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The best holiday packing tips

<p>Thinking about packing and unpacking can be a real point of stress for all travellers. So, the best way to beat the stress when you land is to pack right. These are among the best packing tips we have grown to love.</p> <p>1. Your carry-on and your checked bag should carry different types of items. To some, this is obvious, but to others, this little tip can mean the difference between a carry-on stuffed with socks and one with items that need quick-access. Your carry-on bag will turn into your day-pack once you arrive at your destination. So, to make the transition easier, include personal items like wallet, passport, pen and paper, hand-sanitiser, maps and city guides, books, camera, headphones, and your mobile phone + charger. You’ll avoid lots of stress while flying by having these types of items readily accessible during flight.</p> <p>2. Roll your clothes. When you are unpacking, you will notice that rolled clothes often come out of the bag with fewer creases. Also, by rolling your clothes, you will often be able to pack more into your suitcase (psst…see tip #5 below).</p> <p>3. Pack your suitcase in sections. Standard rectangular suitcases are easy to mentally divide up into sections. Depending on what is right for you, divide your case into 2, 3, or 4 parts. Each part should only contain similar items. For example, keep all tops in one section, bottoms in another, and under garments + bathing suits in yet another. Or, if you like to pack outfits together, consider packing fair weather outfits in one section, cold weather outfits in another, and shoes + accessories in another. And remember, re-section your bag as you start to accumulate clothes that need washing. Keep those clothes separate to keep things simple.</p> <p>4. Fill your shoes. When packing shoes with any structure (ones that can’t be flattened), ALWAYS take advantage of the space inside your shoes. Pack socks, trinkets &amp; extra breakable souvenirs bought while abroad, or (depending on how smelly your shoes are) clothes and other items.</p> <p>5. Over pack. (Yes, you read that right!) When it comes to a semi-full suitcase or a jam-packed one, what’s really the difference? Most of us use rolly-suitcases anyways, so as long as your bag still meets flight weight requirements, pack the extra pair of shoes, gloves, pants, or sunglasses! Having just want you want with you while you are on holiday can be a relief and a give you an added sense of comfort when exploring!</p> <p><em>Written by Luray Joy. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/packing-for-holiday-tips/">MyDiscoveries.</a></em></p>

Travel Tips

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Tagliatelle marinara with light cream sauce & chives

<p>Time to prepare 25 mins | Serves 4</p> <p>This is a beautiful luxurious delicate pasta dish that won’t leave you feeling over full. It’s important to keep the sauce of this recipe light and creamy in texture, so that it doesn’t overwhelm the wine.</p> <p>The tagliatelle is effective at holding the sauce and wrapping it around the seafood as you eat. Many fish shops sell a pre-prepared marinara mix. For freshness of flavour the fish should be bought the same day as you intend to cook.</p> <p>Try a NV New World sparkling wine - ideally a fresh young wine - to pair well with this dish.</p> <p><em>Recipe from <u><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fpaired-champagne-sparkling-wines-fran-flynn%2Fprod9780994348500.html%3Fclickid%3Dz3f1gQzLPx1yxbM33p0QbxC7Ukkw22Sim0LDV80">Paired: Champagne &amp; Sparkling Wines</a></u> by Fran Flynn and David Stevens-Castro.</em></p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 packet fresh tagliatelle pasta </li> <li>2 heaped tablespoons of butter</li> <li>1 garlic clove, finely chopped</li> <li>3 spring onions (scallions), chopped </li> <li>1/2 cup (125ml/4fl oz) dry white wine </li> <li>200ml (7fl oz) cream </li> <li>125g (4.5oz) double cream brie, chopped </li> <li>1½ heaped tablespoons seeded mustard </li> <li>400g (14oz) seafood marinara mix </li> <li>Bunch fresh chives, chopped</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Boil the tagliatelle as per packet’s instructions and set to one side.</p> <p>2. Over a high heat melt the butter and add the garlic. Once it starts to sizzle add the spring onions. Reduce heat slightly and stir regularly for about a minute. Add wine and allow to simmer for about 3–4 minutes until the liquid reduces by about a third. Add cream, brie and mustard. Continue to simmer and stir until all the cheese is dissolved. Introduce the seafood and cook for a further 3–5 minutes, stirring continuously, until the seafood is ready to serve.</p> <p>3. Taste test to check that the seafood is tender. Transfer to a large serving bowl and sprinkle liberally with fresh chives. In a colander, refresh the tagliatelle by pouring some hot water over it and shake out any excess water. Plate the tagliatelle and use a ladle to spoon the seafood and sauce on top. Garnish with a final sprinkle of chives.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <ul> <li>Pairing style / cleansing: A fresh, citric New World sparkling wine (i.e from Argentina, Australia, Chile, New Zealand and the US), will meld beautifully with the pasta flavours. The chives and spring onion create the link between the pasta and the wine, adding a fresh touch to the creaminess of the dish.</li> </ul> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/tagliatelle-marinara-with-light-cream-sauce-and-chives.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Food & Wine

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How I shop for our family's traditional Christmas feast

<p>When I was a child my grandmother made a plum pudding in November and hung it in the laundry of her cottage in Melbourne. For us kids, the appearance of the pudding was the harbinger of exciting festive things to come.</p> <p>With the family jam-packed into my grandparents' little house, Christmas morning saw my Nana, my mother and assorted aunts stuffing a turkey and scrubbing potatoes, to be crammed into an old-fashioned stove in Nana's petite kitchen.</p> <p>I don't know how my Nana managed to serve a hot Christmas dinner for 15 or more people with such limited culinary resources.</p> <p>I recall one year, as we poured gravy onto the turkey in high heat, an uncle suggesting that the following year we picnic at the beach instead. It was the early 1960s, and everyone looked at him as though he was mad.</p> <p>Now, times have changed and people celebrate Christmas Day dining in all sorts of ways – barbecues, picnics, yum cha and Middle Eastern feasts to name a few. </p> <p>But for many of us, childhood traditions die hard. Every year our family decides on a picnic or a barbecue Christmas lunch. But in the end we never do; for some reason we always hark back to a semi-traditional Christmas lunch.</p> <p>In lean years, and there have been many, the cost of Christmas dining seemed overwhelming – as we all know the turkey, the ham, the seafood - the lot - can set you back hundreds of dollars if you're catering for a crowd.</p> <p>My kids and I devised a way to reduce costs many years ago, and continue this practice today.</p> <p>What we do is hit the market and supermarket late afternoon on Christmas Eve. At this time you can pretty much guarantee that turkeys, ducks, seafood and high-end fruit and veggies will be drastically reduced.</p> <p>For some it might seem odd not knowing what you'll be cooking for Christmas lunch. But the challenge of creating culinary Christmas magic with what you have foraged at the last minute has become part of the Yuletide fun in our family of passionate cooks.</p> <p>We don't care if we dine on turkey, chicken, duck - or all of the above – it depends on what's been reduced on Christmas Eve.</p> <p>I make a cranberry and pistachio nut stuffing in preparation for the bargains we might snare, which works just as well with turkey as with chicken (in the rare event we don't bag a half-price turkey), and have oranges and plenty of spices on hand for the happy occasions there's a plump duck on offer at up to 60 per cent off.</p> <p>We've often uncovered low-priced ham, too, which might be doused in a maple, honey and mustard glaze for the Christmas table.</p> <p>Seafood finds can be a real bargain-hunters extravaganza on Christmas Eve: why, last year alone we discovered big, succulent prawns slashed to 50 per cent off. As they were being wrapped I spied a crayfish, also heavily discounted, which was included in a simple prawn and avocado salad I served as a luncheon entree the next day.</p> <p>Our family might continue to celebrate Christmas with a semi-traditional lunch, but one custom that has fallen by the wayside is Nana's plum pud.</p> <p>Perhaps it's because it's no fun without the sixpences, or maybe because the next generation aren't fond of a heavy fruit pudding on a hot Christmas Day.</p> <p>Instead we opt for light, summery desserts, including the classic Aussie favourite, pavlova.</p> <p>The berries alone for the Christmas pav can set you back a packet – we like ours with a pile of summer berries, including raspberries, blueberries and strawberries. And fresh mangoes, rather than tinned, are the preferred option for another favourite Christmas dessert, Mango Tiramisu. </p> <p>While Christmas foodie foraging might not suit everyone, the last-minute hunt for the finest ingredients has become part of the festive fun for our family.</p> <p>We've often wondered what we'd dine on if we found the fridges and shelves empty by the time we hit the shops - a Christmas Day sandwich? But over the past 25 years, it hasn't happened once.</p> <p><em>Written by Sandy Guy. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/food-and-wine/how-i-shop-for-our-familys-traditional-christmas-feast.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Caring

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Appreciating the 50-year-old brain: “Ages like fine wine”

<p>It’s no secret that the big five-oh may come with a few unwanted health complaints. A few more jiggly bits that weren’t there a decade ago. Some aches and pains, perhaps. Definitely more hair in unwanted places.</p> <p>But like a fine wine (and hopefully if you haven’t quaffed too much of it over your time on the planet), there is one part of the body that’s actually doing better in a lot of ways than it did when you were younger.</p> <p>Believe it or not, it’s your brain. Sure, you’re not as good at multitasking as you used to be, and things are possibly operating a little slower up there too – which can be annoying when grappling with a particularly tricky Sudoko or trying to remember Cousin Janet’s daughter’s name. But your brain has learned to compensate for its slightly slower processing speed by using more of itself, according to studies – something it simply couldn’t or didn’t do when you’re younger. Pretty amazing, right?</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3359129/">one study</a>, an MRI taken of a teenager working through a problem shows mainly activity on one side of the brain, the area used for conscious reasoning. The amazing upshot of doing the same test on a middle-aged person? It shows both sides of the brain sharing the task equally.</p> <p>And, research involving air-traffic controllers and airline pilots found that those between the ages of 50 and 69 took more time to learn new equipment than their younger counterparts, but once they had, they made fewer mistakes while using it.</p> <p>Experts also say the 50-year-old brain is more adept at making rational decisions and has better judgement – helped, no doubt, by a lifetime of memories and experiences. You’re also far more likely to make smarter financial decisions, and enjoy better impulse control (something many of us probably couldn’t lay claim to in our youth).</p> <p>The 50-year-old brain can reportedly also adapt, absorb new information and gain new skills and wisdom, too. Your reasoning is better. When faced with a problem, you may be slower to come up with a solution, but the one you put on the table will no doubt be more elegant and shrewder than that of a younger person. Research shows you’re better able to articulate in your 50s and you continue expanding your vocabulary as you age, too. (Clearly, there are good reasons why the <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com.au/this-is-what-you-need-to-become-a-ceo-of-an-asx-200-company-2014-10">average age of CEOs</a> in Australia – men and women – is 54).</p> <p>So, you’re probably feeling smarter, wiser, calmer and more mature right about now. Rightly so; you and your brain have earned it. But that’s not to say you should rest on your, er, noggin.</p> <p>In fact, if you want to keep your brain in its prime for as long as possible, maintaining a healthy weight and doing as much as you can to challenge your grey matter are key in staying sharp and strong upstairs. <a href="http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/regular-exercise-changes-brain-improve-memory-thinking-skills-201404097110">Exercise is huge too</a>: it’s well documented some daily cardiovascular activity can go a long way towards maintaining good brain function (particularly the area involved in verbal memory and learning). Lifting weights may work your guns, but it seems you’ve got to break a sweat for your brain to enjoy the knock-on effects.</p> <p>The best news, though, is that you’ve got a heap of ammo to whip out next time a younger family member starts joking about your doddery ‘senior moments’. You now know better than anyone that you’re far more of a braniac than they are, and actually, it’s all thanks to your age. Who would’ve thought?</p> <p><em>Written by Rachel Smith. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/in-praise-of/in-praise-of%E2%80%A6-the-50-year-old-brain.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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How plant-based meat is stretching New Zealand’s cultural and legal boundaries

<p>Earlier this year, the New Zealand-based pizza chain <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/food-wine/78790234/the-history-of-hell-pizza">Hell Pizza</a> offered a limited-edition “Burger Pizza”. Its customers weren’t told that the “meat” was plant-based.</p> <p>Some customers <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/113824494/hell-pizza-covertly-dishes-up-beyond-meat-burger-patties">complained</a> to the Commerce Commission, which enforces consumer law in New Zealand. Yet, <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/113867599/scorned-hell-pizza-customers-bitter-over-fake-burger-meat">others</a> did not mind – or even appreciated – the move. The Commerce Commission, however, warned that the stunt likely breached consumer protection law.</p> <p>Hell Pizza’s ruse should catalyse discussion around the scope and purpose of consumer law, the culture of meat consumption and the future of animal farming. Under current law, “teaching through deception” is not possible. But we argue that consumer law needs to adopt a more nuanced approach.</p> <p><strong>Traditional legal approach</strong></p> <p>In October, the Commerce Commission <a href="https://comcom.govt.nz/case-register/case-register-entries/the-depths-lp-ta-hell-pizza/media-releases/commission-warns-hell-pizza-over-burger-pizza">warned</a> the pizza chain that it had probably breached the <a href="http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1986/0121/latest/DLM96439.html">Fair Trading Act 1986</a>. In particular, it had likely made false or misleading representations.</p> <p>The Commerce Commission <a href="https://comcom.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0034/178792/Warning-letter-to-The-Depths-LP-trading-as-Hell-Pizza-Redacted-25-September-2019.pdf">stated</a> that a “burger traditionally includes a patty of minced beef” and “medium-rare is a term associated with meat, usually beef”.</p> <p>As a result, the pizza chain advised it had <a href="https://comcom.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0034/178792/Warning-letter-to-The-Depths-LP-trading-as-Hell-Pizza-Redacted-25-September-2019.pdf">no intention</a> of engaging in this kind of campaign again. Interestingly, the pizza company has recently announced that the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbaEo19Oc9k">Burger Pizza is back on the menu</a>.</p> <p>Australia’s consumer law around misleading and deceptive conduct is notably similar to New Zealand’s. In Australia, <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-15/push-to-ban-milk-meat-seafood-labels-on-plant-based-produce/11513754">debates</a> around the meaning of the terms “milk”, “seafood” and “meat” are taking place. These discussions present an opportunity to rethink some of our conventions.</p> <p><strong>When is meat meat?</strong></p> <p>The traditional need to protect consumers from deceptive practices is clear. That said, it is perhaps also time to nudge consumers to reconsider their preconceptions and consumption of meat.</p> <p>Hell Pizza said it launched its plant-based meat product out of concerns for the future of the planet. According to the company, <a href="https://hellpizza.com/wickedpedia/2019/07/03/burger-pizza-statement">80% of consumers did not have an issue with being duped</a>, and 70% would order the pizza again.</p> <p>There are a few good reasons to reduce the amount of meat we eat. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19339402">Research shows</a> that meat consumption is putting pressure on the environment. The amount of food and water required to raise animals for consumption <a href="https://news.cornell.edu/stories/1997/08/us-could-feed-800-million-people-grain-livestock-eat">exceeds</a> the nutrient value humans get from consuming meat. Further, livestock create <a href="https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/full/10.1289/ehp.11034">waste and emissions</a> that contribute to climate change.</p> <p>Plant-based meat may be more environmentally friendly. It also eliminates concerns around animal rights. Additionally, it is often perceived as a <a href="https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/cf90/d287aa226b483aed430ff4f0432081bfd3d7.pdf">healthier alternative</a>.</p> <p><strong>Future foods</strong></p> <p>The plant-based meat industry faces two immediate challenges. The first is taste. If meat substitutes do not taste as good as animal-based meat, people will be <a href="http://freakonomics.com/podcast/meat/">less willing to consume them</a>.</p> <p>The second main challenge is cost. If plant-based meat is significantly more expensive than animal-based meat, consumers may opt for the latter.</p> <p>The cost of plant-based meat has become affordable enough for prominent market players, such as <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/116767086/dominos-adds-plantbased-meat-to-its-pizza-menu">Dominoes Pizza</a> and <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/116657991/burger-king-finds-recipe-for-success-with-its-impossible-whopper">Burger King</a>, to offer plant-based products.</p> <p>Hell Pizza was not the first New Zealand company to offer its consumers plant-based meat products. In another controversy, Air New Zealand offered plant-based burgers in the business cabin on selected flights. This led to some criticism, including the deputy prime minister, Winston Peters, who was acting prime minister at the time, complaining that it was a “<a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/105216779/air-nzs-impossible-burger-criticised-by-former-primary-industries-minister">bad look</a>” for the airline not to promote New Zealand meat.</p> <p>Such a response is short-sighted. Animal farming is an important industry in New Zealand, <a href="http://www.environmentguide.org.nz/activities/agriculture/">contributing significantly</a> to the economy and social fabric. Because of its importance, New Zealanders should take seriously the potential impact of plant-based meat and the consequences of this emerging market.</p> <p><strong>Market disruption</strong></p> <p>Some companies have already stated their aspiration to completely <a href="http://freakonomics.com/podcast/meat/">replace animals as a food production technology</a> by 2035. The meat industry is likely to use its power to protect its interests. But these interests are not the only ones that should be voiced and considered.</p> <p>Instead of merely criticising companies that offer meat alternatives and use innovative marketing tools to do so, we should embrace these initiatives as an opportunity to rethink some of our conventions. We need to adapt to new realities in ways that make our societies more ethical, while also encouraging consumers to be more mindful of the environment and health-related aspects of their foods.</p> <p>The boundaries of consumer law should reflect this. The law regulates against misleading and deceptive conduct mainly because it is purportedly bad for consumers. However, the law should adopt a more holistic approach - one that considers the motivation for the allegedly misleading behaviour.</p> <p>Protecting consumers from deceptive conduct is not an end in itself. Perhaps the degree and context of the misleading behaviour should be considered against other legitimate objectives. We believe that such legitimate objectives include caring for the environment, minimising animal cruelty and advancing public health.</p> <p><em>Written by Samuel Becher and Jessica C Lai. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-plant-based-meat-is-stretching-new-zealands-cultural-and-legal-boundaries-127901">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

Legal

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These style tips will help you freshen up your wardrobe

<p>Sydney-based <a href="http://cindyrobsonstyling.com.au/sydney-fashion-stylist/">Cindy Robson</a> has enjoyed 25 successful years in the fashion industry. In that time she has styled women young and old, of all shapes, sizes and tastes. Cindy now focuses her time and expertise on professional styling, and has compiled a list of her top 13 flattering tips for over 50s. Here, she explains:</p> <p><strong>Tip 1: Find inspiration</strong><br />The first question I ask my clients is, ‘What style are you inspired by?’. Some automatically know what they like, but are unsure of how to put styles together. Others simply reply: ‘That's what I've hired you for. I don't know anymore, I'm in my 50s and I've lost myself.’</p> <p><strong>Tip 2: Know your preferred style</strong><br />Style doesn't come with a use-by date. It is helpful to have an image in mind of how you want to portray yourself. Nobody wants to look either ‘grandmotherly’ or (as much as I dislike the phrase) like ‘mutton dressed up as lamb’.</p> <p>There are three styles/looks that I find most women over 50 prefer: classic/tailored, classic with an edge (my own style) and casual/relaxed. Depending on your style, base your wardrobe around the look you desire.</p> <p><strong>Tip 3: Avoid trends that don't flatter you</strong><br />Keep up with current trends but don't overdo it head to toe – this will only age you. Do you love that hat or to-die-for pair of shoes or statement necklace, but wonder, ‘Am I too old to wear it?’ Of course you’re not! If you choose only one piece you will look on-trend and effortless.</p> <p><strong>Tip 4: Mix and match</strong><br />You don't have to spend a fortune to look a million dollars. I suggest mixing and matching designer pieces with non-designer ones. For example, combine a great pair of designer jeans or shoes with a classic blazer and less expensive top.</p> <p><strong>Tip 5: Don't be afraid to wear colour</strong><br />While it might feel ‘safe’ to cover up in black clothes,  black and grey can be very ageing. If you feel uncomfortable wearing colour, start with small pieces like a bright woollen or silk scarf or a colourful beaded necklace, and work your way up to more significant items of clothing.</p> <p><strong>Tip 6: Upper arm cover-up</strong><br />Most of us are aware of the dreaded ‘tuckshop mum’ arms that seem inevitable as we age, but I have a few tips to flatter the trouble spot. Unless your arms are extremely toned, cover up with 3/4 sleeves or cap sleeves. If you look hard enough you should be able to find styles that have a sleeve. For those situations where you can’t, there are plenty of boleros and jackets that you can pair with a sleeveless dress or top. Gone are the days when we had to match everything (like our mothers and grandmothers did). As long as what you choose complements the outfit, don't be afraid to experiment with colours, prints and textures.</p> <p><strong>Tip 7: Appropriate hem lines</strong><br />No minis! I repeat: NO minis. Hem lines should ideally be on the knees (just below or above it), which also means no short shorts or Daisy Dukes. Having said this, if you find a gorgeous dress that sits above the knee (no minis remember) and you have great legs – go for it! Just make sure the dress doesn't show any cleavage as too much of both doesn't work, and wear stockings if suitable.</p> <p><strong>Tip 8: Shop around</strong><br />Don't be nervous about walking into a store that seems too young for you. Walk in with confidence and look through the racks. You'll be pleasantly surprised by the number of fun staple pieces available that are appropriate for all ages.</p> <p><strong>Tip 9: Leggings are not pants</strong><br />Always pair leggings with a longer top. If you love jeggins or skinny jeans, yes, you can wear them! Always combine them with a floaty top or shirt. Jeans should always be dark denim or solid black – no ripped jeans.</p> <p><strong>Tip 10: Invest in a classic style designer bag and sunglasses.</strong> <br />Think Audrey Hepburn or Coco Chanel. You're now at that age when you deserve it! A designer handbag or pair of sunglasses will last a lifetime and always be on-trend, making it a sound investment that never needs updating.</p> <p><strong>Tip 11: Find a good tailor</strong> <br />Not all styles will fit you perfectly and sizes will differ from store to store, and designer to designer. If you find a garment you absolutely adore and the fit isn't perfect, get a quote on having it altered to your measurements.</p> <p><strong>Tip 12: Invest in good underwear</strong><br />Decent undergarments are the foundation of any outfit. A lot of my clients wear the wrong sized bra – too big in the back and too small in the cup. It creates a seesaw effect. Gravity will always do its thing, but if you are in the right fit this can be reduced and make you feel years younger. Who doesn't want that?</p> <p><strong>Tip 13: Say no to fake tan</strong><br />Stay away from going too dark with a fake tan, as age spots and wrinkles will only become more pronounced. The best advice I have for women aged 50 plus is to wear sunscreen every day on top of your normal beauty routine.</p> <p><strong>Bonus Tip:</strong><br />Last but not least, remember the most important accessory: your smile.</p> <p><em>Written by Cindy Robson. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/style-tips-for-women-over-50.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Have yourself a merry DIY Christmas

<p>Christmas doesn’t have to be all about spending big! How about a little homemade charm with your decorations this year?</p> <p>December often brings a financial and environmental strain. Christmas trees, wrapping paper, decorations. It all adds up both financially and also for the environment. So why not make some of your own Christmas decorations and put your DIY skills to use during the most expensive and unsustainable time of year?</p> <p>Here is an easy 'Christmas tree' that you can build using some cheap products found at your local hardware store. The end result can be as big or as small as you like (therefore not taking up valuable space in your lounge room!) and can be easily packed away for next year!</p> <p>It's as simple as buying a sheet of MDF, some plumber's pipe in a variety of sizes, spray paint and a few Christmas baubles in your chosen colour scheme.</p> <p><strong>Step 1</strong><br />Firstly, paint your MDF backing board. Buying a good quality spray paint will make the job easier and improve the look of the end result. Rustoleum is self-priming, and comes in a variety of metallics and on-trend colours. It is readily and affordably available at Bunnings Warehouse. We have chosen basic matte black and white for the background. It is quite easy to just paint a block colour, however we have chosen to mask the board up and paint stripes to give our finished piece a little more dimension. Start by painting the entire board white and then mask and paint black over the top. Remove the masking tape before the paint dries!</p> <p><strong>Step 2</strong><br />Cut the plumber’s pipe into pieces with a small handsaw, and spray paint with whatever colours you have chosen. Metallic gold and silver work really well here, but you can also use sea mist green, which pays homage to Christmas foliage beautifully.</p> <p><strong>Step 3</strong><br />Using a hot glue gun (also available at hardware stores), adhere the piping to the backing board in the shape of a tree and fill some of the pieces with Christmas baubles. You can go crazy with the colours or keep it totally neutral! We are still scarred over letting children trim the Christmas tree in years gone by, so stuck with a neutral palette.</p> <p><strong>Step 4</strong><br />Finish with your favourite decorations. For fun and a bit of extra colour, we added a deep burgundy velvet ribbon. You could also add small LED lights, or other trimmings to your tree. You could hang it on a wall, lean it on the mantle, or stand it in the corner of your room, ready to lay gifts at its base!</p> <p>It's that simple. Easy, sustainable, DIY Christmas. Happy festive season!</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the easy DIY steps.</p> <p><em>Written by Jane Frosh. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/have-yourself-a-merry-%E2%80%93-diy-christmas.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Art

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A must try! Marinated lamb skewers

<p>Serves 4.</p> <p>These deliciously marinated lamb skewers are a simple and easy dinner option - full of flavour and succulent with each bite.</p> <p>Lamb is a very sturdy meat and so you can add heavy flavours to it without overpowering it, unlike fish or white meat. The maple syrup and soy sauce in this recipe go fantastically well with lamb so make sure the meat is thoroughly coated with the marinade. </p> <p><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fpaleo-monday-to-friday-daniel-green%2Fprod9780857833228.html"><em>Recipe from Paleo: Monday to Friday by Daniel Green, published by Kyle Books, RRP $35.</em></a></p> <p><em>Photography © 2016 Peter Cassidy</em></p> <p><em>153 calories | 10.3g fat | 2.7g saturates | 0.3g sugar | 0.9g salt | 15.5g protein | 0.2g fibre</em></p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>900g lean boneless lamb, cut into 2.5cm cubes</li> <li>2 garlic cloves, crushed</li> <li>1 red pepper, deseeded and cut into 2.5cm cubes</li> <li>1 medium white onion, quartered</li> <li>12 button mushrooms</li> <li>2 tablespoons Paleo soy sauce</li> <li>2 teaspoons tomato paste</li> <li>1 tablespoon maple syrup</li> <li>A few sprigs of fresh thyme, leaves picked</li> <li>Olives</li> <li>Rocket leaves</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 6.</p> <p>2. Place the soy, garlic, tomato paste, maple syrup and thyme in a large bowl and mix together well. Add the lamb and toss in the marinade until thoroughly coated, then cover and place in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.<br /><br />3. Load each skewer with alternating cubes of lamb, onion, pepper and mushroom and then place on a foil-lined tray.<br /><br />4. Place the kebabs in the oven and cook for 16 minutes for rare or 20 minutes for medium well. Alternatively, grill at high heat, turning and browning all sides until cooked through but still a little pink in the middle. Allow to rest for a minute or two, then serve with a small bowl of olives and a side of fresh rocket leaves.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lamb-skewers.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Food & Wine

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Face of mystery driver revealed in Claremont serial killer trial

<p>A mystery driver’s face who was seen creeping around a young woman the same night Sarah Spiers vanished, has been revealed to the jury in the Claremont serial killings trial.</p> <p>The never-before-seen composite was a description given to police over 21 years ago by Julie-Anne Johnstone.</p> <p>The man accused, Bradley Robert Edwards, sat just metres away from the woman during his trial after prosecutors accused the now 50-year-old of the murder of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon in the mid 1990’s.</p> <p>The former Telstra electrician has plead not guilty.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7833126/claremont-killer-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a0aaaab1db8a48a9b07bf13b7a2d97b5" /></p> <p>Ms Spiers was last seen after calling a taxi from a phone box in Claremont, Western Australia, just one day after Australia day in 1996.</p> <p>The 18-year-old’s body has never been found.</p> <p>Julie-Anne Johnson, now 45, was just like Ms Spiers the night before when she left Club Bayview in the early hours of the morning to find a taxi by herself.</p> <p>Ms Johnson told the court she had been waiting on Stirling Highway when a white sedan pulled up in front of her.</p> <p>She says the male driver “leaned over the passenger’s side” and stared at her for 10 to 30 minutes.</p> <p>The woman admitted she wasn’t the best with distinguishing car models but determined the vehicle the man was driving looked like a Toyota Camry sedan and had a Telstra logo on the side of the door.</p> <p>Edwards was assigned the same model of car for his Telstra job at the time. </p> <p>Ms Johnson is one of a few several apparent “living witnesses” who survived Edward’s offering of lifts in the mid 90’s, prosecutors say.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7833127/claremont-killer-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/505a82c23aa146dc995bd0d9a319c7e8" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Bradley Robert Edwards</em></p> <p>Annabel Johnson, 45, is another woman who says she was a passenger of a mystery man’s car.</p> <p>She says she had a “strong instinct” to force herself out of the vehicle after accepting a ride.</p> <p>Both she and her friends Trilby Smith hitched a ride after a night out in Cottesloe, Western Australia in December 1996, when a white station wagon approached them on Eric Street.</p> <p>She told the court they were walking home from the Ocean Beach Hotel when the white station wagon in question slowed down to them on Eric Street, and returned from the other direction sometime later.</p> <p>The court claims the driver offered them a ride which they accepted.</p> <p>Ms Bushell said the vehicle looked like a Commodore or Camry and had a large Telstra logo placed on the bonnet.</p> <p>She says she remembers approaching a traffic lights on Stirling Highway in Claremont and “just wanting to get out,” so made an excuse to quickly exit as she dragged her drunk friend out of the back seat.</p> <p>Trilby Smith’s memory differs to her friend who described the vehicle as an “electrical van” and getting out at a different part of Claremont.</p> <p>Ms Bushell said they'd had 15 to 29 middies of beer between them that evening, but her friend was more drunk than her and had fallen asleep. </p>

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"No way back": How the confrontation between Prince Charles and Prince Andrew played out

<p>It appears that the Prince of Wales has had enough of the intense public scrutiny that surrounds his brother Prince Andrew and has “read him the riot act”.</p> <p>Virginia Giuffre piled on the pressure in her<span> </span><em>Panorama</em><span> </span>interview, where she alleged that Prince Andrew had sex with her when she was 17, which are allegations the Duke of York firmly denies.</p> <p>A royal insider told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/10479374/prince-charles-prince-andrew-sandringham-showdown/" target="_blank">The Sun</a></em><span> </span>about how the confrontation went down between the two brothers.</p> <p>“It was all very civilised and calm, but Charles calmly read him the riot act and told him there was no way back for him in the near future,” they said.</p> <p>“Andrew thought he was being treated harshly as nothing has yet been proved against him, but he accepted the decision. He really had little choice.”</p> <p> The Prince of Wales is said to be deeply worried about the scandal and the impact its having on the monarchy.</p> <p>Options being explored include Prince Andrew going to the US to clear his name, but Prince Charles is hesitant to let that happen.</p> <p>“By doing that, Andrew would remove the mystery around the royal ­family. It’s a difficult predicament.</p> <p>“Philip regrets Andrew doesn’t know how to lead a simple life. He thinks he’s been too extravagant.”</p> <p>This comes after fresh claims that a woman who does not wish to be named approached US lawyer Lisa Bloom about seeing Prince Andrew at the nightclub Tramps with a fresh-faced Virginia Giuffre.</p> <p>Bloom told<span> </span><em>The Sun<span> </span></em>about the woman’s claims.</p> <p>“The woman remembers it vividly. She had never seen a royal before or since. It was a very big moment for her — she stared at him.</p> <p>“She says he was with Virginia — who looked very young and not happy — but Andrew was smiling and seemed to be very much enjoying himself on the dancefloor.</p> <p>“She is very afraid but thinks speaking out is very important.”</p>

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Israel Folau and Rugby Australia reach million dollar settlement

<p>Rugby Australia and disgraced sportsman Israel Folau have reportedly ended their bitter legal battle after months of back and forth, for a reported $8 million. </p> <p>According to reports, RA apologised to the former Wallabies fullback star in an out-of-court settlement on Wednesday to avoid a lengthy court battle. </p> <p>Folau, whose contract was terminated after writing “hell awaits” gay people, among others, in an Instagram post in April, was seeking $14 million in compensation. </p> <p>While the exact amount is still to be revealed, The Daily Telegraph reported Falou agreed to an $8 million settlement. </p> <p>Rugby Australia chief executive Raelene Castle told stakeholders the details of the settlement were confidential.</p> <p>“The terms of the settlement are confidential but importantly Israel's legal claim has been withdrawn and whilst we were very confident in our legal position, this outcome provides certainty for Rugby Australia and allows us to avoid incurring ongoing legal costs and the risks and distractions of a lengthy trial,” she said. </p> <p>RA maintains they firmly disagree with the post made by Folau in April.<span> </span></p> <p>Folau says he and his wife Maria feel “vindicated” by Wednesday’s settlement.</p> <p>“We are extremely pleased with the settlement reached today," Folau said in a video.</p> <p>“Maria and I would like to thank God for his guidance and strength,' he said.</p> <p>“Thank you to our supporters for their thoughts and prayers, in particular our families, our congregation as well as Martyn Iles and the Australian Christian Lobby.”</p> <p>Folau hopes their case will lead to greater religious freedom.  </p> <p>“We started this journey on behalf of all people of faith to protect their rights of freedom of speech and religion,” he said.</p> <p>“We now look forward to the federal government enacting the legislation necessary to further protect and strengthen these rights for all Australians.”</p> <p>Rugby Australia issued a statement where they said: “The social media post reflected Mr Folau's genuinely held religious beliefs, and Mr Folau did not intend to harm or offend any person when he uploaded the social media post.”</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7RPbOWqlA74" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Folau has released his own apology where he said he wants all Australians to know “that he does not condone discrimination of any kind against any person on the ground of their sexuality and that he shares Rugby Australia's commitment to inclusiveness and diversity.</p> <p>“Similarly, Mr Folau did not intend to hurt or harm the game of rugby and acknowledges and apologises for any hurt or harm caused.”</p> <p>While the former cross-coder footballer did not announce any plans to return to his beloved sport – he says he looks forward to “moving on with his life” to “focus on his faith”.</p> <p><strong>UPDATE:<span> </span></strong>Castle fronted media speculation on Thursday to refute the “wildly inaccurate” settlement amount reported. </p> <p>"Folau settlement numbers are confidential but numbers being speculated are wildly inaccurate," Castle said in a tweet on Thursday morning.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Folau settlement numbers are confidential but numbers being speculated are wildly inaccurate</p> — Raelene Castle (@raelenecastle) <a href="https://twitter.com/raelenecastle/status/1202322497661616128?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 4, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Castle further reiterated the nature of the settlement is strictly confidential and cannot be discussed in detail. </p> <p>"I can't talk about the settlement numbers, but we're in a better position than if we went to court," Castle said.</p> <p>"We had a number that we knew was more cost effective to us to settle."</p> <p>Castle said the decision was a "commercial decision" and a "normal process" aimed at avoiding the risk of paying more if court proceedings didn't go their way.</p> <p>"It allows us to not have the uncertainty of a trial," she told reporters.</p> <p>"We didn't get it wrong.</p> <p>"At the end of the day we stood up for the values of Rugby Australia of inclusiveness."</p> <p> </p>

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World leaders mock Donald Trump during NATO summit

<p>Donald Trump has slammed Canadian prime minister as “two-faced” after a video shared on Twitter revealed world leaders mocking the US president at the NATO anniversary celebration in London.</p> <p>In a video footage posted by the CBC, Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau appeared to be talking about Trump at a Buckingham Palace reception with French president Emmanuel Macron, British prime minister Boris Johnson and Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte.</p> <p>“He was late because he takes a 40-minute press conference at the top,” Trudeau could be heard saying, apparently alluding to Trump’s appearance before the press prior to the event.</p> <p>“You just watch his team’s jaws drop to the floor.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">.<a href="https://twitter.com/JustinTrudeau?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@JustinTrudeau</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/EmmanuelMacron?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@EmmanuelMacron</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/BorisJohnson?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@BorisJohnson</a> and other VIPs shared a few words at a Buckingham Palace reception Tuesday. No one mentions <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@realDonaldTrump</a> by name, but they seem to be discussing his lengthy impromptu press conferences from earlier in the day. (Video: Host Pool) <a href="https://t.co/dVgj48rpOP">pic.twitter.com/dVgj48rpOP</a></p> — Power &amp; Politics (@PnPCBC) <a href="https://twitter.com/PnPCBC/status/1202008162997538817?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 3, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Speaking in his closing news conference Wednesday, Trudeau confirmed that he had been talking about Trump and said the moment that made “his team’s jaws drop” was when the US president announced the location for next year’s G7 summit at Camp David.</p> <p>“Last night I made reference to the fact that there was an unscheduled press conference before my meeting with President Trump. I was happy to be part of it but it was certainly notable,” Trudeau said.</p> <p>When asked about the video during a meeting with German chancellor Angela Merkel on Wednesday, Trump slammed Trudeau as “two-faced” and criticised Canada for not meeting NATO’s 2 per cent defense spending target.</p> <p>“Well, he's two-faced ... he’s not paying 2 per cent and he should be paying 2 per cent. It’s Canada, they have money,” Trump said. “And honestly with Trudeau he’s a nice guy, but the truth is I called him out on the fact that he’s not paying 2 per cent and I guess he’s not very happy about it.”</p> <p>Spokespersons for Macron and Rutte have declined to comment on the matter.</p>

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See the magic of Iguazu Falls

<p>You can hear the thunderous roar of Iguazu Falls long before you see the swirling white foamed waters tumbling over rocks to the depths below. The curtain of waterfalls that straddle the Brazil and Argentinian border is a spectacular sight and no matter how many times you watch documentaries or read about it, nothing compares to the first glimpse you catch of nature’s watery masterpiece.</p> <p>Discovered by Spanish conquistador Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca in 1541, there are 275 cascades fed by the Iguazu River across a 2.7km wide canyon. Legend has it that U.S. first lady, the late Eleanor Roosevelt, was so overwhelmed when she first visited the falls she uttered two words – “Poor Niagara.”</p> <p>Iguazu Falls is taller than Niagara and twice as wide and can be visited on both the Brazil and Argentinian sides both providing different experiences. Iguazu, which means ‘big water’ in the native Tupi-Guarani language. Formed about 150 million years ago, it’s considered to be the world’s largest cluster of waterfalls and is so impressive it was voted on to the new natural Seven Wonders of the World hotlist.</p> <p>There are several ways to see these incredible falls. Our day starts with a walk on the Brazilian side of the falls with our guide Louis, who directs us to the best vantage points for photos. As we stand in front of the falls, Louis says: “This is paradise and is always a sight to behold – you just never tire of it.”</p> <p>Lightweight rainjackets are recommended the closer we get to the falls but on a hot day, the light spray is a welcome relief. It’s mesmerising watching the 1.3 million litres of water spill over the rocks, every second.</p> <p>Home for the night is the historic Belmond Hotel Das Cataratas, the only accommodation in Brazil’s Iguacu National Park. Staying there, the falls are yours from dusk to dawn, long after thousands of tourists have left.</p> <p>We sit on the verandah of the 193-room Portuguese colonial style hotel, caipirinha in hand, and wait for the knockout sunset that exceeds expectations. Red and magenta colours streak the sky as Iguazu’s continuous roar serenades us.</p> <p>Dinner is Piranha broth, ceviche and pan-seared Amazonian Piraruca fish at the hotel’s Itaipu Restaurant, and before bed we head across to the falls to watch the full moon cast her shadow over the dark waters. It’s a toss-up what’s a more spectacular sight – the falls in daylight or by moonlight.</p> <p>Taking Louis’ insider advice, we’re up early next morning and spot a colourful resident toucan near the falls viewing platform, just below the hotel. He perches in a tree’s lower branches, allowing us a close-up view of his stunning plumage before he flies off, just as the first tourist buses arrive in the park.</p> <p>For the best bird’s eye view of the falls, take a 10-minute helicopter ride that hovers over the falls and the giant Iguacu National Park that stretches for 185,000 hectares. It is absolutely breathtaking and is a great position from which to take photos.</p> <p>The second day we head to the Argentinian side of the falls after obtaining a visa from the border security, which is quick and efficient. This side offers a different perspective of the beauty of the falls, as well as a chance to get closer to the highest waterfall, the Devil’s Throat, that is considered the most scenic curved cataract, with 14 falls.</p> <p>But the most fun is the jetboat ride that nudges right under the falls – this time we really get a proper dousing and there’s much laughter as we ride the rapids and do several spins. It’s an exhilarating experience that again leaves you in awe of these magnificent falls.</p> <p>The surrounding rainforest delta is home to 2000 species of plants and animals including the opossum, the only marsupial found outside Australia. There are also jaguars, ocelots, anteaters, harpy eagles and yacare caiman. Louis tells us more than 30 jaguars roam the park and he’s been lucky to see one from a distance five years ago. “They don’t like people and are rarely seen, it’s considered very fortunate if you see one,” he says.</p> <p>Back on Brazil’s side of the falls, there’s a bird park that’s covers 17 hectares of native woodland and is home to 150 bird species from around the world including large toucans, macaws and parakeets.</p> <p>Tourists can also visit the Itaipu Dam, the world’s largest hydro-electric power plant in terms of electricity generation and the city of Foz do Iguaçu with a population of 311,000.</p> <p>Unfortunately, we don’t spot a jaguar, but instead a magnificent double rainbow takes centre stage above the falls as we prepare to leave – a fitting farewell to one of the most remarkable sights on Earth.</p> <p><strong>Best time to go: </strong>The rainy season sees even more water rushing over the falls while the dry season features more rainbows</p> <p><em>Written by Sue Wallace. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/iguazu-falls/">MyDisoveries.</a></em></p>

Cruising

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Passengers boarding airplanes: We're doing it wrong

<p>‘Tis the season for airplane travel. We may be looking forward to getting where we’re going, but most aspects of the travel itself are merely endured. There’s stressful security, the madding crowd and the scrum at boarding, where people and their myriad belongings clog the gate area, standing between you and your departure.</p> <p>But take heart: there are scientifically proven ways to improve the boarding process or at least speed it up so that it can be over and done with more quickly.</p> <h2>What’s going wrong now</h2> <p>Currently, it feels like you could have walked to your destination by the time you’ve waited through boarding calls for all the various levels of travelers, from elite down to the dregs of refundable coach. Moreover, once you scan your pass and enter the jetway, you find it’s packed with all those who were crammed up around the ticket scanner a few minutes before – affectionately called “gate lice.”</p> <p>One big contributor to this logjam is the common airline policy to charge for checked baggage, leading passengers to bring aboard more, and more fully packed, luggage. All these carry-ons take time to stow. The fuller the plane becomes, the longer it takes to put the luggage away – like a not-very-fun version of Tetris.</p> <p>Another cause is the boarding process itself: the way and order that passengers are asked to board.</p> <p>You might assume the fastest way to load a plane is from the back to the front, so that no passenger needs to pass anyone in the aisle or hop over anyone in their row. This logic forms the basis of standard boarding procedures. But what would really happen if you boarded in precisely this way? The passengers would rush into the cabin, proceed toward the back – and come to a screeching halt as the first one or two passengers stow their luggage. The first 30 passengers (the back five rows) would take up nearly the entire length of the cabin. The rest of the line has simply moved from the airport gate into the jetway or cabin – and it moves no faster.</p> <h2>The leap from serial to parallel</h2> <p>The problem is that boarding from the back to the front is a serial process: only one action at a time is completed. It’s like deleting a page of text just using the delete key instead of selecting the entire page. In this case, only one passenger at a time is seated. The aisle in the airplane isn’t used effectively.</p> <p>A more efficient way to board would have only as many passengers in the airplane as can put their luggage away without interfering with each other. Those passengers should also be ordered so as to eliminate the need to pass by anyone either in the aisle or in the rows. In other words, it is better to make passenger boarding a parallel process where multiple actions occur simultaneously, instead of a serial process.</p> <h2>An optimum method</h2> <p>Virtually all scientific or industrial fields have optimization problems: finding the best way to complete different tasks. A classic example is the “traveling salesman” problem: what’s the shortest route that connects a number of cities?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SC5CX8drAtU?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="caption">The “traveling salesman” is another mathematical problem that can be solved using the same optimization routine.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/65384/original/image-20141124-19618-9kjeel.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/65384/original/image-20141124-19618-9kjeel.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=237&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <span class="caption">Seating map showing the order that passengers board using the Steffen method.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Jason Steffen</span>, <span class="license">Author provided</span></span></p> <p>The same optimization routine that can solve the traveling salesman problem can be applied to airplane boarding. Drawing from its results, I’ve <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jairtraman.2008.03.003">proposed</a> an optimum boarding method. In this approach, often called the Steffen method, adjacent passengers in line will be seated two rows apart from each other. The first wave of passengers would be, in order, 30A, 28A, 26A, 24A, and so on, starting from the back. (For a typical airplane there would be 12 such waves, one for each seat in a row and for odd and even rows.)</p> <p><a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jairtraman.2011.10.003">In field tests</a>, this method has outperformed all others. In a test with 72 passengers it was nearly twice as fast as boarding back-to-front or in rotating blocks of rows, methods commonly used in the industry. It was 20-30% faster than more optimized boarding methods such as random boarding, when people get on without regard to where their assigned seats are. It also beat boarding windows-middle-aisle. My method even outperformed the industry gold standard of open seating, used by Southwest airlines. That’s when passengers don’t have assigned seats at all.</p> <h2>Can we make the switch?</h2> <p>So, why isn’t this optimum method of airplane boarding being adopted by any carrier in the industry? One significant reason may be the challenge of its implementation – lining passengers up in such a rigid order. While this obstacle may not be insurmountable, the question itself overlooks one of the primary benefits of the Steffen method: it allows an airline to measure how much room there is for improvement and identifies where that improvement is to be found.</p> <p>A head-to-head comparison between an existing strategy and the Steffen method (incorporating all of the different elite and special-needs passengers) might show that a 30% reduction in boarding time is possible. Then, the powers-that-be can weigh the cost of changing to a more efficient, yet still practical process – one that more effectively uses the aisle – against the benefit of recovering only a portion of that potential savings. Those are the kinds of numbers that decisions can be based upon – and it eliminates the common, but utterly useless, defense of “there’s always room for improvement.”</p> <p>Cold comfort on your flight this week, perhaps. Maybe spend some of your time standing in line spreading the word that a better way is possible.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/33615/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Jason Steffen, Research Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/passengers-boarding-airplanes-were-doing-it-wrong-33615" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

International Travel

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Three-Michelin-starred chef bans meat from her restaurants

<p><span>When you walk into any of Dominique Crenn’s San Francisco eateries, do not expect to find any pork or chicken.</span></p> <p><span>The three-Michelin-starred chef has announced that her restaurants – Atelier Crenn, Petit Crenn, Bar Crenn and the forthcoming Boutique Crenn – will no longer serve land-based meat. </span></p> <p><span>“Meat is insanely complicated – both within the food system and the environment as a whole – and, honestly, it felt easier to just remove it from the menus all together,” the chef said in a statement.</span></p> <p><span>“Local and sustainable fish and vegetables are just as, if not more, versatile – and delicious.”</span></p> <p><span>Crenn said some of her restaurants have been meat-free for years. </span></p> <p><span>“What people haven’t talked about is [since] I opened Petit Crenn in 2015, it’s been fully vegetarian and pescatarian, we didn’t have any meat there,” Crenn told <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/dominique-crenn-michelin-star-chef-meat-ban/index.html"><em>CNN Travel</em></a>. “But I never advertised it. And then Atelier has been meat free for the last two years.”</span></p> <p><span>The chef said while she is not a pescatarian or vegetarian, she hopes to “effect real environmental change” through her dining group. </span></p> <p><span>“I know the impact of the way that we fix meat nowadays is not good. It’s killing us, it’s killing the planet,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>“I’m trying to make the best decision for my surroundings and the planet and myself. But I’m not forcing anybody to do that.</span></p> <p><span>But what am I asking is -- I really want people to think about their actions and their behavior and what they can impact on their own. And it’s pretty easy. You know, the little things will go such a long way.”</span></p> <p><span>A reduction in worldwide beef and lamb consumption would help reduce carbon emissions and stave off dangerous climate change, a <a href="https://time.com/5646787/ipcc-climate-change-land-report/">UN report</a> released in August found.</span></p> <p><span>Another study published in the journal <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0594-0.epdf?referrer_access_token=XZVziR7TomkKxdcQPHzQztRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0M2ZckU8PFAjFp2beHrcOXhMGtzE8nzrDqubMx9ONW9ULSbbQ_WUw8pvU9o1FaesDGn7Yyqm7rBefxpvX03Wpn9fVoWCmNUMPUJaksaTZag7YHqVuReazO6_biSFBudf0fo2_DKzyNTaIKyTK4Iuxp7tpl7fPwJrWv85CogEUuSnsQ9AdQHF4LkpZHfMiYl558qP0i6uGuTstvERNFrGr3v_E1KpZK84cX4qaGEUh5_IiX_HQ7lH9hoEbY6vHOB4Bh893_N1hZK2CL4CocbFg00&amp;tracking_referrer=www.theguardian.com"><em>Nature</em></a> found that to keep global warming under 2C, an average world citizen needs to eat 75 per cent less beef and 90 percent less pork. The average world citizen also needs to halve their consumption of eggs, and replace them with <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/10/huge-reduction-in-meat-eating-essential-to-avoid-climate-breakdown">five times as many legumes.</a> </span></p>

International Travel

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Inside what happens at the annual Royal Family gift exchange

<p>Members of the royal family may have to follow strict guidelines and traditions throughout the year, but the annual Christmas gift exchange is said to hold a light, formal tone with the Queen.</p> <p>It is no secret either that the Windsor’s’ love a good wind up and in doing so, have been known to hand each other cheeky gifts to celebrate the annual holiday.</p> <p>Each year on Christmas eve, members of the royal family gather together at the Sandringham Estate where they give each other gifts following an intimate family afternoon tea.</p> <p>Queen Elizabeth, Prince Philip and their children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren reportedly take part in their gift exchange on Christmas Eve over Christmas Day, in a nod to their German ancestry.</p> <p>The family is believed to gather in the red drawing room at 6 p.m., where gifts have been secretly laid out for each family member.</p> <p>However, that is where any stale, old family traditions are thrown out the window because the Windsors like a gift with an admittedly silly tone.</p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/royal-christmas-traditions-meghan-markle-13618812" target="_blank">T</a><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/royal-christmas-traditions-meghan-markle-13618812" target="_blank">he Mirror</a></em> reported Prince Harry gifted his grandmother – The Queen – a shower cap that had "Ain't Life a B****" emblazoned across the front.</p> <p>It has also been reported that before Prince Harry was dating Meghan Markle, his sister-in-law Duchess Kate handed him a "Grow Your Own Girlfriend" gift as a gag.</p> <p>Other silly presents that have been exchanged over the years according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/royal-christmas-traditions-meghan-markle-13618812" target="_blank">The Mirror</a> </em>include a leather toilet seat, which Princess Anne once gave her older brother, Prince Charles, and a leopard print bath mat, a gift for Fergie from her sister in law, Princess Diana.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Royal Family during Christmas throughout the years.</p>

International Travel

Health

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Couple dies 33 hours apart after being married for 68 years

<p>A husband and wife who had been married for 68 years have passed away within hours of each other.</p> <p>Minneapolis couple Robert and Corinne Johnson were laid to rest together after dying 33 hours apart, <em><a href="https://www.kare11.com/article/life/married-68-years-husband-and-wife-die-one-day-apart/89-fba881e6-5178-4e9a-9c0d-c9838523c1b4">KARE11</a> </em>reported.</p> <p>Corinne died on November 24 at the age of 87 from congestive heart failure. Her husband Robert, 85, followed soon on November 25 after months of battle with cancer.</p> <p>The couple’s youngest son Brent Johnson said his parents passed “on their own terms”.</p> <p>He said his father was known for his chivalrous acts, including letting others ahead through doors or buffet lines. “So it was only fitting that in the end he waited for mother to go first and then he passed away,” he told <em><a href="https://www.kare11.com/article/life/married-68-years-husband-and-wife-die-one-day-apart/89-fba881e6-5178-4e9a-9c0d-c9838523c1b4">KARE11</a></em>.</p> <p>Brent said it was not a coincidence that his father’s death came shortly after his mother’s. “When I asked him what his wishes were if mom passed away, he said he couldn’t imagine life without her. And in the end, he was right,” Brent told <em><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/12/04/us/minneapolis-couple-married-68-years-dies-day-apart-trnd/index.html">CNN</a></em>.</p> <p>The pair’s other son Bruce Johnson, <a href="https://people.com/human-interest/minnesota-couple-die-33-hours-apart/">who works as a doctor that specialises in cancer</a>, said he thought his father had more time.</p> <p>“I sort of thought he looked like he could go for weeks,” Bruce said. “As soon as mom died, he went downhill and died in a day. It’s hard to imagine it’s a coincidence.”</p> <p>Robert and Corinne’s relationship began when they grew up beside each other on a farm in Nicollet County, according to their obituaries.</p> <p>The pair tied the knot in October 1951 and raised seven children together. They also shared 14 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.</p> <p>The secret to the couple’s long-lasting marriage was strong faith and commitment, Brent said.</p> <p>“Dad would say, if mom isn’t happy, no one’s happy,” he said. “He understood what it took to make a marriage work.”</p>

Caring

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How stress speeds up your chromosomes’ ageing clock

<p>Ageing is an inevitability for all living organisms, and although we still don’t know exactly why our bodies gradually grow ever more decrepit, we are starting to grasp how it happens.</p> <p>Our new research, <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ele.13426">published in <em>Ecology Letters</em></a>, pinpoints factors that influence one of the most important aspects of the ageing process, at the fundamental level of our DNA. It suggests how stress can cause the biochemical body clock built into our chromosomes to tick faster.</p> <p>DNA - the genetic material in our cells - does not float freely in cells’ nuclei, but is organised into clumps called chromosomes. When a cell divides and produces a replica of itself, it has to make a copy of its DNA, and because of the way this process works, a tiny portion is always lost at one end of each DNA molecule.</p> <p>To protect vital portions of DNA from being lost in the process, the ends of chromosomes are capped with special sequences called <a href="https://www.britannica.com/science/telomere">telomeres</a>. These are gradually whittled away during successive cell divisions.</p> <p>This gradual loss of telomeres acts like a cellular clock: with each replication they get shorter, and at a certain point they become too short, forcing the cell into a programmed death process. The key question is what this process, which plays out on a cellular level, actually means for our mortality. Does the fate of individual cells really matter so much? Does the ticking telomere clock really count down the remaining time our bodies have to live?</p> <p>Cellular ageing is just one of many components of ageing - but it’s one of the most important. Gradual deterioration of our body’s tissues, and the irreversible death of our cells, are responsible for the most conspicuous effects of ageing such as loss of physical fitness, deterioration of connective tissues leading to skin wrinkles, or neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease.</p> <h2>What makes us tick?</h2> <p>Another crucial question is: are there factors that speed up or slow down the loss of our ticking telomeres?</p> <p>So far, our answers to this question have been incomplete. Studies have provided glimpses of possible mechanisms, suggesting that things like <a href="https://science.sciencemag.org/content/347/6220/436/tab-figures-data">infections</a> or even <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jeb.12479">dedicating extra energy to reproduction</a> might accelerate telomere shortening and speed up cellular ageing.</p> <p>This evidence is piecemeal, but these factors all seem to have one thing in common: they cause “physiological stress”. Broadly speaking, our cells are stressed when their biochemical processes are disrupted, either by a lack of resources or for some other reason. If cells lose too much water, for example, we might say they are in “dehydration stress”.</p> <p>More familiar types of stress also count. Tiredness and overwork put us under chronic stress, as does feeling anxious for prolonged periods. <a href="https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/07/180712141715.htm">Lack of sleep</a> or <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2763246/">emotional stress</a> can alter internal cellular pathways, including telomere functioning.</p> <p>With this in mind, we asked ourselves one simple question. Can various types of stress experienced by an individual actually accelerate their rate of ageing?</p> <h2>Stress and strain</h2> <p>In our research, led by my colleague Marion Chatelain of the University of Warsaw (currently University of Innsbruck), we chose to look at this question as broadly as possible. Many studies have looked at this problem in specific species, such as mice, rats, and various fish and bird species (both wild and in the lab). We compiled the available evidence into a summary of the existing knowledge, across all vertebrate organisms studied so far.</p> <p>The emerging picture clearly suggests that telomere loss is profoundly impacted by stress. All else being equal, stress does indeed hasten telomere loss and accelerate the internal cellular clock.</p> <p>Importantly, the type of stress matters: by far the strongest negative impact is caused by pathogen infections, competition for resources, and intensive investment in reproduction.</p> <p>Other stressors, such as poor diet, human disturbance or urban living, also hastened cellular ageing, although to a lesser extent.</p> <h2>Getting radical</h2> <p>A natural question arises: what makes stress exert such a powerful influence on cellular clocks? Is there a single mechanism, or many? Our analysis may have identified one possible candidate: “oxidative stress”.</p> <p>When cells are stressed, this often manifests itself through an accumulation of oxidising molecules, such as <a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-the-untrue-story-of-antioxidants-vs-free-radicals-15920">free radicals</a>. Residing at the exposed ends of our chromosomes, telomeres are perfect targets for attack by these chemically reactive molecules.</p> <p>Our analysis suggests that, regardless of the type of stress experienced, this oxidative stress might be the actual biochemical process that links stress and telomere loss. As to whether this means that we should eat more <a href="https://www.britannica.com/science/antioxidant">antioxidants</a> to guard our telomeres, this certainly requires more research.</p> <p>I know what you’re wondering: does this mean we have discovered the secret of ageing? Can we use this knowledge to slow the ageing process or stop it in its tracks? The short answer is: no.</p> <p>Ageing is too fundamental to our biology to get rid of it completely. But our study does underline an important truth: by reducing stress, we can do our bodies a big favour.</p> <p>In the modern world, it is hard to escape stress completely, but we can make everyday decisions to reduce it. Get enough sleep, drink enough water, eat healthily and don’t push yourself too hard. It won’t buy you eternal life, but it should keep your cells ticking along nicely.</p> <hr /> <p><em>The author thanks his colleagues <a href="https://www.uibk.ac.at/ecology/staff/persons/chatelain.html.en">Marion Chatelain</a> and <a href="https://cent.uw.edu.pl/en/person/prof-marta-szulkin/">Marta Szulkin</a> for their contributions to this article and the research on which it is based.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/127728/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Szymek Drobniak, DECRA Fellow, UNSW</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/tick-tock-how-stress-speeds-up-your-chromosomes-ageing-clock-127728" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Body

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Why it's never too late to explore alternative and holistic medicine

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With the growing popularity of alternative and holistic medicine, you may be wondering if it’s something you should try. Science is showing that alternative medicine is a great way to maintain your health and relieve chronic pain. Many types of alternative treatments can also help to keep relieve certain medical conditions and they can often be used in conjunction with your current treatment plan. Here’s why it’s never too late to explore alternative and holistic medicine, no matter what stage of life you’re in.</span></p> <h2>Reasons to consider alternative and holistic medicine</h2> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are many reasons to consider making the switch to alternative and holistic medicine. First, it may help you manage your medical expenses by reducing your need for expensive prescription medications. With alternative therapies, you may even be able to reduce the frequency of your visits to your conventional doctor.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Generally, alternative care focuses on one-on-one appointments that are much more personal than seeing a conventional doctor. Alternative practitioners usually treat the patient holistically, which means they work to improve physical symptoms, their underlying causes, and your mental health.</span></p> <h2>Types of alternative medicine to try</h2> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are several forms of alternative and holistic medicine that can be very helpful at any stage of life. Here are some you may want to consider:</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"> <h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Herbal and Nutritional Supplements</span></h3> </li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many people are familiar with herbal and nutritional supplements and they can be very helpful for a variety of conditions. Herbs can often be used in conjunction with or in place of certain prescription medications. Nutritional supplements may also help to prevent diseases that become more prevalent as you get older, including diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. In fact, </span><a href="https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/cholesterol-lowering-supplements/art-20050980"><span style="font-weight: 400;">experts at the Mayo Clinic</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> report that dietary supplements can even be used to lower your cholesterol levels.</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"> <h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chiropractic Care</span></h3> </li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chronic back and neck pain are a major issue for people of all ages. Conventional treatments often involve medications that have harmful side effects or even invasive surgery. As you age, the risk of surgery and anesthesia increases, especially if you have kidney or liver problems, so trying alternative treatments first only makes sense. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chiropractic care is a hands-on therapy that involves manipulating the spine and joints to realign the body. It can be a safe and non-invasive way to get relief for neck and back pain, headaches and chronic pain issues.</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"> <h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Acupuncture</span></h3> </li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Acupuncture has been used to treat maintain health, treat a variety of diseases, and treat chronic pain for centuries. </span><a href="https://www.yinovacenter.com/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Yinova Center acupuncture in New York City</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> recommends acupuncture treatments for people of all ages who want to relieve pain or treat medical conditions without pharmaceuticals or invasive treatment. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The treatment works by encouraging the release of certain chemicals into the bloodstream by inserting ultra-fine needles into the skin. Acupuncture is also great for relieving stress, anxiety, and depression.</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"> <h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Massage Therapy</span></h3> </li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Massage therapy, much like acupuncture and chiropractic care, is a type of hands-on, safe, and non-invasive alternative medicine. Massage is great for improving circulation and relieving pain. It’s especially beneficial for people who can’t be active due to certain medical conditions. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Massage can also be extremely beneficial for reducing stress. It’s a very relaxing experience and the health benefits can be boosted by the addition of certain essential oils. For example, peppermint and lavender essential oils are extremely helpful for relieving headaches, relaxing muscles, and reducing stress.</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"> <h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Naturopathy</span></h3> </li> </ul> <p><a href="https://www.lifestylephysicians.com/six-incredible-benefits-of-naturopathic-medicine"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Naturopathy</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> is a form of lifestyle medicine that focuses on restoring the physical, psychological, and structural balance of the patient. They focus on using the healing powers of nature, such as sunshine and fresh air, to improve the health of the patient. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Naturopathic physicians utilize a variety of therapies depending on the patient’s needs, which may include nutrition, herbs, acupuncture, massage and much more. Although naturopathy isn’t as mainstream as some other forms of alternative medicine, it has been successfully used to reduce the symptoms of fatigue, stress, headaches, chronic back pain and more.</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"> <h3><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yoga</span></h3> </li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While it’s true that yoga isn’t technically a form of medicine, it is an alternative therapy that has significant benefits as you age. If you struggle with joint pain, arthritis, balance issues, or stress, yoga can be especially beneficial. Practicing yoga regularly will improve your balance and stability by strengthening your muscles and improving your flexibility. It can also lower your blood pressure and improve your heart healthy by </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25177555"><span style="font-weight: 400;">reducing oxidative stress</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, which is one of the leading risk factors of heart attacks.</span></p> <h2>Choosing an alternative healthcare provider</h2> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you decide to give alternative medicine a try, be sure to talk with your doctor first. Certain nutritional or herbal supplements can interfere with prescription medications and there may be other things to consider as well. Your doctor will know what’s safe and what isn’t, depending on your current health condition.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When choosing an alternative healthcare provider, be sure they are properly licensed to work in your state. Ask for recommendations from friends and family to see if they have any recommendations. It’s very important that you’re comfortable talking to the practitioner that you choose because alternative medicine is very personalized.</span></p> <h2>Final thoughts</h2> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Alternative and holistic medicine can be a safe and effective way to complement your current healthcare regimen at any age. As acupuncture, massage therapy, and chiropractic care all become more mainstream, they are more likely to be covered by your health insurance as well. If you want to improve your health without pharmaceuticals or invasive treatments, these therapies are certainly worth trying.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Donna Maurer is a content creator and a former writer for an alternative medicine clinic.</span></em></p>

Body

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Michael Schumacher’s former teammate spills on what the F1 legend is really like

<p>A former Ferrari teammate has lifted the lid on what it was like to work alongside Formula 1 legend Michael Schumacher.</p> <p>Rubens Barrichello was Schumacher’s right-hand man for six seasons and explained what it was like working alongside him.</p> <p>Drivers know there’s a hierarchy within teams and despite being on the same team, drivers can sometimes be competitive with the men they call teammates.</p> <p>Barrichello says that Schumacher wasn’t always a supportive and open teammate.</p> <p>“I’ve always made friends and had a great relationship between my teammates. I do (include Michael), but he was never supportive … it’s not the right word. He would never be there to offer help so I never asked because there are teammates to go and ask,” Barrichello said on F1’s <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://youtu.be/3MvXyr7p4_E" target="_blank">Beyond the Grid</a></em> podcast.</p> <p>“For example Eddie Irvine, you ask him and he says ‘I don’t know which gear I take that corner’. I got p****d one day because I couldn’t understand how the hell he doesn’t know what gear and he doesn’t really know, he just doesn’t think, he did it naturally.</p> <p>“So you have to learn people with Michael it was different, he was a bit naive in a way that he worked his way.”</p> <p>He also spoke about meetings with just Schumacher, even though they were a part of the same team.</p> <p>“So many times I grabbed my chair because the meeting was already finished and then they started another meeting with just Michael there and I said hmm this is funny.</p> <p>“I took my chair and I just would sit there, say nothing and just stay there.”</p> <p>Eventually, Barrichello said that figuring out that the team was essentially Schumacher’s didn’t change his own ambitions towards the championships.</p> <p>“Eventually I felt that (it was Schumacher’s team), eventually I felt that the team was his,” he said.</p> <p>“It never dropped my emotions, seeing as I had to overcome my emotions to get better and to race against the best it wasn’t that ‘oh ok this engine was for him and this engine is for Rubens’.</p> <p>“I think they’d done such a good job on the year 2000 already that the engines had the same amount of power, but one is special and would have a choice to go to Michael but I think at the end of the day it was not a problem for me to race the same car as him.”</p> <p>Barrichello said that the thing that set Schumacher from the rest was his courage at high speeds.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5a4aIyFGYk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5a4aIyFGYk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">#tbtFerrari Badoer era magrin magrin 😂 /// #tbtFerraridays. 50kg for Badoer.... #forzaschumi @michaelschumacher</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/rubarrichello/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Rubens Barrichello 1️⃣1️⃣1️⃣</a> (@rubarrichello) on Nov 28, 2019 at 10:58am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“He was super, super on high speed like very courageous. The way I drove on the low speed was actually I was taking more speed out of it than him,” he explained.</p> <p>“I remember so many times Ross (Brawn) telling him that he had too do something different. I became so much better on the high speed because of him.</p> <p>“I think we both went to another level of pushing each other so it was good.</p> <p>“It’s not that easy to make Michael Schumacher go to another level.</p> <p>“Mine had to be mental. How do you go to a racetrack knowing that you have a B option of a pit stop and this and that and still be ready to win?”</p> <p>Barrichello said that he would have walked away with “at least one” championship had the time been split equally between Schumacher and himself.</p> <p>“If you put myself against Michael, I think it was a 70-30 split, lets put it this way he was better than me.</p> <p>“He was more complete, and Michael didn’t have bad days, whenever he had a bad day or he was vulnerable the team around him prepared him to be back up. They knew how to affect him positively.</p> <p>“But if it was run straight, just the same strategy for everyone I might have won at least one championship … at least one.</p> <p>“It doesn’t make a difference now, it’s part of the past. I didn’t and I’m happy with that because I tried.”</p>

Body

Lifestyle

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Delicious pork belly and prawn fresh rice paper rolls

<p>Time to prepare 20 mins | Serves 4-6</p> <p>A great fresh-tasting starter or snack, and you can even get creative with the ingredients you put inside!</p> <p>“Although I love Vietnamese fried spring rolls, these fresh rice paper rolls are my favourite rolls to eat. They’re light and delicious and hugely popular in Vietnam as well as all around the world,” says chef Adam Liaw.</p> <p><em>Recipe from <u><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fadam-liaw-s-asian-cookery-school-adam-liaw%2Fprod9780733634307.html">Asian Cookery School by Adam Liaw</a></u> (Hachette, RRP $49.99)</em> -.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong>:</p> <ul> <li>300g pork belly, skin and bone removed </li> <li>1 tbsp salt </li> <li>100g dried rice vermicelli </li> <li>30 rice paper sheets </li> <li>3 cups shredded iceberg lettuce </li> <li>1 cup loosely packed mint </li> <li>1 cup loosely packed coriander or perilla </li> <li>300g cooked prawns, peeled, deveined and split lengthways </li> <li>1 bunch Chinese chives, halved </li> <li>1 cup Nuoc Cham* (see tip below), to serve</li> </ul> <p>*If you don’t feel like making it yourself or can’t find Nuoc Cham at your local Asian supermarket then try it with sweet chilli sauce or experiment with your favourite Asian dipping sauce.</p> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Place the pork belly in a pot just big enough to fit it. Cover with cold water. Add the salt, bring the water to a simmer and simmer for 20 minutes, or until the pork belly is cooked through. Remove from the water and allow to cool. Thinly slice the pork into 5cm wide slices no more than a few millimetres thick.</p> <p>2. Place the rice vermicelli in a large bowl and pour over plenty of boiling water. Leave for 5 minutes then drain, rinse in cold water, drain again and cut into 5cm lengths.</p> <p>3. Fill a large bowl with lukewarm water and dip a sheet of rice paper into the water until it slightly softens. (It will continue to soften out of the water.) Transfer the rice paper to a plate and place a pile of pork, lettuce, rice vermicelli and some mint and coriander on the paper in a line just in from the edge closest to you.</p> <p>4. Place a few prawns at the centre of the paper with the orange backs facing down and roll the paper, folding in the edges halfway along, as shown. Add a few spears of chives just before finishing the roll so the cut ends stick out of the top. Serve with Nuoc Cham.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong>:</p> <ul> <li>Keeping the prawns separate from the other fillings is purely for presentation, so you can see the colourful backs facing outward through a single layer of rice paper.</li> <li>You don’t need to do all the work yourself – you can put the ingredients on platters on the dining table with bowls of warm water to dip the rice papers into and everyone can make their own.</li> <li>The filling of the rolls can be whatever you like. Try leftover <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lemongrass-beef.aspx">Lemongrass Beef </a>or <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/porchetta-sliders-by-matt-moran.aspx">shredded chicken</a>. </li> </ul> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/fresh-rice-paper-rolls.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Food & Wine

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How to give yourself a DIY pedicure at home

<p>Save both time and money by learning how to do your own pedicure at home. Taking extra special care of your feet will mean you can walk comfortably and with an extra spring in your step.</p> <p><strong>Feet first</strong><br />Our feet have been working hard for us for many years now and require regular servicing to keep them in good working order. Attend to your feet every two or three weeks.</p> <p>1. Use a corn plane on calluses and corns. Take care with the first few sweeps when the blade is new and very sharp. Feet must be dry and skin ‘crispy’. Use a new blade every time you perform this procedure.</p> <p>2. Corn and callus plasters are useful if the corn plane is difficult to use. Follow the instructions and repeat the process for stubborn corns and calluses.</p> <p>3. If your feet are aching or sore or tired, soak in hot water and a foot soak lotion for twenty or thirty minutes.</p> <p>4. Always take care each day to wash and dry thoroughly between your toes to prevent inflammation.</p> <p>5. Try arch supports or custom-made orthotics if you have flat feet.</p> <p>6. Visit the podiatrist if you have difficulty managing your feet yourself.</p> <p>7. The foot milk solution (available from pharmacies), which causes dry skin and callus to peel off, is effective and worth using.</p> <p><strong>Top tip:</strong> Try to arrange for your pharmacy to order 20 or 30 packets of corn plane blades for you to stockpile as they are not always easy to find.</p> <p><strong>Step-by-step home pedicure</strong></p> <p>1. Soak your feet in warm soapy water for about twenty minutes, topping up with extra hot water from a nearby jug. Bliss!</p> <p>2. Adjust a chair under your strong lamp to shine on your toes whilst performing the pedicure.</p> <p>3. Dry your feet quickly and whilst the nails are softened, trim and cut away any dry and dead skin, especially around the little toes. Expose all the little toenail. You may need a bandaid on your little toes for 24 hours or so.</p> <p>4. File down any thick toenails with a nail file, or take off a layer of thick toenail with your callus cutter. Be careful.</p> <p>5. Take off sharp, pointed edges of nails with scissors and pull off thick side cuticles with tweezers.</p> <p>6. Clean all around your nails with an orange stick.</p> <p>7. Apply a base coat of clear nail polish, then two coats of colour, counting to 60 between coats. Freeze-dry with baby oil. If you go over the edge onto your skin don’t worry, it will wear off quickly.</p> <p><strong>Top tip:</strong> Time your pedicure for evening so that you don’t have to put on shoes before the nail polish has cured. It is not necessary to paint your toenails during winter, but do have a pedicure either at home or in a salon every two or three weeks to keep your feet and nails in good shape.</p> <p><em>Written by Margaret Woodberry. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/how-to-give-yourself-a-pedicure-at-home.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Where there’s Wilbr, there’s a way to make a Will

<p>Have you written your professional Will? Is it on your to-do list? </p> <p>More than half of New Zealanders leave this world without a professional Will each year, resulting in confusion and uncertainties for their immediate family, and the prospect of working through a mountain of complex legal paperwork during a time of intense grief. </p> <p>A personal binding Will shouldn’t be difficult or expensive. Even so, thousands of New Zealanders are likely to avoid the task of creating a professional Will. This is not helped by a proliferation of legally suspect online DIY will kits, and concerns over exorbitant costs charged by law firms.</p> <p>The process can be incredibly costly, time consuming, confusing or unclear, or just sensitive and difficult to face. Thankfully, that real stress can be avoided because an Australian-based company has created a platform that enables anyone to remotely and securely create a binding Will.</p> <p><a href="https://wilbrwills.com/au/register">Wilbr Wills</a> was founded in August 2019 by a senior lawyer with a simple goal: that access to legally binding and easy-to-navigate wills should be offered to all Australians and that any friction or obstacles should be removed. All you have to do is Write, Sign and Store.</p> <p>The company has removed any worries about the legality of the Will by allowing people to sign digitally via its own technology, which encrypts your signature, creating total security and authenticity.</p> <p><strong>Why Wilbr? </strong></p> <p>The benefits of Wilbr? No waiting to see a lawyer, no hidden costs or fees, and no need to fret about the process. The Wilbr Will platform is seamless, transparent and easy to navigate, making the process less stressful and quite possibly, even enjoyable. You can even use the platform to calculate your own net worth.</p> <p>Wilbr allows anyone to commence writing their Will whenever they like, wherever they like – on their laptop, tablet or mobile device (via the Wilbr App). The company offers a once-off fee Will for only $169. Approved by solicitors and barristers, Wilbr Wills are legally binding and just as trustworthy as seeing your own local lawyer.</p> <p>Wilbr Wills can be signed and verified authentically online, without the hassle of printing copious streams of paper. The Wills are stored securely online and the all-important signature is captured digitally. There is no excuse anymore for creating heartache for your loved ones.</p> <p>You can <a href="https://wilbrwills.com/au/register">sign up for Wilbr here</a>.</p> <p><em>This is a sponsored post in partnership with <a href="/Wilbr%20Wills">Wilbr Wills</a>. Guest author Doron Rivlin is the founder of Wilbr Wills and a practising solicitor based in Sydney. </em></p>

Retirement Life

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4 easy steps to get rid of stink bugs

<p>Anyone who’s had a citrus tree will be familiar with bronze orange bugs. Also called stink bugs, they produce a foul-smelling secretion and suck the sap from stalks, causing flowers and fruit to drop.</p> <p>These pests need to be controlled in winter before they can build up their numbers in spring and summer.</p> <p>They lay eggs on the underside of leaves with the young, called nymphs, appearing in winter. The nymphs are flat, lime green and about 6mm long.</p> <p><strong>1. Know the beast</strong></p> <div id="page1" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Nymphs can be harder to spot as their green colour helps them blend with leaves.</p> <p>As they mature they turn orange or bronze and become rounded, going from brown to black and reaching 25mm long as adults.</p> <p><strong>2. Get them while they are young</strong></p> <div id="page2" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Adult stink bugs change from orange or bronze to black or brown in colour.</p> <p><strong>3.  Methods of control</strong></p> <p>Numbers of bronze orange bug build up rapidly, making control difficult, so take action immediately. A high population may be a sign the tree is stressed. Give it a deep watering and apply a citrus fertiliser.</p> <p>Wear goggles to control bronze orange bugs, as they expel a caustic liquid that can cause severe irritation. For small trees, blast them off with a jet of water from the hose then collect in a bag and squash, or drop into a bucket of methylated spirits.</p> <p>Large trees should be sprayed every 10 to 14 days with Eco-Oil or Confidor to kill the nymphs before they develop into breeding adults.</p> <p>You may also notice green bugs with sharp shoulder spines. Native to Australia they’re called spined citrus bugs. They like lemons and mandarins but suck sap from other citrus fruit.</p> <p>This pest causes young fruit to develop flat patches of skin and brown stains on the flesh.</p> <p>Treat them the same way as bronze orange bugs but you’ll have to look a little closer to find them, as their green colour helps them blend in well.</p> <p><strong>4. Organic remedy</strong></p> <p>One way to treat small nymphs in winter is with a soap spray, concentrating on the underside of leaves and the lower part of the tree.</p> <p>To make the spray, add one tablespoon of pure soap flakes, such as grated Velvet soap, to half a bucket of warm water.</p> <p>When the soap has dissolved in the water, fill a spray bottle and treat leaves early in the day.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Don’t use any sprays on hot days, as this can damage stressed plants even more.</p> <p><em>Written by Handyman. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.handyman.net.au/4-easy-steps-get-rid-stink-bugs">Handyman.</a></em></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

Home & Garden

Finance

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Married couple at the centre of bizarre billion-dollar drug bust

<p>A recently married couple from Melbourne alongside an IT worker have been arrested and charged with running a customs importing business which dealt with over $1 billion worth of 1.6 tonnes of ice and heroin.</p> <p>It is the nation’s largest uncovered methamphetamine haul.</p> <p>Rachel Annette Cachia and Donovan Mark Rodrigues, both 37, have been described as “trusted insiders” in the customs industry and advised clients on the logistics of importing and exporting goods through their independently owned business.</p> <p>However, the couple have suffered a violent fall from grace as they may be met with life imprisonment if convicted over the seizure of 1.6 tonnes of ice and heroin found hidden inside speakers being shipped to Melbourne in April 2019.</p> <p>On social media, the couple showed off their lavish lifestyle, including holidays with their two young children and luxury sports cars.</p> <p>Alongside Ms Cachia and Mr Rodrigues is Bayside IT worker Stephen Mizzi, 38, who has also been charged after the Australian Federal Police raided properties in the Melbourne suburbs of Darley, Sunshine West, Brooklyn, Elwood and Murrumbeena.</p> <p>All three individuals are to face numerous charges of importing illicit drugs.</p> <p>Australian Federal Police Deputy Commissioner Neil Gaughan alleged the couple were "middle to high up" in the drug operation.</p> <p>"We feel to a certain extent that they’ve been used," he said.</p> <p>"They [allegedly] used their positions of trust to circumvent the border control. It will be alleged that two of the three suspects charged are trusted industry insiders."</p> <p>Australian Border Forces uncovered the drugs after they asked for sea cargo sipped from Bangkok, Thailand to be inspected at a container examination facility, in April.</p> <p>Officers spotted “anomalies” inside the speakers after an X-ray and took them apart in result.</p> <p>They found numerous packages containing methamphetamine and heroin that had been vacuum-packed and stuffed inside the speakers.</p> <p>Court documents allege that Mr Rodrigues and Ms Cachia had begun dealing with proceeds of crime in December 2016.</p> <p>Then, between June 2017 and July this year, the couple allegedly began arranging the movement of goods without authorisation through ports on numerous occasions between West Melbourne and Brooklyn.</p> <p>By December 2018, it’s alleged that Mr Mizzi joined in on the drug operation with the plan to help ship heroin and ice to Australia.</p> <p>Mr Mizzi has also been additionally charged with dishonestly obtaining identification information from a mobile phone in April this year.</p> <p>The trio faced Melbourne Magistrates Court on Thursday, where lawyers said it was the first time in custody for both men and that Mr Mizzi had a "blood pressure issue".</p> <p>Liliana Dubroja, the lawyer representing Ms Cachia, requested a nurse assess her client due to kidney and mental health concerns.</p> <p>Commonwealth prosecutor Jamey Ellis said police required extra time to compile their brief of evidence due to the extensive number of phone taps.</p> <p>"There is a significant amount of listening device and telephone material," he said.</p> <p>The trio was remanded in custody to face court again on May 7. They have not applied for bail.</p>

Money & Banking

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Understanding the financial pages

<p>Looking at the financial pages of the daily newspaper may seem like a bewildering onslaught of information with reams of market statistics and measurements. This can make the investment world seem quite complex and intimidating, but when you break it down and try to grasp each of the component parts, it is well within the capacity of most lay people to understand.</p> <p>Here are a few tips that may help to get you started:<strong><br />Firstly, a word of warning</strong><br />Beware of the temptation to start reading the financial pages in the same way you would read the form guide for horse racing!</p> <p>It is easy to get caught up in habit of tracking daily movements of particular share values, but this can distract you from the taking the broad, long term view that is so essential to successful investing. In short, don’t be tempted to try and ‘pick winners’.</p> <p><strong>Understanding the ASX table</strong><br />The financial section of the newspaper will normally show the full list of companies listed on the Australian Stock Exchange. Next to each company will be a range of figures, usually beginning with the price of the share for that company at the end of the previous day’s trading. Some publications will also show a three letter ‘ASX code’ used to identify the company.</p> <p>Other measurements shown on this table include:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Weekly volume</strong> – The total number of shares of a company that were bought and sold within the last week.</li> <li><strong>Price movements</strong> – This may be shown as the price change since the previous day’s closing price, or it may be shown as a change over the previous week and some financial tables will even show the change over the last 12 months.</li> <li><strong>Dividend yield percentage</strong> – This figure is sometimes also shown and is the amount a company pays out in dividends each year as a percentage of the current share price. For example, if a particular share has a value of $100 and has paid a dividend of $5 then its dividend yield is 5% ($5 divided by $100).</li> </ul> <p><strong>Market indices</strong> <br />While the ASX table breaks down the performance of each company separately, you can also look at the collective performance of the market as a whole via the ‘All Ordinaries Index’. This tracks the movement of the total value of all shares on the exchange and the change over the last week and month may also be shown.</p> <p>Apart from the All Ordinaries Index, there are also a range of other sub-indices which indicate the performance of different segments of the market. The ASX 200, for example, is an index that tracks the change in collective value of the largest 200 public companies.</p> <p>Some indices focus on specific industrial segments. The S&amp;P ASX200 Energy Index, for example, measures the largest 200 energy companies. There are indices for and range of other sectors, such as health care, industry, finance, and metals and mining.</p> <p><strong>International markets</strong><br />Financial pages will also usually show various indices for major stock markets in other countries, such as the Dow Jones index in the USA, the FTSE in the UK and the Hang Seng in China.</p> <p><strong>Commodity prices</strong><br />The prices and price changes of key commodities are also a feature of many financial pages. Oil and gold are two such commodities that will usually be shown because of their importance as indicators of the general direction of the world economy and of market sentiment.</p> <p><strong>Exchange rates</strong><br />These are another important indicator of economic conditions and the state of the economies of different countries relative to each other. The financial pages will usually show the daily movement of the Australian Dollar against major world currencies, such as the US Dollar, the Euro and the Yen.</p> <p>There can be many factors within each country’s domestic economy which influence the movements in exchange rates. These can include interest rates, inflation, political stability, government debt and terms of trade.</p> <p><strong>Making sense of it all</strong><br />It would obviously take quite some time if you were to review and analyse all the items being reported and measured on the daily financial pages. Even if you do have the time to do that, it takes a considerable amount of skill and experience to interpret what different movements mean.</p> <p>Often the day to day movements in things like share prices and exchange rates are the result of transient factors and it is only a consistent analysis over a long period of time that can start to make a coherent interpretation.</p> <p>While it can be interesting to follow the fluctuating fortunes of particular shares, or the daily machinations of indices, commodities and exchange rates, it helps to have a financial adviser on your side to look at the bigger, long term picture.</p> <p>They will have access to expert research resources that constantly analyse markets at home and abroad and can position you to grow wealth without the need to personally keep track of day to day changes.</p> <p>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/money/financial-planning/understanding-the-financial-pages.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></p>

Legal

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Ex-police sergeant charged for stealing from homes of the dead

<p>A 66-year-old ex-police sergeant whose job it was to comfort grieving families may land himself in jail after it was found out he was stealing from the homes of the dead. </p> <p>Graeme 'Taff' Williams’ role was “sudden death coordinator” at Stoke Newington police station, in London, UK, until 2013.</p> <p>His job was to locate relatives of the deceased and log their belongings and valuables.</p> <p>However, it was revealed William’ stole more than $10,000 and valuable furniture from the homes of three deceased people after visiting their homes.</p> <p>He was “trusted implicitly” by his employers and was paid an annual salary of $52,966.82 by the time he retired.</p> <p>Williams was convicted of three charges of theft by a jury at Snaresbrook Crown Court.</p> <p>Prosecutor, Alexandra Felix, said Williams abused his position “by helping himself to the cash that was recovered, stealing it and providing information to heir hunters in return for payment”.</p> <p>Expensive furniture, artwork and other pricey goods were stolen from the home of one deceased, whose family thought were being taken to a homeless charity.</p> <p>An $800 watch, a 60-inch flat-screen TV, a fridge-freezer and washing machine were missing from the home, said the deceased's sister.</p> <p>She noted only the expensive items were the ones that had gone missing.</p> <p>William told Hackney council in 2012 that $35,835 had been recovered from the home of an elderly man who had been moved to a care home despite $40,835 being “banked” in the superintendent’s safe.</p> <p>Despite retiring in 2013, he continued to volunteer at Newingtown station and made money from heir hunters.</p> <p>Jurors heard $6,520 was missing from $46,315 cash that was found from under the bed of a man who died in his flat in 2015.</p> <p>Police raided Williams' home and found $20,000 in a safe and $5,000 in a box.</p> <p>Not stopping there, he had also received $11,504.02 in “discretionary” referral fees from heir hunting firm Fraser and Fraser, after he left the force.</p> <p>Company boss Andrew Fraser told jurors that as far as his firm was aware Williams was retired.</p> <p>Her further went on to say he hadn’t realised he was still working with police.</p> <p>“I knew he was retired because I was invited, as lots of other people were to his retirement. I didn't know he continued to work at Stoke Newington police station” Mr Fraser explained.</p> <p>“A number of cases were referred to us after his retirement. I think there might have been a dozen or so.</p> <p>“A couple of cases were looked at but we didn't spend much time on them but couldn't establish much value in them.</p> <p>“'After he retired he was a private individual. These referral fees were paid out at discretion.</p> <p>“Payments of $8,000 and $3,504.02 were paid in discretionary referral fees in relation to two estates.”</p> <p>The court heard that Firm Fraser had received an email addressed to them from William’s police email on at least one occasion.</p> <p>“The whole firm thought he had retired from the police,” Mr Fraser said.</p> <p>“If I knew he was still any matters referred to us from a police officer I would not have made payment. We saw him as a member of the public from after his retirement.”</p> <p>Williams denied but was convicted of three charges of theft. A separate charge of fraud was dropped earlier in the trial.</p> <p>Judge Alex Gordon ordered a medical report and bailed Williams ahead of sentence on 7 January.</p>

Legal

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“You destroyed my life”: Widow’s heartbreaking reply to man who killed her husband

<p>A man who bashed a grandfather in Adelaide to death with a hammer in front of his wife has been ordered to spend the rest of his life under mental health supervision.</p> <p>In May 2018, Steven Berg stormed the house of the couple and attacked 74-year-old Deon Hewitt who was cooking dinner with his wife, Patricia. The attack ended in death.</p> <p>Patricia saw the horrific crime and said to Berg in court that he “destroyed my life”.</p> <p>"You destroyed my life. I couldn't even say goodbye to the man I spent the best parts of my life with…. For this I will never forgive you."</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2F9NewsAdelaide%2Fvideos%2F1434612646686069%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>Berg was found not guilty of murder due to mental incompetence as the court was told he was suffering delusions at the time of the unprovoked and random attack.</p> <p>"My husband was my best friend, taken from me in the most horrific way - You have inflicted more pain on my family than any sentence can on you - until my final day I'm to live without my husband, stuck with the memory of that night," Ms Hewitt said.</p> <p>Five victim impact statements were read out in court by family members of Leon, as his grandchildren outlined their grief and the toll his passing had on their mental health.</p> <p>"When we were feeling down, we had Pop to call," they said.</p> <p>Leon and Patricia’s daughter Vanessa said that as long as Berg is detained “society is a safer place”.</p> <p>"the day you took dad from us, we lost a mother as well - I fear for the day Berg is released - While he is detained, society is a safer place,” she said.</p> <p>Berg is being held in the secure mental health facility of James Nash House.</p>

Legal

Entertainment

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5 ways to outsmart a burglar

<p>From burglars’ mouths to your ears: Here are the vulnerabilities they look for when they’re deciding whether to rob you blind.</p> <p><strong>1. Keep a car parked in your driveway</strong></p> <p>The investigative team at the Portland 24-hour news station KGW conducted an anonymous survey of 86 inmates incarcerated for burglary in a state prison, and almost all of the burglars surveyed said they’d think twice if they saw a car in a driveway.</p> <p><strong>2. Keep your doors and windows locked</strong></p> <p>Yes, this seems obvious. Yet a lot of people actually forget to lock their doors and windows. Most burglars KGW surveyed said they tended to “break in” simply by walking through an unlocked door or climbing through an unlocked window.</p> <p><strong>3. Consider making your door kick-proof</strong></p> <p>Some of the burglars surveyed by KGW said they’d be willing to kick in a locked door. It’s actually not difficult to kick in a door.</p> <p><strong>4. Don’t ignore a knock on the door</strong></p> <p>Every burglar surveyed by KGW reports knocking on the front door before breaking into a home; if someone answers the door, the burglar makes up an excuse and moves on. You don’t have to open the door for the person, but definitely let the person know you’re home – you just might thwart a burglary.</p> <p><strong>5. Prune those shrubs</strong></p> <p>Burglars value their privacy while they’re breaking and entering. Theoretically, if every house on a particular block seemed empty, a burglar would still choose to target the house that offers the most privacy. To deter would-be burglars, keep the shrubs around your house well-trimmed.</p> <p><em>Written by Lauren Cahn. This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/im-a-burglar-heres-how-to-outsmart-me"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p>

Technology

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Titanium is the perfect metal to make replacement body parts

<p><em>To mark the <a href="https://www.iypt2019.org/">International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements</a> we’re taking a look at how researchers study some of the elements in their work.</em></p> <p><em>Today’s it’s titanium, a metal known for its strength and lightness so it’s ideal for making replacement hips, knees and other parts of our bodies, but it’s also used in other industries.</em></p> <hr /> <p><a href="http://www.rsc.org/periodic-table/element/22/titanium">Titanium</a> gets its name from the <a href="https://www.britannica.com/topic/Titan-Greek-mythology">Titans of ancient Greek mythology</a> but this thoroughly modern material is well suited to a huge range of high-tech applications.</p> <p>With the chemical symbol Ti and an atomic number of 22, titanium is a silver-coloured metal valued for its low density, high strength, and resistance to corrosion.</p> <p>I first studied titanium via a Master’s degree at the Institute of Metal Research in the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1999. One of my projects was to investigate the formation of titanium alloys for their high-strength characteristics.</p> <p>Since then, the applications for this metal have grown exponentially, from its use (as <a href="https://www.britannica.com/science/titanium-dioxide">titanium dioxide</a>) in paints, paper, toothpaste, sunscreen and cosmetics, through to its <a href="https://www.britannica.com/science/titanium">use as an alloy</a> in biomedical implants and aerospace innovations.</p> <p>Particularly exciting is the perfect marriage between titanium and 3D printing.</p> <p><strong>Custom design from 3D printing</strong></p> <p>Titanium materials are expensive and can be problematic when it comes to traditional processing technologies. For example, its high melting point (1,670℃, much higher than <a href="https://www.bssa.org.uk/topics.php?article=103">steel alloys</a>) is a challenge.</p> <p>The relatively low-cost precision of 3D printing is therefore a game-changer for titanium. 3D printing is where an object is built layer by layer and designers can create amazing shapes.</p> <p>This allows the production of complex shapes such as replacement parts of a <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-30/victorian-woman-gets-3d-printed-jawbone-implant/8400410">jaw bone</a>, <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-10-21/rare-cancer-sufferer-receives-3d-printed-heel/5830432">heel</a>, <a href="https://www.southampton.ac.uk/news/2014/05/16-ground-breaking-hip-and-stem-cell-surgery.page">hip</a>, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27313616">dental implants</a>, or <a href="http://www.media-studio.co.uk/news/media-studios-first-3d-printed-titanium-cranioplasty-plate-delivered">cranioplasty plates</a> in surgery. It can also be used to make <a href="https://3dprint.com/219546/3d-print-golf-clubs-and-equipment/">golf clubs</a> and <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-norsk-boeing-idUSKBN17C264">aircraft components</a>.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.csiro.au/en/Research/MF/Areas/Metals/Lab22">CSIRO is working with industry</a> to develop new technologies in 3D printing using titanium. (It even <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8oc8GoOOUo4">made a dragon</a> out of titanium.)</p> <p>Advances in 3D printing are opening up new avenues to further improve the function of <a href="https://www.materialise.com/pl/node/3197">customised bodypart implants</a> <a href="https://www.renishaw.com/en/metal-3d-printing-for-healthcare--24226">made of titanium</a>.</p> <p>Such implants can be designed to be porous, making them lighter but allowing blood, nutrients and nerves to pass through and can even <a href="https://3dprint.com/219795/3d-printed-lattice-structures/">promote bone in-growth</a>.</p> <p><strong>Safe in the body</strong></p> <p>Titanium is considered the most biocompatible metal – not harmful or toxic to living tissue – due to its resistance to corrosion from bodily fluids. This ability to withstand the harsh bodily environment is a result of the protective oxide film that forms naturally in the presence of oxygen.</p> <p>Its ability to physically bond with bone also gives titanium an advantage over other materials that require the use of an adhesive to remain attached. Titanium implants last longer, and much larger forces are required to break the bonds that join them to the body compared with their alternatives.</p> <p>Titanium alloys commonly used in load-bearing implants are significantly less stiff – and closer in performance to human bone – than stainless steel or cobalt-based alloys.</p> <p><strong>Aerospace applications</strong></p> <p>Titanium weighs about half as much as steel but is 30% stronger, which makes it ideally suited to the aerospace industry where every gram matters.</p> <p>In the late 1940s the US government helped to get production of titanium going as it could see its potential for “<a href="https://titaniumprocessingcenter.com/titanium-technical-data/titanium-history-developments-and-applications/">aircraft, missiles, spacecraft, and other military purposes</a>”.</p> <p>Titanium has increasingly become the buy-to-fly material for aircraft designers striving to develop faster, lighter and more efficient aircraft.</p> <p>About 39% of the US Air Force’s <a href="https://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/f22/">F22 Raptor</a>, one of the most advanced fighter aircraft in the world, is made of titanium.</p> <p>Civil aviation moved in the same direction with Boeing’s new <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/engineering/boeing-787-dreamliner">787 Dreamliner made of 15% titanium</a>, significantly more than previous models.</p> <p>Two key areas where titanium is used in airliners is in their landing gear and jet engines. Landing gear needs to withstand the massive amounts of force exerted on it every time a plane hits a runway.</p> <p>Titanium’s toughness means it can absorb the huge amounts of energy expelled when a plane lands without ever weakening.</p> <p>Titanium’s heat resistance means it can be used inside modern jet engines, where temperatures can reach 800℃. Steel begins to soften at around 400℃ but titanium can withstand the intense heat of a jet engine without losing its strength.</p> <p><strong>Where to find titanium</strong></p> <p>In its natural state, titanium is always found bonded with other elements, usually within igneous rocks and sediments derived from them.</p> <p>The most commonly mined materials containing titanium are <a href="https://geology.com/minerals/ilmenite.shtml">ilmenite</a> (an iron-titanium oxide, FeTiO<sub>3</sub>) and <a href="https://geology.com/minerals/rutile.shtml">rutile</a> (a titanium oxide, TiO<sub>2</sub>).</p> <p>Ilmenite is most abundant in China, whereas Australia has the highest global proportion of rutile, <a href="http://www.ga.gov.au/education/classroom-resources/minerals-energy/australian-mineral-facts/titanium#heading-6">about 40% according to Geoscience Australia</a>. It’s found mostly on the east, west and southern coastlines of Australia.</p> <p>Both materials are generally extracted from sands, after which the titanium is separated from the other minerals.</p> <p>Australia is one of the world’s <a href="https://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/titanium/mcs-2015-timin.pdf">leading producers of titanium</a>, producing more than 1.5 million tonnes in 2014. South Africa and China are the two next leading producers of titanium, producing 1.16 and 1 million tonnes, respectively.</p> <p>Being among the top ten most abundant elements in Earth’s crust, titanium resources aren’t currently under threat – good news for the many scientists and innovators constantly looking for new ways to improve life with titanium.</p> <hr /> <p><em>If you’re an academic researcher working with a particular element from the periodic table and have an interesting story to tell then why not <a href="https://theconversation.com/au/pitches">get in touch</a>.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/115361/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/laichang-zhang-715775">Laichang Zhang</a>, Professor Mechanical Engineering, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/titanium-is-the-perfect-metal-to-make-replacement-human-body-parts-115361">original article</a>.</em></p>

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How music is used to frame our daily routines

<p>The concept of “home” refers to more than bricks and mortar. Just as cities are more than buildings and infrastructure, our homes carry all manner of emotional, aesthetic and socio-cultural significance.</p> <p>Our research investigates music and sound across five settings: home, <a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&amp;lr=&amp;id=zcMuMglzyzkC&amp;oi=fnd&amp;pg=PA190&amp;ots=atQw4trFNS&amp;sig=35Ok_TO3mJYXgm3mGRt_8bFfZ0Q#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">work</a>, <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/soin.12232">retail spaces</a>, private <a href="https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/S0163-2396(2010)0000035015/full/html">vehicle travel</a> and <a href="https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=200907280;res=IELAPA;type=pdf">public transport</a>.</p> <p>We found our interview subjects often idealised home along the lines of what <a href="http://www.losquaderno.professionaldreamers.net/?p=1106">Rowland Atkinson terms an “aural haven”</a>. He suggests, although “homes are … rarely places of complete silence”, we tend to imagine them as “refuge[s] from unwanted sound” that offer psychic and perceptual “nourishment to us as social beings”.</p> <p>We explored the ways in which people shape and respond to the home as a set of “<a href="http://www.professionaldreamers.net/images/losquaderno/losquaderno10.pdf">modifiable micro-soundscapes</a>”. Through 29 in-depth interviews, we examine how people use music and sound to frame the home as a type of “<a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/2095141?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents">interaction order</a>”. Erving Goffman coined this term to capture how people respond to the felt “presence” of an other.</p> <p>That presence can be linguistic or non-linguistic, visual or acoustic. It can cross material thresholds such as walls and fences. Goffman <a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=EM1NNzcR-V0C&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=behaviour+in+public+places&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwic9JaW6-XlAhV-73MBHRilB4oQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&amp;q=work%20walls%20do&amp;f=false">wrote</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>The work walls do, they do in part because they are honoured or socially recognised as communication barriers.</em></p> </blockquote> <p><strong>Cultivating sonic havens through music</strong></p> <p>As we detail in our recent <a href="https://tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14036096.2019.1686060">essay in Housing, Theory and Society</a>, the type of listening that most closely matches the idea of the home as an aural haven is bedroom listening – by young people in particular. We found that, as well as offering “control” and “seclusion”, the bedroom gave listeners a sense of “transcendence” and immersed them in “deep” listening. One interview subject said:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>When I get a new album … I like to experience [it] by … lying down on the floor… I’ll turn the lights off and I’ll just be engaging with the music, my eyes won’t be open.</em></p> </blockquote> <p>Another reported putting on headphones to listen to special selections of music, despite not needing to. “Headphones… [is] a more intimate … kind of thing”, even in a bedroom setting.</p> <p>When it came to music in shared spaces and in relation to neighbours, our interview subjects seemed both aware of music’s visceral powers and keen to respect the territorial or acoustic “preserves” of others. One young female sharing a house with her mother carefully curated the type of music played, and what part of the house it was played in. Her choices depended on whether her mother was home and whether she had shown interest in particular genres.</p> <p>All respondents who lived in shared households expressed some kind of sensitivity to not playing music at night.</p> <p>Another lived by herself in an apartment complex of five. She took deference towards neighbours seriously enough to “tinker away” on her piano only when she was sure her immediate neighbour wasn’t home. She “didn’t play the piano much” inside her flat and was only prepared to “go nuts” playing the piano in halls and other non-domestic settings.</p> <p><strong>Music as a bridging ritual</strong></p> <p>Another of our findings accorded with the microsociological focus on how people organise <a href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0226981606/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_taft_p1_i10">time</a> and <a href="https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0029344204/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_taft_p1_i6">space</a> in everyday life. We found evidence, for example, of how music was used to wake up, or to transition to the weekend, or as a “bridging ritual” between work and home.</p> <p>One interview subject remarked that he is “dressed casually anyway” when he returns from work, so his mechanism for shifting to home mode is to listen “to music … pretty much as soon as I get home … unless I’m just turning around and going straight somewhere else”. In other words, he associated the boundary between home and non-home with music and the listening rituals of returning home.</p> <p>One of the themes in academic literature about media and the home is that electronic and digital media <a href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/no-sense-of-place-9780195042313?cc=au&amp;lang=en&amp;">blur the boundary between the inside and outside of the home</a>. There is no doubt radio, television and now various digital platforms bring the world “out there” into the immediacy and intimacy of our own domestic worlds. But, as <a href="https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9780203033142/chapters/10.4324/9780203033142-8">Jo Tacchi noted of radio sound</a>, those sounds can also be used to weave a sonic <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0038026118825233">texture</a> of domestic comfort, security and routine.</p> <p>We also found interesting sonic continuities between our homes and how we make ourselves at home in non-domestic settings. As <a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=KEHjTYnT-MUC&amp;q=Locked+in+our+cars#v=snippet&amp;q=Locked%20in%20our%20cars&amp;f=false">Christina Nippert-Eng writes</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>Locked in our cars, commutes offer the working woman or man the legitimate equivalent of a teenager’s bedroom, often complete with stereo system and favourite music.</em></p> </blockquote> <p>In short, sonic havens are simply “places where we can retreat into privacy”, inside or outside our literal homes.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/126188/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michael-james-walsh-147733">Michael James Walsh</a>, Assistant Professor Social Science, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-canberra-865">University of Canberra</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/eduardo-de-la-fuente-161803">Eduardo de la Fuente</a>, Honorary Fellow, School of Humanities and Social Inquiry, University of Wollongong, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-wollongong-711">University of Wollongong</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/sonic-havens-how-we-use-music-to-make-ourselves-feel-at-home-126188">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Hidden women of history: Neaera, the Athenian child slave raised to be a courtesan

<p>The ancient worlds of Greece and Rome have perhaps never been as popular as they presently are. There are numerous television series and one-off documentaries covering both “big picture” perspectives and stories of ordinary people.</p> <p>Neaera was a woman from fourth century BCE Athens whose life is significant and sorrowful – worthy to be remembered – but may never feature in a glossy biopic.</p> <p>Possibly born in Corinth, a place where she lived from at least a young age, Neaera was raised by a brothel-keeper by the name of Nicarete.</p> <p>Her predicament was the result of her being enslaved to Nicarete. While we don’t know the reason for this, we do know that foundlings were common in antiquity. The parents of baby Neaera, for whatever reason, left her to fate – to die by exposure or be collected by a stranger.</p> <p>From a young age, Neaera was trained by Nicarete for the life of a hetaira (a Classical Greek term for “courtesan”). It was Nicarete who also named her, giving her a typical courtesan title: “Neaera” meaning “Fresh One”.</p> <p>Ancient sources reveal Naeara’s life in the brothel. In a legal speech by the Athenian politician and forensic orator, Apollodorus, the following description is provided: “There were seven young girls who were purchased when they were small children by Nicarete … She had the talent to recognise the potential beauty of little girls and knew how to raise them and educate them with expertise – for it was from this that she had made a profession and from this came her livelihood.</p> <p>“She called them ‘daughters’ so that, by displaying them as freeborn, she could obtain the highest prices from the men wishing to have intercourse with them. After that, when she had enjoyed the profit from their youth, she sold every single one of them …”</p> <p>The occasion for the passage from Apollodorus is a court case that was brought against Neaera in approximately 343 BCE. Neaera was around 50-years-old by the time of her prosecution, which took place in Athens.</p> <p><strong>Trafficking and abuse</strong></p> <p>The circumstances of her trial are complicated, involving the buying, selling, trafficking and abuse of Neaera from a very young age.</p> <p>Piecing together the evidence from Apollodorus’ prosecution speech, which has come down to us with the title, “Against Neaera”, it transpires that two of her clients, who shared joint ownership of her, allowed her to buy her freedom around 376 BCE.</p> <p>Afterwards, she moved to Athens with one Phrynion, but his brutal treatment of her saw Neaera leave for Megara, where circumstances caused her to return to sex work.</p> <p>Further intrigues involving men and sex work saw Neaera eventually face trial on the charge of falsely representing herself as a free Athenian woman by pretending to be married to a citizen.</p> <p>The charge of fraud was based on the law that a foreigner could not live as a common law “spouse” to a freeborn Athenian. The fact that Neaera also had three children, a daughter by the name of Phano, and two sons, further complicated the trial and its range of legal entanglements.</p> <p>While we never discover the outcome of the trial, nor what happened to Neaera, the speech of the prosecutor remains, and reveals much about her life. Unfortunately, the speech of the defence is lost.</p> <p>We do know, however, that the man with whom Neaera cohabitated, Stephanus, delivered the defence. Of course, he was not only defending Neaera – he was defending himself! Should Neaera have been found guilty, Stephanus would have forfeited his citizenship and the rights that attended it.</p> <p>Stephanus had a history of legal disputes with the prosecutor, Apollodorus. He also had a history of being in trouble with the law. For example, he had illegally married off Phano – not once, but twice – to Athenian citizens. Shady “get rich quick” schemes motivated such activities, and it seems that Stephanus was adept at using both his “wife” and his “daughter’ for bartering and personal profit.</p> <p>Another accusation revealed during the trial alleged that Stephanus arranged for Neaera to lure men to his house, engage them in sex, and then bribe them. And while Apollodorus provides no evidence for such a scam ever having taken place, judging by Stephanus’ track-record, it does not seem implausible.</p> <p><strong>Remembering Neaera</strong></p> <p>Reading through the long, complex and damnatory speech of Apollodorus, we risk losing sight of the woman at the centre of it. Caught amid petty politics, sex scandals, and personal vendettas is a woman who becomes peripheral to the machismo being played out in court.</p> <p>Yet, somewhat ironically, this is the only ancient source we have that records not only Neaera and the life she was forced to lead – but the life of a hetaira from infancy, girlhood, middle-age and, ultimately, past her "use by” date.</p> <p>Had she not been taken to court as part of the factional fighting of ancient Athens, had she not had her reputation annihilated so publicly, we would have never known about Neaera.</p> <p>Were it not for Apollodorus and his ancient version of “slut-shaming”, Neaera’s story would have been lost.</p> <p>But it hasn’t been lost. Somewhere, amid the male rhetoric, her story endures. Unfortunately, her voice is not preserved. All we can read in the speech, “Against Neaera” are the voices of men; her prosecutor and the witnesses he calls to the stand.</p> <p>Ironically, these testimonies and accusations - so casually introduced in ancient Athens, but received so differently today - emphasise the inhumanity of the sex trade in an antiquity too often and too unthinkingly valorised.</p> <p>The document known as “Against Neaera” is the only record we have of this (almost) hidden woman. It prompts us to remember. And it’s important to remember Neaera.</p> <p><em>Written by Marguerite Johnson. Republished with permission from <a href="https://theconversation.com/hidden-women-of-history-neaera-the-athenian-child-slave-raised-to-be-a-courtesan-126840">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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