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Restaurant’s brilliant response to “rude” customer goes viral

<p>A UK restaurant’s brilliant response to a "rude" customer who described their food and space as "crap" has gone viral on the Internet.</p> <p>By the River Brew Co's Träkol Restaurant in Tyne, England, shared the complaint email from a self-described "wealthy" and "well-educated" customer on their social media account last Monday.</p> <p>The unsatisfied customer wrote in an the email sent to the restaurant, "I am born and bread [sic] in Newcastle … Self employed from a wealthy background and well educated (privately, obviously). I have eaten in the best restaurants of Newcastle, Europe and the Caribbean.</p> <p>"I can honestly say I have never eaten such crap food in crap surroundings and payed [sic] at least four times what the food was worth."</p> <p>The paying patron's protest was also extended to the "salty" shellfish on the Barnsley Chop dish.</p> <p>The customer went on, "As a businessman I would not do you the disservice of putting this on social media, but someone needs to look at your offering."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT... UNLESS THEY ARE VERY VERY RUDE AND VERY VERY WRONG and sometimes, even in hospitality, you just have to say it like it is... x <a href="https://t.co/OJTeO2zYVi">pic.twitter.com/OJTeO2zYVi</a></p> — ByTheRiverBrewCo (@BTRBrewCo) <a href="https://twitter.com/BTRBrewCo/status/1094940228807282690?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">11 February 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The restaurant, which has been featured in the Michelin Guide, clapped back at the harsh review by sharing their brilliant response publicly on Twitter. </p> <p>"The customer is always right… unless they are very very rude and very very wrong," the management wrote in the Twitter caption accompanying a picture of their exchange.</p> <p>In their response to the customer, the restaurant masterfully addressed the customer’s "barbed and rather insulting" complaints.</p> <p>"Thank you for your mail — as a self employed, wealthy, privately educated individual we would have thought you would have understood the difference between bread and bred," they wrote.</p> <p>"Crap food: We are glad you enjoyed the Barnsley Chop … the real surprise is that you would expect crustaceans to be anything but salty given that they live in… the sea.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BtyiKZsgrql/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BtyiKZsgrql/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">CHOP CHOP... Barnsley Chop, Seaweed Butter, Cockles &amp; Sea Vegetables.... DISCLAIMER: Cockles are salty mind ;) x . . . #träkol #foodie #foodporn #foodgasm #foodphotography #foodies #foodblogger #brewing #brewers #beer #craftbeer #beerstagram #beersofinstagram #beergeek #picoftheday #craftbeer #craftbeerporn #cycling #bikestagram #roadcycling #ilovemybike #beerstagram #picoftheday #gateshead #pictureoftheday</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bytheriverbrewco/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> ByTheRiverBrewCo</a> (@bytheriverbrewco) on Feb 12, 2019 at 9:09am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"Crap surroundings: you don’t go into much detail here — and of course this is not the Caribbean at which you have dined in the best restaurants.</p> <p>"Whilst we are always welcoming of comments, critique and well reasoned complaints in this case we must take umbrage to your mail which we feel is simply a personal attack."</p> <p>The sharp-witted Twitter post has received more than 5,000 "likes", with people applauding the restaurant's answer.</p> <p>One of the restaurant’s fans wrote, "I'm sat here shouting far too many four letter words on behalf of you guys... shocking behaviour… please keep smashing out the amazing food and service that you guys do."</p> <p>Another user wrote, "Well, you've just earned yourself more customers the next time we’re down south. Brilliant response to an utterly terrible person."</p> <p>What do you think of the restaurant’s amusing response to the customer's email? Share your thoughts in the comments.</p>

Technology

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How to help adult kids flee the nest

<p>Moving out of home can a big step in your kids’ lives and can often be considered a milestone in transitioning from childhood to adulthood. It is also a good time to have a casual chat with your adult child about how to live as an independent person. This could help with setting expectations about how much you’re willing to help out now and in the future and set healthy boundaries. Here are a few essential tips to help make the transition less stressful for everyone.</p> <p><strong>Choosing the right place</strong> <br />For first time movers, choosing the right place to live can be a difficult decision which is why your kids may need some help with this. There are a few different factors that should be considered before deciding, such as; location, cost, sharing a property, or getting their own place with each having their own pros and cons.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Location:</strong> Cars can be expensive, so being close to public transport can help with saving some extra cash. </li> <li><strong>Share house:</strong> Division of rent and utility costs is a plus for this option however, your kids may want to ask their mates if they want to move in together, rather than starting fresh with strangers.</li> <li><strong>Own place:</strong> This option can save your kids the stress of living with new people. However, this can sometimes get lonely and be expensive. Don’t be surprised if your kids end up returning for financial help or come home to raid your kitchen on weekends.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Budgeting</strong><br />Creating a budget is crucial for good financial management both now and in the future. No-one wants any nasty surprises with utility or credit card bills. You should consider having a chat with your kids and mapping out a budget in a spreadsheet or budget planner. It is a great opportunity to create healthy financial habits for the future.</p> <p><strong>Donating unwanted furniture</strong> <br />Does your home need a long-awaited refresh? Imagine having a custom-built lounge suited to your specific cushioning requirements! Now that you’re an empty nester, there’s no risk of pizza scraps staining the lounge by careless kids who’s showering habits are questionable. Another plus is saving your kids money by passing on any furniture you no longer need.</p> <p><strong>Home cooking</strong><br />Teaching your kids to cook seven basic meals can give them the tools to maintain health and sustenance while they’re living out of home. This will also help with their budget as leftover food can be used for other meals throughout the week.</p> <p><strong>Chores</strong><br />By moving out, your kids can find some independence, freedom and adventure. But with freedom, comes great responsibility. From now on keeping on top of chores such as cleaning, cooking, laundry, watering plants, and taking bins out will all be part of their daily lives. Don’t forget, it’s not your duty to help complete these things, but it is important that they are aware of these responsibilities. Don’t be surprised if you come to visit and their place isn’t up to your standards. It’s all part of the learning process of transitioning into adulthood.</p> <p><strong>Insurance</strong> <br />When moving out, insurance can often be a forgotten piece of the puzzle for young adults. This can be particularly important if your kids have some of your old furniture, television or expensive computer equipment. To save on costs, your adult child should consider shopping around online to get the best deal on contents insurance. Expensive items can be hard to come by at this early stage of adulthood, so every dollar counts.</p> <p>As a parent, it might be tempting to take full control of your kids moving out. However, remember that you are there to help and provide them with support; and if asked, provide more information about how to live independently. </p> <p>Remember, these are just starting points and living independently is usually a learning process that can take some time. So, placing expectations which are too high on your adult kids during this transition period, may add unnecessary stress to all parties involved. Take it one step at a time and let them make some (small) mistakes on their own.</p>

Retirement Life

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Fans rejoice: There's going to be a Golden Girls cruise!

<p>Fans of the show <em>Golden Girls</em> will be thrilled to hear that there’s a cruise available specifically for fans.</p> <p>The Golden Girls at Sea aims to capture a Florida retiree lifestyle that the girls would be proud of, and there’s a lot on offer.</p> <p>With a Caftan Sail Away Party (with cheesecake), as well as Golden Girls trivia and Dorothy’s Bingo on offer, there’s plenty around to ensure that you’re entertained and making Dorothy, Blanche, Rose and Sophia proud.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjpltd6lmkI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading&amp;utm_campaign=embed_locale_control" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjpltd6lmkI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading&amp;utm_campaign=embed_locale_control" target="_blank">A post shared by The Golden Girls (@goldengirlsdaily)</a> on Jun 5, 2018 at 9:33am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The ocean adventure is being touted as a “once in a lifetime gathering” of<span> </span><em>Golden Girls</em><span> </span>fans.</p> <p>The cruise will take you from Miami, Florida, which is the home of the <em>Golden Girls</em>, and visit Key West and Cozumel in the Caribbean.</p> <p>There’s also a <em>Golden Girls</em> costume contest and a fancy dinner, so don’t forget to pack your best <em>Golden Girls</em> outfits!</p> <p>The cruise departs from Florida on February 2020, so there’s plenty of time to save up and plan for it.</p> <p>Have you ever been on a themed cruise before? Tell us about it in the comments below. </p>

Cruising

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4 things to consider for your retirement planning

<p>Planning the retirement of your dreams may seem incomprehensible at the moment – life is coming at you fast and figuring out the right steps can seem like a daunting task. However, there are steps you can take to fast track your retirement and make sure you’re where you want to be much sooner.</p> <p><strong>1. What is your current situation like? </strong></p> <p>Regardless of what work situation you’re currently in, there are always questions you should be thinking about during your retirement planning. Are you managing your debt and expenses?</p> <p>Retirement is about cash flow and ensuring your basic daily needs are met with your new regular income.</p> <p>Be honest with yourself when understanding your current life situation – are you ready to retire yet?</p> <p><br /><strong>2. Envision your retirement</strong></p> <p>How do you want your retirement to look? Visualising your desired retirement outcome and envisioning it over and over will help to mentally set your life after work into motion.</p> <p>For example, do you see yourself travelling the world during your retirement or spending time with your loved ones in the comfort of your own home?</p> <p><strong>3. Calculate your needs </strong></p> <p>Knowing where you are and where you need to go are important but now it’s time to consider what you’ll need in retirement. The thing is, putting a specific number under the thumb is impossible to do as every person is different. If you’re struggling to figure out how much you’ll need during your retirement, consulting a financial advisor might be your best bet so you can get a sure answer.</p> <p><strong>4. Review your income sources </strong></p> <p>So, you know what you need for retirement but how will it happen? Consider <em>all </em>your income sources, including your superannuation, your home equity, investment portfolios and perhaps the workforce. How much longer are you willing to spend time working to get yourself into retirement?</p> <p>Are you considering retirement? What other factors are you considering? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Retirement Life

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Airline passengers left abandoned after this happened

<p>A British airline has had an abrupt collapse of its business, leaving hundreds of airline passengers stunned and stranded throughout Europe.</p> <p>The British airline company, Flybmi, has announced it has gone bust, telling customers to contact their “payment card issuer to obtain a refund for flights which have not yet taken place".</p> <p>The airline thanked employees for their hard work and dedication, now leaving over 376 people without a job across Britain, Germany, Sweden and Belgium.</p> <p>The East Midlands-based airline operated in 25 European cities with 17 regional jet aircrafts.</p> <p>British Midland Regional Limited, operating as Flybmi, has said in a public announcement that it is filing for administration due to higher fuel costs and the uncertainty of Britain’s exit from the European union.</p> <p>“Current trading and future prospects have also been seriously affected by the uncertainty created by the Brexit process, which has led to our inability to secure valuable flying contracts in Europe and a lack of confidence around bmi’s ability to continue flying between destinations in Europe,” the airline announced on its website on Saturday.</p> <p>Pilots Union chief Brian Strutton said the airline’s collapse “is devastating news for all employees".</p> <p>“Our immediate steps will be to support Flybmi pilots and explore with the directors and administrators whether their jobs can be saved,” he said.</p> <p>A distressed passenger was left stunned by the announcement made on Saturday, she told <a href="https://news.sky.com/story/advice-issued-for-flybmi-passengers-frustrated-by-flight-cancellations-after-airlines-collapse-11639880">SkyNews.</a></p> <p>“Unfortunately for me, I was supposed to be flying home with them in less than 48 hours to Bristol. I don’t think that’s going to happen now,” she said.</p> <p>Customers were urged not to travel to the airport on Sunday unless arrangements were made with other airlines. Flybmi explained they would not be rescheduling passengers on to other flights. </p>

Travel Trouble

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How skipping breakfast can help you lose weight

<p>Breakfast, we are told, is the most important meal of the day. Over the last 50 years, we have been bombarded with messages extolling the health benefits of processed cereals and porridge oats. We are told breakfast helps us reduce weight by speeding up our metabolism – this helps us avoid hunger pangs and overeating later in the day.</p> <p>These are not just marketing messages, they are core to nutritional guidelines in developed countries, such as in the US, UK and Australia, prepared by expert scientific panels. These messages are mirrored in the media and websites worldwide. But what if the benefits of breakfast are just another diet myth?</p> <p><strong>No word for breakfast</strong></p> <p>It’s popular these days to follow the nutritional regimes of our ancient ancestors, but no one seems to be studying whether or not they ate breakfast. The Hadza people in Tanzania are the last true hunter-gatherers in East Africa who we believe live much like our ancestors. Living with them, we noticed a definite lack of a breakfast routine. They also have no regular word to describe “breakfast”.</p> <p>After waking up, the men usually leave on a hunting or honey-gathering trip without eating, maybe grabbing some berries a few hours later, en route. If they stay in camp in the morning or even all day, a handful of honey late morning – or even consumed as late as early afternoon – may be all they eat until a larger, evening meal. That said, there is no routine and eating patterns are highly variable, depending on the camp size and season.</p> <p>The women stay close to the camp and on some days make simple food, like baobab porridge, or they eat some stored honey, but rarely before 9-10am, giving them a fasting time since their evening meal of over 15 hours. Lacking a regular breakfast routine has not made them fat or unhealthy and they lack most Western diseases. Perhaps we should take a leaf from their book. At least, that’s what the latest scientific evidence suggests.</p> <p><strong>An honest mistake</strong></p> <p>The health benefit of breakfast has now been completely debunked by a new <a href="http://www.bmj.com/content/364/bmj.l42">systematic review and meta-analysis</a> of 11 randomised trials that investigated the impact of skipping breakfast on weight and metabolic rate.</p> <p>The studies vary widely in duration and quality, and seven looked at changes in weight as well as changes in energy usage. Their conclusion is the same as in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27292940">recent reviews</a> that have been largely ignored, namely, there is no evidence to support the claim that skipping meals makes you put on weight or adversely reduces your resting metabolic rate.</p> <p>There is now considerable evidence from these studies that skipping breakfast can be an effective way to reduce weight for some people. So why has the field got it so wrong in the past?</p> <p>One reason is the belief in “grazing” rather than “gorging” to avoid “stress” on the body from having to digest large meals, especially later in the day when glucose and insulin peaks are higher and metabolic rate lower. The flawed rationale was based on lab rodents and a few <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Jenkins+DJ+NEJM+1989">short-term human studies</a>. While the concept of over-compensation later in the day was correct – breakfast skippers do eat more lunch and slightly reduce their activity – it is not nearly enough to make up the energy deficit in a real-world setting outside a lab.</p> <p>Scientists were honestly misled in the past by many observational studies showing that obese people skipped meals more often than thin people. This mindset became ingrained in nutritional dogma. But these observational studies were seriously biased. Breakfast skippers were more likely, on average, to be poorer, less educated, less healthy and have a poorer diet. Overweight people were more likely to diet and, after a binge, more likely to feel guilty and skip a meal.</p> <p>Despite these flaws in the science and the steady increase in opposing evidence from randomised controlled trials, the idea that skipping meals is unhealthy has prevailed for decades. It’s still part of current NHS recommendations by Public Health England and one of its eight key <a href="https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/eight-tips-for-healthy-eating/">healthy diet messages</a>, part of <a href="https://www.cnpp.usda.gov/2015-2020-dietary-guidelines-americans">USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans</a>, as well as the <a href="https://nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/australian-dietary-guidelines">Australian Guidelines for Nutrition</a>.</p> <p>Another common pro-breakfast argument is that, as well as reducing obesity, it is essential for the mental well-being and attention span of children, even if well nourished. Again the evidence of over 20 trials, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27184287">when reviewed independently</a>, is at best weak and inconsistent, and probably biased in the same way as for adults.</p> <p>Evidence is also accumulating that restricted eating times and increasing fasting intervals can help some people <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6004924/">lose weight</a>. Some of these recent developments that seem counterintuitive to traditional thinking, make sense when we consider the importance of the gut microbiome on our health and metabolism. The community of 100 trillion gut microbes have a circadian rhythm and vary in composition and function in fasting and fed states. Data suggests microbial communities could benefit from <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413114005051">short periods of fasting</a>. They, like us, may need to rest and recuperate.</p> <p>Some of us are programmed to prefer eating food earlier in the day and others later, which may suit our unique personal metabolism. Around a third of people in developed countries regularly skip breakfast while many others enjoy it. This does not mean that everyone overweight would benefit from skipping breakfast. There is no one size fits all, and prescriptive diet guidelines filled with erroneous information look increasingly counterproductive and detract from important health messages.</p> <p>Different populations have their own varied breakfast habits, but before you next go hunting, why not try your own personal breakfast skipping experiments - it may suit you.</p> <p><em>Written by Tim Spector and Jeff Leach. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/skipping-breakfast-may-help-you-lose-weight-what-hunter-gatherers-can-teach-us-109840">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

Body

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The 3 mistakes you could be making with your skincare routine

<p>Everyone has a different approach to skincare. Whether you choose to opt for 12 different products day and night, or prefer a minimalist routine, experts say that both options are perfectly fine to follow. Speaking to <span><em><a href="https://www.marieclaire.com.au/how-to-use-eye-cream">Marie Claire</a></em></span>, dermatologist Dr Christine Armor said: “The most important thing is that you’re applying the appropriate active ingredients to achieve your skincare goals. Most women are busy and time-poor, so want an effective skincare with as few steps as possible. However, others enjoy the multi-step ‘Korean’ approach to skincare.”</p> <p>Here are somethings you should know:</p> <p><strong>1. Skincare that works while you sleep</strong></p> <p>Our skin is the body’s largest organ, and much like the rest of us, it repairs itself while we’re fast asleep. This is the perfect time to provide nourishment and antioxidants for glowing skin the next morning. Dr Armor says: “Our final steps at night should include the application of a moisturiser and active ingredients to address repair of damage caused by environmental damage during the day and well-rejuvenating ingredients (such as retinoids and AHA’s). Again, this can be achieved through multitasking products that ‘do it all’ or using multiple different products.”<strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>2. Are you making this night-time routine mistake? </strong></p> <p>“Using an expensive eye cream in addition to their night cream. We have been told that it’s really important to use a different product in the delicate eye area as opposed to the night cream that we use on the rest of our face. In most cases, the product that you use at night to repair, rejuvenate and moisturise the rest of your face is appropriate to achieve these functions in the eye area,” explains Dr Armour.</p> <p><strong>3. Skincare doesn’t just stop at your face</strong></p> <p>While we usually have no troubles taking care of the skin on our face, we often neglect the rest of our body, which should be seen as equally important. After using harsh soaps in the shower, it’s important to rejuvenate the skin with hydrating products. “Individuals that suffer from sensitive or dry skin should consider products that contain beneficial ingredients like aloe vera and vitamin B5 that are gentle on the skin. This ensures that the skin’s oil is replenished and not stripped away,” said Dr Armour.</p> <p>Are you someone who prefers a 12-step routine? Or someone who enjoys the minimal approach when it comes to caring for your skin? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Beauty & Style

News

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Duchess Meghan’s dad breaks silence about private letter: "I love my daughter"

<div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Duchess Meghan’s father has spoken out about his decision to publish a private letter that the Duchess had written to him. The letter was private and said that her heart was broken.</p> <p>"If you love me, as you tell the press you do, please stop. Please allow us to live our lives in peace. Please stop lying, please stop creating so much pain, please stop exploiting my relationship with my husband,” the letter from Meghan to her father is reported to have said.</p> <p>However, in a video that has been published by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8424380/meghan-markle-letter-dad-loves-her/" target="_blank">The Sun</a>, her father, Thomas Markle Sr, spoke to media in Mexico, asking: <span>"Why did you release the letter your daughter sent? Do you guys think you'll ever speak again?"</span></p> <p>"Read the papers," Markle Sr replied.</p> <p>"Are you sad, do you feel hurt, is it depression you're going through?" the reporter asked.</p> <p>"I love my daughter very much, I'm very sad," Markle Sr said, as he got into his car.</p> <p>Although the letter was date stamped August 2018, Markle Sr released it to the media a week after there were reports in <a rel="noopener" href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-dad-shares-letter-confirming-her-friends-account/" target="_blank">People</a> saying how hurt the Duchess was by her father’s actions.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7823285/gettyimages-1082207960.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ff5579a436214e87bf417f2aa35b1580" /></p> <p>Markle Sr initially kept the letter private “out of respect for Meghan”, but released it due to false reports surfacing about the specifics of it.</p> <p>The letter goes into detail about how Duchess Meghan tried to help her father before the royal wedding in May 2018. It reportedly says: </p> <p>"So the week of the wedding to hear about you having a heart attack through a tabloid was horrifying.</p> <p>"I called and texted… I begged you to accept help – we sent someone to your home … and instead of speaking to me to accept this or any help, you stopped answering your phone and chose to only speak to tabloids."</p> </div> </div> </div>

News

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What Queen Elizabeth forgot about her youngest son Prince Edward

<p>Prince Edward is the youngest child of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, however despite being the baby of the family reports say the Earl of Wessex’s birthday was forgotten while in his 20s by his mother.</p> <p>Now 54 years old, Prince Edward had a rather sobering experience in his younger life that the public took to social media to extend their sympathies.</p> <p>Jeremy Paxman’s new Channel 5 documentary is delving into the early life of the Queen’s children, and his biographer Ingrid Seward described him as a young lonely royal who found it difficult to find his place in Buckingham Palace.</p> <p>Seward, the editor-in-chief of<span> </span><em>Majesty</em><span> </span>magazine, said he was the “overlooked” third son.</p> <p>“At Buckingham Palace, he was lonely.</p> <p>“One year on his birthday he went to have breakfast with the Queen, and nothing was said. No card, no present. She didn’t know it was his birthday,” Seward recounted.</p> <p>Previously she had mentioned the same experience in her 2005 book<span> </span><em>Prince Edward: A Biography</em>, where she described the Q<span>ueen eating her toast and marmalade and sipping her special blend of homemade tea.</span></p> <p>The Prince’s demeanour hadn’t changed throughout breakfast, however, when a royal aide was made aware of the situation, the Queen was alerted, a “hasty” phone call was made, and presents were delivered to him a few hours later.</p> <p>"If it had been Prince Edward’s 20th or his 30th, his mother would not have forgotten,'" Steward wrote.</p> <p>She also noted the Queen’s second “heroic” son Andrew, who fought in the war, was her favourite son.</p> <p><em>Daily Mail</em>’s Richard Kay told Jeremy Paxman that Prince Edward never really knew where he fit in.</p> <p>“His royal aides once told me that the trouble with Prince Edward is that he can never decide whether he is His Royal Highness or Edward Windsor.</p> <p>“He couldn't tell whether he was one of us or a member of the royal family,” Kay said.</p> <p>This news comes days after the surprising revelation that <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/prince-charles-surprising-admission-prince-andrew-wants-to-be-me" target="_blank">Prince Charles claimed his younger brother, Prince Andrew, wanted to be him.</a></p> <p>The dynamic that existed between Prince Charles and his youngest brother, Edward, was extremely separate.</p> <p>“Charles is 16 years older than Edward and they weren't close,” Stewart admitted.</p> <p>She also confirmed their was a time where Prince Charles was the ‘leading’ son of the family.</p> <p>“On one of those occasions Prince Edward went upstairs and found some of the Duke of Windsor's old kilts which of course were all the tartans that the Prince of Wales is entitled to wear, and he thought, 'Ooh those look rather fun.' So, he put one on, and it fitted.</p> <p>“He went down to dinner in a tartan which was that of the Duke of Rothesay, and as he went into the dining room Charles went apoplectic and said, ‘What are you doing wearing that? I am the only one entitled to wear that kilt. It is a kilt for the Prince of Wales. Go upstairs and take it off.’”</p> <p>“Edward being such a calm person just went, 'OK', went upstairs and took it off and never mentioned it again.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Prince Edward through the years.</p> <p>Are you surprised by the Queen forgetting Prince Edward’s birthday? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

News

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The place you never thought an alligator might end up

<p>A woman was given the fright of her life when she checked to see who, or in her case,<span> </span>what<span> </span>was pounding on her door when she realised an 113-kilogram alligator was on her porch.</p> <p>Geri Staples says she heard loud knocking on her front door on Tuesday morning in Merritt Island, Florida and after peering outside through some windows, she noticed the large reptile on her door step.</p> <p>It was then the Florida woman realised she needed to get as far away from the deadly alligator as possible.</p> <p>“I wasn’t sure, if he kept pounding like that, if he could actually open the door with his snout if he hit hard enough,” she explained to NBC Wash 2 reports.</p> <p>“So, I wasn’t taking any chances.”</p> <p>Staples says she fled to the upstairs area of her home, closing as many doors as she could.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7823620/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/63cd31e4e4784982b17529491cda47ab" /></p> <p>While she fled, neighbours attempted to wrestle and trap the alligator but found it to be too violent and combative so turned to authorities, the United Press International reported.</p> <p>An alligator trapper later came and shot the animal dead.</p> <p>Florida is known for inhabiting the dangerous reptiles but Corey Larkam, a neighbour to Geri Staples told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.clickorlando.com/news/man-spots-giant-gator-at-neighbors-front-door-in-merritt-island" target="_blank">WKMG-TV</a><span> </span>the alligator was the largest he’d seen in Merritt Island.</p> <p>“That’s the biggest gator that has been here in the last 20 years that we have seen,” Mr Larkam said.</p>

News

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The naughtiest kids’ names revealed

<p>The top names for naughtiest children have been revealed in a new poll.</p> <p>A research conducted by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.motherandbaby.co.uk/baby-names/girls/revealed-the-names-that-the-nicest-and-naughtiest-children-have" target="_blank">School Stickers</a> looked at 63,000 school children in the UK and their behaviour in class by tracking the rewards they gained in online sticker books.</p> <p>After looking at the data, the company was able to identify the top 20 naughtiest boys' and girls' names.</p> <p>Ella topped the list as the naughtiest girl's name, followed by Bethany and Eleanor. Meanwhile, the naughtiest boy’s name is Joseph, with Cameron and William taking the second and third spots respectively.</p> <p>The poll also revealed the names of the nicest children, with Amy at the top of the girls’ list and Jacob ranking first on the boys' list. <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dia.govt.nz/diawebsite.nsf/wpg_URL/Services-Births-Deaths-and-Marriages-Most-Popular-Male-and-Female-First-Names?OpenDocument" target="_blank">New Zealand’s most popular baby names,</a> <span>Oliver and Charlotte also made the nice list.</span></p> <p>See the naughtiest and nicest kids’ names below.</p> <p><strong>Naughiest girls:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Ella</li> <li>Bethany</li> <li>Eleanor</li> <li>Olivia</li> <li>Laura</li> <li>Holly</li> <li>Courtney</li> <li>Amber</li> <li>Caitlin</li> <li>Jade</li> </ul> <p><strong>Naughtiest boys:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Joseph</li> <li>Cameron</li> <li>William</li> <li>Jake</li> <li>Joshua</li> <li>Jamie</li> <li>Lewis</li> <li>Benjamin</li> <li>Ethan</li> <li>Luke</li> </ul> <p><strong>Nicest girls:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Amy</li> <li>Georgia</li> <li>Emma</li> <li>Charlotte</li> <li>Grace</li> <li>Sophie</li> <li>Abigail</li> <li>Hannah</li> <li>Emily</li> <li>Alice</li> </ul> <p><strong>Nicest boys:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Jacob</li> <li>Daniel</li> <li>Thomas</li> <li>James</li> <li>Adam</li> <li>Harry</li> <li>Samuel</li> <li>Jack</li> <li>Oliver</li> <li>Ryan</li> </ul> <p>Is your grandkid’s name on any of these lists? Tell us in the comments.</p>

News

Travel

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6 essentials to pack when heading off on a road trip

<p>We all generally have a good idea on what to take when travelling overseas, but what if you’re exploring your own backyard? Road trips are a great way to see more of the country you live in but be sure to bring these items with you for a smoother trip!</p> <p><strong>1. Bags</strong></p> <p>Duffle bags are a dream come true when driving across the country. Not only are they less bulky than standard luggage, but you can squish them into any nook and cranny, making them a great option for when you’re planning overnight stays.</p> <p>The lightweight option is a great necessity to take with you, as you can pack an extra pair of clothes, a toothbrush and any other essentials you may need while you’re away from home.</p> <p><strong>2. Clothing</strong></p> <p>This is one of those situations where comfort should always be given priority over style. Sitting in a car for hours isn’t the most pleasant of situations, so wearing clothes that are loose and breathable will keep you feeling fresher for longer.</p> <p>Dark colours are a good idea as they help hide wrinkles, meaning when you stop over along the way, you won’t feel out of place and daggy.</p> <p><strong>3. Snacks</strong></p> <p>Is it really a road trip if you don’t have snacks on hand? Pre-packing your food for the journey is going to prove to be a lot cheaper than purchasing them from a service station. A few good things to take with you are frozen fruit and veggies, and mixed nuts to give you that extra burst of protein.</p> <p>Mixing your snacks in a Ziplock bag is a genius and efficient way of making your own trail mix and be sure to keep the boot of your car stocked up with back-up options.</p> <p><strong>4. Games</strong></p> <p>While your phone always proves to be a nice distraction, it isn’t a device that can get everyone involved. Games such as Mad Lib and other non-electronic activities is a fun way to liven things up after a long day on the road.</p> <p><strong>5. Music</strong></p> <p>Music is crucial if you want to set the mood and is a nice way to clear your head as you journey to your destination. Make sure the tunes are upbeat, so everyone can remain alert, but then also have a playlist with mellow music, for the moments you need a breather.</p> <p><strong>6. Navigation</strong></p> <p>This is the most important item you need to keep, as without a good navigation system, you may end up somewhere with no way to get out. While every smartphone has the option of Google Maps, it’s a good idea to purchase a separate GPS device as phone apps require network coverage, which you may not always have, and always use up your data.</p> <p>Be sure to test it out before you head off, just to see if everything is working properly.</p> <p>Do you have any more road trip essentials to add to this list? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Travel Tips

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5 clever packing hacks: How to travel light

<p>Travelling light with carry-on comes with a lot of benefits – apart from saving money on luggage allowance, you could also skip the long wait at baggage claim and move from one destination to another more easily.</p> <p>Most airlines will allow you to bring up to 7kg on board – and with the right tricks, 7kg is all you need. Here are some of the things you can do to cut down your carry-on weight.</p> <p><strong>1. Invest in a lightweight luggage</strong></p> <p>With the right luggage, you can cut 2-3kg right off the bat. A wheeled suitcase can be a convenient option, but weekender bags also work. Keep in mind that most airlines will have size limits for carry-on luggage. While the dimensions may vary, in general they need to fit under the seat or in the overhead lockers.</p> <p><strong>2. Go digital</strong></p> <p>In today’s world, there’s little need to bring bundles of paperwork to the airport. Digitise your travel documents by using apps or saving them to your phone, a cloud drive or a USB stick. This not only helps save space and weight, but also eliminates any worries about losing important docs on the go.</p> <p>You can also swap heavy paperbacks for an e-Book reader device – or better yet, have the e-Books ready on your tablet or smartphone.</p> <p><strong>3. Wear your heaviest items</strong></p> <p>For light travelling, it is best to opt for a small number of versatile clothing items to pack. However, if you need to bring a heavy coat or a pair of boots, you can wear them to the airport to minimise the carry-on weight. </p> <p><strong>4. Minimise toiletries</strong></p> <p>Depending on your destination, you might not need to bring basics such as shampoo and body wash. Still, you can bring your personal toiletries without going over the airline’s liquid limits by going for the mini travel-sized version of the products. If your favourite brand does not offer this, you can decant them into smaller containers, which you can purchase in pharmacies.</p> <p><strong>5. Get a travel scale</strong></p> <p>Avoid the surprise of being charged excess baggage fees at the airport by weighing your bags with a luggage scale before check-ins. With portable, compact size and affordable price – some of the scales on the market cost as low as $9 – there’s no reason not to get one.</p> <p>Do you have any other hacks to keep your luggage light and breezy? Share them in the comments.</p>

International Travel

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6 travel tricks: Get through airport security faster

<p>It’s easy to be a good passenger on a flight. Use your headphones, be polite to the cabin crew and be aware that there are other people on the flight besides yourself. However, navigating the airport can be a bit tricker. Here are a few tips to help you get through the airport with ease.</p> <p><strong>1. Bring an empty water bottle</strong></p> <p>As you’re only able to bring 100ml of liquid through airport security, bringing an empty water bottle with your carry-on is a good tip to avoid paying through the nose for a bottle of water later on.</p> <p>You can easily fill it up in the water fountains provided at the airport, as well as asking cafes to fill it up for you with drinking water.</p> <p><strong>2. Let the check-in staff know if it’s a special occasion</strong></p> <p>If you’re heading somewhere special or off to see your first grandchild, it can be handy to let the check-in staff know this. By simply being friendly and courteous, it can be easier to get a free upgrade on a flight.</p> <p>If you’re feeling bold, you can ask directly.</p> <p><strong>3. Take a picture of your parking spot</strong></p> <p>It can be tricky to remember where you’ve parked your car on the best of days.</p> <p>Taking a photo of your parking spot in a carpark, especially if you’ve parked at the airport, is a good way to ease yourself into the harsh reality of everyday life after a lovely holiday.</p> <p><strong>4. Rebook your flight quickly</strong></p> <p>Waiting in a long line, only to find your flight has been cancelled, can be very frustrating. However, instead of waiting in line to complain to the airport staff, use the airport phone and call the airline to rebook your flight over the phone.</p> <p>This is much quicker than waiting in line. You could also try booking online.</p> <p><strong>5. Wear your heaviest items of clothing</strong></p> <p>This hack is definitely weather dependent, but it can help to free up space in your luggage if you’re wearing your heaviest items of clothing.</p> <p>By doing this, you’ve freed up space and weight in your luggage.</p> <p><strong>6. Bring hotel toiletries with you</strong></p> <p>If you’ve got sticky fingers and often take hotel toiletries from places you’ve stayed at, it’s handy to use them when you’re travelling overseas as they’re usually under the liquid allowance of 100ml.</p> <p>Do you know of any other tips to get through security faster? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Travel Trouble

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Why cruise ships may be dirtier than you think

<p>The beautiful salty breeze on the deck of a cruise ship might not be as fresh or clean as you think it is and a new study has revealed it might be less clean than beach air.</p> <p>Research conducted on four Carnival Corporation ships over the last two years found particulate matter (PM) – pollution comprising of small solids or liquid droplets in the air – had amounts comparable to places with high levels of pollution like Beijing and Taipei, Taiwan.</p> <p>The worst readings taken in the cruise ships were in areas designated for exercise or children’s activities.</p> <p>When cruise ship air is inhaled, it can “damage the heart and lungs,” according to the study completed by associate professor at the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Ryan Kennedy.</p> <p>”It’s dangerous, it’s not a healthy thing for us to be exposed to,“ he<span><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/01/24/health/cruise-ship-air-quality-report/index.html"> told CNN</a></span>.</p> <p>The report explains the ship may exhaust harmful toxins into the air including metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) – of these which can have damaging impacts on vacationers and ship employees.</p> <p>The cruise ships tested were<em>: Carnival Liberty</em> in 2017, <em>Carnival Freedom</em> in April-May 2018 in the Caribbean, <em>Holland America Amsterdam</em> in October 2018 and <em>Princess Emerald</em> in November 2018.</p> <p>Holland America and Princess Cruises are both under the ownership of Carnival Corporation.</p> <p>Carnival Corporation has rebuffed the tests saying they were “completely ridiculous, inaccurate and in no way represent reality”.</p> <p>“We test the air quality of our ships and they meet or exceed every requirement.”</p> <p>This is not the first time that cruise lines have been subject to criticism for their contribution to pollution.</p> <p>In 2018 the Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) committed to reduce the rate of carbon emissions across the industry fleet by 40 per cent by 2030 globally.</p>

Cruising

Health

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<p>You are the kind of parent who, in order to help your adult children, get ahead in life and pay off a large mortgage, are chipping in to babysit grandchildren to ease the burden of childcare costs.</p> <p>The amount of caring you are doing may vary from a few hours a week to multiple days per week.<br />In doing so you are also contributing significantly to the nation’s coffers. Research shows that $5.54 billion is added to the Australian economy by unpaid carers and $1.26 billion from unpaid childcare provided by the over 50s.</p> <p>It is a very natural, altruistic and noble intention to want to help your children in this way and research published in May this year by the University of Melbourne revealed that it can be good for you. The study found postmenopausal women who took care of their grandchildren one day a week had better memory and faster cognitive speed than those who didn’t.</p> <p><strong>Balancing yours and your children’s needs</strong><br />The researchers however carry a warning about over-using the generous nature of grandparents noting that women who cared for grandchildren five or more days a week had significantly slower processing speed and planning scores, possibly because they felt exhausted and stressed.</p> <p>National Seniors CEO, Michael O’Neill says it’s important for grandparents to aim for a balance in enjoying their retirement years and providing support to their children.</p> <p>“It’s about balance and not giving up on your dreams, expectations and goals to achieve. Those goals shouldn’t be subsumed by the demands of a younger generation".</p> <p>However, the economic reality is that there is an increasing reliance on grandparents for childcare assistance in dual income families and so here are some good ideas for negotiating the babysitting/caring parameters successfully:</p> <p><br /><strong>Tips for setting babysitting boundaries</strong><br />Set limits early on – you might even like to start the conversation with your adult child before your grandchild is born</p> <ul> <li>Consider how far in advance of sitting time you'd like to be approached. If you prefer a week’s notice and not same-day requests </li> <li>Let your children know in advance if you are okay with taking grandchildren to doctor’s appointments or something similar.</li> <li>Let your children know if you are comfortable with supervising homework/study.</li> <li>Set time parameters around drop-off and pick-up </li> <li>School holiday arrangements need to be set early and be clear about school holiday activities i.e. signing grandkids up to camps/classes etc.</li> <li>Will you have grandchildren for sleepovers or not?</li> <li>Will playdates need to be arranged?</li> </ul> <p><strong>More ideas for stress-free babysitting</strong></p> <ul> <li>If you have a skill or hobby that you are talented at share this with your grandkids where appropriate</li> <li>Decide if and/or how you will deliver discipline. You are not obligated to share this role, but it will help your child and grandchild if you have a plan in place</li> <li>Let your household standards slip a bit and put away the precious ornaments while grandkids are around, as this can save heartache for them and you</li> <li>Discuss food and nutrition issues with your child as they may have strong views on this</li> <li>Discuss sleep pattern and arrangements i.e. will the grandchild be required to nap during the day or not</li> <li>Discuss appropriateness of certain movies, books and video games with your child ahead of the sitting/caring time</li> <li>The key thing to remember is to have open, honest communication about babysitting with your children early to avoid unrealistic expectations. You shouldn’t have to do anything you are uncomfortable with so you should try not to be a ‘yes’ man or woman to your children all the time, or your generosity could be taken for granted and lead to stress for both you and your children.</li> </ul> <p>What are some of your tips? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Danielle Cesta. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/the-granny-nanny-trend.aspx">Wyza.com.au. </a></em></p>

Caring

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5 things you might not realise can be signs of depression

<p>We all know about depression. It is a debilitating illness, and while feeling sad and alone are obvious symptoms, many subtle signs are swept under the rug.</p> <p>Whether one of your loved ones have suffered from the illness, or you’ve heard about it through the grapevine, the mental disorder is one that does not discriminate. Regardless of age, gender, class or creed, anyone can suffer from depression.</p> <p>But how do you know if you’re on the road to a depressive disorder? Most people know the obvious signs, such as sleeping too much, losing interest in social gatherings and constantly feeling down, but it’s important to understand the less obvious symptoms.</p> <p>Subtle signs can help you decide whether you need to seek help.</p> <p>There is a big difference between feeling sad – which is a temporary emotion that will subside – and depression. Which carries a number of specific characteristics and can be ongoing.</p> <p>Here are the 5 signs you need to look out for when it comes to your mental health:</p> <p><strong>1. You’re easily irritated</strong></p> <p>You’re becoming easily agitated with friends and family. Things that generally don’t affect you are now causing you to feel rage. Or maybe you’re dealing with sporadic mood swings. Speaking to<em> <span><a href="https://www.buzzfeed.com/stephhallett/things-you-might-not-realize-can-be-signs-of-depression">Buzzfeed</a></span></em>, counsellor Elizabeth Black of the Renfrew Centre said the feeling of constant irritation is an underrated sign of depression.</p> <p>“It can be challenging to have patience or compassion for those who present as irritable and therefore harder to identify when it is a sign of depression,” she said.</p> <p><strong>2. You’re looking back to the “good ol’ days”</strong></p> <p>Everyone has memories that they enjoy revisiting from time to time, but constantly living in the past is a sign of something more serious.</p> <p>“Many people who struggle with depression look back to the good old days as a coping mechanism,” says psychologist Dr. Sal Raichbach to <em>Buzzfeed</em>.</p> <p>“A depressed person might feel great for years but then plunge back into their sadness when a loss or a major life change occurs. Fun times in the past help them feel better temporarily.”</p> <p><strong>3. You’re finding it hard to concentrate</strong></p> <p>According to psychologist Dr. Cindy Graham, the negative thoughts that come with depression makes it harder for those with the illness to concentrate on things such as work. Many times, lack of concentration is misdiagnosed as ADHD, especially when medical professionals are unaware of the negative thoughts clouding your mind.</p> <p><strong>4. You’re finding “me time” to be stressful</strong></p> <p>Many adults look forward to the moment they can get a few hours to themselves, but for someone who is depressed, lack of plans bring about feelings of anxiousness.</p> <p>Speaking to <em>Buzzfeed</em>, Dr. Graham said: “These moments [of downtime] may feel heavenly and highly sought after by some, but for someone struggling with depression, downtime leads to plenty of opportunity for negative thoughts to run unchecked.”</p> <p><strong>5. You’re feeling guilty about everything</strong></p> <p>According to the <span><a href="https://www.apa.org/">American Psychological Association</a></span> (APA) “inappropriate and excessive guilt” is a sign of depression.</p> <p>This can range from feeling bad about something that happened at work which was out of your control, or feeling responsible for something that you had no part in. APA gave this as an example: “A realtor may become preoccupied with self-blame for failing to make sales even when the market has collapsed generally, and other realtors are equally unable to make sales.”</p> <p>While these are only five symptoms of many, if you believe you may have depression be sure to visit your doctor to get a diagnosis.</p> <p><em>If you are troubled by this article, experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide, you can call the Depression Helpline at 0800 111 757 or visit depression.org.nz.</em></p>

Body

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Body language expert's verdict on pregnant Duchess Meghan: “Overly self-aware”

<p>With another public outburst from her father, all eyes were on Duchess Meghan as she stepped out with Prince Harry for a gala performance at the Natural History Museum in London.</p> <p>However, the Duchess was calm and confident as she ditched her usual habits of cradling her baby bump and holding onto Prince Harry’s hand as she walked. She walked several steps ahead of him, appearing confident and calm.</p> <p>The author of the<span> </span><em>Body Language Bible</em><span> </span>and body language expert, Judi James, says there’s more to this display than meets the eye.</p> <p>James explained that Duchess Meghan is more aware of the eyes of the public being on her after the outburst from her father.</p> <p>“'This was the first public appearance since her pregnancy was announced where Meghan didn’t cup, stroke and cradle her bump.</p> <p>“Her decision to drop these rituals looks deliberate. There are a couple of times when we can see her perform a truncated gesture, when her left hand rises towards her bump in a bid to cradle it, but she appears to self-correct and drop her hand down to her side instead.”</p> <p>James also pointed out that the distance between Duchess Meghan and Prince Harry was deliberate as well.</p> <p>“There are some clues that Meghan’s response to the problems with her father is to assert her independence and confidence in her royal role. It could have been easy for her to become visually vulnerable and to lean on or shelter behind her husband for support – but by striding out in the lead she may have wanted to suggest resilience and even a sense of power.”</p> <p>Prince Harry appeared as nervous as ever when he’s near his wife, with the Duke of Sussex displaying anxious body language.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7823606/body-language-harry.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f9d29f252fd74b35b4afbac7edbc8013" /></p> <p>“In contrast Harry appears a lot less masked, with several suggestions of anxiety visible in his facial expression and his body language. He looks tired and at times rather distant and reflective.” James said.</p> <p>“This [behaviour] would be normal for his father Charles but Harry has been the one Windsor male who always appeared jolly and lacking in any self-comfort traits. He begins by buttoning his jacket rather deliberately in two "barrier gestures", then hikes his trousers up from the back.”</p> <p>What do you think? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Body

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How being nostalgic makes you healthier

<p>The sound of waves crashing on the shore, the smell of freshly baked biscuits, the chorus of your favourite rock song, these are all triggers for us to become nostalgic, to look back sentimentally on something in our past that holds deep personal meaning. But rather than just pleasant daydreaming, being nostalgic can have positive effects on our wellbeing.</p> <p>Studies have shown that people who are nostalgic are more confident, are more likely to maintain healthy relationships, have a greater sense of self-worth and are more optimistic about the future. Being nostalgic can also help counteract loneliness, which is a precursor to poor mental health.</p> <p><strong>So how does nostalgia work?</strong></p> <p>Nostalgia expert Krystine Batcho, professor at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York, said nostalgia works on a psychological level by "helping a person maintain stability during times of change" and "helping them cope during times of adversity."</p> <p>"What nostalgia does is that it reconnects a person to their own history. It gives them a sense that even though so much change is going on around them, something stays the same – and that is very comforting, because change can be stressful," said Batcho.</p> <p>"People who are nostalgic are more likely to have a healthy sense of confidence and self-esteem and they’re also more likely to be interconnected socially," added Batcho, whose research involved developing an inventory test to measure the likelihood an individual will become nostalgic. </p> <p>According to Batcho, nostalgic people have healthy coping mechanisms that make them more willing to seek advice and emotional support from others and they are also more likely to engage in active problem solving – behaviours that have positive implications for those individuals’ health.</p> <p>"What we know from the health literature is that it’s very important to have a social support system in place when an individual is battling diseases that need a lot of treatment," she said. "Having a social support network can even be helpful in a preventative kind of way, because people who are connected socially are more likely to join a health club, a sports team, or monitor their diet or exercise progress because others are doing it with them."</p> <p>So what can we do to indulge in a bit of our own healthy daydreaming about days long gone? Below are the five ways you can use nostalgia to boost your wellbeing.</p> <p><strong>1. Have a nostalgic ritual<br /></strong></p> <p>The longing for a real something or someone from your past falls under the banner of 'personal nostalgia.' It could be for a loved one, a pet, place, school, a song, a possession, or any number of things. This kind of nostalgia is 'bittersweet', Batcho said, because it is a blend of ambivalent emotions – memories that are 'sweet' such as 'I liked my life back then' but also memories that are 'bitter' like 'But my brother was a real pain'.</p> <p>Interestingly, reliving the bitter as well as the sweet memories gives us a powerful tool to deal with hardships because it allows what Batcho calls 'positive reappraisal'. That’s where we see the good and the bad together, in turn helping us to see the positive in our present day hardship.</p> <p>To tap into your sense of personal nostalgia, try creating a ritual around something meaningful in your past and set aside some time to experience that ritual. It could be digging up old photographs on a quiet Sunday afternoon, reading a poem that you once liked, writing about an event from your past, or even reminiscing with a childhood friend over coffee.</p> <p>Batcho advised there is no hard and fast rule to what you should reminisce about or how often you should experience nostalgia, but "it should be used as frequently as is needed."</p> <p><strong>2. Hold a get-together and reminisce<br /></strong></p> <p>Sharing your nostalgic memories with others is a good way to nostalgise, said Tim Wildschut, associate professor within the psychology department at the University of Southampton, UK.</p> <p>Strapped for ideas about what to do? Think about how you can infuse something whimsical or retro into your next get-together with friends or family as a talking point for memories. You might like to set a historical theme with a dress code from a bygone era, or hold a vintage high tea with comfort foods from the past, or even ask everyone to bring a photo of themselves on their 21st birthday. </p> <p><strong>3. Let the music take you back</strong></p> <p>Both Wildschut and Batcho agreed that music is one of the best ways to experience nostalgia. "Listening to music gives the same benefits as writing about memories," Wildschut said.</p> <p>To find out which music will wind your mental clock back, think about the songs from your past that may have held special significance at landmark moments in your life. Was The Beatles' number playing when you had your first kiss? Was your first dance at your wedding an Elvis song? Play them as often as you like. While you’re listening, remind yourself why they mean so much to you and pay attention to lyrics that give you a warm, fuzzy feeling.</p> <p><strong>4. Do something childish - just for fun!</strong></p> <p>Doing things we did when we were kids can also be a useful strategy for dialling back to the past. "It might only be that a person has to go all the way back to the time of their childhood to when they felt safe and secure, and more importantly, really loved for who they were to find examples of problems that were dealt with earlier," said Batcho.</p> <p>Some ideas to bring out your inner child include colouring in, finger painting and swinging on swings in your local park. Chances are, if you feel a tad awkward about the behaviour as an adult, you’re heading down the right path.</p> <p><strong>5. Anticipate a loss (but enjoy the moment)</strong></p> <p>Anticipatory nostalgia is a type of nostalgia currently being investigated by researchers. This is when you feel nostalgic for the loss of something before you have even lost it – consider the example of a parent who might put a child on a bus for the first time and realise that one day their child will be so independent that they won’t need them anymore.</p> <p>Although tinged with some sadness, Batcho said this type may prove to be personally beneficial because it "reminds you to value and treasure being in the present moment, because it's true that nothing lasts forever."</p> <p>To experience this kind of nostalgia, think of the things in your everyday life that you highly value such as the coffee shop down the road that makes your favourite coffee and imagine a time when you will no longer have these things. Afterwards, remind yourself that you still do have them and make a point of enjoying them.</p> <p>What are the things in your life you are most nostalgic about? Join the conversation in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Dominic Bayley</span>. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/can-being-nostalgic-really-make-you-healthier.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></span>.</em></p>

Mind

Lifestyle

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“You have to show up”: Serena Williams' husband shares the secret to their happy marriage

<p>Known to be the brains behind discussion website Reddit and the husband of Serena Williams, Alexis Ohanian penned a letter, revealing the secrets behind his marriage and how he supports his tennis legend wife.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.glamour.com/story/alexis-ohanian-serena-williams-successful-marriage" target="_blank"><em>Glamour</em></a>, journalist Samantha Leach asked the 35-year-old entrepreneur on how he learnt to be the perfect husband.</p> <p>This is what he had to say:</p> <p>Glamour<em> asked me to talk about “going big” when it comes to romance. I’ve done a few things that you may have seen on social media – things that have gotten me plenty of teasing from my friends, as well as other husbands on the Internet who’ve said I’m making them look bad. It started when I put up some billboards for my wife, a.k.a. the GMOAT (greatest mom of all time), to celebrate her first tournament after having our daughter, Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr. I made a video showcasing her journey returning to tennis around the U.S. Open. And then there was that trip to Italy – she had a craving, so I delivered her to Venice.</em></p> <p><em>I get it; these are pretty extravagant gestures. But I think if you were to ask my wife, or many other people in relationships, it’s often the simpler things that are the most important. You have to show up. You have to be supportive. These are the things that matter.</em></p> <p><em>I credit my parents with a lot of what I’ve learned about partnership and relationships. My father, who’s Armenian, and my mother, who came from what was then West Germany, met in Ireland and spent a whirlwind two weeks together. Even though my dad didn’t speak any German and my mom spoke only basic English, they fell in love. She followed my father to America and worked as an au pair, ultimately overstaying her visa and actually living in the U.S. undocumented for a while until they got married. My mom had to hit reset on her whole life. In Germany she was almost credentialed to be a pharmacist. Here in the U.S. she had to start over and get her GED while working a ton of service and restaurant jobs. Then she opted to work nights as a pharmacy technician – not a pharmacist – just so she’d be able to be around when I came home from school. Meanwhile, my father logged long hours to put food on the table and give us the best life he possibly could.</em></p> <p><em>It wasn’t always easy, but my parents were partners in the truest sense. By watching them up close, I learned what it means to be supportive, how to make compromises without sacrificing yourself, and how to show up in the ways that matter. Whether it was being proud parents at my football games or organising family road trips for weekend getaways to Civil War battlefields or antiquing (the former was my dad’s favourite, the latter my mom’s; at the time I found them boring, but I appreciate those memories now). In short, I got the cheat code for partnership early on.</em></p> <p><em>When you’re married to the GOAT, the logistics alone can make the act of physically “showing up” a challenge. Serena’s tennis schedule takes her all over the world, and my career also requires being on the road, whether it’s travelling to meet with founders, speaking at industry events, or spending time at my venture capital firm Initialised home office in San Francisco. Comparing calendars isn’t romantic, but at the start of every year, Serena and I map out our schedules so that, ideally, there isn’t more than a week that we go without seeing each other. I brought Google Calendar into her world so we could see each other’s schedules at any time, which would also make it easier to plan an impromptu call if we’re away from each other – a day without FaceTime is rough when you’ve been away from each other for two weeks.</em></p> <p><em>My understanding of showing up and being present for my wife was taken to a whole new level when Olympia was born. I was able to take 16 weeks of paid leave from Reddit, and it was one of the most important decisions I’ve made. It helped that I was a founder and didn’t have to worry about what people might say about my “commitment” to the company, but it was incredible to be able to spend quality time with Olympia. And it was perhaps even more meaningful to be there for my wife and to adjust to this new life we created together – especially after all the complications she had during and after the birth. There is a lot of research about the benefits of taking leave, not only for the cognitive and emotional development of the child but for the couple. However, many fathers in this country are not afforded the privilege of parental leave. And even when they are, there is often a stigma that prevents them from doing so. I see taking leave as one of the most fundamental ways to “show up” for your partner and your family, and I cherished all 16 weeks I was able to take.</em></p> <p><em>Since I came back from leave, I’m less “full-time dad” and more what I like to call “business dad". When Serena has an intense day of training or a photo shoot, I’ll spend the day with Olympia. I’m fortunate to be my own boss, which comes with the freedoms of doing things like bringing my daughter into the office or working remotely from virtually anywhere Serena competes. My partners at Initialised are used to seeing Olympia jump on camera – along with her doll Qai Qai – or hearing her babbling on a call. I tell them with pride, “Olympia’s at work today!” And I’ll post some photos on Instagram or Twitter so my followers can see it too.</em></p> <p><em>The more we normalise this, on social media and in real life, the better, because I know this kind of dynamic makes a lot of men uncomfortable (and selfishly I want Olympia to hear me talking about start-ups!). Research shows that men are happy to have successful wives – until it interferes with their own work. A full 50 per cent of men expect their career to take precedence over their wife’s. I know this is real, because I’ve seen the tweets and comments about how being less successful (or doing what is traditionally considered “women’s work” and caring for your kids) can be “emasculating". To me, that says more about the guy than anything else. If you need to make more money than your partner to have confidence, then I think there’s something more going on under the hood. If that’s where your swagger’s has to come from, then it’s probably not real.</em></p> <p><em>I know I’ve been successful in my career, but I’m not the one racking up the trophies. It helps that my wife and I both know what it takes to be successful and bring that mutual understanding, drive and relentlessness to the table. But at the end of the day, sometimes her career really does have to come first. I try to be the most supportive partner I can be and to have conversations with her about her career goals and what she can do to reach them. Most of my talks with Serena about her career have come from a place of “What do you want to be doing?” or “Where do you want to be?” and that’s not only in sport but in life. She does the same with me. I’m far from perfect, but I try to get behind her and let her know I’m there for her and our daughter, no matter what.</em></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjxErpTFqpw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjxErpTFqpw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Family day yesterday. @olympiaohanian was not having it though. @serena collection top.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/serenawilliams/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Serena Williams</a> (@serenawilliams) on Jun 8, 2018 at 7:18am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><em>While I don’t have anything extravagant planned at the moment (or if I did, I wouldn’t tell you!), I will always try to show my wife how much I appreciate and support her. As an entrepreneur, one of my big mantras is to surprise and delight. I guess I’ve applied that in some way to romance, and if I can think of a way to top myself, I’ll keep pulling out the stops.</em></p> <p><em>But the real scoop on “going big” for my wife would never go viral – it’s our simple Sunday tradition. When I was growing up, my dad would make pancakes every Sunday. They were delicious, but it wasn’t just about the food. It was about being together. So, on Sunday mornings I make breakfast for the family and it doesn’t cost me a thing, except for gluten-free flour (I had to modify Dad’s recipe a bit), some eggs, almond milk, a secret ingredient, and berries (Olympia loves raspberries). There are no phones, just conversation. And we’ll spend the day together lounging around the house, or playing hide-and-seek, or going for a swim in the pool. Just being a family on those days means so much to both of us – more than a billboard, a video montage or a whirlwind trip to Italy. And before you ask: No, I won’t tell you my pancake recipe.</em></p> <p>What is your secret to a successful marriage? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

Relationships

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4 style tips for women over 60 from a fashion insider

<p>These easy to incorporate tips from a professional stylist will help you look and feel great today. Here’s how!</p> <p>According to Heather Rivendell, founder of <a href="http://her-creative.com/about-her/">Her Creative</a> in Melbourne and stylist at Blue Illusion, one of the best styling trends this year is layering.</p> <p>“The bottom layer of your outfit shouldn't always sit hidden away under your other items. Wearing longer length shirts under your knit is not only a great look, the additional colour and detail from the shirt can add interest to your outfit. It can also be a great way to break up colours and fabrications,” she says.</p> <p>Natural colour palates are also a flattering trend.</p> <p>She adds, “Not only does this create more versatility within your wardrobe, it is ageless. For those who love colour you can still add colour and that feature piece which suits your personality.”</p> <p><strong>Heather’s top 4 style tips for 60+</strong></p> <p><strong>Tip 1: A versatile shirt and trench coat are must-have wardrobe items</strong><br />The shirt can be worn on its own or layered under a knit and jacket, can be worn both causally during the day and styled to suit the evenings. A trench coat or adaptable jacket, which can be worn over any outfit, adds style and brings practicality to your outfit.</p> <p><strong>Tip 2: Get to know your body shape (and look great)</strong><br />Don't be afraid to trial new shapes, patterns and prints. Even though you may have done this when you were younger, with the changing fashion and your evolving body type, this needs to be re-explored regularly to make sure you’re getting the best out of your wardrobe.</p> <p><strong>Tip 3: Embrace new ideas and have fun<br /></strong>Fashion trends are for all ages. Many trends evolve and suit all ages and body types so it’s worth keeping an eye on them. With this in mind always be willing to try new things. It can be as small as wearing a gorgeous colourful scarf in a different way or tucking your shirt into your jeans. Not every look will suit you, but a number will, and it will be those of which will make the difference to how you feel.</p> <p><strong>Tip 4: Clever tricks will help address problem areas</strong><br />Each person will have slightly different versions of the same problem areas, what works for one ‘apple’ shape may not work for another person due to height for example. The main goal is to draw the eye away from that area which you don't like and create interest in your stronger areas.</p> <p>If your mid-section is the problem, then you don't want anything to ‘stop’ in this area. Longer line kits or tops often work well to draw the eye down past the area. From there, select an accessory or neckline to accentuate and draw the attention up to your face.</p> <p>If you are a little shorter than average, then don’t always automatically put on your favourite black shoes. Depending on what you’re wearing this could be ‘cutting you off’ and making you seem shorter than you are.</p> <p>Try to continue your outfit all the way to your feet by continuing on the colour tone. This doesn’t have to be exactly the same colour, if you’re wearing a lighter toned bottom like a light denim jean or khaki wear a nude shoe. It gives the illusion that your legs are continuing on and gives you the extra length to give you a slimmer look.</p> <p>What looks are you loving at the moment? Share in the comments section below.</p> <p><em>Written by Mahsa Fratantoni. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/4-style-tips-for-50-plus-from-a-fashion-insider.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Senior sisters open their own café in retirement

<p>Stepping into Sue Wright and Nicky Brindle’s Greytown café is like walking into the stylish living room of a long lost friend. The two sisters, who have a combined hospitality experience of over 120 years, are warm and inviting, much like the light and airy contemporary surroundings of their café “2 Short Whites”… the name a humorous play on their stature and a nod to their hair colour.</p> <p>The café located in the The Hub’ a new retail development in the centre of Greytown, a pretty colonial village only one hour’s drive from Wellington, is the latest chapter in the varied and interesting working lives of these two dynamic sisters.</p> <p>“We tried retiring but to be honest got bored,” laughs Nicky. “We realised at this age no one else was going to employ us, so we decided to employ ourselves.”</p> <p>Nicky and Sue have boundless energy and have been behind several well-known businesses in New Zealand’s Wairarapa region over the years.</p> <p>Nicky is Le Cordon Bleu trained andused to own Masterton based wedding venue and catering company Toad’s Landing while Sue along with husband Andrew established the Mela fruit juice brand, which is now run by her daughter Sarah and son in law Brian Belluomini. The couple were also involved in the award-winning Lighthouse Gin and Sue owned the popular, funky giftware store Mondo for almost 10 years.</p> <p>“Nicky and I did our own thing for years then decided to come together and set up this café and restaurant. We’re both serious about food and great hospitality so it was a bit of a no-brainer,” says Sue.</p> <p>"We came along, two old ladies, and gave The Hub developer Steve Pilbrow our concept for a café … and he loved it. We want people to feel welcome here and enjoy our menu which offers seasonal, rustic and wholesome food.”</p> <p>The smell of freshly baked bread, which is fermented for 24 hours, greets visitors and depending what time of day free-range bacon can be smelt cooking. There is a terrific range of baking and sweet treats to tempt all ages while the sister’s range of preserves are neatly displayed on colourful shelves.</p> <p>Since opening their doors, Nicky and Sue have run cooking classes, such as bread-making; had themed dinner evenings and even played Fairy Godmother running a series of successful Singles Dinners (for ages 35 years to 50 years and for the 50-plus years) for those looking for love and friendship.</p> <p>“We were directors of the night serving up an incredible two-course meal and helping make introductions between people. We wanted them to come here, feel relaxed and enjoy great company, great wine and great food,” says Sue. “We all know that the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach!”</p> <p>Unfortunately, <em>2 Flat Whites </em>is no longer in business. The cafe has since changed hands and is now known as <em>Brasserie 74.</em></p> <p>Have you started your own business in retirement? Share your experience with us in the comments below.</p> <p><em>For more information about 2 Short Whites or the Wairarapa visit, <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.wairarapanz.com" target="_blank">www.wairarapanz.com</a></strong></span>.</em></p>

Retirement Life

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The cutest nicknames owners call their pets

<p>The best thing about having a pet, apart from their never-ending love and companionship, is that you can call them anything you want and they’ll usually respond to it based on your tone.</p> <p>Twitter user and pet owner @metroadlib posted a sweet tweet explaining that while her dog’s name is Cooper, she calls him a range of other things. These names include:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">my dog's name is cooper.<br /><br />i call him--<br />boubba<br />boub<br />honeybunny<br />coopypoopy<br />heyloverthisismorethanacrush<br />stinkboy<br />&amp; sweetboy.<br /><br />i use sweetboy the most.<br /><br />i call this mfer "cooper" exactly 7% of the time.</p> — fooler initiative (@metroadlib) <a href="https://twitter.com/metroadlib/status/1088123017681608706?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">23 January 2019</a></blockquote> <p>This tweet resonated with a range of pet owners, who were quick to share what names they call their pets (apart from their actual names).</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Koda<br /><br />Kodes<br />Kodesters<br />Koda Popeye<br />Koda Pops<br />Popeye my Popeye<br />Lovebug<br />This Little Butthead<br />Football Head <a href="https://t.co/TDiSi05DeU">pic.twitter.com/TDiSi05DeU</a></p> — chesapeake bae // ᜀ ᜋᜒ (@adotsaint) <a href="https://twitter.com/adotsaint/status/1088128527529058304?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">23 January 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Turns out this is a common practice amongst pet owners, with one owner lamenting that his wife called one of their dogs by a nickname so much that it’s all he responds to now.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Our puppy was originally named Gary, here is how it has evolved since:<br />Gary<br />Gar Bear<br />Honey Bear<br /><br />He will now only answer to Honey Bear thanks to my wife. (He’s the white one in this photo) <a href="https://t.co/BCxhXGgnsL">pic.twitter.com/BCxhXGgnsL</a></p> — Thomas Newman (@ThomasNewman) <a href="https://twitter.com/ThomasNewman/status/1088126652763308038?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">23 January 2019</a></blockquote> <p>This practice isn’t limited to dogs either, as cat owners joined in with their nicknames.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">This is Plum. also known as Plumbelina, Plumpert, Plumbarton Oaks, Plumples, Lil’ Baby, BunBun, and Plom. <a href="https://t.co/AekT7ptKRd">pic.twitter.com/AekT7ptKRd</a></p> — tekla 💜✨ (@alketrolyat) <a href="https://twitter.com/alketrolyat/status/1088125529151148034?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">23 January 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Do you have any nicknames you call your pets? Let us know in the comments!</p>

Family & Pets

Finance

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Bank programmer jailed after stealing $1.5 million from ATMs

<p>A bank programmer in China has been jailed after stealing $1.4 million in cash.</p> <p>The theft was due to Qin Qisheng noticing a loophole in Huaxi Bank’s system back in 2016.</p> <p>As the 43-year-old worked as a senior programmer at the bank, he came to realise that withdrawals that were completed close to midnight weren’t being recorded properly.</p> <p>After realising this, Qisheng inserted scripts into the system so he was able to “test” the issue without alerting staff.</p> <p>He then made test withdrawals of 20,000 Yuan (NZD$4324) to a dummy account for almost a year before being caught. By January 2018, he had withdrawn almost 7 million Yuan (NZD$1.5 million) without notifying anyone what he was up to.</p> <p>He was caught after depositing the funds into his own bank account, as well as investing some funds in the stock market.</p> <p>Hauxi Bank accepted the claims that Qisheng was investigating the glitch and dropped the case after he returned the funds.</p> <p>“Qin Qisheng said that the matter was complicated and involved lots of work … he believed the bank would not pay attention even if he reported it,” the <a href="https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2184883/chinese-banks-software-chief-jailed-after-finding-way-withdraw"><em>South China Morning Post</em></a> reported a bank representative as saying during the trial.</p> <p>“We think this reason for not reporting is legitimate.”</p> <p>However, even though the company dropped the charges, this was not enough to save Qisheng from 10-and-a-half years of jail time, as well as a fine of 11,000 Yuan (AUD$2378).</p> <p>“On the one hand, (the bank) said that the accused’s behaviour was in violation of the rules. On the other hand, he said that he could conduct relevant tests. This is self-contradictory,” the judge said.</p> <p>The flaw that caused Qisheng to be able to withdraw the funds has now been fixed.</p>

Money & Banking

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How Amazon became the best of the best

<p>Any company whose brand becomes a common noun (without the capital letter, called an eponym) has made a big impact. Generations have cleaned the house with a hoover, blown their noses with a Kleenex, stored hot drinks in a thermos and xeroxed a document. Most of us google rather than search.</p> <p>Although not exactly the same thing, the goal of many new companies is to become ‘the Amazon of’ something. In wealth management and superannuation, many new entrants describe their strategy as aiming to become ‘the Amazon of financial services’.</p> <p>Well, good luck with that, because not only is Amazon a unique company, it may well want to become the Amazon of financial services itself. FinancialAdvisorIQ (part of the Financial Times group) recently published an article about digital financial advice (FA) called ‘Betterment Yearns to be Amazon of FAs. Does Amazon?’ including this statement:</p> <p>“Amazon entering wealth management would cause a major disruption to the advice industry, pushing down prices and driving up demand for far faster delivery of financial services.”</p> <p>And now Amazon is coming to Australia, and it will change retailing and other sectors such as property and shopping malls forever. Investors should consider whether other companies held in an investment portfolio can measure up to these challenges in a digital, fast-moving world.</p> <p><strong>CEO Jeff Bezos’s annual letter to shareholders</strong><br />Amazon has disrupted many industries, and destroyed companies such as Borders Bookstores, but in its 20 years, it has had negligible impact on financial services.</p> <p>Warren Buffett produces an annual letter to his shareholders which is widely quoted, but it’s less well-known that Amazon’s Chief Executive Jeff Bezos does the same. It’s a completely different style. Buffett focuses on his returns and investments, and it’s clear that making money is the main game. In his 2017 letter, Bezos does not mention ‘profit’ once, while ‘customer’ receives 19 hits.</p> <p>There are a few highlights in Bezos’s letter that everyone can learn from, although the vast majority of large companies do not have the internal structures and processes to make them work. Bezos wants his company to always operate as if it’s Day 1, as Day 2 is a step to an excruciating, painful decline followed by death. Day 1 vitality requires obsessive customer focus.</p> <p>He identifies four rules for making high quality decisions that apply to managing a company, and they may be useful for investing or even making the most of a relationship. The rules are:</p> <p><strong>High velocity decision making</strong><br />Large organisations struggle to decide quickly because they fear failure. Speed matters, and where a decision is reversible, it should use a lightweight process. It doesn’t matter much if it’s wrong.</p> <p><strong>Don’t wait for certainty</strong><br />Most companies overestimate the cost of being wrong, whereas being slow will be expensive.</p> <p>“Most decisions should probably be made with somewhere around 70% of the information you wish you had. If you wait for 90%, in most cases, you’re probably being slow. Plus, either way, you need to be good at quickly recognising and correcting bad decisions.”</p> <p><strong>Disagree and commit</strong><br />It’s often difficult to achieve consensus, as nobody can know with certainty the outcome of a new initiative. He says ‘disagree and commit’ saves a lot of time:</p> <p>“I disagree and commit all the time … (My staff) had a completely different opinion and wanted to go ahead. I wrote back right away with “I disagree and commit and hope it becomes the most watched thing we’ve ever made.” Consider how much slower this decision cycle would have been if the team had actually had to convince me rather than simply get my commitment.”</p> <p><strong>Recognise misalignment</strong><br />Misalignment between teams and objectives must be identified early and addressed, or the problem will lead to exhaustion.</p> <p>“Whoever has more stamina carries the decision. I’ve seen many examples of sincere misalignment at Amazon over the years. When we decided to invite third party sellers to compete directly against us on our own product detail pages – that was a big one. Many smart, well-intentioned Amazonians were simply not at all aligned with the direction. The big decision set up hundreds of smaller decisions, many of which needed to be escalated to the senior team. “You’ve worn me down” is an awful decision-making process. It’s slow and de-energising. Go for quick escalation instead – it’s better.”</p> <p><strong>Does it work?</strong><br />Many analysts have criticised Bezos over the years for investing in the business rather than creating more profits and dividends. When $10,000 invested in 1997 now has a value of about five million dollars, it’s hard to criticise success and the way Amazon is challenging other businesses the world over. Are investments in your portfolio ready for the Amazon challenge?</p> <p>Do you use Amazon? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Graham Hand. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/money/superannuation/four-rules-amazon-uses-to-build-its-dominance.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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10 ways to find new investment ideas

<p>Investors now have an unprecedented amount of information available to them to expand their knowledge base, which is especially important to those who are managing their own superannuation money. You can gain investment ideas predominantly from the following 10 sources:</p> <p><strong>1. Media</strong></p> <p>The media provides a wealth of information on individual stocks, market themes and economic trends. </p> <p>Valuable media sources include financial newspapers, radio, television and online newsletters such as Cuffelinks and Livewire. Market data provider Bloomberg, which is universally used by institutional and professional investors, has free daily email alerts and newsletters available on its website.</p> <p><strong>2. Market tables and price movements</strong></p> <p>After the market closes each day, share market tables can be reviewed to identify companies with share prices that have reached 12-month rolling highs and lows. When a price hits a 12-month high, it can indicate a degree of momentum (particularly in a bull market) that will drive it higher. Conversely, if a company hits its 12-month low, this is often a sign of fundamental company issues and the price is likely to fall further.</p> <p><strong>3. Word of mouth</strong></p> <p>While company executives can provide a biased perspective, personal and business contacts with knowledge of a company or industry can be more objective. Some of the most illuminating investing insights can come from personal and professional connections such as family, competitors, sell-side analysts and other fund managers.</p> <p><strong>4. Stock brokers</strong></p> <p>Stock analyst reports provide valuable and well-researched business insights. If a company is covered by sell-side research analysts, analysing their reports and understanding the consensus forecasts could prove valuable. </p> <p><strong>5. Directors buying</strong></p> <p>As a general rule, a company’s directors know more than others in the market. Therefore, directors buying shares is a very strong signal about the business. The announcement of a Change in Director’s Interest Notice revealing a company director has substantially increased their holding may prompt us to examine the company further.</p> <p><strong>6. Observations of a business</strong></p> <p>Everyday observations can also offer insights into a company. Apple’s share price languished for many years until after the release of its portable media player iPod. Around this time, the casual observer would have witnessed thousands lining up to buy the iPod and an increase in foot traffic at Apple stores, however this strong demand was not reflected in Apple’s share price. Apple subsequently sold 55 million iPods, generating US$9 billion in revenue and spurring the share price.</p> <p><strong>7. Life experiences, behaviours and preferences</strong></p> <p>Our own life experiences, behaviours and preferences, and those of the people around us, can also reveal a consumer trend, or structural industry change, that leads us to an investment idea.</p> <p>Some time ago, I tried to buy a tin of infant formula only to find there was a considerable shortage. This experience demonstrated demand for this particular product was vastly outstripping supply. This insight was the catalyst to investigate the company and subsequently invest in it.</p> <p><strong>8. Company meetings and site tours</strong></p> <p>Company meetings and visits offer insights into a business such as the quality of management and its culture. Individual investors can sometimes join site visits arranged by the company. For example, an executive’s remark that a certain competitor is giving them a ‘run for their money’ could prompt us to investigate that competitor business as a potential investment.</p> <p>Any investor can contact a company and ask to meet the CEO or other executives and, while access to executives at larger companies may be limited, micro and small-cap companies should welcome interest from potential shareholders.</p> <p>Retail investors may also have the option of listening to earnings results teleconferences, giving them the opportunity to interpret the executives’ tone, as well as their words. Larger companies often host investor days for shareholders.</p> <p><strong>9. ASX announcements</strong></p> <p>Previously undiscovered investment gems can be found through regular scan of ASX company announcements. Company announcements can be a particularly good source of micro-cap investment ideas during reporting season, and are available to everyone.</p> <p><strong>10. Ask a lot of questions</strong></p> <p>Having a fascination with the market and an inquisitive attitude are indispensable attributes for investors. The most successful investors ask a lot of questions and are driven to gain an in-depth understanding of a company, trend or investment theme.</p> <p>It’s possible to generate a worthwhile investment idea, or a piece of information that leads to one, from a vast range of sources. Constantly gathering insights to develop a broader knowledge base and being alive to potential investment ideas is key.</p> <p>Do you have any other sources for investment ideas? Share them in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Chris Stott. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/money/superannuation/10-ways-to-find-new-investment-ideas.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></span>.</em></p>

Retirement Income

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Prince Philip surrenders his driver’s licence following dangerous car crash

<p>After being involved in a car crash last month, Prince Philip has voluntarily surrendered his driver's licence.</p> <p>The Duke of Edinburgh caused an uproar after he was spotted behind the wheel shortly after the collision in last month without a seatbelt.</p> <p>The 97-year-old gave his licence up on Saturday according to Buckingham Palace.</p> <p>The crash left two women hospitalised after the Prince’s Land Rover collided with their vehicle on January 17.</p> <p>But despite issuing an apology to those affected, only 48 hours after the incident, the royal was pictured driving without a seatbelt.</p> <p>“After careful consideration, the Duke of Edinburgh has taken the decision to voluntarily surrender his driving licence,” a statement from Buckingham Palace read.</p> <p>Philip pulled out onto a busy road, causing his car to flip over and crash into a Kia, which was carrying a 9-month-old child, his mother and another passenger.</p> <p>While the royal made it out unharmed, passenger Emma Fairweather wasn’t so lucky, as she broke her wrist and demanded for the Duke to be charged for negligent driving.</p> <p>According to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/" target="_blank"><em>Sunday Mirror</em></a>, the Duke wished Ms Fairweather a “speedy recovery” and that he “failed to see the car coming” in a letter that was written to her on January 21.</p> <p>He faulted the bright sunlight for obscuring his vision, saying that he was “very contrite about the consequences”.</p> <p>Authorities revealed that they spoke to the Prince and gave him “suitable words of advice” and if necessary, “any appropriate action” would be taken.</p> <p>Norfolk Police released a statement on Saturday regarding the incident, saying that the matter “has been passed to the Crown Prosecution Service for their consideration”.</p> <p>Celebrity lawyer Nick Freeman said the royal could be charged with a hefty penalty for negligence. </p> <p>But according to another lawyer, he could avoid prosecution all together if he surrenders his right to drive. </p> <p>Despite handing over his licence, Prince Philip will still be allowed to drive around the grounds of the palace and other royal estates. </p>

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Entertainment

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4 expert tips: How to store books properly

<p>To keep your books in pristine condition, it is not enough to just put them on a shelf or stack them on your nightstand. Below are some of the best tips from librarians and experts that will help preserve books in good condition and prolong their life for years to come.</p> <p><strong>1. Find the right place</strong></p> <p>When it comes to storing books, humidity and temperature are the keys. To promote book longevity, the storage area should be a stable, cool, dry and well-ventilated environment.</p> <p>A room that is too humid or prone to condensation can lead to mould growth and encourage insects like silverfish and roaches, while hot temperatures can turn the bindings and pages dry and brittle. Because of this, experts generally advise against keeping books in the attics, basements and garages. Places near radiators, vents or water pipes are also not recommended.</p> <p>The British Library recommends keeping your reads in a place that has a relative humidity of 45 to 55 per cent. You can check the humidity level by getting a hygrometer.</p> <p><strong>2. Stay away from sunlight</strong></p> <p>Direct sunlight brings a lot of damage on books. Prolonged sunlight exposure can bleach spines and increase the paper’s acid content, allowing for the release of organic acidic vapours and turning the papers yellow and brittle. The US Library of Congress also suggests keeping books away from other intense lights.</p> <p><strong>3. Keep upright whenever possible</strong></p> <p>According to the National Library of Scotland, only large, heavy books should be placed flat. Other types of books should be kept upright without leaning to the sides of the shelves in order to protect the covers and spines. Organising books by size and using book stands with books of similar size could help them maintain their shape.</p> <p>If you have to stack your books, make sure to keep the largest books at the bottom and lighter, smaller ones on top in a pyramid-adjacent shape to prevent the spines from becoming rolled.</p> <p>Take care not to leave any books open and facing down for any period of time.</p> <p><strong>4. Clean regularly</strong></p> <p>Dust your books regularly to prevent dirt from accumulating, which could foster mould growth and pest infestation. To clean a book, take it from the shelf, keep the book closed and use a soft, chemical-free duster to clean it individually. Don’t forget to clean the bookshelves – while they are clear, you can also use this opportunity to vacuum the floor underneath the shelves.</p> <p>How do you store your books? Share your ideas in the comments.</p>

Books

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Good news: Facebook finally lets you ‘unsend’ messages

<p>For those of you who have sent a private message to the wrong person and wished for there to be a way to unsend it, you’re not alone. Facebook has listened to its users and added an ‘unsend’ feature to Messenger.</p> <p><a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/5/18211255/facebook-messenger-unsend-delete-feature-sent-mark-zuckerberg">The Verge</a> has reported that if you have the latest version of Messenger for iOs (Apple) and Android, you will be able to delete messages that you were never meant to send. However, you only have 10 minutes to do so after sending the first message, otherwise the feature doesn’t work.</p> <p>The added feature comes after users demanded to have it implemented after seeing CEO Mark Zuckerberg being able to delete a message after sending it out. The feature was originally only for “higher ups” within Facebook, but after multiple sources noted that messages that they received from the CEO had disappeared, that was when news of the ‘unsend’ feature came to light.</p> <p>It took Facebook nine months to implement the ‘unsend’ feature for all users, but it’s finally here. Facebook also said that it would limit Zuckerberg’s use of the feature until everyone was able to use it.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7823677/messenger-unsend.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3205103eaf4249ada947ec6d0fb7c9cc" /></p> <p><em>Source: The Verge</em></p> <p><strong>How to use the feature</strong></p> <ol> <li>Press and hold on the message you want to delete. Note: <strong>Must be done within 10 minutes of sending the first message.</strong></li> <li>Tap ‘Remove’ when Messenger displays the ‘Copy’, ‘Forward’ etc section.</li> <li>You can then choose whether you want to remove for everyone and remove for you. If you choose ‘Remove for everyone, the people in the chat will be notified that you have removed the message.</li> <li>Choose your option and then click on ‘Remove’.</li> <li>It will show that you have removed a message in Messenger.</li> </ol> <p>Will you be using this feature? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Technology

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Kensington Palace shares rare photos of Princess Diana

<p><span>Kensington Palace has released a rare throwback photograph of Princess Diana and Prince William in celebration of the Duke's new patronage.</span></p> <p>On Wednesday, Prince William officially became the Royal Patron of The Passage, a charity focusing on homelessness.</p> <p>The Palace announced the news with pictures of his first visit to the charity in 1993, when he went with his mother and brother Prince Harry.</p> <p>The first photograph depicted Princess Diana sitting with Prince Harry on her lap and Prince William nearby. The second showed the charity's visitor book signed by the Princess and her first son.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">This entry in The <a href="https://twitter.com/PassageCharity?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PassageCharity</a> visitor’s book marks The Duke of Cambridge's first visit with his mother Diana, Princess of Wales in 1993. <a href="https://t.co/iKgC5pQMaB">pic.twitter.com/iKgC5pQMaB</a></p> — Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) <a href="https://twitter.com/KensingtonRoyal/status/1095653653107617792?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>"The visits I made as a child to this place left a deep and lasting impression upon me – about how important it is to ensure that everyone in our society, especially the poorest, are treated with respect, dignity and kindness, and are given the opportunities to fulfil their potential in life," Prince William said in a statement.</p> <p>The 36-year-old Duke of Cambridge marked the news with another visit to the charity, in which he helped serve food in the resource centre’s kitchen and met with clients and volunteers for the charity’s 'Home for Good' program.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">8-10 volunteers support Head Chef Nour Shab in the kitchen every day. <br /><br />2,651 homeless people were supported by <a href="https://twitter.com/PassageCharity?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PassageCharity</a> in 2017/18 - this was made possible with the help of the charity’s 450 regular volunteers who work 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. <a href="https://t.co/P0xSVsCMAd">pic.twitter.com/P0xSVsCMAd</a></p> — Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) <a href="https://twitter.com/KensingtonRoyal/status/1095660758409596928?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The Duke has also been a Patron to Centrepoint, a charity that supports homeless youths, since 2005, following in the footsteps of his mother who had filled the role from 1992 until her death in 1997. </p> <p>When he took over the role at the age of 23, he told <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1498374/William-becomes-patron-of-the-homeless.html" target="_blank"><em>The Telegraph</em></a>, "My mother introduced that sort of area to me a long time ago. It was a real eye-opener and I am very glad she did. It has been something I have held close to me for a long time."</p> <p>On Thursday, Prince William also visited a number of men’s mental health charities in London, including the 'Future Dads' program run by the charity Future Men where he discussed issues surrounding fatherhood.</p> <p>"Whenever a high-profile royal visits any organisation, they bring the spotlight with them so his visit will naturally be a huge boost for awareness of the issue," royal expert Victoria Murphy told <a href="http://sandhillsexpress.com/abc_world/prince-william-visits-mens-mental-health-charities-in-london-abcid36158055/"><em>ABC News</em></a>.</p> <p>"So public visits, where they speak about and endorse the work of the charities in this area as well as meeting and speaking to people they have helped, are an important part of helping to achieve this."</p>

Art

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Celebrity items that fetched top dollar at auctions

<p>Bob Dylan’s guitar, which he used on his first electric tour in 1966, recently sold at auction for an eye-watering US$490,000!</p> <p>The 1965 Fender Telecaster had also been used by other musicians like Eric Clapton and George Harrison.</p> <p>That’s certainly not the first time celebrity memorabilia have sold for a huge chunk of change.</p> <p>Check out these other instances:</p> <p><strong>1. Russell Crowe’s movie memorabilia (US$2.8 million)</strong></p> <p>The Gladiator star held an auction dubbed “The Art of Divorce” in Sydney last April to sell 227 of his personal valuables and movie memorabilia.</p> <p>Among the items that sold were a leather jockstrap he wore in Cinderella Man, an antique violin he learned how to play for the movie Master and Commander, and his director’s chair from American Gangster.</p> <p>The auction netted the actor an impressive US$2.8 million.</p> <p>Not bad for an afternoon’s work.</p> <p><strong>2. JK Rowling’s chair (US$394,000)</strong></p> <p>The chair that author JK Rowling sat on when she worked on the first two Harry Potter novels sold for US$394,000 in 2016.</p> <p>According to a note that Rowling sent to the new owner, this was the comfiest of four mismatched chairs she had been given when she lived in a council flat in Edinburgh, which was why it became the chair of choice in front of her typewriter.</p> <p><strong>3. Albert Einstein’s notes (US$1.8 million)</strong></p> <p>The Nobel Prize-winning physicist had given a courier two handwritten notes in 1922 in lieu of a tip when he was staying at the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo.</p> <p>Those two notes sold for a whopping US$1.8 million in October last year.</p> <p>One of the notes reads: “A calm and humble life will bring more happiness than the pursuit of success and the constant restlessness that comes with it.”</p> <p>Very practical - but expensive - advice indeed.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/entertainment/celebrity-items-fetched-top-dollar-auction">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Movies