are put into action and our voices are heard. Your voice is a reminder that you matter, because you do and you deserve to be heard.”</p> <p>Prince Harry also spoke up in the video, saying: “As we approach this November, it’s vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity.</p> <p>“When the bad outweighs the good, for many, whether we realise it or not, it erodes our ability to have compassion and our ability to put ourselves in someone else’s shoes.</p> <p>“Because when one person buys into negativity online, the effects are felt exponentially. It’s time to not only reflect, but act.”</p> <p>Critics have been quick to see this as a thinly veiled attempt to vote US President Donald Trump out of office.</p> <p>A statement from Buckingham Palace made it clear that the couple's comments were separate from the Royal Family.</p> <p>“The Duke is not a working member of the Royal Family and any comments he makes are made in a personal capacity,” they said in a statement to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">The Times.</a></p> <p>Piers Morgan shared his opinion, saying that Prince Harry was "poking his nose" in US politics.</p> <p>“Prince Harry poking his woke nose into the US election &amp; effectively telling Americans to vote against President Trump is completely unacceptable behaviour for a member of the Royal Family," he said.</p>

News

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Grandma puts toddler in hospital after hand sanitiser mix-up

<p>An 18-month-old boy has been taken to hospital after his grandmother accidentally gave him a pouch of hand sanitiser instead of food.</p> <p>The mother of the urged parents to not buy sachets of hand sanitiser because they look so similar to baby food pouches.</p> <p><img style="width: 472.253052164262px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838015/1-75.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cc30d14f6428405d8b0fdd6345cca5eb" /></p> <p>“Please DO NOT buy these cute hand sanitiser pouches from Wal-Mart that can easily be mistaken for a food pouch,” Nikki Teixeira posted on Facebook in August.</p> <p>According to the mum, the grandmother opened the son’s baby bag and took the pouch out.</p> <p>She thought the hand sanitiser was puree and gave it to the 18-month-old, who ingested it before being rushed to hospital.</p> <p>“He took a sip and immediately turned red and started coughing, so she grabbed it from him and then immediately saw it was hand sanitiser," Ms Teixeira told Good Morning America.</p> <p>"She [the grandmother] called her neighbour and called 911 because he started to get a little bit dozy and out of it, and then five minutes later he was falling asleep.”</p> <p>The child did not suffer any further symptoms, but his mother said he lost his appetite for a day along with being irritable.</p> <p>The child’s mum said she purchased the Trollz-branded hand sanitiser for her step-daughter who was going back to school.</p> <p>“The way it was packaged and displayed with hand sanitisers, I didn't even think of it looking like a food,” she said.</p> <p>She said the medical professionals who saw the pouch of hand sanitiser were “appalled” by how similar it looked to food.</p> <p>“The ER doctor even took it upon herself to send a picture to her colleague who works with poison control in attempt to raise awareness,” the mum explained.</p> <p>Smart Care, the brand that sold the hand sanitiser, has since pulled the product from the shelves, Good Morning America reported.</p>

Caring

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Dream holiday turns into horror: Family sues after baby loses legs and fingers

<p>A British family is suing the Royal Caribbean cruise line after their nine-month-old daughter left their trip a triple amputee following a major misdiagnosis onboard.</p> <p>Phoebe Moon and her parents boarded the Symphony of the Seas in February, and found that their baby girl had become ill after they had settled in.</p> <p>“We had never taken her away before and we thought we would have the time of our lives in America, but sadly, it didn’t turn out that way,” said Phoebe’s mother Aimee.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838022/phoebe-baby-amputee-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f23261177ed24fb184dfd8d9c75adf58" /></p> <p>“We actually visited the infirmary five times that day and she just got worse and worse throughout the day,” she said.</p> <p>“Every time we went down (the infirmary), we were sent back to our cabin.”</p> <p>When they refused to leave, the parents say Phoebe was handed antibiotics.</p> <p>Eventually they got off the ship mid-cruise in St Martin to seek help.</p> <p>“When we got to St Martin’s hospital, they said they’ve got about 15 minutes to save her life,” explained Phoebe’s father, Luke.</p> <p>“They said to prepare for the worst because she’s very sick.”</p> <p>Phoebe’s feet, legs, and hands were handed swollen and purple - caused by a severe form of meningitis.</p> <p>“We were just in utter shock to think you left to go on holidays with your daughter and the prospect that you’re not going to be going home with her is unimaginable,” Aimee said.</p> <p>The family say that doctors in Fort Lauderdale had to amputate to save her life.</p> <p>Phoebe lost her feet and the fingers of her left hand.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838023/phoebe-baby-amputee-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/94a00cd7e23d46218b7bc82551f82bd8" /></p> <p>The family has since filed a lawsuit against Royal Caribbean in Miami, with the family alleging that the cruise line’s doctors misdiagnosed Phoebe with “a stomach bug” despite her showing “classic signs of a life-threatening meningococcal meningitis infection”.</p> <p>Some of those symptoms included lethargy and high fever.</p> <p>Thomas Scolaro is the attorney for the family and told NBC 6: “Listening to their story just breaks my heart every time.</p> <p>“This would otherwise be the world’s most horrific case of medical negligence and damage to the world’s sweetest little child, but it gets substantially worse.”</p> <p>Her parents say every day is a struggle following their daughter’s life-changing surgery.</p> <p>“Even now all she wants to do is get down and walk, and it’s so difficult that she is unable to do that,” Aimee said.</p> <p>“And these challenges are just going to get harder as she gets older.”</p> <p>The family has given a message for other families planning to sail in the future.</p> <p>“We were always under the impression that the medical facilities and staff on a ship were world class and world leading,” Luke said.</p> <p>“We now think that isn’t the case. You are on your own at sea.”</p>

Legal

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Dolly Parton sets the record straight on tattoo rumours

<p>Dolly Parton has set the record straight on the long winding rumour about her body being covered in tattoos.</p> <p>It’s said the country music star wears long sleeves to cover up the ink running up and down her arms.</p> <p>But that doesn’t seem to be the case.</p> <p>Speaking to People magazine, the 74-year-old said, "I do have some tattoos, that's true. But they're tasteful. I'm not a tattoo girl.”</p> <p>She goes on to explain that she was unwell for a period of time and required a feeding tube which left a scar on her side. </p> <p>She didn’t want to be constantly reminded of her health issues, so she decided to get tattoos over it.</p> <p>"My tattoos are pretty, they're artful and they usually started out to cover some scar, not to make a big statement," she revealed. "Ribbons and bows and butterflies are the things that I have. I was very sick for a while and I had to wear a feeding tube. It left a little indention in my side and I didn't like it because I'm so fair that scars turn purple on me.</p> <p>"I had a little beehive tattooed over it — a little yellow-and-brown beehive with a tiny little bee on top of the hive. The mouth of it is that little sinkhole."</p> <p>But Parton joked that she never says never, and there's still time to live up to the tattoo hype.</p> <p>"Who knows, I may get some more later. I may just have to get covered with tattoos just so everybody could be right!" she said. </p>

Beauty & Style

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Six free (or super cheap) things to do in Paris with your grandkids

<p><strong>Jardin Du Luxembourg – Luxembourg Gardens</strong></p> <p>At face value Jardin du Luxembourg seems like another one of mum’s boring ideas of fun. But hidden deep in its many gardens is a kids wonderland. The perfect place to let off some steam. And it’s free.</p> <p>The park is in the 6th arrondissement of Paris, a ten-minute walk from the <strong>Pantheon</strong>. It's adored all year round by Parisian kids for its endless activities and bustle. Puppet shows, toy boats and its very own lolly shop – this park has it all.</p> <p>Keep exploring to find the forgotten apple orchard and <strong>Orangerie</strong>. Hours of fun can be had at one of the six chess tables, or on the carousel. If you’re there in summer you might even score a real pony ride.</p> <p><strong>Parc De Jeux</strong> is Jardin du Luxembourg’s ultimate kids play park, and it has perimeter fences so there’s no fear of runaway toddlers. The multi-level forts, giant tunnel slides and climbing nets are all colour coded for different age groups. But no adult slides – sorry Dad.</p> <p>Older kids flock to the park after school hours to play basketball, martial arts and tennis. You can try your luck at <strong>Jeu de paume</strong>, a 250-year-old version of tennis played without racquets. The former Olympic sport is still played competitively, and the French championships are held right here.</p> <p>The parents might even be able to escape long enough for a coffee and romantic walk around the forgotten apple orchard. But strictly no kissing. Gross.</p> <p>They can even catch a puppet show at the mini-theatre next door. Oh, wait – that’s for kids too.</p> <p><strong>Great for:</strong> Ages 3 to 15<br /><strong>Price:</strong> Free. The play park is $3. Pony rides are $8.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Métropolitain de Paris – The Metro</strong></p> <p>The Paris Metro is one of the oldest, largest and most efficient subways in the world. It still maintains its original Art Nouveau entrances and architecture and is a great example of Paris’ original aesthetics. It’s also a great chance to people watch, and get around the city.</p> <p>Every corner of Paris is full of quaint French bistros and winding cobbled streets, and all of the 303 stations will get you there. The trains have clear signage, giving the kids an opportunity to navigate.</p> <p>Many of the larger stations are covered in art and elaborate tiling, so it helps to plan your route beforehand. Louvre-Rivoli, Concorde, Varenne, and Cluny-La Sorbonne are a couple of the stations worth checking out.</p> <p>Be careful not to get caught up in rush hour. The Paris Metro is also one of the busiest.</p> <p><strong>Great for:</strong> Ages 4 and up. Limited access for strollers.<br /><strong>Price:</strong> $3/ticket. A carnet (ten tickets) is $23.<br />You can also purchase unlimited metro travel passes that also include buses and trains to airports, Disneyland and Château de Versailles at all stations. More information on the RATP website.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Champs De Mars – Field of Mars</strong></p> <p>The Eiffel Tour is beautiful from the top – but when you’re on it, you can’t see it. The Champs de Mars gardens below are the perfect place for a picnic with a view. It’s free, and you don’t have to stand in a queue.</p> <p>These sunny gardens are delightful on summer days, and at night you can rug up and sit under the stars. Each night, for 5 minutes on the hour, the <strong>Eiffel Tower</strong> is lit up with sparkles that beam over Paris.</p> <p>Why not head to one of Paris’ many fresh food markets and make your own French meal? Fresh baguettes and cheese cost next to nothing for an easy lunch. The kids can have a go at reading all the French labels to find their favourite foods in the supermarché.</p> <p><strong>Great for:</strong> All ages<br /><strong>Price:</strong> Free</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Le Marais – The Marsh</strong></p> <p>Le Marais is constantly reinventing itself. Originally the aristocratic district, this area is now home to the vibrant youth culture in Paris. It’s cobblestone streets are covered in ivy and lined with funky boutiques, galleries and bistros.</p> <p>You can get lost in groovy second-hand stores <strong>Free P Star</strong> and <strong>Kilo Shop</strong>, where leather jackets can be found for as little as $2. Stop for some coffee and cake at <strong>Lily of the Valley</strong>, or even give baking a go with their pastry lessons.</p> <p>One of Le Marais’ hidden gems is <strong>59 Rivoli</strong>. The creative art space stands out as a unique bubble of creativity in the area’s traditional streets. The staircase connecting the galleries multiple levels is painted from floor to ceiling: each floor a maze of sketches and canvas. You can usually catch the 20 permanent artists at work in the studio space, surrounded by their own creations.</p> <p><strong>Great for: Teens<br />Price: Free</strong></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Musee D’Art Moderne – The Paris Museum of Modern Art</strong></p> <p>While Paris is full of classic art galleries and museums, traditional portraits and landscapes may not be number one for kids. The Musee d’Art Moderne offers a welcome change.</p> <p>The gallery is constantly changing its exhibitions, so there is something for everyone. Especially under 18s, who get in free. The museum also offers visual creation workshops for families, and yoga and wutao classes for something more calming. There’s even a variation for parents with bubs under 8 months.</p> <p>It might be worth checking which artworks the kids are looking at in school because chances are; they’re in Paris. The city has plenty of galleries and museums, and on the first Sunday of every month, they are all free.</p> <p><strong>Great for:</strong> Ages 7 and up<br /><strong>Price:</strong> All museums are are free on the first Sunday of every month. Musee d’Art Moderne’s permanent exhibitions are free. Temporary exhibitions are free for kids and $8 – 20 for adults.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Shakespeare &amp; Company – Bookstore</strong></p> <p>If you hop off the Metro at <strong>Saint-Michel-Notre-Dame</strong>, this stretch of the <strong>Steine</strong> in the 4th arrondissement has plenty of hustle and bustle. Shakespeare &amp; Company is an enchanting, independent bookstore on the banks of the river, and all the books are written in English.</p> <p>When it opened in the 17th Century, writers and artists were welcomed to sleep among the bookshelves in exchange for a couple of hours work in the shop. It’s estimated that over 30,000 of the named ‘tumbleweeds’ have stayed a night.</p> <p>The bookstore offers a great variety, including picture books and kids novels. See if you can find <strong>Aggie</strong>, the friendly bookshop cat who is usually in her chair on the second floor.</p> <p>The store hosts one free literary event a week. Baked treats, fresh juices and coffee can all be found at the <strong>Shakespeare and Company Cafe</strong>, located next door.</p> <p>Remember to head over the <strong>Seine</strong> and tick off the <strong>Notre-Dame</strong> when you have a moment – it’s free. When you’re finished, wander through the gardens of <strong>City Park</strong> and head towards the <strong>Maubert Mutualité</strong> market for some fresh food.</p>

International Travel

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7 morning brain exercises to clear your mind

<p>It can be mentally exhausting to try and resume your “normal” schedule during coronavirus. You may be working remotely, helping your children adapt to hybrid learning, keeping your family safe from coronavirus, or all of the above. Add trying to practice self-care in this mix of endless responsibilities. All this stress can zap your concentration, make you irritable or depressed, and potentially damage your professional and personal relationships.</p> <p>However, brain exercises, especially before work, can help get you through your day. “Working out areas of the brain before a full day can set us on a path of increased agility and flexibility in our thinking and enable us to communicate more calmly and effectively with our colleagues,” says Dr Jennifer Wolkin, a clinical neuropsychologist. Fold a mix of these brain exercises into your morning routine and you’ll find yourself working smarter and more efficiently from the get-go.</p> <p><strong>Relax with a good read</strong></p> <p>In today’s fast-paced day and age, it’s hard to remember to unplug and take time for the simple things that relax and stimulate the mind. Reading is certainly one of those—be it a chapter book, newspaper, or online article. “Some of the best activities to perform are ones that enrich the brain with new information, like reading,” says neurosurgeon Dr Jason Liauw. “Taking in a good book or the morning paper is not only a calming way to start your day, but it also can help you reorient your priorities, taking you momentarily out of the daily grind from yesterday before today’s begins.” Most importantly, reading can also cause a frameshift in your mind, so that when you’re in the middle of your day, you may be able to look at your routine and tasks through a different lens.</p> <p><strong>Do exercise</strong></p> <p>You probably know how important of a role exercise plays in your health and mood, but there are some additional brain-boosting reasons to sneak in a workout before work. “Exercise actually alters brain chemistry and has even been likened to the effect of taking antidepressants,” says Wolkin. “It signals the release of several key neurotransmitters, many of which play a vital role in keeping our brain sharp as we age.” Exercise also helps pump blood flow and oxygen to the brain, allowing your grey matter to work to its highest capacity, which translates to better and sharper decision making, judgment, and memory.</p> <p><strong>Practise meditation</strong></p> <p>“Studies have found that the amygdala, known as the brain’s ‘fight or flight’ centre and the seat of our fearful and anxious emotions, decreases in brain cell volume after mindfulness practice,” says Wolkin. “The impact mindfulness exerts on our brain is born from routine—a slow, steady and consistent reckoning of our realities, and the ability to take a step back, become more aware, more accepting, less judgemental and less reactive.” Meditators also show a greater ability to recall information faster, leading researchers to believe that the ability to quickly “screen out” mental noise, allows the working memory to search and find information needed more quickly and efficiently, says brain expert Daniel Amen, double-board-certified psychiatrist, physician, and author of Time for Bed Sleepyhead.</p> <p><strong>Play classical music in the background</strong></p> <p>The gentle, peaceful sounds of classical music from the likes of Mozart and Beethoven have long been touted as beneficial to the brain and productivity in general. “Listening to classical music while getting dressed in the morning or exercising is a one-two punch of neural circuitry that’s been shown by researchers to significantly improve verbal fluency, cognitive functioning, and overall focus and concentration,” says Dian Griesel, entrepreneur and business and health spokesperson.</p> <p><strong>Play a fast logic-based game</strong></p> <p>Lifelong learners are definitely onto something, as continued education—not just higher education—promotes brain health and creates new neural connections. “Even just taking a stab at a crossword puzzle or taking online quizzes that challenge your mind, can help build cognitive reserves,” says Wolkin. The best tasks for the brain are not only challenging, but are varied and novel—think Sudoku, or memory-recall games or apps.</p> <p>“It’s important to keep brain-boosting activities constantly changing with increasing complexity as well as cross-training brain activities that use different parts of the brain,” says Dr Kristin M. Mascotti. “Consistency is key, and many of these techniques can be done in just a few minutes every day with different skills tested on different days.”</p> <p><strong>Make a gratitude list</strong></p> <p>When you bring your attention to the things in your life for which you’re grateful, your brain actually works better, especially with a gratitude list. “Brain imaging studies show that negative thought patterns change the brain in a negative way, but that conversely, practicing gratitude literally helps you have a brain to be grateful for,” says Dr Amen. Every day, write down five things you’re grateful for—whether that’s your dog, your job, or that the football season has started back up again.</p> <p><strong>Get a good night’s rest</strong></p> <p>It sounds obvious, but between 33-45 per cent of adults report they get insufficient sleep at least one night per month, according to the Sleep Health Foundation. “Sleep is proven in countless studies to help our ability to recall—which directly affects our capability to control both our behaviour and learning,” says Griesel. “Sleep deficits actually result in performance comparable to intoxication.” The best way to prime your body for a great work performance the following day is to stick to a sleep schedule. Make sure that it doesn’t change much on the weekends. Also, remember to practice a relaxing bedtime ritual, like reading a book. Make sure your room is dark and cool at an ideal temperature of around 19 degrees celsius.</p> <p><em>Written by Jenn Sinrich. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/7-morning-brain-exercises-to-clear-your-mind">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

Mind

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5 traits you didn’t know you inherit from mum (and 4 you inherit from dad)

<p>Do you have your mum’s button nose? Did your dad pass on the curse of sneezing in bright sunlight? And where did your baby’s red, curly hair come from when there hasn’t been a redhead in your family for generations? These questions may sound simple but the answers get complicated fast. Why? Because the science of genetic inheritance is complicated, says genetic counsellor, Dawn Allain. “It’s nearly impossible to tease out exactly where each of your traits came from,” she explains. “Most traits are influenced by many different genes and you inherit some from each parent.” Plus, there’s the influence your environment plays; just because you have a gene for a certain trait doesn’t always mean you’ll end up with it, she adds.</p> <p><strong>How you inherit traits</strong></p> <p>Still, it’s fun to ask those questions and while there aren’t many detailed answers, there are a few basic things genetics can tell you about traits you inherit from your mum and those you got from our dad, Allain says. But first, you need to know how inheritance works.</p> <p>“There are three main ways you can inherit traits from your parents,” she explains. First is through a dominant gene – if you inherit a dominant gene you will develop that trait. Take eye colour, for example. If either of your parents have brown eyes, you likely will have brown eyes as this is a dominant trait. Second is through a recessive gene – both parents have to have the recessive gene for you to have that trait. For instance, if you have blue eyes then both of your parents must carry a gene for blue eyes, even if their eye colour isn’t blue. Lastly, there are X-linked traits which are found only on the X chromosome and are passed on through the mother.</p> <p><strong>Your ability to lose weight</strong></p> <p>There are two types of fat in your body: ‘good’ brown fat, which increases your metabolism and helps you maintain a healthy weight, and ‘bad’ white fat, which can cause obesity and disease if you have too much of it. Everyone has some of each type but how much brown fat you have – and therefore how high your metabolism is – may be inherited from your mum, according to a study published in Nature Communications. Another trait you get from your mum is your intelligence.</p> <p><strong>How easily you gain weight</strong></p> <p>However, while mum may be helping you out with the brown fat, you can blame your dad for your white fat, the Nature Communications study found. How much fat you store, particularly around your organs may be partly determined by genes passed down from your father, the researchers said. Genetics aren’t destiny when it comes to your weight, your lifestyle choices play an even bigger part.</p> <p><strong>Your ability to focus</strong></p> <p>If your mother has lower levels of serotonin, a brain chemical linked to mood, then you’re more likely to develop attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder later in life, according to a study published in JAMA Psychiatry. The genes, passed down from mum to kid, that impact serotonin production also seem to influence your ability to focus. Sound like you?</p> <p><strong>If you hit puberty early</strong></p> <p>Puberty, and all the fun milestones that come along with it, like acne, cracking voices, or getting your period while wearing white shorts, is a rite of passage many children go through on their way to becoming an adult. Both parents’ genetics play a part in determining when exactly you start the big change but if you started puberty early– before age eight in girls and nine in boys – that may be due to a gene you inherit from your father, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Specifically, they identified that a genetic mutation leads to a type of premature puberty, meaning that if you have it, you’ll have to deal with all that stuff before any of your friends.</p> <p><strong>Your laugh lines</strong></p> <p>How well you age and how much you show it is determined on a cellular level by the accumulation of damage over your lifetime to your mitochondrial DNA – genes you only get from your mum. Environmental factors like sun exposure, smoking, and an unhealthy diet can cause mtDNA damage but some of the damage can be inherited from your mother, according to a study published in Nature. The more mtDNA with mutations you inherit from your mother, the faster you age and the more it will show in traits like wrinkles and grey hair.</p> <p><strong>Your mood</strong></p> <p>Mothers can influence your mood in many ways and it’s not just by grounding you or serving broccoli three times a week. The structure of the part of the brain known as the corticolimbic system, which controls emotional regulation and plays a role in mood disorders like depression, is more likely to be passed down from mothers to daughters than from mothers to sons or from fathers to children of either gender, according to a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. This may mean that daughters at least partly inherit their mood from their mothers.</p> <p><strong>The genders of your children</strong></p> <p>Obviously the genes from you and your spouse determine the gender of your children. But did you know that which gender genes you pass on may be inherited from your father? This is how it works: a man with many brothers is more likely to have sons, while a man with many sisters is more likely to have daughters, according to a study published in Evolutionary Biology.</p> <p><strong>Your memory</strong></p> <p>It’s been known for some time that a family history of Alzheimer’s disease significantly increases the risk for developing the illness, but a new study, published in Biological Psychiatry, found that the genetic risk primarily comes from your mother. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia later in life, affecting nearly 459,000 Australians, so it’s important to know what factors increase your risk – including your mother’s medical history – so you can start taking steps to protect your brain health now, the researchers noted. Medical history is only one of the questions you should ask your parents before it’s too late.</p> <p><strong>Your fertility</strong></p> <p>A woman’s fertility may be impacted by a gene she inherited from her father, according to a study published in Science. In a normal egg cell, a part of the cell called the centrioles is eliminated as part of the natural development process. However, if the centrioles aren’t eliminated – often due to a genetic dysfunction, passed on by her dad – then the woman is sterile, researchers explained.</p> <p><strong>Your hairline?</strong></p> <p>You may have heard that how and when a man loses his hair is due to an inherited trait from his mum’s side. However, a study, published in PLoS Genetics, of over 55,000 men has proved this to be a myth. Researchers found 287 independent genetic signals that were linked to male-patterned hair loss and while 40 were only found on the X chromosome, meaning they were inherited on the maternal side, the rest were scattered throughout DNA inherited from both patterns. Interestingly, some genes associated with hair loss also seem to be associated with an increased risk for heart disease in men. While some traits are inherited, others are learned.</p> <p><em>Written by Charlotte Hilton. This article first appeared on </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/5-traits-you-didnt-know-you-inherit-from-mum-and-4-you-inherit-from-dad?pages=1"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Relationships

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The missing question from New Zealand’s cannabis debate: what about personal freedom and individual rights?

<p>Much of the debate on New Zealand’s referendum on recreational cannabis legalisation has focused on health, the economy, criminal justice and the uncertainties about the impact on youth and adult use.</p> <p>But one argument is oddly missing from the debate - personal freedom, autonomy and individual rights.</p> <p>This is striking, because the issue of personal liberties has traditionally been at the forefront of cannabis reform activism. At the heart of all public health laws is the conflict between the powers of the state and the individual’s liberty, privacy and autonomy.</p> <p>In the past two years, constitutional courts in several countries have ruled the prohibition of use, possession and private cultivation of cannabis interferes with an individual’s right to privacy. They’ve said protecting public health and security does not justify state punishment.</p> <p>It may come as a surprise, but about half of the countries in Europe do not prohibit the use of drugs (as New Zealand does). Instead, they choose only to ban their possession.</p> <p>The difference is more than academic. Prohibition of consumption may give police extraordinary powers, such as taking biological samples from people as evidence. Drug testing is intrusive and should only be done if there is a significant public interest to protect.</p> <p>Some countries go even further. They ban possession and use of drugs, but only in public spaces, on the understanding that drug laws exist to prevent public nuisance.</p> <p>In Spain, the distinction between use in public and private led to the so-called “cannabis social clubs”. Users grow and share cannabis among club members in private settings.</p> <p><strong>The rights and the risks</strong><br />The fundamental personal right to ingest a substance that has little impact on others has long been argued by cannabis activists such as NORML (National Organisation for the Reform of Marijuana Laws).</p> <p>With this argument largely absent from current debate in New Zealand (as well as many other jurisdictions contemplating reform), debate focuses instead on the potential to create jobs and tax revenue (Colorado), reduce arrests and discrimination (Illinois), address public security and drug-related violence (Uruguay) and restrict youth access to cannabis and enhance public health (Canada).</p> <p>The aim of New Zealand’s proposed Cannabis Legalisation and Control Bill is to apply market controls to reduce harms associated with cannabis and restrict access by young people. But, as we have argued before, the goal of reducing overall use over time will be hard to achieve via a commercial market.</p> <p>The personal rights argument can struggle to win over people concerned about the health and social implications of legalisation, especially given their experience of other public health debates.</p> <p>The alcohol industry, for example, pushed individual rights and consumer responsibility to undermine effective public health measures such as higher taxes and bans on advertising.</p> <p><strong>Personal choice vs public health</strong><br />The assumption all adults can make responsible choices about using psychoactive drugs is also challenged. There are risks of dependency that could interfere with personal autonomy, and the psychological influence of marketing that targets vulnerable groups such as the young and poor.</p> <p>There is a fine line between respecting people’s right to choose and facilitating the normalisation and commercialisation of something that could lead to poor public health.</p> <p>The use of any psychoactive substance carries the potential to harm personal and family relationships, and cause unsafe driving or workplace accidents. This reinforces the argument that some degree of regulation and state intervention will always be necessary.</p> <p>The age-old question is how best to balance the powers of the state with individual rights to privacy and autonomy, while protecting public health and vulnerable groups.</p> <p><strong>The absence of recreational users’ voices</strong><br />Society appears more receptive to the personal right to use medicinal cannabis.</p> <p>Despite the (as yet) limited scientific evidence for the effectiveness of cannabis in medical treatment, greater legal availability of medicinal cannabis attracts good public support. This is largely based on respecting a person’s decisions about how to treat their illness.</p> <p>The right to use cannabis recreationally requires decision makers to consider the benefits people get from its use, such as pleasure or relaxation. But this is often forgotten or avoided in drug reform debates.</p> <p>Medicinal cannabis users have been actively involved in the cannabis law reform debate, with a representative on the Medicinal Cannabis Advisory Group. But recreational cannabis users seem to be largely absent from the public debate.</p> <p>Including more voices from recreational cannabis users could provide new ways of thinking about balancing the powers of the state with individual rights.</p> <p>Given the current uncertainties about the long-term health and social impacts of legalisation, the individual rights issue may actually be among the more convincing arguments for reform.</p> <p><em>Written by </em><em>Marta Rychert</em><em> and </em><em>Chris Wilkins</em><em>. This article first appeared <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-missing-question-from-new-zealands-cannabis-debate-what-about-personal-freedom-and-individual-rights-146304">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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Princess Mary opens Australian War Memorial in Copenhagen

<p>Crown Princess Mary of Denmark has unveiled a new Australian War Memorial in Copenhagen.</p> <p>She attended the event at Churchill Park on Thursday and was joined by Australian AMmbassador Mary Ellen Miller for the unveiling.</p> <p>Princess Mary placed a wreath with a ribbon decorated with her monogram on the monument.</p> <p>The memorial reads: "This stone stands in memorial to Australian servicemen of the first and second world wars who are at rest in Danish soil. Their valiant sacrifice stands testament to the common devotion to freedom and democracy that our nations share.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFPPkgJAGE8/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFPPkgJAGE8/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by DET DANSKE KONGEHUS 🇩🇰 (@detdanskekongehus)</a> on Sep 17, 2020 at 5:47am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"They shall not grow old as we are left to grow old. Age shall not weary them nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning we will remember them.</p> <p>"Lest we forget."</p> <p>The memorial was developed and funded by the Australian Embassy in Copenhagen as the Australian army and service personnel helped liberate Denmark during WWII.</p> <p>This was after the country was invaded by German forces despite declaring Denmark as neutral.</p> <p>Australian forces joined the British in freeing Denmark from German occupation.</p> <p>Princess Mary also attended a World Health Organisation meeting to discuss the toll of the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>She participated via video link and spoke of the "uncertainty, worry and sadness" of recent months.</p> <p>"I am sure that you, as I, have experienced uncertainty, worry and sadness in recent months, as we try to find meaning in rapidly changing events, as we are unable to follow the familiar patterns of daily life, and as we are prevented from spending time with friends and loved ones," <em>Royal Central</em> reports the royal as saying.</p> <p>"For many, the psychological, emotional, social and economic costs of the pandemic will be felt for years to come," she added.</p>

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Tony Abbott’s major boarding pass blunder

<p><span>Former Australia Prime Minister Tony Abbott is not the only one to ever share a screen grab of his boarding pass onto Instagram, however it has been revealed that it took hackers only 45 minutes to get private information about the politician purely due to one simple mistake.</span><br /><br /><span>Australian tech expert Alex Hope said he was able to retrieve Mr Abbott’s phone number and passport details from the Instagram post in March.</span><br /><br /><span>“A big thank you to all the team on QF26 from Tokyo. Hope to see you flying again soon!,” Mr Abbott captioned the photo, which has since been deleted. Pity.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Hope said he took on the challenge to hack the former PM after he was dared by a friend in his group chat that asked: “Can you hack this man?”.</span><br /><br /><span>The “hacker” says finding the information was easy as he simply took the details from the image on Mr Abbott’s Instagram to log into Qantas’ booking page.</span><br /><br /><span>He was able to read the HTML code and find Mr Abbott’s phone number and passport number within minutes.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837940/tony-abbott-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ebd8ba1c75634c80a6a7672b0641ae1c" /><br /><br /><span>In a blog post, the self-described “hacker” noted that he had tried for six months to alert Mr Abbott to what had happened.</span><br /><br /><span>“I had Tony Abbott’s passport number, phone number, and weird Qantas messages about him. I was the only one who knew I had these,” he wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>“Anyone who saw that Instagram post could also have them. I felt like I had to like, tell someone about this. Someone with like, responsibilities. Someone with an email signature,” he added.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Hope said he tracked Mr Abbott’s personal assistant down after many months of trying.</span><br /><br /><span>He then had a quick chat with Mr Abbott one-on-one.</span><br /><br /><span>“Mostly, he wanted to check whether his understanding of how I’d found his passport number was correct (it was). He also wanted to ask me how to learn about ‘the IT’,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“He asked some intelligent questions, like ‘how much information is in a boarding pass, and what do people like me need to know to be safe?’, and ‘why can you get a passport number from a boarding pass, but not from a bus ticket?’.</span><br /><br /><span>“The answer is that boarding passes have your password printed on them, and bus tickets don’t. You can use that password to log in to a website (widely regarded as a bad move), and at that point all bets are off, websites can just do whatever they want.”</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Hope says Qantas fixed the bug that allowed him to retrieve Abbott’s private details was fixed in July thanks to his warnings.</span><br /><br /><span>He says that he hopes this incident will make people think twice about what they post to social media.</span><br /><br /><span>“The point is that if someone famous can unknowingly post their boarding pass, anyone can,” Mr Hope wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>Qantas say they have tightened their protocols.</span><br /><br /><span>They urge passengers to keep their booking details private.</span><br /><br /><span>“Our standard advice to customers is to not post pictures of the boarding pass, or to at least obscure the key personal information if they do, because of the detail it contains,” a spokesperson said.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Abbott has since been issued a new passport number.</span></p>

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Brave terminally ill bride's battle comes to a tragic end

<p><span>Just days after tying the knot with her husband, Ashleigh Simrajh has died after her long-fought battle with cancer.</span><br /><br /><span>The 23-year-old’s husband Jason has paid tribute to his bride with an emotional post just days after he had the opportunity to wed her in a powerful ceremony.</span><br /><br /><span>Ashleigh died from malignant melanoma and was told in early September she had only days to live after being diagnosed in 2019.</span><br /><br /><span>She was granted one last wish to marry Jason before the disease claimed her life, and on September 5 the brave terminally ill bride “fought like a superstar” and said “I do” in front of 50 close friends and family at Sea World Resort on the Gold Coast.</span><br /><br /><span>Jason paid tribute to the 23-year-old after her battle with cancer came to a tragic end.</span><br /><br /><span>“Words cannot describe the pain I’m feeling right now, I’m absolutely devastated and my heart is completely shattered,” he wrote on Facebook Tuesday morning.</span><br /><br /><span>“You were so brave and strong and I know that you tried your absolute best fighting this battle, you couldn’t have tried any harder than you did.</span><br /><br /><span>“I’m so proud of you babe.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837891/ashleigh-bride-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f8175c7e93e448e684b2cd45833f9cc5" /><br /><br /><span>Jason described his new wife as the “most beautiful woman” and said he always held out “so much hope” that she would get better again”.</span><br /><br /><span>He also talked about the couple’s dream to have kids would never be fulfilled.</span><br /><br /><span>“We had so much planned out! We pictured having kids, cute kids too! (Only because of your gorgeous looks, not mine haha), travelling the world and most importantly growing old together,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“I think growing old with you was something I wanted to do the most. Not much else mattered to me than to just be there with you for my whole life.”</span><br /><br /><span>In the lengthy post, Jason also described feeling “completely empty inside” without Ashleigh adding it “doesn’t feel real” she was gone and that he had been “ripped apart” by her loss.</span><br /><br /><span>“I really don’t know what I’m going to do without you now. I’m so lost and feel completely empty inside,” he wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>“It doesn’t even feel real to me that you’re gone, it just feels like I’m in this horrible dream which I can’t escape.”</span><br /><br /><span>Ashleigh’s father, Tony Simrajh, shared an update to the family’s Go Fund Me page just a week before she died, saying his daughter was at home with a dedicated nurse.</span><br /><br /><span>“Ashleigh does not want to go back into hospital and we as a family are going to make sure that she remains at home surrounded by the people who love her,” he said.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837892/ashleigh-bride-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/540a6059dd6d439c996f87e6aa743f8b" /><br /><br /><span>“Ashleigh is still fighting so hard and she is still defying what the doctors have told her. Again this morning we got told to brace for the worst as she only had a few hours left which devastated us all, but she has rallied and is looking good again at the moment.”</span><br /><br /><span>“Our Ashleigh is a fighter and is fighting as hard as she can to stay here with us.”</span><br /><br /><span>The 23-year-old was diagnosed with malignant melanoma over a year after she was told the lump on her leg was not suspicious.</span><br /><br /><span>Ashleigh was just 20-years-old when she spotted a lump on her leg and after it became painful and started bleeding, she knew something wasn’t right.</span><br /><br /><span>However, she was told the lump was nothing more than a “wart” and was sent to a surgeon without taking a biopsy.</span><br /><br /><span>It was when she knocked it and it began to bleed that she decided to visit another doctor who performed a biopsy and informed her it was cancer.</span><br /><br /><span>The cancer then spread to her lungs, liver and chest.</span><br /><br /><span>Ashleigh’s family have since launched legal action against two practitioners.</span><br /><br /><span>Her father Tony Simrajh told Daily Mail Australia that the legal case is not about money, but is actually about the doctors “owning up to their errors and taking responsibility”.</span><br /><br /><span>“Ash weighs 34 kilograms now and is skin and bones. She is under palliative care and struggles for every single breath,” Mr Simrajh said before his daughter’s passing.</span><br /><br /><span>He described his daughter as “amazing” and someone who deserved better than the challenges she had.</span><br /><br /><span>“She is on a mission to get her story out there for young people to get checked but also to get another doctor to have a look at it if you are still not sure,” the heartbroken father said on a GoFundMe page set up for Ashleigh.</span><br /><br /><span>“That would have saved her life if she did.”</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Simrajh’s said that Ashleigh’s wedding was the happiest and saddest day of his life.</span><br /><br /><span>“To see her so fragile on what should have been her happiest day was heartbreaking but yet seeing the love that was in the room for her was very inspirational,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>Prime Minister Scott Morrison sent her a letter in late August thanking her for her efforts in reminding Australians about the dangers of skin cancer.</span><br /><br /><span>“I know these are poignant days for you: a wedding time with the family and friends and reflections on what was. Even Prime Minister’s can’t fathom why such things happen in life.</span><br /><br /><span>“But I do know you will be surrounded by love – and I hope the joy of your wedding day surpasses your dreams,” the Prime Minister said.</span><br /><br /><span>Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk had also heard about Ashleigh’s story and called her ahead of her wedding to send flowers and her will wishes.</span><br /><br /><span>She gave Ashleigh her mobile number to send wedding pictures and to reach out to her if she needed anything.</span><br /><br /><span>“Ashleigh’s message is making it to so many people, she is saving lives,” her father said on the GoFundMe page.</span><br /><br /><span>They set up the GoFundMe page to share Ashleigh’s story and spread her message, and say they have received an overwhelming amount of support.</span><br /><br /><span>“Please share this link not just for the donations but so everyone sees her story and help her spread the message to everyone re medical checks,” her father wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>“So let’s spread Ashleigh’s story it may save someone’s life.”</span></p>

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Chinese whistleblower claims she has proof COVID-19 came from Wuhan lab

<p>A Chinese virologist has made claims that COVID-19 was manufactured in a laboratory and did not come from “nature” like the Chinese government is claiming.</p> <p>Doctor Li-Meng Yan, a scientist who conducted some of the earliest research on COVID-19, joined the British talk show <em>Loose Women </em>to share her claims.</p> <p>She says that reports the virus came from a wet market are a “smokescreen”.</p> <p>“It comes from the lab, the lab in Wuhan and the lab is controlled by China’s government,” she said.</p> <p>She says her source are “local doctors”.</p> <p>“The first thing is the market in Wuhan ... is a smokescreen.</p> <p>“This virus is not from nature.”</p> <p>Yan earlier claimed she was told to keep a secret about the possibility of human-to-human transmission of COVID-19 back in December.</p> <p>She went on to say that former supervisors at the Hong Kong School of Public Health silenced her when she tried to sound the alarm.</p> <p>She fled Hong Kong for America in April.</p> <p>Dr Yan’s next plan is to release genomic sequencing that she says will trace the virus back to a lab.</p> <p>“The genome sequence is like a human fingerprint,” she said.</p> <p>“So based on this you can identify these things. I use the evidence … to tell people why this has come from the lab in China, why they are the only ones who made it.”</p> <p>China has repeatedly said that COVID-19 may not have originated in Asia at all.</p> <p>In July, the country pointed its finger at Spain, claiming that wastewater testing there found traces of the virus in March 2019.</p>

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The first step to conserving the Great Barrier Reef is understanding what lives there

<p>Look at this photo of two coral skeletons below. You’d be forgiven for thinking they’re the same species, or at least closely related, but looks can be deceiving. These two species diverged tens of millions of years ago, probably earlier than our human lineage split from baboons and macaques.</p> <p>Scientists have traditionally used morphology (size, shape and colour) to identify species and infer their evolutionary history. But most species were first described in the <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/027073a0">19th century</a>, and based solely on features of the coral skeleton visible under a microscope.</p> <p>Morphology remains important for species recognition. The problem is we don’t know whether a particular morphological feature reflects species ancestry, or evolved independently.</p> <p>Our new study <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1055790320302165">examined</a> the traditional ideas of coral species and their evolutionary relationships using “<a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1755-0998.12736">phylogenomics</a>” – comparing thousands of DNA sequences across coral species.</p> <p>Our results revealed the diversity and distributions of corals are vastly different to what we previously thought. It shows we still don’t know many fundamental aspects about the corals on Great Barrier Reef.</p> <p>And after three mass bleaching events in five years, not having a handle on the basics could mean <a href="http://elibrary.gbrmpa.gov.au/jspui/bitstream/11017/3569/4/Draft-restoration-adaptation-policy.pdf">our attempts to intervene</a> and help coral survive climate change may have unexpected consequences.</p> <p><strong>How do we know which species is which?</strong></p> <p>Despite being one of the <a href="https://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1755-263X.2010.00146.x">best-studied</a> marine ecosystems on Earth, there are fundamental knowledge gaps around the Great Barrier Reef, including:</p> <ol> <li>how many coral species live there?</li> <li>how do we identify them?</li> <li>where are they found across the vast Great Barrier Reef ecosystem?</li> </ol> <p>Finding the answers to these questions starts with accurate “taxonomy” – the science of naming and classifying living things.</p> <p>Identifying species based on how similar they look may seem straightforward. As Darwin famously said, closely related species often share morphological features because they inherited them from a common ancestor.</p> <p>However, this can be misleading if two unrelated species independently acquire similar features. This process, called convergent evolution, often occurs when different species are faced with similar ecological challenges.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/phenomena/2015/02/06/why-an-ichthyosaur-looks-like-a-dolphin/">classic example</a> of convergent evolution is dolphins and the prehistoric ichthyosaurs. These animals are unrelated, but share many similarities since they both occupy a similar ecological niche.</p> <p>At the other end of the spectrum, morphology can vary considerably within a single species. An alien taxonomist visiting Earth could be forgiven for describing the Chihuahua and the Irish Wolfhound as two distinct species.</p> <p><strong>Bringing coral taxonomy into the 21st century</strong></p> <p>We used molecular phylogenetics, a field of research that uses variations in DNA sequences to reconstruct genealogies. From corals to humans, molecular phylogenetics has revolutionised our understanding of the origins and evolution of life on Earth.</p> <p>Molecular approaches have <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-31305-4_4">revolutionised</a> our understanding of the diversity and evolution of corals, shedding light on <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nature02339">deeper branches</a> in the coral “tree of life”. But within hyper-diverse, ecologically-important coral groups, such as the staghorn corals from the genus <em>Acropora</em>, we are still in the dark.</p> <p><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1055790320302165">Our new technique</a> addresses this by comparing thousands of key regions across coral genomes (the entire genetic code of an organism) to help identify species in this ecologically important group for the first time. This method will also allow us to identify morphological features that do reflect shared ancestry and help us recognise species when diving in the reef.</p> <p>About a quarter of all coral species on the Great Barrier Reef are staghorn corals, and they provide much of the three-dimensional structure fishes and many other coral reef animals rely on, just like trees in a forest.</p> <p>Unfortunately, staghorn corals are also highly susceptible to threats such as thermal bleaching and crown-of-thorns seastar predation. The future of reefs will be heavily influenced by the fate of staghorn corals.</p> <p><strong>The risk of ‘silent extinctions’</strong></p> <p>While we don’t yet know how many coral species occur on the Great Barrier Reef or how widespread they are, many species appear to have far smaller ranges than we previously thought.</p> <p>For example, we now know some of the corals on Lord Howe Island are endemic to only a few reefs in subtropical eastern Australia and <a href="https://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.3626.4.11">occur nowhere else</a>, not even on the Great Barrier Reef. They evolved in isolation and bleach at <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gcb.14772">much lower temperatures</a> than corals on tropical reefs.</p> <p>This means Lord Howe Island’s corals are of far greater conservation concern than currently recognised, because <a href="https://theconversation.com/bleaching-has-struck-the-southernmost-coral-reef-in-the-world-114433">one severe bleaching event</a> could cause the extinction of these species.</p> <p>The risk of “silent extinctions”, where species go extinct without even being noticed, is one of the reasons behind the Australian Academy of Science’s <a href="https://www.science.org.au/support/analysis/decadal-plans-science/discovering-biodiversity-decadal-plan-taxonomy">Decadal Plan for Taxonomy</a>, which has led to the ambitious goal to document all Australian species in the next 25 years.</p> <p><strong>Intervening now may have unexpected consequences</strong></p> <p>In April, the <a href="https://www.gbrrestoration.org/reports#technical-reports">Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program</a> concept feasibility study found 160 possible interventions to help save the Great Barrier Reef. <a href="https://www.gbrrestoration.org/">Proposed interventions</a> include moving corals from warm to cooler waters, introducing genetically-engineered heat-tolerant corals into wild populations, and the harvest and release of coral larvae.</p> <p>What could go wrong? Well-intentioned interventions may inadvertently threaten coral communities, for example, through introduction or movement of diseases within the Great Barrier Reef. <a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/amphibians/c/cane-toad/">Cane toads</a> are a famous example of unintended consequences: introduced in the 1930s to control an insect pest, they are now wreaking havoc on Australian ecosystems.</p> <p>Any intervention affecting the ecology of a system as complex as the Great Barrier Reef requires a precautionary approach to minimise the chance of unintended and potentially negative consequences.</p> <p>What we need, at this time, is far greater investment in fundamental biodiversity research. Without this information, we are not in a position to judge whether particular actions will threaten the resilience of the reef, rather than enhance it.</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Bridge, Andrea Quattrini, Andrew Baird and Peter Cowman. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-first-step-to-conserving-the-great-barrier-reef-is-understanding-what-lives-there-146097">The Conversation.</a> </em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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How the decline in Chinese tourists around the world has hit the luxury sector

<p>Large groups of Chinese visitors have become a pillar of the global tourism industry. Coronavirus has not only put paid to this enormous source of income for major cities and sights around the world, it is having a massive knock-on effect for the luxury goods business.</p> <p>For any tourist, buying souvenirs is a key part of the holiday experience. They might be trinkets such as key rings or fridge magnets, a T-shirt emblazoned with the slogan “I ❤ NY” or a Russian matryoshka doll. But a significant number of Chinese tourists prefer to spend large sums on luxury items, such as designer clothes and accessories, when they travel overseas.</p> <p>Roughly one-third of global spending on luxury goods was credited <a href="https://www.voguebusiness.com/consumers/chinese-consumers-luxury-purchases-growth-bain">to Chinese consumers in 2018</a>. Consultants at Bain predict this <a href="https://jingdaily.com/bain-company-chinese-consumers-will-make-up-half-of-global-luxury-purchases-by-2025/">to rise to 50% by 2025</a>. Before the coronavirus pandemic, nearly all of this £85 billion worth of spending (92%) was done <a href="https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/mckinsey/featured%20insights/china/how%20young%20chinese%20consumers%20are%20reshaping%20global%20luxury/mckinsey-china-luxury-report-2019-how-young-chinese-consumers-are-reshaping-global-luxury.ashx">outside the Chinese mainland</a> .</p> <p>What’s more, most of this overseas shopping is done by women between the ages of 19 and 29, according to a 2018 survey of <a href="http://223.27.21.115/~allegiantmediaco/wp-content/uploads/Documents/CN-Travel-Shopper-White-Paper-Final.pdf">over 750 million Chinese people</a>. From our interviews <a href="https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/TR-08-2019-0335/full/html">with many of these women</a>, it seems clear that as the Chinese economy recovers from coronavirus they will return to spending. Where they are able to travel and spend will have a big impact on economic recoveries from the pandemic.</p> <p><strong>The awakened generation</strong></p> <p>In China, demographic cohorts are defined by decades. Rather than millennials or generation Z, in China it is the post-90s generation (those born in the 1990s) that have become the core driver of growth for many industries, including luxury, leisure and travel retail.</p> <p>China’s post-90s generation are the direct beneficiaries of the country’s economic reform that began in the 1980s, which opened up the Chinese market to the rest of the world and spurred enormous economic growth through the 1990s to today. Girls, in particular, benefited from growing up at a time when China was more connected with the rest of the world and experienced significant cultural changes, including a decline in the <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10834-011-9277-9">historic preference for sons</a>. The one-child policy played a part in this, too.</p> <p>Compared with previous generations, which are more family-centred and self-effacing, post-90s Chinese women are self-confident, independent and well-educated. They are also keen to express themselves through consumerism. This was evident in the conversations we had with high-spending young women. For them, buying luxury goods was a key part of their identity and self-expression. When travelling, it was one of the most important parts of their holiday, if not the actual purpose for their trip.</p> <p>Around the world, people buy and display luxury goods – from fancy cars to expensive watches and handbags – as status symbols. This is especially the case for the post-90s Chinese woman who seeks to distinguish herself from others in various ways. Vivian*, who’s 30, has a master’s degree and works in finance, told us:</p> <p><em>Buying luxury branded products is very personal. It’s my handbag. I do not want to look like everyone else.</em></p> <p>Travelling further afield to Europe is a way to buy luxury goods that distinguish themselves from their peers, as different designs are available to those in China. As well as the premium shopping experience, the people we spoke to repeatedly talked about the importance of having unique items. Ava, a 23-year-old student, said:</p> <p><em>Those special designs somehow are much more beautiful than those basic items that are available everywhere [in China]. They also reflect my lifestyle as a well-travelled person. When I carry it around, people know I am special.</em></p> <p>We also found that for the post-90s Chinese woman who travels abroad, buying designer items in the country where they originated from was seen as part of the authentic experience. As Emma, who is 23 and works in fashion, put it:</p> <p><em>Buying handbags in Paris makes me feel like a French lady. It’s a fun and authentic experience. It is a very different experience to purchasing them in Shenzhen.</em></p> <p><strong>‘Revenge spending’</strong></p> <p>The coronavirus pandemic has not reduced this appetite among China’s wealthy post-90s generation to travel and spend. A survey from <a href="https://blog.globalwebindex.com/chart-of-the-week/coronavirus-reshaping-the-luxury-market/">April this year found</a> that almost 60% of this group who had delayed their purchase plans would return to spending once the outbreak was over in China. And a number of luxury businesses reported a <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2020/06/11/business/global-luxury-sales-china-coronavirus-intl-hnk/index.html">big rise in spending</a> following the easing of lockdown restrictions in China, including jewellery brand Tiffany and fashion house Burberry.</p> <p>While overseas travel restrictions will significantly reduce the outbound tourist market for the time being, many brands will be hoping for a similar bout of so-called <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/13/revenge-spending-by-the-rich-could-drive-luxury-recovery.html">“revenge spending”</a>, as people make up for the time spent cooped up in lockdown.</p> <p>Having been the first to be hit by coronavirus, China is the first major economy to show a recovery. And as the world’s largest (and still growing) source of travellers and luxury shoppers, China will be the engine of the post-pandemic recovery for both these sectors. Both should be aware of what motivates this younger generation to spend in order to tap into it. Growing tension between the west and China, along with struggles to contain the pandemic in the west, may see other Asian countries as the first to benefit from outbound Chinese tourists.</p> <p>*<em>Names have been changed.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Misha Ketchell</em><em>. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-the-decline-in-chinese-tourists-around-the-world-has-hit-the-luxury-sector-145267">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

International Travel

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Ejected: Mum's humiliation at being kicked off flight

<p>A mum has revealed she felt “super humiliated” after being kicked off a flight because her toddler pulled down his mask to eat a snack.</p> <p>Mum Jodi Degyansky and her two-year-old son were sitting on a flight due to depart to Fort Myers in Florida for Chicago on Saturday.</p> <p>As they waited for takeoff, her son decided to have a snack.</p> <p>The mum said she was approached by flight attendants after the plane had pushed back from the gate and was taxiing to takeoff.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>Fox 5 Vegas,</em><span> </span>she said there was “no heated discussion” but the flight soon returned to the gate and they were asked to leave. </p> <p>“I’m super humiliated,” she said, adding her son replaced his mask once the attendants approached her.</p> <p>“Flight attendants kept coming over asking if we would wear it for the full flight, and I said he would,” she told<span> </span><em>NBC</em>.</p> <p>“It definitely was a struggle but something we’re working on.”</p> <p>She said she tried her best to keep the mask on her son’s face but they were eventually told to leave the flight. </p> <p>“A couple minutes later, we were pulled back into the gate and I was asked to leave the plane, accompanied by the manager, the supervisor, the flight attendants and the pilot,” she said.</p> <p>The airline said they are investigating the incident, but stand by their mask policy.</p> <p>Ms Degyansky has been given a refund by Southwest Airlines for her tickets.</p> <p>“If a customer is unable to wear a face covering for any reason, Southwest regrets that we are unable to transport the individual,” a spokesperson from Southwest Airlines told<span> </span><em>NBC</em>.</p> <p>“In those cases, we will issue a full refund and hope to welcome the Customer on-board in the future, if public health guidance regarding face coverings changes.”</p> <p>They later flew back to Chicago on a different flight on Saturday night.</p>

Travel Trouble

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Five ways to make your holidays more sustainable

<p>COVID-19 has resulted in the most severe disruption to the global tourism industry in modern times. And although many countries have now reopened to visitors from overseas, the economic impact is likely to be felt for many years.</p> <p>Prior to the pandemic, awareness had been growing regarding the environmental sustainability of tourism. From over-consumption of precious resources to the destructive impact on natural habitats, tourism can put enormous strains on destination communities.</p> <p>Over-tourism has also been highlighted as an issue in many places. The Galapagos Islands, Machu Picchu, Mount Everest, Majorca, Barcelona and Venice have all felt the affects.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Greta Thunberg’s climate-change activism has added the term “flight shame” to our vocabulary. Her work has encouraged airlines to engage in tree planting or invest in wind farms to offset their carbon emissions, and travellers to think before they fly.</p> <p>As global restrictions begin to ease, now is a good time to think radically about the purpose of tourism and the way we all travel. This is a chance to reset everything we know – and not simply return to business as usual.</p> <p>Obviously, one of the difficulties is that many of us are used to going wherever we want, whenever we want – which is not sustainable. But a few changes to our travel plans can play a key role in shaping the future of the travel industry.</p> <p>Below are five suggestions to help you travel in a more purposeful way.</p> <p> </p> <ol> <li><strong> Choose carefully</strong></li> </ol> <p>Carefully consider your desired destination and avoid places impacted by over-tourism. Visiting during off-peak seasons will likely save you money and enhance your overall experience - and let you skip the queues.</p> <p>It’s also worth thinking about a different type of “holiday” or travel experience. You could volunteer for a local NGO or consider travel opportunities that support marginalised groups, for example.</p> <p> </p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Travel slowly</strong></li> </ol> <p>Travel like Greta to minimise your environmental impact. Travel less for longer, swapping the quantity of experiences for quality. Instead of taking three separate long weekends, why not take just one two-week holiday.</p> <p>Slow travel is a mindset. Rather than pursuing Instagram-worthy photos and trying to squeeze as many attractions into your trip as possible, leave your phone at home and explore each destination at your own pace.</p> <p>Keeping sustainability in mind, it’s also worth considering opportunities that allow you to slowly experience a certain city, country or region while supporting local projects. Try a walking tour that supports previously marginalised locals or rent a bike with purpose and help to fund educational programmes for local students.</p> <p> </p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> Plan how you spend</strong></li> </ol> <p>Wherever you go, make sure you seek out local initiatives including local guides and local accommodation providers. This will make sure your money goes directly to people who will benefit from your support.</p> <p>Sites such as Good Travel list businesses that prioritise environmental action and support local communities. You can also find out about locally made products sold at local businesses employing local people. This helps to ensure positive impacts remain in the community.</p> <p>And if you’re thinking of heading to Africa, Fair trade tourism is also a great resource to find out about businesses recognised for promoting responsible practices. Certified businesses range from eco-lodges, resorts, safaris, educational centres, township tours, golf clubs and cruises – so there are a lot of different options to choose from.</p> <p> </p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Eat like a local</strong></li> </ol> <p>Food accounts for over a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions, so it lies at the heart of tackling climate change, reducing water stress, pollution and restoring land.</p> <p>There are many ways to minimise your food miles when you travel. For a start, avoid eating at restaurant chains and instead, try to eat like a local. Visit markets, local neighbourhoods or local vendors for your foodie needs.</p> <p>You could even check out a food tour or meal-sharing host. Traveling Spoon has a whole host of online and in-person cooking classes with locals from around the world. Eating locally supports local jobs and can also teach you about new cuisines.</p> <p> </p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> Immerse yourself</strong></li> </ol> <p>An immersive type of travel prioritises people over places and avoids overcrowded spaces. This allows you to make real connections and can also help you gain insights about local traditions, cultures and history. For example, you could go trekking with a local guide, enrol in a language course or attend a local festival or event.</p> <p>Ultimately, the pandemic has presented an opportunity to rethink and act radically and really consider the actual purpose of tourism. This is not only important from an environmental perspective, but travelling in a more purposeful way is more likely to help support local people in destination communities. And it also helps to contribute to a future where tourism is less harmful to people, places and the planet.</p> <p><em>Written by Misha Ketchell</em><em>. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/five-ways-to-make-your-holidays-more-sustainable-143379">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

International Travel

Health

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Gender reveal: Bindi shares new details about pregnancy

<p><span>Bindi Irwin has announced the gender of her unborn baby in a beautiful post to social media.</span><br /><br /><span>The 22-year-old and her husband Chandler Powell took to Instagram to share</span><br /><span>A pregnant Bindi Irwin has announced the gender of her unborn baby, in a loving post on social media.</span><br /><br /><span>In the Instagram post, the 22-year-old and husband Chandler Powell shared a sonogram of their baby, as they posed with a tortoise.</span><br />\</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFX1UV5BtHk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFX1UV5BtHk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin)</a> on Sep 20, 2020 at 1:50pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>“Baby girl, you are our world,” Bindi said in a post on Tuesday.</span><br /><br /><span>“Our beautiful daughter is now about the same size as a hatchling Aldabra tortoise and is as healthy as can be.</span><br /><br /><span>“We can’t wait for her arrival next year.”</span><br /><br /><span>In a comment on the post, Chandler wrote: “I love you and our daughter more than anything”.</span><br /><br /><span>Bindi’s brother Robert added: “I can’t wait to meet my niece!”</span><br /><br /><span>The pair announced they were expecting their first child last month.</span><br /><br /><span>Earlier this month, Bindi said she broke the news of her positive pregnancy test to Chandler, admitting it was a “moment where time stood still”.</span><br /><br /><span>“I took a test and ran into the kitchen where Chandler was making us tea,” she said.</span><br /><br /></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFStD7HhmAn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFStD7HhmAn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin)</a> on Sep 18, 2020 at 2:02pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span>“He didn’t hear me come in so I speechlessly watched him pouring the water into my most loved hedgehog mug.</span><br /><br /><span>“I started crying tears of pure joy and told my sweetheart husband that my test was positive.</span><br /><br /><span>“In that short span of time the gorgeous baby I’m carrying became the most important part of our lives.</span><br /><br /><span>“Our baby Wildlife Warrior is going to be so very loved by our families and entire Australia Zoo team.”</span><br /><br /><span>The pair tied the knot in a ceremony at Queensland’s Australia Zoo on March 25.</span></p>

Body

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Couple married for 50 years die minutes apart from COVID-19

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A US couple who were married for more than 50 years have tragically died from coronavirus just minutes apart, with the couple holding hands as they passed.</p> <p>Johnny Lee Peoples, 67, and his wife Cathy "Darlene" Peoples, 65, started to feel symptoms at the start of August but would not live to see more than a few days of September.</p> <p>Their son, Shane, is devastated.</p> <p>“Mum and Dad lived hand to hand for 50 years, they died hand to hand, now they’re walking in heaven hand to hand," he said.</p> <p>“The message our family would like to convey is that COVID is real. It’s not a hoax or a joke. Our parents took the proper precautions but tragically still contracted the virus.”</p> <p>The pair were admitted to hospital on August 11th after testing positive to the virus earlier that week, as they both had difficulty breathing due to previous illnesses.</p> <p>Darlene had high blood pressure, fibromyalgia and Type 2 diabetes and Johnny had pneumonia two years ago that caused damage to his lungs.</p> <p>“(On Sept. 1), we were told they had no chance of surviving. Dad could continue to live on the ventilator but would never come off of it. Mom’s organs were failing,” Shane said.</p> <p>“They both had pre-existing conditions. Just keep in mind, these didn’t kill my parents, COVID-19 did,” Shane said.</p> <p>“This was the first time for that ICU staff to deal with two family members passing. The hospital staff was amazing through the whole thing.”</p> <p>The couple is survived by their three children and nine grandchildren, but son Shane still feels "cheated".</p> <p>“We were cheated,” Shane said in a <a rel="noopener" href="https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_671965370_posts_10164064176965371_-3Fextid-3DLBj1UBKw0DvpX3we-26d-3Dn&amp;d=DwMGaQ&amp;c=Y6lK3sQOQe5gkvL3EqgybQ&amp;r=Sz9CKBZmZNP1ysNejBBG0IM2f1cxV3HZRghCAzOPwMo&amp;m=8D5VaQ8gES-pNdd92qywv3REqG4ABZtfLp8LMr_qZK0&amp;s=zTBMZvcrxrHBIkBS6m3bJ_u6kilgR2pZWYoeEX2kr98&amp;e=" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Facebook post</a> after his parents passed.</p> <p>“My parents weren’t just a blessing for me, my brother, my sister, our spouses, and our children.</p> <p>“They were a blessing to every person that met them... I just wish everyone could see them through my eyes. You would see the two most loving and caring couple, ever. Without them, this world just got a bit more gloomy.”</p> <p><em>Photo credits: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/travel/coronavirus/we-were-cheated-couple-married-for-50-years-die-within-minutes-of-each-other-from-covid-c-1330634" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">7News</a></em></p> </div> </div> </div>

Caring

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Ellen's back! But viewers and critics are unimpressed with her latest apology

<p>Ellen DeGeneres' highly anticipated TV return has been met with swift backlash from unimpressed fans and critics.</p> <p>DeGeneres apologised at the start of her 18th season premiere and addressed the toxic workplace rumours that have followed her for months.</p> <p>“Sometimes I get sad. I get mad. I get anxious. I get frustrated. I get impatient. And I am working on all of that. I am a work in progress,” she said.</p> <p>She also joked that while she’s a “pretty good actress” having played a “straight woman in movies” she said she isn’t good enough to “come out here every day for seventeen years and fool you”.</p> <p>She also alluded to the toxic workplace claims, saying that the company have "made the necessary changes" without revealing what they are.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CFZjbAdDnA7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CFZjbAdDnA7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Ellen DeGeneres (@theellenshow)</a> on Sep 21, 2020 at 6:00am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p> </p> <p>Within five minutes, DeGeneres had moved on and introduced her first guest, comedian Tiffany Haddish.</p> <p>Fans weren't as quick to move on, going to Twitter to voice their disapproval about the "quite bad" apology.</p> <p>"The Ellen apology was quite bad, right?" one user asked his followers.</p> <p>"Ellen's apology made no sense to me because she seems to base it on the idea that people mistake impatience, sadness and bad moods for being unkind. That's not really how it works," another explained.</p> <p>“Ellen DeGeneres using her first monologue back after allegations of a toxic work environment to make jokes about how she‘s impatient and not a good enough actress to fake being a nice person for 18 years just grosses me out,” <a rel="noopener" href="https://twitter.com/abb3rz07/status/1308105075236073472" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">wrote another Twitter user</a>.</p> <p>TV critics also questioned the apology, which was first posted to social media six hours before the season premiere of <em>The Ellen Show.</em></p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/ellen-degeneres-strange-apology-for-toxic-behavior-wont-satisfy-anybody" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Jezebel</a> noted: “Absent from this speech about kindness, however, was an acknowledgment of the remarkably unkind things that allegedly happened under DeGeneres’s long tenure as the head of<em> The Ellen Show.</em>”</p> <p>The<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/ellen-degeneres-strange-apology-for-toxic-behavior-wont-satisfy-anybody" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"> Daily Beast</a> called it “a strange apology that’s unlikely to appease anyone.”</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://variety.com/2020/tv/columns/ellen-degeneres-monologue-apology-1234777459/" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Variety</a> declared the monologue “fell short”.</p> <p>“It’s hard not to feel as though an opportunity was missed here,” they wrote, imagining what had happened if DeGeneres had spoken in more detail about feeling “mad, anxious and frustrated” in the past. “Going a bit deeper — being something other than blithely kind to an audience that craves real connection — might have been welcome.”</p>

Caring

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Jacinda Ardern admits mistake after group selfie

<p><span>Jacinda Ardern has admitted she “made a mistake” after she took a selfie with fans, breaching social distancing measures.</span><br /><br /><span>The New Zealand Prime Minister went to Massey University at Palmerston North on Thursday while on the campaign trail.</span><br /><br /><span>Excited students followed her around campus and as she left, the PM was met by a group who wanted to take a photo with her.</span><br /><br /><span>The prime minister reportedly asked the crowd to step back at first, but eventually joined them for the selfie.</span><br /><br /><span>Ardern has admitted her mistake on Monday while announcing the easing of coronavirus restrictions.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837997/jacinda-ardern-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/bcb974e3cf7f40b796fef5218d838935" /></p> <p><em>Image: Twitter</em><br /><br /><span>"All the way through on the campaign trail and even before during alert level settings, I work really hard not to shake people's hands," she said.</span><br /><br /><span>"I sanitise. I wear my mask in Auckland, and I work hard to try to keep my social distance.</span><br /><br /><span>"In that particular photo I did make a mistake. I should have stepped further forward. I should have asked them to step apart from each other, and I acknowledge that."</span><br /><br /><span>New Zealand is set for an election on October 17, which presents a unique challenge for candidates and voters during the COVID pandemic.</span><br /><br /><span>Ardern spoke about the challenges on Monday.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Have I woken up in an alternate reality?<br /><br />Ardern: “I’ve acknowledged it was the wrong thing, I shouldn’t have taken a selfie...I’m sorry for it...I need to take responsibility for it...I should have not done it”<a href="https://twitter.com/TheAMShowNZ?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TheAMShowNZ</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/jacindaardern?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@jacindaardern</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/nzpol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#nzpol</a> <a href="https://t.co/QL0hSZZmfu">pic.twitter.com/QL0hSZZmfu</a></p> — The Orwellian 🇳🇿 (@TheOrwellianNZ) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheOrwellianNZ/status/1308146584517894144?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 21, 2020</a></blockquote> <p><br /><br /><span>She says the country's social distancing restrictions are decided based on health advice and not on campaign needs.</span><br /><br /><span>"None of our decision-making around these alert levels, actually are based on the politics or the campaign," she said.</span><br /><br /><span>Restrictions in New Zealand have now eased, however Auckland still faces tougher rules than the rest of the country.</span><br /><br /><span>"We are in a strong position to make our next move down our alert settings," Ardern said.</span><br /><br /><span>"Auckland needs more time."</span></p>

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Lifestyle

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Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise’s daughter shares rare selfie

<p>Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman’s daughter Isabella ‘Bella’ Cruise has posted a rare photo of herself with a new haircut.</p> <p>The 27-year-old, who is known to keep a low profile, shared a selfie of her short black hair with pops of green through it.</p> <p>She completed the look with peace sign earrings, a nose piercing and oversized sunglasses.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFVRw6kA-iS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFVRw6kA-iS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Bella Kidman Cruise (@bellakidmancruise)</a> on Sep 19, 2020 at 2:01pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Bella didn’t caption the photo, but chose to tag two jewellery labels instead.</p> <p>Her friends and followers responded to the photograph by commenting on how much the new hairdo suits her.</p> <p>"Love it, also, your skin looks soooo freaking good," another added.</p> <p>"You're so beautiful and talented," a third commented.</p> <p>In 1992, Cruise, 58, and Kidman, 53, adopted Bella during their 10-year marriage.</p> <p>In 1995, the couple also adopted a son, Conor Cruise, now 25.</p> <p>They then called it quits in 2001 and it is believed Bella and Connor are estranged from Kidman.</p> <p>In an interview with Who magazine, Kidman seemed to have confirmed that fact.</p> <p>"They are adults. They are able to make their own decisions. They have made choices to be Scientologists and as a mother, it's my job to love them," she said. "And I am an example of that tolerance and that's what I believe — that no matter what your child does, the child has love and the child has to know there is available love and I'm open here."</p> <p>Nicole went on to marry Keith Urban, whom she shares two children with.</p> <p>The same year, Cruise married Katie Holmes, who he shares 14-year-old Suri Cruise with. </p>

Beauty & Style

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The story behind Princess Diana’s iconic wedding dress

<p>Princess Diana’s wedding dress is considered till this day to be iconic. </p> <p>But the lavish gown that was embroidered with 10,000 pearls and featured frilled lace couldn’t have had the same impact without its covert understudy, created without Diana’s knowledge.</p> <p>David Emanuel and his then-wife Elizabeth were given the honour to design the late Princess’s dress and tried their hardest to make sure it remained a secret.</p> <p>But it proved to be extremely difficult with the media watching her every move.</p> <p>So the Emanuels took extreme measures: Making a second dress for “peace of mind.”</p> <p>"At the time we wanted to make absolutely sure that the dress was a surprise," David told People in 2018. "We didn't try it on Diana. We never even discussed it. We wanted to make sure that we had something there; it was for our own peace of mind, really."</p> <p>The second dress was never completed, and much less lavish than the one Diana actually wore.</p> <p>When the wedding day did finally come along, Diana's dress design had managed to remain a mystery, but the Emanuels were nervous all the same. "She was incredibly together and wasn’t panicking," Elizabeth Emanuel told <a rel="noopener" href="https://people.com/royals/princess-dianas-wedding-dress-waistline/" target="_blank">People</a>. "But I was really worried about all things that could possibly go wrong. We’d taken smelling salts, glucose tablets — what if she feels faint? What if she passes out? Spills something down her skirt? I had this kind of horror that maybe the train would drop off. We sewed her into things, we pinned her into things."</p> <p>Luckily, all went well.</p>

Beauty & Style

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10 foods you should never reheat in a microwave

<p>Some 30 years ago, domestic kitchens received the gift of the microwave and quickly became dependent on it for lightning-fast heating. Younger generations can’t even imagine making porridge, hot chocolate or popcorn without it. And yet so many of us are using the microwave incorrectly for reheated foods. Sure, we know to never zap aluminium foil, metal, or plastic, but there are equally dangerous risks involved in nuking certain foods. For starters, a microwave does not cook food evenly, which often means that any bacteria present in the reheated foods will survive. Then there’s the problem of microwave blasts directly contributing to the production of carcinogenic toxins. To minimise the microwave risks, don’t use it to cook or warm these ten foods:</p> <p><strong>Hard-boiled eggs</strong></p> <p>Shelled or unshelled, when a hard-boiled egg is cooked in a microwave, the moisture inside creates an extreme steam build-up, like a miniature pressure cooker, to the point where the egg can explode! Even scarier, the egg won’t burst inside the microwave while it’s being heated, but afterward, which means the scalding hot egg can erupt in your hand, on your plate, or even in your mouth. To avoid turning your egg into a steam bomb, cut it into small pieces before reheating, or better yet, avoid putting it in the microwave altogether.</p> <p><strong>Breast milk</strong></p> <p>Many new mothers freeze and store their breast milk for later use, which is great, as long as it’s not reheated in a microwave. In the same way that microwaves heat plates of food unevenly, they can also warm a bottle of breast milk unevenly, creating ‘hot spots’ that can severely burn a baby’s mouth and throat. Then there’s the carcinogen hazard that comes with reheating plastic. It’s recommended that breast milk and formula be thawed and reheated in a pot on the stove, or using hot tap water. As a workaround, you could heat a cup of water in the microwave and then drop the bag or bottle of breast milk in it to thaw.</p> <p><strong>Processed meat</strong></p> <p>Processed meats often contain chemicals and preservatives extend their shelf lives. Unfortunately, microwaving them can make those substances worse for your health. In microwaving processed meats, we might unknowingly be exposed to chemical changes such as oxidised cholesterol in the process, according to research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. A study in the journal Food Control suggests that reheating processed meats with a burst of microwave radiation contributes to the formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs), which have been linked to the development of coronary heart disease. Compared to other meal-prep methods for reheated foods, microwaving processed meats is far more likely to introduce COPs into your diet.</p> <p><strong>Rice</strong></p> <p>Rice, really? Well, according to the Food Standards Agency, microwaving rice can sometimes lead to food poisoning. The issue with rice involves the common presence of a highly resistant bacteria called Bacillus cereus. Heat kills this bacteria, but it can have produced spores that are toxic, according to findings in the International Journal of Food Microbiology – and surprisingly heat resistant. A number of studies confirm that once rice comes out of the microwave and is left out at room temperature, any spores it contains can multiply and cause food poisoning if you eat it. (The humid environment of the warm rice makes it an ideal breeding ground.) As is explained on the U.S. government website Food Safety: ‘B. cereus is a type of bacteria that produces toxins. These toxins can cause two types of illness: one type characterised by diarrhoea, and the other, called emetic toxin, characterised by nausea and vomiting. Sources: a variety of foods, particularly rice.’ To avoid contaminated rice, heat it to near boiling and then keep it warm (above 60 degrees C) to keep it food safe.</p> <p><strong>Chicken</strong></p> <p>The most important thing to realise about microwaves is that their heat does not always kill bacteria, because microwaves heat from the outside in instead of the inside out. As such, certain bacteria-prone reheated foods will have higher risk of causing sickness when these bacterial cells survive. Bearing this in mind, you can see why chicken, which is at risk of salmonella contamination, could be a dangerous food to microwave. Before eating chicken, you have to cook it thoroughly to eliminate all present bacteria. Since microwaves don’t fully or evenly cook all parts of the meat, you’re more likely to be left with surviving bacteria such as salmonella. In one study, out of 30 participants who reheated raw meat, all 10 who used a microwave became ill, whereas the 20 who used a frying pan were fine. This goes to show how much bacteria can survive in meat when microwaved, compared to other cooking methods.</p> <p><strong>Leafy greens</strong></p> <p>If you want to save your celery, kale, or spinach to eat later as leftovers, plan to reheat them in a conventional oven rather than a microwave. When blasted in the microwave, naturally occurring nitrates (which are very good for you on their own) may convert to nitrosamines, which can be carcinogenic, studies show.</p> <p><strong>Beetroot</strong><br />The same chemical conversion that happens to spinach holds true for reheating nitrate-rich beetroot and turnips! Good thing they’re just as delicious cold.</p> <p><strong>Chillies</strong></p> <p>When chillies are reheated in the microwave, capsaicin – the chemical that gives them their spicy flavour – is released into the air. Airborne, the chemical can burn your eyes and throat. In fact, one US apartment building was evacuated after a microwaved chilli caused residents to start coughing and have trouble breathing.</p> <p><strong>Fruit</strong></p> <p>Microwaved grapes won’t make raisins, but they will make plasma, which is a form of matter that’s created when gas is ionised and lets electricity flow. In a video, Stephen Bosi, PhD, physics lecturer at the University of New England, shows nuking two pieces of a plain ol’ grape in a microwave can create enough plasma to melt a hole through a plastic container. Plasma might not be produced from other fruits, but you could still be left with a mess. Whole fruit traps steam under the flesh, meaning it could burst while it’s heating.</p> <p><strong>Potatoes</strong></p> <p>Thankfully, you’re still safe to nuke a raw spud for a quick and easy side dish. The danger comes when you try reheating cooked potatoes. Cooking potatoes in aluminium foil protects the bacteria C. botulinum from the heat, meaning it can still thrive if the potato stays at room temperature too long, and potentially cause botulism. Popping that contaminated tatie in the microwave won’t kill the bacteria, either, so play it safe by cooking them on a baking sheet instead of wrapped in foil and refrigerating leftover potatoes as soon as possible. Did you know Queen Elizabeth II refuses to eat potatoes, microwaved or otherwise? Find out what other foods the Queen will never eat here.</p> <p> </p> <p class="p1">This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/kitchen-tips/10-foods-you-shouldnt-reheat-microwave"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</p>

Food & Wine

Finance

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The one quality Steve Jobs always looked for in employees

<p>Do you have what it takes to land a career that can make you a millionaire before you retire? Sure, you can perfect your resume, dress to impress, and nail the trickiest interview questions. But odds are, you’re probably forgetting one rather underrated quality – and for the late Steve Jobs, it mattered much, much more than a polished CV.</p> <p>In a rarely seen interview, a then-young Jobs revealed that when he was first hiring professional managers for Apple, he quickly learned that “most of them were bozos.” “They knew how to manage, but they didn’t know how to do anything,” he added.</p> <p>So, from there on out, Jobs began to value a different trait in job candidates. “We wanted people who were insanely great at what they did, but were not necessarily those seasoned professionals,” he said. “But who had at the tips of their fingers and in their passion the latest understanding of where technology was and what they could do with that technology.”</p> <p>In other words, forget job experience; Jobs wanted passionate people on his team, instead. Why, you ask? Not only can enthusiastic employees manage themselves, but they also understand the company’s mission – and strive for that common goal with earnest.</p> <p>To find employees with this type of passion, the Apple team interviewed each job candidate by presenting a Macintosh prototype and noting his or her reaction. “We wanted their eyes to light up and to get really excited,” Andy Hertzfeld, one of Apple’s first software engineers, said. “Then we knew they were one of us.”</p> <p><em>Written by Brooke Nelson. This article first appeared on </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/culture/what-steve-jobs-looked-for-in-an-employee"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Retirement Income

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A computer can guess more than 100,000,000,000 passwords per second. Still think yours is secure?

<p>Passwords have been used for thousands of years as a means of identifying ourselves to others and in more recent times, to computers. It’s a simple concept – a shared piece of information, kept secret between individuals and used to “prove” identity.</p> <p>Passwords in an IT context <a href="https://www.wired.com/2012/01/computer-password/">emerged in the 1960s</a> with <a href="https://www.techopedia.com/definition/24356/mainframe">mainframe</a> computers – large centrally operated computers with remote “terminals” for user access. They’re now used for everything from the PIN we enter at an ATM, to logging in to our computers and various websites.</p> <p>But why do we need to “prove” our identity to the systems we access? And why are passwords so hard to get right?</p> <p><strong>What makes a good password?</strong></p> <p>Until relatively recently, a good password might have been a word or phrase of as little as six to eight characters. But we now have minimum length guidelines. This is because of “entropy”.</p> <p>When talking about passwords, entropy is the <a href="https://www.itdojo.com/a-somewhat-brief-explanation-of-password-entropy/">measure of predictability</a>. The maths behind this isn’t complex, but let’s examine it with an even simpler measure: the number of possible passwords, sometimes referred to as the “password space”.</p> <p>If a one-character password only contains one lowercase letter, there are only 26 possible passwords (“a” to “z”). By including uppercase letters, we increase our password space to 52 potential passwords.</p> <p>The password space continues to expand as the length is increased and other character types are added.</p> <p>However, the problem with depending on password complexity is that computers are highly efficient at repeating tasks – including guessing passwords.</p> <p>Last year, a <a href="https://www.cbronline.com/news/stolen-user-credentials">record was set</a> for a computer trying to generate every conceivable password. It achieved a rate faster than 100,000,000,000 guesses per second.</p> <p>By leveraging this computing power, cyber criminals can hack into systems by bombarding them with as many password combinations as possible, in a process called <a href="https://www.kaspersky.com/resource-center/definitions/brute-force-attack">brute force attacks</a>.</p> <p>And with cloud-based technology, guessing an eight-character password can be achieved in as little as 12 minutes and cost as little as US$25.</p> <p>Also, because passwords are almost always used to give access to sensitive data or important systems, this motivates cyber criminals to actively seek them out. It also drives a lucrative online market selling passwords, some of which come with email addresses and/or usernames.</p> <p><strong>How are passwords stored on websites?</strong></p> <p>Website passwords are usually stored in a protected manner using a mathematical algorithm called <a href="https://www.wired.com/2016/06/hacker-lexicon-password-hashing/">hashing</a>. A hashed password is unrecognisable and can’t be turned back into the password (an irreversible process).</p> <p>When you try to login, the password you enter is hashed using the same process and compared to the version stored on the site. This process is repeated each time you login.</p> <p>For example, the password “Pa$$w0rd” is given the value “02726d40f378e716981c4321d60ba3a325ed6a4c” when calculated using the SHA1 hashing algorithm. Try it <a href="https://passwordsgenerator.net/sha1-hash-generator/">yourself</a>.</p> <p>When faced with a file full of hashed passwords, a brute force attack can be used, trying every combination of characters for a range of password lengths. This has become such common practice that there are websites that list common passwords alongside their (calculated) hashed value. You can simply search for the hash to reveal the corresponding password.</p> <p>The theft and selling of passwords lists is now so common, a <a href="https://haveibeenpwned.com/">dedicated website</a> — haveibeenpwned.com — is available to help users check if their accounts are “in the wild”. This has grown to include more than 10 billion account details.</p> <p>If your email address is listed on this site you should definitely change the detected password, as well as on any other sites for which you use the same credentials.</p> <p><strong>Is more complexity the solution?</strong></p> <p>You would think with so many password breaches occurring daily, we would have improved our password selection practices. Unfortunately, last year’s annual <a href="https://www.securitymagazine.com/articles/91461-the-worst-passwords-of-2019">SplashData password survey</a> has shown little change over five years.</p> <p>As computing capabilities increase, the solution would appear to be increased complexity. But as humans, we are not skilled at (nor motivated to) remember highly complex passwords.</p> <p>We’ve also passed the point where we use only two or three systems needing a password. It’s now common to access numerous sites, with each requiring a password (often of varying length and complexity). A recent survey suggests there are, on average, <a href="https://www.newswire.com/news/new-research-most-people-have-70-80-passwords-21103705">70-80 passwords per person</a>.</p> <p>The good news is there are tools to address these issues. Most computers now support password storage in either the operating system or the web browser, usually with the option to share stored information across multiple devices.</p> <p>Examples include Apple’s <a href="https://www.computerworld.com/article/3254183/how-to-use-icloud-keychain-the-guide.html">iCloud Keychain</a> and the ability to save passwords in Internet Explorer, Chrome and Firefox (although <a href="https://www.howtogeek.com/447345/why-you-shouldnt-use-your-web-browsers-password-manager/">less reliable</a>).</p> <p><a href="https://tech.co/password-managers/what-is-a-password-manager">Password managers</a> such as KeePassXC can help users generate long, complex passwords and store them in a secure location for when they’re needed.</p> <p>While this location still needs to be protected (usually with a long “master password”), using a password manager lets you have a unique, complex password for every website you visit.</p> <p>This won’t prevent a password from being stolen from a vulnerable website. But if it is stolen, you won’t have to worry about changing the same password on all your other sites.</p> <p>There are of course vulnerabilities in these solutions too, but perhaps that’s a story for another day.</p> <p><em>Written by Paul Haskell-Dowland and Brianna O’Shea. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-computer-can-guess-more-than-100-000-000-000-passwords-per-second-still-think-yours-is-secure-144418">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Shocking twist after parents make public appeal to find missing daughter

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The parents of a missing teenager have been charged with her murder after they appealed for help to find her.</p> <p>Bernadetta Walker was reported missing 7 weeks ago by her 37-year-old mum, Sarah and 57-year-old father Scott from their home in the east of England.</p> <p>Police declared that detectives would be pursuing the case as a "no body" investigation as they continued their search for the 17-year-old who was last seen by her parents on July 18th. </p> <p>Ms Walker asked the public for help in distributing flyers and claimed she “couldn’t eat or sleep properly”, saying that she hoped her daughter was “hiding” at a friend’s home.</p> <p>“I know my baby girl wouldn't be out in the open. She's scared of being out in the dark alone, that's what makes me think she's at a friend's house,” she said, according to The Sun.</p> <p>Bernadette’s dad also appealed for help, writing on Facebook: “You can imagine how much we are both worried. We miss you. We need to know that you're safe. We love you.”</p> <p>Police have said that "significant progress" has been made in the investigation, but they are yet to find the missing teenager.</p> <p>“Therefore our plea is for anyone who has information on what has happened to her, or where she might be, to get in touch as a matter of urgency,” Policing Peterborough wrote to Facebook.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Facebook</em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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Entertainment

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Life on Venus? Traces of phosphine may be a sign of biological activity

<p>The discovery that the atmosphere of Venus absorbs a precise frequency of microwave radiation has just <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-020-1174-4">turned planetary science on its head</a>. An international team of scientists used radio telescopes in Hawaii and Chile to find signs that the clouds on Earth’s neighbouring planet contain tiny quantities of a molecule called phosphine.</p> <p>Phosphine is a compound made from phosphorus and hydrogen, and on Earth its only natural source is tiny microbes that live in oxygen-free environments. It’s too early to say whether phosphine is also a sign of life on Venus – but no other explanation so far proposed seems to fit.</p> <p>This video shows how methane was detected in the atmosphere of Mars. The process is the same for finding phosphine on Venus.</p> <p><strong>What makes an atmosphere?</strong></p> <p>The molecular makeup of a planet’s atmosphere normally depends on what its parent star is made of, the planet’s position in its star’s system, and the chemical and geological processes that take place given these conditions.</p> <p>There is phosphine in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, for example, but there it’s not a sign of life. Scientists think it is formed in the deep atmosphere at high pressures and temperatures, then dredged into the upper atmosphere by a strong convection current.</p> <p><strong>Join 130,000 people who subscribe to free evidence-based news.</strong></p> <p>Although phosphine quickly breaks down into phosphorus and hydrogen in the top clouds of these planets, enough lingers – 4.8 parts per million – to be observable. The phosphorus may be what gives clouds on Jupiter a reddish tinge.</p> <p>Things are different on a rocky planet like Venus. The new research has found fainter traces of phosphine in the atmosphere, at 20 parts per billion.</p> <p>Lightning, clouds, volcanoes and meteorite impacts might all produce some phosphine, but not enough to counter the rapid destruction of the compound in Venus’s highly oxidising atmosphere. The researchers considered all the chemical processes they could think of on Venus, but none could explain the concentration of phosphine. What’s left?</p> <p>On Earth, phosphine is only produced by microbial life (and by various industrial processes) – and the concentration in our atmosphere is in the parts per trillion range. The much higher concentration on Venus cannot be ignored.</p> <p><strong>Signs of life?</strong></p> <p>To determine whether the phosphine on Venus is really produced by life, chemists and geologists will be trying to identify other reactions and processes that could be alternative explanations.</p> <p>Meanwhile, biologists will be trying to better understand the microbes that live in Venus-like conditions on Earth – high temperatures, high acidity, and high levels of carbon dioxide – and also ones that produce phosphine.</p> <p>When Earth microbes produce phosphine, they do it via an “anaerobic” process, which means it happens where no oxygen is present. It has been observed in places such as activated sludge and sewage treatment plants, but the exact collection of microbes and processes is not well understood.</p> <p>Biologists will also be trying to work out whether the microbes on Earth that produce phosphine could conceivably do it under the harsh Venusian conditions. If there is some biological process producing phosphine on Venus, it may be a form of “life” very different from what we know on Earth.</p> <p>Searches for life beyond Earth have often skipped over Venus, because its surface temperature is around 500℃ and the atmospheric pressure is almost 100 times greater than on Earth. Conditions are <a href="https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/ast.2017.1783">more hospitable for life</a> as we know it about 50 kilometres off the ground, although there are still vast clouds of sulfuric acid to deal with.</p> <p><strong>Molecular barcodes</strong></p> <p>The researchers found the phosphine using spectroscopy, which is the study of how light interacts with molecules. When sunlight passes through Venus’s atmosphere, each molecule absorbs very specific colours of this light.</p> <p>Using telescopes on Earth, we can take this light and split it into a massive rainbow. Each type of molecule present in Venus’ atmosphere produces a distinctive pattern of dark absorption lines in this rainbow, like an identifying barcode.</p> <p>This barcode is not always strongest in visible light. Sometimes it can only be detected in the parts of the electromagnetic spectrum that are invisible to the human eye, such as UV rays, microwave, radio waves and infrared.</p> <p>The barcode of carbon dioxide, for example, is most evident in the infrared region of the spectrum.</p> <p>While phosphine on Jupiter was first detected in infrared, for Venus observations astronomers used radio telescopes: the <a href="https://www.almaobservatory.org/en/home/">Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array</a> (ALMA) and <a href="https://www.eaobservatory.org/jcmt/about-jcmt/">James Clerk Maxwell Telescope</a> (JCMT), which can detect the barcode of phosphine in millimetre wavelengths.</p> <p><strong>New barcodes, new discoveries</strong></p> <p>The discovery of phosphine on Venus relied not only on new observations, but also a more detailed knowledge of the compound’s barcode. Accurately predicting the barcode of phosphine across all relevant frequencies took <a href="http://www.tampa.phys.ucl.ac.uk/ftp/eThesis/ClaraSousaSilva2015.pdf">the whole PhD</a> of astrochemist Clara Sousa-Silva in the <a href="https://www.ucl.ac.uk/exoplanets/research/spectroscopy-exoplanets">ExoMol group</a> at University College London in 2015.</p> <p>She used computational quantum chemistry – basically putting her molecule into a computer and solving the equations that describe its behaviour – to predict the strength of the barcode at different colours. She then tuned her model using available experimental data before making the <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1410.2917">16.8 billion lines of phosphine’s barcode</a> available to astronomers.</p> <p>Sousa-Silva originally thought her data would be used to study Jupiter and Saturn, as well as weird stars and distant “hot Jupiter” exoplanets.</p> <p>More recently, she led the detailed consideration of <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.05224">phosphine as a biosignature</a> – a molecule whose presence implies life. This analysis demonstrated that, on small rocky exoplanets, phosphine should not be present in observable concentrations unless there was life there as well.</p> <p>But she no doubt wouldn’t have dreamed of a phone call from an astronomer who has discovered phosphine on our nearest planetary neighbour. With phosphine on Venus, we won’t be limited to speculating and looking for molecular barcodes. We will be able to send probes there and hunt for the microbes directly.</p> <p><em>Written by Laura McKemmish, UNSW; Brendan Paul Burns, UNSW, and Lucyna Kedziora-Chudczer, Swinburne University of Technology. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/life-on-venus-traces-of-phosphine-may-be-a-sign-of-biological-activity-146093">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Art

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Behind the new Samsung Fold: how the quest to maximise screen size is driving major innovation

<p>To enlarge a phone, or not to enlarge a phone? That is the question. In the world of flagship smartphones, there seems to be one clear trend: bigger is better.</p> <p>Manufacturers are trying to strip away anything that might stand in the way of the largest possible slab of screen. There is also growing demand for thinner phones with diminishing <a href="https://www.lifewire.com/bezel-4155199">bezels</a> (the area surrounding a screen).</p> <p>This trend has now culminated in the latest innovation in smartphone design, the <a href="https://www.t3.com/au/news/best-folding-phones">foldable screen phone</a>. These devices sport thin <a href="https://www.techradar.com/au/news/what-is-oled">OLED</a> self illuminating screens that can be folded in half.</p> <p>The newest release is the <a href="https://www.theverge.com/21427462/samsung-galaxy-z-fold-2-review">Samsung Galaxy Z fold 2</a> – a device that is almost three-quarters screen and has extravagant overtones rivalled only by a hefty <a href="https://www.samsung.com/au/smartphones/galaxy-z-fold2/buy/">A$2,999 price tag</a>.</p> <p><strong>Hear from them</strong></p> <p>But to prevent the phones themselves from growing to unwieldy size, manufacturers are having to find ways to balance size with usability and durability. This presents some interesting engineering challenges, as well as some innovative solutions.</p> <p><strong>Internal design complexities of folding phones</strong></p> <p>Modern phones still typically use a thin LCD or plastic OLED display covered by an outer glass panel.</p> <p>Folding displays are a new category that exploit the flexibility of OLED display panels. Instead of simply fixing these panels to a rigid glass panel, they carefully engineer the panel so that it bends – but never quite tightly enough to snap or crack.</p> <p>Internal structural support is needed to make sure the panel doesn’t crease, or isn’t stressed to the point of creating damage, discolouration or visible surface ripples.</p> <p>Since this is a mechanical, moving system, reliability issues need to be considered. For instance, how long will the hinge last? How many times can it be <a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/10/4/20898484/samsung-galaxy-fold-folding-test-failure-durability">folded and unfolded</a> before it malfunctions? Will dirt or dust make its way into the assembly during daily use and affect the screen?</p> <p>Such devices need an added layer of reliability over traditional slab-like phones, which have no moving parts.</p> <p><strong>Large screen, thin phone: a recipe for disaster?</strong></p> <p>Each generation of smartphones becomes thinner and with smaller bezels, which improves the viewing experience but can make the phone harder to handle.</p> <p>In such designs, the area of the device you can grip without touching the display screen is small. This leads to a higher chance of <a href="https://www.cnet.com/news/study-19-percent-of-people-drop-phones-down-toilet/">dropping the device</a> – a blunder even the best of us have made.</p> <p>There’s an ongoing tussle between consumers and manufacturers. Consumers want a large, viewable surface as well as an easily portable and rugged device. But from an engineering point of view, these are usually competing requirements.</p> <p>You’ll often see people in smartphone ads holding the device with two hands. In real life, however, most people use their phone with <a href="https://www.smartinsights.com/mobile-marketing/mobile-design/research-on-mobile-interaction-behaviour-and-design/">one</a> <a href="https://alistapart.com/article/how-we-hold-our-gadgets/">hand</a>.</p> <p>Thus, the shift towards larger, thinner phones has also given rise to a boom in demand for assistive tools attached to the back, such as <a href="https://www.androidcentral.com/best-popsockets">pop-out grips and phone rings</a>.</p> <p>In trying to maximise screen size, smartphone developers also have to account for interruptions in the display, such as the placement of cameras, laser scanners (for face or object identification), proximity sensors and speakers. All are placed to minimise visual intrusion.</p> <p><strong>Now you see it, now you don’t</strong></p> <p>In the engineering world, to measure the physical world you need either cameras or sensors, such as in a fingerprint scanner.</p> <p>With the race to increase the real estate space on screens, typically these cameras and scanners are placed somewhere around the screen. But they take up valuable space.</p> <p>This is why we’ve recently seen tricks to carve out more space for them, such as <a href="https://www.techradar.com/au/news/this-is-the-worlds-first-smartphone-where-half-the-screen-is-a-fingerprint-scanner">pop up</a> cameras and <a href="https://www.google.com/search?q=phone+screen+hole+for+camera&amp;source=lmns&amp;bih=598&amp;biw=1280&amp;rlz=1C5CHFA_enAU871AU871&amp;safe=active&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwjXvcyoveDrAhUwhUsFHXvqBYMQ_AUoAHoECAEQAA">punch-hole</a> cameras, in which the camera sits in a cutout hole allowing the display to extend to the corners.</p> <p>But another fantastic place for sensors is right in front of us: the screen. Or more specifically, under the screen.</p> <p>Samsung is one company that has suggested placing selfie-cameras and fingerprint readers behind the screen. But how do you capture a photo or a face image through a layer of screen?</p> <p>Up until recently, this has been put in the “too hard basket”. But that is changing: Xiaomi, Huawei and <a href="https://www.extremetech.com/mobile/262497-samsung-patent-shows-phone-camera-inside-display">Samsung</a> all have patents for <a href="https://www.phonearena.com/news/samsung-galaxy-s21-s30-under-display-camera_id125174">under-display cameras</a>.</p> <p>There are a range of ways to do this, from allowing a camera to see through the screen, to using <a href="https://www.rp-photonics.com/microlenses.html">microlenses</a> and camera pixels distributed throughout the display itself – similar to an insect’s <a href="https://www.britannica.com/animal/insect/Nervous-system#ref250944">compound eye</a>.</p> <p>In either case, the general engineering challenge is to implement the feature in a way that doesn’t impact screen image quality, nor majorly affect camera resolution or colour accuracy.</p> <p><strong>Laptops in our pockets</strong></p> <p>With up to 3.8 billion smartphone users <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/330695/number-of-smartphone-users-worldwide/">expected by 2021</a>, mobile computing is a primary consumer technology area seeing significant growth and investment.</p> <p>One driver for this is the professional market, where larger mobile devices allow more efficient on-the-go business transactions. The second market is individuals who who <a href="https://www.statista.com/topics/779/mobile-internet/"><em>only</em> have a mobile device</a> and no laptop or desktop computer.</p> <p>It’s all about choice, but also functionality. Whatever you choose has to get the job done, support a positive user experience, but also survive the rigours of the real world.</p> <p><em>Written by Andrew Maxwell. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/behind-the-new-samsung-fold-how-the-quest-to-maximise-screen-size-is-driving-major-innovation-145700">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

Art

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Where are the films starring successful women entrepreneurs?

<p><a href="https://www.hbo.com/documentaries/the-inventor-out-for-blood-in-silicon-valley">The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley</a>, now streaming in Australia on Binge, depicts Theranos founder and former CEO Elizabeth Holmes as a bewitching sociopath.</p> <p>Holmes wanted to revolutionise health care by providing a simple and cheap way to perform blood tests using only a finger prick. In 2003, she founded Theranos, with a vision of the company’s machines in every home in America.</p> <p>But, as the Wall Street Journal’s John Carreyrou <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/theranos-has-struggled-with-blood-tests-1444881901">revealed</a> in 2015, Holmes created an intricate web of deception. Even as machines found their way into chemists and were being used by medical insurance companies, they never actually worked.</p> <p>Holmes put patients’ lives at risk and cost investors millions of dollars.</p> <p>The documentary is compelling viewing, but as it enters a very slim field of movies about female entrepreneurs it is worth questioning the impact of the stories we choose to tell.</p> <p><strong>Fall from grace</strong></p> <p>The journey Holmes took from young idol to spectacular failure is a story about systemic issues and the <a href="https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/silicon-valley-work-culture/">sometimes toxic</a> culture of the world of start-ups.</p> <p>Prior to the scandal breaking, Holmes was <a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/12/15/blood-simpler">celebrated in the media</a>. She was portrayed as a Stanford University dropout with a vision for changing the world. She raised hundreds of millions of dollars from powerful men in a start-up landscape known for its <a href="https://hbr.org/2020/01/how-the-vc-pitch-process-is-failing-female-entrepreneurs">discriminating funding practices</a>.</p> <p>She made the <a href="https://www.forbes.com/profile/elizabeth-holmes/#338f337c47a7">cover</a> of Forbes magazine in 2014 as the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire. Holmes represented a heady mix of tech, science and business. She was the golden girl of the start-up world.</p> <p>This made her fall from grace even more spectacular.</p> <p>But compare Holmes’ portrayal with another well known example of a deceitful male entrepreneur: <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/feb/28/wolf-of-wall-street-jordan-belfort-sex-drugs">Jordan Belfort</a>, the “wolf of Wall Street”.</p> <p>Belfort ran an elaborate crime scheme linked to manipulating the stock market and was jailed for 22 months for securities fraud. Nonetheless, his <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/522776.The_Wolf_of_Wall_Street">autobiography</a> and Martin Scorsese’s 2013 <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0993846/">film adaptation</a> depict Belfort’s story as celebration of wealth and power, rather than a critical review of his fraudulent behaviour.</p> <p><strong>Where are all the good stories?</strong></p> <p>Feature films about female entrepreneurs are few and far between.</p> <p><a href="https://journals.aom.org/doi/abs/10.5465/AMBPP.2020.21276abstract">Research</a> from one of the authors examined English-language films from 1986 to 2016 with female entrepreneurs as the central character. Over the 30-year period, only 11 films about women entrepreneurs were identified – fewer than the number of <a href="https://www.macworld.co.uk/news/apple/steve-jobs-movies-documentaries-to-watch-3786148/">films about Apple co-founder Steve Jobs</a> alone.</p> <p>From <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092605/">Baby Boom</a> (1987), where Diane Keaton’s character starts a baby food business, to Melissa McCarthy’s brownie empire in <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2702724">The Boss</a> (2016), these films overwhelmingly depicted female entrepreneurs as running small-scale kitchen table businesses in female-dominated industries.</p> <p>These movies told stories of cleaning, as in <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2446980/">Joy</a> (2015) and <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0862846/">Sunshine Cleaning</a> (2008); fashion, as in <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2361509/">The Intern</a> (2015); and not-for-profit work, as in the <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116313/">First Wives Club</a> (1996).</p> <p>Businesses depicted typically had low numbers of paid employees. The entrepreneurs were resource-poor, and most often it was a supporting male character who helped the female entrepreneur succeed.</p> <p>Additionally, the study found a woman starting her own business is seemingly not enough to hold audience attention: all films included a parallel romantic storyline.</p> <p><strong>The female entrepreneur as role model</strong></p> <p>Celebrating successful female role models <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167487011000353">encourages women</a> to dream big and succeed in male dominated arenas.</p> <p>Role models provide a source of inspiration and contribute to self-belief. As the quantity of entrepreneurship related media increases, so does the amount of <a href="https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11365-006-0018-8.pdf">entrepreneurial activity</a>.</p> <p>However, negative portrayals of careers may <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1997-04591-001">prevent</a> people from considering a profession.</p> <p>The case of Holmes and Theranos is damaging for the <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2018-03-14/theranos-misled-investors-and-consumers-who-used-its-blood-test">betrayed</a> customers and investors, but also for the field of entrepreneurship, which only in recent decades has seen its reputation overhauled.</p> <p>Entrepreneurship was once the <a href="http://cup.columbia.edu/book/a-brief-history-of-entrepreneurship/9780231173049">domain of racketeers</a>. Over time, it has evolved to be the domain of tech celebrities, socially conscious founders and a vehicle for upward social mobility – but still, too often, a domain of men.</p> <p><a href="https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9780429279836/chapters/10.4324/9780429279836-26">One study</a> investigated how female entrepreneurs are featured on the cover of Entrepreneur magazine. Women were vastly outnumbered by men on the cover, and were often portrayed in a stereotypical female fashion.</p> <p>Words surrounding images of women tended to be about nurturing, health, beauty and fashion. Wording accompanying images of male entrepreneurs talked of power, innovation and risk taking.</p> <p>Women were “glamified” in full make-up and focus given to their face, while men were more likely to be standing and set against a corporate colour palette.</p> <p>How we tell stories of female entrepreneurs matters.</p> <p>In order to achieve equity in entrepreneurship, we need to acknowledge the role of the media in filling the entrepreneurship pipeline.</p> <p>Positive depictions of innovative women act as a mirror, showing girls and women what they can achieve. We need more, and better, stories about female entrepreneurs so stories about female innovation aren’t limited to failure and fraud.</p> <p><em>Written by Bronwyn Eager and Louise Grimmer. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-inventor-tells-a-story-of-a-fraudulent-female-billionaire-where-are-the-films-starring-successful-women-entrepreneurs-145922">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Movies

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Outraged fans announce "death" of J.K. Rowling

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>J.K Rowling's new book called <em>Troubled Blood</em> has made fans furious, as it features a male serial killer who dresses as a woman while on violent killing sprees.</p> <p>Rowling has previously made controversial comments about the transgender community, including a range of tweets comparing hormone therapy to gay conversion therapy.</p> <p>Hormone therapy is where transgender people take sex hormones to align their bodies more closely with their gender identity and gay conversion therapy refers to the discredited practice of trying to change sexual orientation using psychological or spiritual means.</p> <p>Fans have had enough and have declared her "dead" by sending the hashtag #RIPJKRowling to the top of the Twitter trending charts. </p> <p>“In memory of jk rowling. she ain’t dead, but she killed her own career by proudly hating trans people &amp; no one would really miss her that much anyway,” wrote one Twitter user.</p> <p>“#RIPJKRowling she (ain’t) dead but her career is,” added another.</p> <p>“Imagine getting cancelled so hard, we have to pretend that you died,” chimed in someone else.</p> <p>J.K Rowling has published five books under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith and <em>Troubled Blood</em> is the latest.</p> <p>In <em>The Silkworm</em>, the second novel in the series, Rowling portrays a trans character as being “unstable and aggressive.”</p> <p>“The meat of the book is the investigation into a cold case: the disappearance of GP Margot Bamborough in 1974, thought to have been a victim of Dennis Creed, a transvestite serial killer,” wrote the <em>Telegraph</em> in a review of the novel.</p> <p>“One wonders what critics of Rowling’s stance on trans issues will make of a book whose moral seems to be: never trust a man in a dress.”</p> <p>Rowling defended her past comments in an essay.</p> <p>“I’m concerned about the huge explosion in young women wishing to transition and also about the increasing numbers who seem to be detransitioning (returning to their original sex), because they regret taking steps that have, in some cases, altered their bodies irrevocably, and taken away their fertility,” she wrote.</p> </div> </div> </div>

Books

Property

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Hemsworth brothers list stunning Malibu retreat for $4.9 million

<p><span>Australian brothers Chris, Liam and Luke Hemsworth are looking to let go of their Malibu home that they shared for $4.9 million.</span><br /><br /><span>Together the trio have lifted the price $1.45 million more than they paid for the place using a trust four years ago, real estate records show.</span><br /><br /><span>While there were not many changes made to the 4,612-square-foot floor plan, with its polished concrete floors, warm woody accents and shiny marble finishes - they did touch up the landscape and exterior of the house.</span><br /><br /><span>The home hosts four marvellous bedrooms, four bathrooms, a sunny chef’s kitchen and a wine cellar.</span><br /><br /><span>It also features a spacious media room that is decked out with purple walls and carpet floors.</span><br /><br /><span>The back patio includes a sauna and beyond that is serene tiered gardens that overlook a grassy lawn and unbelievable mountain dunes.</span><br /><br /><span>Altogether, the Malibu retreat is 1.3 acres and is above Point Dume.</span><br /><br /><span>Chris Hemsworth, 37, is best known for his role as Thor in the Marvel cinematic universe.</span><br /><br /><span>Liam Hemsworth, 30, gained fame for his role as Gale Hawthorne in “The Hunger Games” trilogy.</span><br /><br /><span>Luke Hemsworth, 39, plays the part of Ashley Stubbs on HBO’s critically acclaimed sci-fi western show “Westworld.”</span></p>

Real Estate

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Doris Day’s California home listed for eye-watering price

<p>Doris Day’s home in Carmel Valley, California, has hit the market but her estate wont be raking in the profits for the grand property.</p> <p>The residence was where Day lived right up until her death in May 2019 at age 97.</p> <p>It has been listed by Sotheby's International Realty for $7.4 million.</p> <p>All of the proceeds from the sale will go towards Day's animal charity she founded in 1978, the Doris Day Animal Foundation (DDAF).</p> <p>The 12,400-square-foot home includes two expansive floors in the main home, a guest house, three lofts, two caretaker units, and a caretaker’s office.</p> <p>The main home rests on a knoll overlooking Carmel Valley and is also adjacent golf club so it holds captivating views at every direction.</p> <p>It includes three bedrooms, a kitchen with a dining area, a large living room with a Carmel stone fireplace, a library, and two offices.</p> <p>Fans of <em>The Doris Day Show </em>will also notice that the spiral staircase from the iconic CBS sitcom lies inside Day's main home.</p> <p>Day died on May 13, 2019 at her home.</p> <p>Her death followed closely after the beloved actress celebrated her 97th birthday.</p> <p>Bob Bashara, Day's business manager and close friend, told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://over60.monday.com/boards/63889387/pulses/people.com" target="_blank">PEOPLE</a></em><span> </span>that the star "died peacefully” after a fulfilling life working on films and TV shows.</p> <p>“She lived by her most famous song,<span> </span><em>Que Sera, Sera</em>. That was her belief.</p> <p>“Whatever will be, will be, and there is a purpose for everything that happens and you need to get on with her life,” Bashara said. “She always looked forward and looked for the good in whatever happened.”    </p>

Real Estate