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A life in pictures: 5 facts about Andrea Bocelli

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Andrea Bocelli is one of the world’s most well known and beloved tenors in the world. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Italian singer, songwriter and record producer turned 61 on Sunday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are five facts about the legendary Italian celebrity. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">1. It is well known Bocelli is blind. He was diagnosed with glaucoma in his early childhood which was the result of a sad football accident when he was 12-years-old. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">2. Bocelli’s became a name to remember when Luciano Pavarotti was handed a demo tape of him singing by Zucchero, an Italian rock star. The two opera singers were then invited to perform together on Zucchero’s tour and together they performed a beautiful rendition of </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Miserere</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">3. He married his wife, Veronica Berti in 2014. They live together with their children in a former hotel in Forte dei Marmi.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">4. In 1994, Bocelli performed for the pope for the first time.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">5. Also in 1998, Bocelli made his opera debut in Puccini’s </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">La Bohemeat Teatro Comunale</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> in Cagliari. He beautifully played the role of Rodolfo.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll through the gallery above to see Andrea Bocelli’s life in pictures. </span></p>

Art

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“Extreme racism”: TV host’s appalling comments about Serena Williams

<p>A Romanian TV host has received heavy criticism after a shocking racial slur aimed at Serena Williams was made on air. </p> <p>Radu Branciu said on his evening show during the US Open he found Serena Williams to “look exactly like one of those monkeys at the zoo with the red asses”. </p> <p>“If monkeys wore trousers, they’d look exactly like Serena Williams does on the court,” he said.</p> <p>The National Council for Combating Discrimination in Bucharest has condemned Banciu’s comments.</p> <p>“The governing board shows that slavery of people of colour was based, among other things, on their comparison with monkeys,” a press release said.</p> <p>“As a result, such statements express a form of extreme racism.”</p> <p>Banciu was fined $2,700 however it doesn’t seem like the TV host will lose his job. </p> <p>This isn’t the first time Serena has faced racism at the hands of the media. </p> <p>The<span> </span><em>Herald Sun<span> </span></em>gained criticism in Australia and the U.S after the infamous US Open final in 2018 with a cartoon depiction of Serena which many labelled inappropriate and racist. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Australia's media watchdog finds cartoon of <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/SerenaWilliams?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#SerenaWilliams</a> did not breach standards. <a href="https://t.co/a6BgIWFLWB">https://t.co/a6BgIWFLWB</a> <a href="https://t.co/CpWTVTc87Y">pic.twitter.com/CpWTVTc87Y</a></p> — ABC Grandstand (@abcgrandstand) <a href="https://twitter.com/abcgrandstand/status/1099806603681751040?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 24, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>However, the cartoon was deemed by the Australian media watchdog in a “highly animated tantrum”. </p> <p>"Specifically, concern was expressed that the cartoon depicted Ms Williams with large lips, a broad flat nose, a wild afro-styled ponytail hairstyle different to that worn by Ms Williams during the match, and positioned in an ape-like pose," the Australian Press Council said.</p> <p>The Council noted the publication “failed to take reasonable steps to avoid causing substantial offence, distress or prejudice without sufficient justification in the public interest.”</p>

TV

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BBC issues apology to Prince Harry over “seriously offensive” neo-Nazi image

<p>The BBC has issued an apology to Prince Harry after they published a confronting image of him from a neo-Nazi social media group without warning.</p> <p>The news outlet came under fire after they released an image showing the royal with a gun to his head, with text calling him a “race traitor”. Shortly after, a complaint was lodged amid safety concerns for the royal family.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/au" target="_blank"><em>The Guardian</em></a>, a spokesperson raised “serious security concerns” for the Duke and “caused his family great distress specifically while his wife was nearly five months pregnant”.</p> <p>The image was shared on a far-right platform, and showed blood splattered over the father-of-one. The creator placed a swastika over the 35-year-old and captioned it: “See ya later race traitor. #racetraitor.”</p> <p>The BBC originally rejected the complaint, justifying the use of the image as public interest. But they’ve now changed their tune, issuing an apology for failing to warn the Duke and Duchess of Sussex before the report was published.</p> <p>The media corporation said it should have considered the impact of publishing “seriously offensive material”.</p> <p>“We need to be vigilant in balancing the impact on individuals against the wider good which may be served by publication,” read the statement.</p> <p>Addressing a letter to Harry, the BBC said it was working to strengthen its guidance on the use of possibly offensive content.</p> <p>Harry’s spokesperson responded: “His Royal Highness welcomes the letter from the BBC relation to the shocking image published by<span> </span><em>BBC News</em><span> </span>last year as part of a report on the activities of a British new-Nazi group with links in the US.</p> <p>“His Royal Highness raised the issue with Ofcom about the rebroadcasting of this racist image due to his concerns that hateful and dangerous propaganda had been spread globally by the world’s most important public service broadcaster. Due to the credibility of the BBC, their choice to publicise this material created an open door for all other media to reproduce it.”</p> <p>The statement then went on to say that Harry was completely against the decision of the image being published in the first place.</p>

News

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Queen “fuming” over David Cameron's tell-all memoir

<p>The former British Prime Minister David Cameron has landed himself in hot water with the monarchy over his admission about his relationship with the Queen in his new memoir.</p> <p>The politicians<span> </span>For The Record<span> </span>was published on Thursday, causing a stir as it is the first time the former PM has spoken about the 2016 Brexit referendum and its aftermath. </p> <p>The lengthy autobiography, spanning over 703 pages, has dished out a number of juicy details from his six years in office - from the internal workings of the Conservative Party to the rise of ISIS. </p> <p>However, what left the Queen “displeased” in Mr Cameron’s work was his comments about the 93-year-old Monarch. </p> <p>In a BBC interview which accompanied publication, Mr Cameron said he sought the sovereign’s guidance and help ahead of the 2014 Scottish independence vote. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7830978/david-cameron-queen-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6fde0c8726684ab6a241a887ded780e8" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Queen Elizabeth greeting David Cameron, 2010. </em></p> <p>He said he’d asked the Queen whether she could “raise an eyebrow” about what leaving the UK might mean for the Scots.</p> <p>According to Mr Cameron, the discussion with the Queen’s officials was not “anything that would be in any way improper … but just a raising of the eyebrow even … a quarter of an inch.”</p> <p>A royal source stated conversations between Queen Elizabeth and the PM being made public would “serve no one’s interests”.</p> <p>“It makes it very hard for the relationship to thrive,” the palace source said.</p> <p>This wasn’t the only detail to slip about the private affairs between the 93-year-old and the former PM. </p> <p>Mr Cameron wrote details about holidaying at the Queen’s “summer haven,”<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="/travel/travel-trouble/a-full-royal-household-how-is-balmoral-castle-handling-all-their-guests" target="_blank">Balmoral Castl</a>e - a place where she would drive at “breakneck speed” across the countryside. </p> <p>His book also said Prince Philip would host barbecues and flip burgers, before cleaning up himself. </p> <p>“Literally, the Queen of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth Realms topping up your drinks, clearing up your plates and washing up,” he wrote.</p> <p>The politician revealed the key preparations for the famous “audience” the Queen has held with every Prime Minister since Winston Churchill. </p> <p>“One: always check the BBC headlines, in case you’ve missed something (I usually turned up just after the 6 o’clock news, and in any event, she is phenomenally well-informed).</p> <p>“Two: always check what’s going on in the horseracing world. A quick call to Tom Goff, my racing expert friend, would bring me up to speed on whether one of the Queen’s horses had won that week, or another had recently had a foal. Her knowledge of the turf is prodigious.</p> <p>“During a separate conversation, the week after my father died, the Queen said how sorry she was, and asked if his horse was running at Windsor that evening. It was. I had absolutely no idea about it, and was completely lost for words.”</p> <p>Mr Cameron added Her Majesty was “better informed than most politicians” and wrote he would always leave with a “spring in his step”. </p> <p>The former country’s leader admitted in an interview with John Humphry, some of his comments about the monarch - particularly the one where he said the Queen “purred down the line” to him after informing her Scotland had voted no to independence - was a “terrible mistake”. </p>

Travel Trouble

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Why Princess Eugenie’s engagement ring is so special to the royal family

<p>While it is true Duchess Kate’s engagement ring is the most iconic and special pieces of jewellery to the royal family, it is not the only deeply meaningful one. </p> <p>While the Duchess of Cambridge - who announced alongside her then-fiance Prince William back in 2011 of their engagement - had an heirloom passed down from Princess Diana, Princess Eugenie has a special connection to her own ring. </p> <p>The pink centre stone made of large pink sapphire and surrounded by a halo of diamonds is a special nod to her parents, the Duke and Duchess of York. </p> <p>The stone which is called padparadscha sapphire, also referred to as a “lotus blossom sapphire,” is an incredibly rare stone that takes on a gorgeous hue from the red and yellow in the gem. </p> <p>The stone itself is estimated at a cost of AU$12,000 which is not including the intricate diamonds which makes up the halo. </p> <p>The design carries significant weight to Princess Eugenie, as it bears a striking resemblance to her mother’s very own engagement ring. </p> <p>The royal’s husband Jack Brooksbank designed the ring for his wife while keeping in mind his mother-in-law’s special jewellery collection and took inspiration from the piece Prince Andrew used when proposing to Sarah Ferguson in 1986. </p> <p>Fergie's beautiful ring was a Garrard &amp; Co-design which featured 10 stunning diamonds surrounding a large ruby.</p> <p>At the time, it was considered a beautiful contrast to that of Princess Diana’s own engagement ring, which was also designed by Garrard and had a stark blue sapphire. </p> <p>The pair were close pals for many years and it was just one of the many touching ways their different personalities complimented each other so well. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Princess Eugenie’s engagement ring and how it compares to other members of the royal family.</p>

beauty & Style

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Duchess Kate is pretty in polka dots on visit to children’s centre

<p>The Duchess of Cambridge has stepped out Autumn ready at a surprise engagement at the Sunshine House Children and Young People’s Health and Development Centre in London.</p> <p>Opting for a long-sleeved polka dot blouse, which she paired with cropped, wide-legged trousers, the mother-of-three looked picture perfect in her chic attire.</p> <p>Her new hair colour, which she debuted earlier this month while dropping Princess Charlotte off on her first day of school, was styled in her signature blowout.</p> <p>According to Kensington Palace, Kate visited Sunshine House to learn more about the Southwark Family Nurse Partnership National unit, a program in which “parents are partnered with a specially trained family nurse, who visits them regularly from early pregnancy until their child is two.”</p> <p>The 37-year-old met with the team at Sunshine House, which supports young mothers and parents. And her visit was specifically to “further her research and engagement with the Early Years sector,” said Kensington Palace.</p> <p>Recently, Kate has started to focus her attention of supporting families, mothers and young children.</p> <p>The Duchess has a “really strong interest therefore in how you can support mothers and fathers in the earliest months of life of a child and during pregnancy in order to make sure that brain architecture was well supported,” Kate Stanley, the Director or Strategy for the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children to<span> </span><em>People<span> </span></em>magazine.</p> <p>“And a real compassion about the challenges of that and desire to understand the experiences of the families that some of the people around the table work with.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Kate’s chic ensemble.</p>

Caring

News

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"US Navy has officially acknowledged that UFOs are real": Leaked footage goes viral

<p>A Navy official has confirmed videos of unidentified flying objects as real, however the footage was not authorised to be released to be public. </p> <p>Spokesman for the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare, Joseph Gradisher told<span> </span><a href="https://time.com/5680192/navy-confirms-ufo-videos-real/"><em>TIME</em><span> </span></a>the three widely-shared footage captured “Unidentified Aerial Phenomena”. </p> <p>Gradisher told also confirmed the information to<span> </span><a href="https://www.theblackvault.com/documentarchive/u-s-navy-confirms-videos-depict-unidentified-aerial-phenomena-not-cleared-for-public-release/?fbclid=IwAR3L18F_eN0aPwb2WKXLr3Zj7j2-XVqJXjCeA8xuCtEeUIBOcSWNTLsCoLE"><em>The Black Vault,</em></a><em><span> </span></em>a website dedicated to declassified government documents in the United States. </p> <p>“The Navy designates the objects contained in these videos as unidentified aerial phenomena,” Gradisher said. </p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tf1uLwUTDA0" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>“The reason why I’m talking about it is to drive home the seriousness of this issue,” Gradisher says. “The more I talk, the more our aviators and all services are more willing to come forward.”</p> <p>The spokesman hopes conversation sparked will lead to UAP’s being “destigmatised”. </p> <p>The viral footage caused a sensation online after<span> </span><em>The Washington Post<span> </span></em>and<span> </span><em>The New York Times<span> </span></em>reported on three videos obtained and released by the<span> </span><em>To The Stars Academy Of Arts And Science</em>. </p> <p>In one video, two navy pilots are recorded tracking an unidentified object flying off the East Coast in 2015. </p> <p>“Wow! What is that, man? Look at that flying!” one of the pilots can be heard saying. </p> <p>Former military intelligence official Luis Elizondo said there is more information the public does not have access to. </p> <p>“My personal belief is that there is very compelling evidence that we may not be alone,” Elizondo, who is now part of the TTS Academy, said to<span> </span><em>CNN<span> </span></em>in 2017. </p> <p><em>To the Stars Academy of Arts and Science<span> </span></em>is a self-described “public benefit corporation: co-founded by vocalist and guitarist for rock band, Blink-182, Tom Delonge. </p>

News

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The identity of baby Archie's godmother has finally been revealed

<p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been determined to do things differently since the beginning of their marriage, and that includes keeping their four-month-old Archie as far away from the public eye as possible.</p> <p>However, despite their best efforts, they can’t seem to beat the nosy public, as a royal correspondent has figured out Archie’s godmother.</p> <p>The godparents of Archie were another detail that was kept private, but a royal correspondent says she figured out who was Archie’s godmother at the launch of the mother-of-one's clothing line for Smart Works in September.</p> <p>"I was there at the launch and spotted in the audience Isabel May," Katie Nicholl told <em>Entertainment Tonight</em>. "Who is in fact Archie's Godmother although that's been kept very, very quiet.</p> <p>"She's a great friend of the Duchess' and of course she would have known all about this launch," she continued.</p> <p>A source told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7460293/Is-Isabel-Archies-godmother.html" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Mail</em></a> that they keep their relationship “very quiet”.</p> <p>"Izzy is one of Meghan's closest and dearest friends and she values her friendship so very much," they said. "She helped Meghan adjust to life in London when she moved here, and Meghan relied on her a lot. They totally support each other and, like any other female friends, enjoy social activities together."</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Archie’s godmother as well as pictures of baby Archie.</p>

News

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Duchess Meghan releases never-before-seen Archie photo in sweet birthday message to Prince Harry

<p>The Duchess of Sussex has posted a heartfelt tribute to mark Prince Harry’s 35th birthday.</p> <p>Taking to Instagram to shower praise upon her husband on his special day, she said the royal was “the best husband and most amazing dad”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2bDdAMlxgY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2bDdAMlxgY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Wishing a very happy birthday to His Royal Highness Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex! ••••••••••••••• A birthday message from The Duchess of Sussex: • “Your service to the causes you care so deeply for inspires me every day. You are the best husband and most amazing dad to our son. We love you ❤️Happiest birthday!” • Colour Photos © PA Images BW photo: Chris Allerton © SussexRoyal</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sussexroyal/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> The Duke and Duchess of Sussex</a> (@sussexroyal) on Sep 15, 2019 at 12:01am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The 37-year-old posted a collage of the Prince, featuring a photograph with his mum, Princess Diana. The message read: “Wishing a very happy birthday to His Royal Highness Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex!</p> <p>“A birthday message from The Duchess of Sussex: ‘Your service to the causes you care so deeply for inspires me every day.</p> <p>“You are the best husband and most amazing dad to our son. We love you.</p> <p>“Happiest birthday!”</p> <p>The collage also included a never-before-seen photograph of the doting parents at baby Archie’s christening.</p> <p>When it was Meghan’s birthday last month, Prince Harry posted an equally touching message.</p> <p>“Happy Birthday to my amazing wife. Thank you for joining me on this adventure! – Love, H,” it read.</p>

News

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“I was uncomfortable”: Zara Tindall explains her strange demeanour at Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan’s wedding

<p>Over tens of millions tuned in around the world to watch the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on May 19, 2019. </p> <p>However, there is one royal who said she felt “uncomfortable” while sitting on the sidelines watching her cousin wed. </p> <p>Photos of Zara Tindall, the Queen’s eldest grandchild and Princess Anne’s daughter,  painted her looking slightly uneasy during the special service at St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle last year. </p> <p>Zara explained the obvious discomfort on her face while talking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/family/parenting/zara-tindall-going-back-work-8-weeks-has-made-better-happier/" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Telegraph. </em></a></p> <p>"I was uncomfortable! My bum sort of slid over either side [of the pew] and Lena kicked the hell out of me for an hour," she said of her youngest daughter who was born in June 2018. </p> <p>"It just wasn't comfy at all, and it probably showed on my face."</p> <p>Tindall said she found it particularly difficult to be at ease while during Bishop Michael Curry’s speech, which lasted a little over 13 minutes. </p> <p>"It was just the general amount of time everything was taking," she said.</p> <p>"I think my face was probably caught the point when I thought, 'Right he's going to finish now' and then he went off on another little story and it was like, "Really?'"</p> <p>The royal and her husband welcomed their second daughter a month after the royal wedding, on June 18. </p> <p>Their eldest daughter, Mia, is five and Lena is now 15 months old.</p> <p>The couple sadly suffered two miscarriages before successfully welcoming their second daughter to the world. </p> <p>Zara Phillips is an equestrian and has competed in the Olympics - going on to win silver in 2012. She and former footballer Mike Tindall married in 2011.</p> <p>At birth, Zara was sixth in line to the British throne and is now 18th.</p>

News

Travel

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9 forbidden places no one will ever be allowed to visit

<p>Might as well leave these ones off your bucket list, as you’re never going to get anywhere near them.</p> <p><strong>Snake Island, Brazil</strong></p> <p>Brazil’s Ilha da Queimada Grande – dubbed Snake Island – is home to a dense population of one of the world’s deadliest snakes. The golden lancehead viper’s venom is so poisonous that it melts human flesh around the bite, and some claim there’s one snake per square metre in certain areas. For safety reasons, the Brazilian government doesn’t allow visitors, and a doctor is required on the team of any research visits.</p> <p><strong>U.N. buffer zone, Cyprus</strong></p> <p>Turkish troops invaded Cyprus in 1974, sparking a civil war between the Greek and Turkish inhabitants. When the fighting ended in a ceasefire, the United Nations took control of a no-man’s land “buffer zone” in the country’s capital, Nicosia. There, walls separate the Turkish community in the North (which Turkey, but no other countries, recognises as a separate state) from the Greek community in the South. Behind the walls are abandoned homes and businesses. Some “Civil Use Areas” allow civilians, but other areas have been practically untouched for decades. Don’t miss these four fascinating facts about Turkey.</p> <p><strong>Tomb of the Qin Shi Huang, China</strong></p> <p>Farmers discovered the tomb of China’s first emperor, Qin Shi Huang, in 1974, and archaeologists have since found about 2,000 clay soldiers and expect there are another 8,000 still uncovered. Despite the excavation, the Chinese government has forbidden archaeologists from touching the central tomb with Qin Shi Huang’s body, which has been closed since 210 B.C.E. The decision is partly to respect the dead, but also from fear that current technology isn’t up to snuff for excavating without damaging the ancient artefacts. The whole thing is reminiscent of the mysterious chamber scientists recently found in the Great Pyramid of Giza.</p> <p><strong>Area 51, Nevada</strong></p> <p>The U.S. government wouldn’t admit Area 51 existed until 1992 documents released in 2013 mentioned the Nevada military base. Officials still haven’t revealed what type of research goes on, though conspiracy theorists claim alien activity is studied there. You can get a birds-eye view of the spot on Google Maps, but the sprawling desert makes it hard for anyone to sneak in, and security is tight. Even visitors with security clearances reach Area 51 on private planes that keep the windows drawn until landing. This is only one of many ways Area 51 stays so secretive.</p> <p><strong>North Sentinel Island, India</strong></p> <p>In the Bay of Bengal sit the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, most of which are Indian territories. The Sentinelese tribe of North Sentinel Island is thought to have been there for 60,000 years, and it’s one of the last communities in the world to remain totally isolated from outside societies. In 2006, the boat of two fishermen drifted to the shallows of North Sentinel Island, where the Sentinelese killed the pair. Since then, there have been other reports of the tribe shooting arrows at passing helicopters. Because the Sentinelese haven’t been in contact with the diseases others have built resistance to, contact with outsiders could prove deadly to the tribe, so the Indian government has agreed not to attempt any contact.</p> <p><strong>Vatican Secret Archives, Vatican City</strong></p> <p>Housed in a heavily protected area of the Vatican are 85 kilometres of shelves containing documents relating to the Catholic Church, dating as far back as the eighth century. Some artefacts include a letter from Mary Queen of Scots begging Pop Sixtus V to save her from beheading and documents of Martin Luther’s excommunication. The archive opened to researchers in 1881, but it isn’t easy to get a pass inside. Researchers who apply for access can only have access for up to three months, and no more than 60 scholars are allowed in at once.</p> <p><strong>Fort Knox, Kentucky</strong></p> <p>The Fort Knox vaults, home to most U.S. gold reserves, have been deemed the most heavily guarded place on the planet. No single person can make it into the vault; several combinations need to be entered to gain access, and various staff members know just one. Even they wouldn’t be able to get in without the help of their colleagues.</p> <p><strong>Svalbard Seed Vault</strong></p> <p>Plunging around 100 metres into a mountain between Norway and the North Pole, the Svalbard Seed Vault holds a massive collection of seeds in a vault designed to withstand manmade and natural disasters. If a major catastrophe happened, the 890,000 preserved seed samples from almost every country in the world would ensure diverse food options. The vault opens its doors just a few times a year, and a limited number of depositors are allowed inside to deliver the seeds to its shelves. Still, climate change might test how effective the Svalbard Seed Vault is. In May 2017, melted permafrost made it inside, though none of the water – which froze inside – reached the vault with the leaves.</p> <p><strong>Lascaux Cave, France</strong></p> <p>The prehistoric paintings in the Lascaux cave were found in 1940, and it became a tourist site after World War II. The carbon monoxide from visitors’ breath started to damage the cave paintings, which are now named a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the cave closed to the public in 1963. Replicas opened for business after it closed, but only preservationists and researchers are allowed in the original.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Marissa Laliberte</span>. This article first appeared in </em><span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/10-forbidden-places-no-one-will-ever-be-allowed-visit" target="_blank"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V" target="_blank"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

International Travel

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You can now stay in Downton Abbey’s iconic Highclere Castle

<p>The iconic castle from hit TV show<span> </span><em>Downton Abbey</em><span> </span>is now available to rent,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.airbnb.com.au/rooms/38373507" target="_blank">courtesy of Airbnb.</a></p> <p>The Highclere Castle will be available for a one-off stay for two lucky fans of the show for just $270.</p> <p>The experience is being offered as the motion picture<span> </span><em>Downton Abbey</em>hits cinemas.</p> <p>The castle covers 100,000 square feet and has a total of 300 rooms that showcase the history of the building.</p> <p>The lucky winners get to explore iconic rooms that they know from the show, including the Drawing Room and the Library.</p> <p>They also will enjoy drinking cocktails in the Saloon, followed by a traditional dinner with the Earl and Countess of Carnarvon in the State Dining Room. It is here you'll be waited on by your own butler.</p> <p>The next day, you’ll be treated to a private tour of the extensive grounds.</p> <p>Lady Carnarvon has described the experience offered as “truly unique”.</p> <p>"It's an absolute privilege and pleasure to call Highclere Castle my home and I am delighted to be able to share it on Airbnb for a truly unique stay," she said in a statement.</p> <p>"Highclere Castle has been in the Carnarvon family since 1679 and has an incredibly rich history. I am passionate about the stories and heritage of Highclere Castle, and I am looking forward to welcoming our future guests."</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see what the historic Highclere Castle looks like.</p>

International Travel

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“My dear Prime Minister”: Alan Jones’ apology letter to Jacinda Ardern revealed

<p>Australian radio host Alan Jones said he “did not intend to suggest any violence” towards Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in an apology letter.</p> <p>On August 15, Jones was addressing Ardern’s meeting with Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison at the Pacific Islands Forum on his breakfast show when the broadcaster suggested Morrison should “shove a sock down her throat” to silence her climate change views, and that Ardern should be “backhanded”.</p> <p>The comments sparked widespread backlash, with <a href="https://mumbrella.com.au/acma-receives-over-100-complaints-about-alan-jones-jacinda-ardern-comments-598626">over 100 complaints made to the Australian Communications and Media Authority</a> against the radio station 2GB. More than 100 advertisers – including Coles, Bing Lee and the Commonwealth Bank – took a stance against the program.</p> <p>In a letter obtained by <em><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2019/sep/19/my-dear-prime-minister-alan-joness-apology-letter-to-jacinda-ardern-revealed">The Guardian</a></em>, Jones said his comments “didn’t come out quite as I intended”.</p> <p>“My dear Prime Minister,” the letter read.</p> <p>“I would like to assure you that I did not intend to suggest any violence towards you.</p> <p>“While I may disagree with your stance on climate change, I would never wish any harm to you.</p> <p>“I had meant to say ‘put a sock in it’ and my actual words were taken literally by some who took offence on your behalf.”</p> <p>Jones then invited Ardern to do an on-air interview to discuss the climate change issue. “I would also like to extend a standing invitation to participate in an interview on my programme,” he wrote.</p> <p>“Again, my sincerest apologies and please know I wish you and your family only the best.”</p> <p>Last month, Ardern told AM show that Jones had a right to his opinions.</p> <p>“I don’t have an opinion on every single person who says something about me,” Ardern said. “And particularly given this is an Australian commentator, we’ve got enough of our own to occupy my time without me having to jump into something that an Aussie says.”</p> <p>Macquarie Media chairman Russell Tate said <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/alan-jones-contract-will-be-torn-up-if-he-repeats-ardern-comments-employer-says-20190817-p52i54.html">any repeat offences would lead to Jones’ contract being terminated</a>.</p> <p>“Notwithstanding his apologies, I have … discussed the matter with Alan and advised him that any recurrence of commentary of this nature will result in the termination of his contract,” Tate said.</p>

Travel Trouble

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Right Royal cuppa: The Buckingham Palace builder who gave his tea order to The Queen by mistake

<p>A builder got more than he bargained for after putting in a request for tea.</p> <p>The workman was dismantling a desk at Buckingham Palace and was out of view when a “well-spoken” woman asked if he wanted some tea.</p> <p>According to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9956917/queen-made-tea-buckingham-palace/" target="_blank">The Sun</a></em>, he replied: “Yeah. In a mug. Two sugars. Builders’ tea.</p> <p>“I don’t want any of that nonsense I had the last time I was here, all that fine china and all that saucer stuff.”</p> <p>The woman returned and said: “I’ve put your tea on the table here.”</p> <p>The builder looked up and saw the Queen leaving the room.</p> <p>Little did the builder know that the woman he had spoken to was the Queen.</p> <p>The story is told in Channel 5’s four-part series<span> </span><em>Secrets of the Royal Palaces</em><span> </span>by Kevin Andrews, the Queen Mother’s upholsterer.</p> <p>Former palace chef Darren McGardey has previously said that the Queen’s favourite way to have tea is Twinings Earl Grey tea with a splash of milk and no sugar.</p> <p>Twinings has had a long association with the monarchy, as they’ve had a royal warrant since 1837.</p> <p>Royal butler Grant Harrold shared more light in 2018 on the Queen’s tea habits. Apparently she favours Earl Grey and Assam.</p> <p>"I am sure the Queen enjoys her [tea] the traditional way, made with tea leaves in a teapot and poured into a fine bone china teacup. She will also use a strainer," he said, according to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://honey.nine.com.au/royals/queen-makes-tea-for-builder/2f61660c-53b8-4f26-8b7c-ef300f33c238" target="_blank">Nine Honey</a></em>.</p>

International Travel

Health

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10 easy steps to improve your health

<p>Congrats on wanting to lead a healthier life. The world is your oyster so why not enjoy it for as long as you possibly can!</p> <p>With so many popular opinions on what a healthy diet is, it can be hard to separate fact from fad. <br />Let’s get down to basics and look at the top 10 tips that will grant you a better quality of life.</p> <p><strong>1. Hydrate</strong><br />Did you know the human body is 80% water? – so it’s no surprise we need to replenish this magical liquid throughout the day. Drink 2-3 Litres a day and even more if it’s hot outside. If you find it difficult to remember to drink then have a big glass immediately when you awake in the morning and carry around a bottle of filtered water with you wherever you go throughout the day.  </p> <p><strong>2. Eat good fats</strong><br />Eating fat won’t make you fat but choose the healthy fats such as egg yolk, avocado, nuts, seeds, <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/healthy-eating-series-the-mediterranean-diet.aspx">cold pressed olive oil</a>, nut butter and coconut oil which is great for cooking too. A good rule of thumb is to never overheat cooking oils and always go for the local pasture-raised chicken eggs. Also, some moderation is required for eating nuts due to their caloric density so settle for a handful of unsalted, unroasted nuts a day if you can. Have you considered <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/healthy-eating-series-why-you-should-eat-like-a-caveman.aspx">eating like a caveman</a>?</p> <p><strong>3. Stay away from soft drinks and sweetened fruit juices</strong><br />The PH value in coke is 3 – not far from the PH value of battery acid which is 0. Therefore, it's no wonder that soft drinks create an acidic environment in your body making it easier for inflammations to set in. Chronic inflammation is the leading cause of many lifestyle diseases of the 21st century. So, think again before reaching for that refreshing beverage.</p> <p><strong>4. Fruit</strong> <br />It's nature’s medicine, full of antioxidants and cleansing for the body. The key to weight management is to go for <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/pick-the-right-fruit-for-better-health.aspx">fruits with a low glycaemic index</a> such as berries, apples, pears and grapefruit. A few serves a day will suffice. Choose organic with fruits that have a large edible surface area then you can be less strict with plants that have inedible skin like bananas and melons. </p> <p><strong>5. Exercise</strong><br />Exercise can transform your life providing a <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/top-tips-for-overcoming-the-blues.aspx">brighter outlook</a> for the future to come. Adults who include at least 150 minutes of physical activity in their routines each week live longer than those who don't. <br />Whether it’s in the gym or a walk along the beach, it all ads sand to the hourglass. Here are some ideas on how to <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/exercise/make-fitness-fun.aspx">make fitness fun</a>. </p> <p><strong>6. Sleep</strong><br />You may not want to sleep your life away but plenty of quality sleep can in fact prolong your life and will add to the quality of your waking hours as well. <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/are-you-cheating-yourself-of-sleep.aspx">A good night’s sleep</a> has a tremendous impact on your overall health and wellbeing. If you are having sleeping difficulties, talk to your GP or pharmacist. There will be a solution for you.</p> <p><strong>7. Vegetables </strong><br />Forget about your meat, potato and peas. Instead, think fresh! Eat a large variety of veggies, either raw or keep the cooking process to a minimum to preserve the life giving nutrients. Consuming vegetables helps promote alkalinity in your body, boosting immune function and reducing inflammation in the body.</p> <p><strong>8. Fun </strong><br />Being social, caring for other humans and having a good old laugh is potion for the soul. <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/work/employment/volunteering-holds-the-key-to-self-fulfillment.aspx">Have you considered volunteering?</a></p> <p><strong>9. Supplements </strong> <br />Are you missing out on crucial nutrients? Due to preferences or intolerences you may be missing out on key vitamins and minerals. Multivitamin, Fish oil, spirulina, pro biotics or protein supplements. Consult your GP or local pharmacist. </p> <p><strong>10. Sensible indulgences </strong> <br />We all strive for balance in our lives and the 80/20 rule may help you. Make superior food choices 80% of the time and enjoy sensible indulgences for the remaining 20. Good quality red wine and <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/flourless-orange-chocolate-cake.aspx">dark chocolate</a> with min 75% cacao offer numerous health benefits, making them superior choices. Best news you’ve heard all day right!<br /><br />Now, go on and use these tips in your daily life and reap the benefits of a more vibrant and vital body.</p> <p><em>Republished by <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/10-steps-to-improve-your-health.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Caring

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Mother and daughter team are close to discovering a vaccine for Alzheimer's

<p>A mother and daughter have worked together to start a biotech company that has developed what could be the world’s first Alzheimer’s vaccine.</p> <p>Dr. Chang Yi Wang, Ph.D. is a prolific bio-inventor who teamed up with her daughter Mei Mei Hu and son-in-law Louis Reese to create United Neuroscience four years ago.</p> <p>Mei Mei urged her mother to focus all of her efforts on working on an Alzheimer’s vaccine through the company.</p> <p>In January, 2019, United Neuroscience Inc announced the first promising results from a pilot clinical trial on an Alzheimer’s vaccine called UB-311 in 42 human patients.</p> <p>“We were able to generate some antibodies in all patients, which is unusual for vaccines,” Yi tells <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wired.co.uk/article/alzheimers-vaccine-united-neuroscience" target="_blank">Wired</a></em>. </p> <p>“We’re talking about almost a 100 percent response rate. So far, we have seen an improvement in three out of three measurements of cognitive performance for patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease.”</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5Kx17SfoBQ8"></iframe></div> <p>The vaccine contains synthetic versions of amino acid chains that trigger the antibodies to attack Alzheimer’s protein in the blood.</p> <p>What makes this vaccine different is that it attacks the protein without any side effects.</p> <p>According to Yi’s research team, the vaccine can delay the onset of the disease by five years.</p> <p>“You’d want to see larger numbers, but this looks like a beneficial treatment,” Aston University Research Centre for Healthy Ageing director James Brown was quoted as saying, according to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://nextshark.com/alzheimers-vaccine-mother-daughter/" target="_blank">NextShark</a></em>. </p> <p>“This looks like a silver bullet that can arrest or improve symptoms and, if it passes the next phase, it could be the best chance we’ve got.”</p> <p><em>Photo credit:<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wired.co.uk/article/alzheimers-vaccine-united-neuroscience" target="_blank">Wired, Benedict Evans</a><span> </span></em></p>

Mind

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One skill that doesn't deteriorate with age

<p>When Toni Morrison <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/aug/06/toni-morrison-author-and-pulitzer-winner-dies-aged-88">died on Aug. 5</a>, the world lost one of its most influential literary voices.</p> <p>But Morrison wasn’t a literary wunderkind. <em><a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11337.The_Bluest_Eye?ac=1&amp;from_search=true">The Bluest Eye</a></em>, Morrison’s first novel, wasn’t published until she was 39. And her last, <em>God Help the Child</em>, appeared when she was 84. Morrison published four novels, four children’s books, many essays and other works of nonfiction after the age of 70.</p> <p>Morrison isn’t unique in this regard. Numerous writers produce significant work well into their 70s, 80s and even their 90s. Herman Wouk, for example, was 97 when he published his final novel, <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/14546758-the-lawgiver?ac=1&amp;from_search=true"><em>The Lawgiver</em></a>.</p> <p>Such literary feats underscore an important point: Age doesn’t seem to diminish our capacity to speak, write and learn new vocabulary. Our eyesight may dim and our recall may falter, but, by comparison, our ability to produce and to comprehend language is well preserved into older adulthood.</p> <p>In our forthcoming book, <em><a href="https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/changing-minds-1">Changing Minds: How Aging Affects Language and How Language Affects Aging</a></em>, my co-author, Richard M. Roberts, and I highlight some of the latest research that has emerged on language and aging. For those who might fear the loss of their language abilities as they grow older, there’s plenty of good news to report.</p> <p><strong>Language mastery is a lifelong journey</strong></p> <p>Some aspects of our language abilities, such as our knowledge of word meanings, actually improve during middle and late adulthood.</p> <p><a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/10862969509547878">One study</a>, for example, found that older adults living in a retirement community near Chicago had an average vocabulary size of over 21,000 words. The researchers also studied a sample of college students and found that their average vocabularies included only about 16,000 words.</p> <p><a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Gitit_Kave/publication/271333928_Doubly_Blessed_Older_Adults_Know_More_Vocabulary_and_Know_Better_What_They_Know/links/5665d0f308ae192bbf92726d/Doubly-Blessed-Older-Adults-Know-More-Vocabulary-and-Know-Better-What-They-Know.pdf">In another study</a>, older adult speakers of Hebrew – with an average age of 75 – performed better than younger and middle-aged participants on discerning the meaning of words.</p> <p>On the other hand, our language abilities sometimes function as a canary in the cognitive coal mine: They can be a sign of future mental impairment decades before such issues manifest themselves.</p> <p>In 1996, epidemiologist David Snowdon and a team of researchers <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Susan_Kemper/publication/14593027_Linguistic_Ability_in_Early_Life_and_Cognitive_Function_and_Alzheimer%27s_Disease_in_Late_Life_Findings_From_the_Nun_Study/links/0046351854821c5a35000000.pdf">studied</a> the writing samples of women who had become nuns. They found that the grammatical complexity of essays written by the nuns when they joined their religious order could predict which sisters would develop dementia several decades later. (Hundreds of nuns <a href="https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2010-aug-22-la-na-nuns-brains-20100822-story.html">have donated their brains to science</a>, and this allows for a conclusive diagnosis of dementia.)</p> <p>While Toni Morrison’s writing remained searingly clear and focused as she aged, other authors have not been as fortunate. The prose in Iris Murdoch’s final novel, “<a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/56089.Jackson_s_Dilemma">Jackson’s Dilemma</a>,” suggests some degree of cognitive impairment. Indeed, <a href="https://www.britannica.com/biography/Iris-Murdoch#ref664797">she died from dementia-related causes</a> four years after its publication.</p> <p><strong>Don’t put down that book</strong></p> <p>Our ability to read and write can be preserved well into older adulthood. Making use of these abilities is important, because reading and writing seem to prevent cognitive decline.</p> <p><a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbw076">Keeping a journal</a>, for example, has been shown to substantially reduce the risk of developing various forms of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>Reading fiction, meanwhile, has been associated with a longer lifespan. A <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.07.014">large-scale study</a> conducted by the Yale University School of Public Health found that people who read books for at least 30 minutes a day lived, on average, nearly two years longer than nonreaders. This effect persisted even after controlling for factors like gender, education and health. The researchers suggest that the imaginative work of constructing a fictional universe in our heads helps grease our cognitive wheels.</p> <p>Language is a constant companion during our life journey, so perhaps it’s no surprise that it’s interwoven into our health and our longevity. And researchers continue to make discoveries about the connections between language and aging. For example, <a href="http://eds.a.ebscohost.com/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=0&amp;sid=c96fe951-c06d-48e4-bf96-eb00c2f8f70e%40sdc-v-sessmgr01">a study published in July 2019</a> found that studying a foreign language in older adulthood improves overall cognitive functioning.</p> <p>A thread seems to run through most of the findings: In order to age well, it helps to keep writing, reading and talking.</p> <p>While few of us possess the gifts of a Toni Morrison, all of us stand to gain by continuing to flex our literary muscles.</p> <p><em>Written by Roger J. Kreuz and Richard M. Roberts. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/one-skill-that-doesnt-deteriorate-with-age-122613" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Mind

Lifestyle

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Listen up, young folk: Words of advice from care home residents goes viral

<p>Senior residents at a nursing home have gone viral after sharing their wisdom and advice for the younger generation on Facebook.</p> <p>St Clair Nursing Center in Missouri, US has helped pensioners share their messages to young people in its ‘advice of the day’ series.</p> <p>Since last month, the care home has been sharing pictures of the elderly residents holding a whiteboard with their name, age and unique insight.</p> <p>The initiative was created by activities manager Debbie Michael, who chose a resident to participate each day and took the pictures for the centre’s Facebook page.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FStClairNursingCenter%2Fphotos%2Fa.2179977855376867%2F2937791032928875%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="594" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>91-year-old resident Bob has captured the attention of people around the Internet with his advice: “Find someone to love, and keep on loving them”. His picture has gained more than 14,000 comments and 129,000 shares, and kickstarted a #BeLikeBob campaign with merchandise sales.</p> <p>81-year-old Rose advised the youth to “get a good education”, while 92-year-old Waunita encouraged everyone to “eat, drink and be merry”.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to read the advice from the residents.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/StClairNursingCenter" target="_blank">St. Clair Nursing Center</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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How to talk to your teen grandkids about drinking

<p>Sadly, you cannot shelter your child from a world made up of ingrained cultural norms and expectations, friendship groups that break the ‘rules’, socio-economic factors, and the media.</p> <p><strong>Why you should have the conversation</strong><br />Because children are brought up around people drinking alcohol at parties, celebrations, friends’ houses and all sorts of occasions, they tend to be naturally curious about it.</p> <p>Therefore, it is important to make sure they know the right information about alcohol and drinking, like how alcohol works in our system, what happens to the body and mind when you drink and the possible dangers of drinking too much, so they can be more informed and educated to make their own choices in the future.</p> <p><strong>The facts</strong><br />Statistics show that 86 per cent of Australian students have tried alcohol by age 14, with this figure increasing to 96 per cent by 17 years of age (White &amp; Hayman, 2006). Moreover, 22 per cent of 14 year olds who are current drinkers consume alcohol at levels exceeding the Australian Alcohol Guidelines, with this figure increasing through adolescence, and peaking at 44 per cent among 17 year olds.</p> <p><a href="https://medium.com/hellosundaymorning">Hello Sunday Morning’s</a> Health Coach and mother of two, Tehani, says it’s important to educate your kids by letting them know, “this is what you can expect, this is what you might see, this is what might happen,” and ask them how they would like to conduct themselves at a festival or party, and what their idea of fun looks like.</p> <p>Rather than saying, “This is what I think you should do,” give them ideas to achieve a goal that they have come up with on their own. Trying to find the right balance between protecting your child and giving them their own freedom isn’t easy. There’s a fine line between being overly controlling with your kids but also teaching them that they can go out and have fun without needing to get drunk.</p> <p><strong>When should you speak to them?</strong><br />Tehani suggests that having the conservation with kids about drinking should start from a young age, as children start to learn that actions have consequences, and because you as parents are not always going to be there to enforce rules.</p> <p>The Alcohol Education Trust found that at age 11, children see it as unacceptable to get drunk and 99 per cent don’t drink regularly, but age 13 is what they call “the tipping point”. Teenagers tend to shy away from talking and opening up to their parents at this time in their lives as they start to form their own opinions and find their own identity.</p> <p>Don’t make it harder for yourself, bring it up as a natural conversation when something relatable comes up and try to stay open and listen.</p> <p>A Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy report from a qualitative investigation of young people found that helpful communication results from this tactic. In the report, 59 boys and girls aged 13 to 15 years were interviewed, and many reported their parents talking openly and negotiating boundaries around their drinking. This approach appeared to be largely effective in helping them to develop a responsible approach to alcohol.</p> <p><strong>Should I let my kids drink alcohol at home before they are of age?</strong><br />Tehani believes that if you make drinking taboo it can then become a big deal when it’s finally allowable.</p> <p>“I don’t think humans respond very well to really strong rules,” she says. “It’s in our nature, we want to test boundaries, so the more solid the boundaries the more likely we’re going to push against them.”</p> <p>There are no laws in Australia that make it a crime to drink alcohol supplied by parents in a private home. There are, in fact, studies that have found drinking a little bit with your parents at home teaches kids about moderation. They are also less likely to be binge drinkers when they are older.</p> <p>A four-year study from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre followed 2000 children and their parents to find what effect early introduction to alcohol has on consumption levels.</p> <p>After tracking the families for four years it found that teenagers and children introduced to alcohol by their parents were less likely to binge drink later on. However, it also showed that teenagers and kids introduced to alcohol early on were more likely to be drinking full serves by ages 15 or 16. Children who obtain alcohol from people other than their parents are three times more likely to binge drink.</p> <p>But, true to form, these things are never entirely clear-cut. One of the authors of the four-year study from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, Professor Richard Mattick, points to other research indicating that the adolescent brain is still developing well into the early 20s, and alcohol may interfere with optimum development.</p> <p><strong>The effect of alcohol on a developing brain</strong><br />A recent study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital found that long-term heavy use of alcohol in adolescence alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain.</p> <p>The study concluded that for young people whose brain is still developing, heavy alcohol use is especially detrimental and caused significant alterations in both electrical and chemical neuro-transmission among the study participants, although none of them fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of a substance abuse disorder.</p> <p>The parts of the brain that are affected are the hippocampus (responsible for memory and learning) and the prefrontal lobe (important for planning, judgement, decision making, impulse control and language). Alcohol can affect these two crucial parts of a developing brain by resulting in irreversible brain changes that can impact decision making, personality, memory and learning.</p> <p><a href="http://alcoholthinkagain.com.au/">Alcohol Think Again</a> recommends that for under 18 year olds, no alcohol is the safest choice and that parents should delay the initiation of drinking for as long as possible.</p> <p><strong>The role of identity and belonging</strong><br />Research shows that having a sense of belonging is a really strong protective mechanism against misuse of drugs and alcohol, as well as other unsafe behaviours that teenagers engage in. Identity and belonging also give kids an insight into a less individualistic society, and a sense that actions often impact more than one person.</p> <p>In a series of focus groups made up of Year 11 students in Victoria, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire which focused on beliefs regarding the factors that promote resilience and well-being.</p> <p>The four main factors indicated by young people to promote resilience included: peer connectedness (having good friends); family connectedness (feeling that you are loved by family); feeling that your family respects your decisions; and school connectedness (believing that you fit in at school, and having good teachers).</p> <p><strong>How to talk to your teens about drinking</strong><br />With so much mixed information around, it’s important to know where you stand on this issue as parents. Reflect on your values and communicate that to your children in an open, constructive and loving way. And if they do slip up here and there, use it as a process to help them learn to be the kind of person they want to be, and to choose a relationship with alcohol that works for them.</p> <p><em>Written by Grace Enright Burns. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/how-to-talk-to-your-teens-about-alcohol.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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“Legend”: Plumber praised for act of kindness towards elderly woman

<p>A British plumber has been praised for his act of kindness after he was called out to fix an elderly woman’s boiler.</p> <p>James Anderson from the English town of Burnley was asked to look at a woman’s boiler after it was reported to be leaking.</p> <p>Once the job as done, Mr Anderson refused to bill her, writing on the receipt that the total cost of the job came to $0.</p> <p>The invoice was shared throughout social media by the woman’s daughter.</p> <p>“Lady is 91 years of age, acute leukaemia, end of life care. No charge for this lady under any circumstances,” read the bill.</p> <p>“We will be available 24 hours to help her and keep her as comfortable as possible.”</p> <p>Mr Anderson has running Disabled &amp; Elderly Plumping and Heating Emergency Repair (DEPHER), a not-for-profit company, since March 2017.</p> <p>Since the company was established, Mr Anderson has helped 2389 people.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>CNN</em>, he revealed that he was inspired to start DEPHER after he saw an elderly man being “manipulated” by another engineer.</p> <p>“It got me thinking about other elderly and vulnerable people – we need to do something more to help the people who need it most,” he said.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">This is the invoice from plumber, James Anderson in Burnley after fixing a lady's boiler - gives me a little hope for humanity after all <a href="https://t.co/zddMJO2f4a">pic.twitter.com/zddMJO2f4a</a></p> — ProudDevonian (@PDevonian) <a href="https://twitter.com/PDevonian/status/1173273427874070529?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">15 September 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“A lot of elderly and disabled people don’t like asking for assistance and if they can’t afford something like fixing the boiler, they might not do it and get into trouble. We are there to take that worry away.”</p> <p>The company relies on<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/disabled-elderly-free-plumbing-heating-service" target="_blank">donations and support</a><span> </span>from community members, with Mr Anderson close to $14,590 in debt due to this act of selflessness.</p> <p>He is currently paying off the debt in monthly instalments and said that as long as he had enough money to fill up his car he would “be there to try and help the people who need it”.</p> <p>Countless people have taken to Facebook to shower praise upon Mr Anderson for his kindness.</p> <p>“There are some wonderful people in this world. James is one of them,” wrote one user.</p> <p>“James Anderson, you sir are a legend, in a country filled with hate &amp; greed your humanity shines like a beacon, massive good luck with your business you thoroughly deserve it, you haven’t touch my boiler but you’ve given me a warm glow,” wrote another.</p>

Retirement Life

Finance

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Major heartbreaking change in Kevin Spacey lawsuit

<p>A male massage therapist who accused disgraced Hollywood heavyweight Kevin Spacey of sexual assault has died - however the lawsuit the star faces may still continue according to court records. </p> <p>Spacey, whose real name is Kevin Fowler, is being investigated in both London and Los Angeles over several allegations. </p> <p>The 60-year-old faces a titan federal lawsuit alleging he assaulted the late masseur, and his lawyers have filed a “notice of statement noting plaintiff’s death” in the federal case on Tuesday, according to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9957461/kevin-spacey-sexual-assault-allegations-accuser-dead/" target="_blank">The Sun. </a></p> <p>The filing said they were informed on September 11 of the masseur’s passing. </p> <p>“No further information or details have been given to Mr Fowler’s counsel, but Plaintiff’s counsel stated they intended to notify the Court with additional information at an appropriate time in the future.”</p> <p>The massage therapist claimed he was attacked by the Oscar winning actor three year ago during a massage session in Malibu, US. </p> <p>The actor also allegedly grabbed the masseur’s hand twice and guided it to his private parts. </p> <p>He has also been accused of asking to perform a sexual act on the massage therapist - which caused him to bolt from the session. </p> <p>The lawsuit could continue despite the therapist’s death. </p> <p>Spacey has been accused by more than a dozen men of sexual misconduct. </p>

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What you should know about renovating and asbestos

<p>We all love making our own home better to live in, but are we aware of the risks? </p> <p>Many amateur renovators aren’t aware of some of the hidden renovating risks. For instance, you only have to inhale one tiny dot of asbestos into your lungs and there’s a chance, many years later, you could develop mesothelioma – a deadly cancer of the lungs and chest wall.</p> <p>In the past, the people who were being diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma were mostly men who’d been exposed to asbestos through their work as tradesmen. However, more recently, this has changed with current research showing more people – including women – are exposing themselves to very slight amounts of asbestos when they do simple home renovations.</p> <p>A recent study by Professor Eun-Kee Park into Asbestos exposure during home renovations in NSW showed: </p> <ul> <li>61.4 per cent of DIY renovators reported being exposed to asbestos during home renovations.</li> <li>39.3 per cent reported their partner and 22.8 per cent reported their children, were also exposed to asbestos during home DIY home renovations.</li> <li>Non DIY renovators were less likely to be exposed or have their families exposed.</li> </ul> <p><strong><em>In Australia, at least one house in every three has some asbestos in it</em></strong></p> <p>Asbestos was widely used in Australian homes before 1987 and so to help get this information to the general public, this month is National Asbestos Awareness Month.</p> <p><strong>John Jarratt wants to help spread the message</strong> <br />Well-known Australian actor, <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/entertainment/where-are-they-now-john-jarratt.aspx">John Jarratt</a>, feels strongly about asbestos exposure because he had a close friend, Harold Hopkins, die from mesothelioma at the age of 67. Because of Hopkins story Jarratt agreed to be a spokesperson for National Asbestos Awareness.</p> <p>Jarratt’s friend was a fellow actor and when he was studying his craft, used to work in the building trade, renovating houses. In 1968, he renovated a fibro house and was exposed to the asbestos fibres.</p> <p>“He ended up with mesothelioma,” says Jarratt. “It killed him in six months, once he was diagnosed.”</p> <p><strong>A few seconds of exposure is all it takes</strong> <br />Jarratt is aware of just how easy it is to expose yourself to asbestos accidentally – even just momentarily – but he says that’s enough to be a death sentence. Jarratt also worked in the building industry when he was an up-and-coming actor, and he’s seen first-hand how easy it is to accidentally come across asbestos.</p> <p>“It’s potent stuff. Only one tiny little dot of it goes into your lungs, and you’re gone,” he says.</p> <p>The trick with mesothelioma is the fact it can lay dormant for between 20 and 50 years but when it does develop, it’s usually at a rapid pace. Unfortunately, there’s no cure for mesothelioma and the average survival time is 10 to 12 months following diagnosis. As well as mesothelioma, you can develop lung cancer, asbestosis and benign pleural disease from inhaling asbestos fibres.</p> <p>“It can lay dormant a long, long time,” says Jarratt. “I could be down the drain myself because I was raised in a fibro house myself in a little coal-mining village on the south coast of New South Wales.”</p> <p>“Every time my mum got pregnant, the old man was out there cutting up sheets of fibro and building another room. And we were all sucking it all in, helping him out. So I could just as easily suffer for it – who knows?” he explains.</p> <p>Jarratt is quick to point out, it doesn’t matter how careful you are after you’ve been exposed. His friend, Hopkins, was a vegan and kept himself extremely fit.</p> <p>“If you wanted to put money on somebody to get to 100, you’d put all your money on Harold. He ran 15k, which was his morning run and halfway through his hundred push ups he got a pain in the chest. Six months later he was dead,” says Jarratt. “But none of that helps – once you’ve been exposed, there’s nothing much you can really do.”</p> <p>“Also, unfortunately you can be susceptible to it too. That’s the other thing. You can be a lucky guy and have a strong immunity to it or maybe not,” Jarratt adds.</p> <p><strong>It’s easy to check if your house has asbestos</strong><br />Jarratt emphasises it’s very easy to be proactive and find out if your house has asbestos in it.</p> <p>“You go to your local council. Every council in Australia knows about it,” says Jarratt. “You just go there and they’ll give you a leaflet on it and that’ll tell you exactly what to do and what the problems are. It’s all very well organised in that regard.”</p> <p>“If your house is pre-1987, it’ll most definitely have asbestos in it – could be the back board of your meter box. It’s everywhere. You know those old hot water services that used to be in the roof? They usually sit on a bed of asbestos. So it’s in all sorts of places,” he adds.</p> <p>As for DIY renovating, Jarratt warns it’s important to know what you’re doing: “If you’ve got an old house and some timber cladding, you’ve got to make sure that someone hasn’t put that over fibro which is very common.”</p> <p>“Just don’t bore a hole into a wall unless you know what it’s all made of,” he adds. “I know, because I’ve done a lot of building. I just simply go under the house and look up through the stud wall and see on the inside, all the sheeting. That’s the only way you can see the sheeting so that’s what experts who know what they’re doing, do,” he explains.</p> <p>Jarratt adds there’s no safe level of working with asbestos.</p> <p>“Look, I’ve been exposed to it all my life because I’ve built houses in between acting jobs. I mean, it’s very extensive in this country. I mean they call the working class the fibro belt for god’s sake,” he laughs.</p> <p>But as Jarratt explains, if you find some fibro in your house and don’t touch it, you’re fine. “If you don’t touch it you’re fine – don’t touch it. You can paint it – that’s fine. But don’t go sanding!!! Leave it alone and get advice – it’s not worth it!”</p> <p>It’s important to keep in mind, asbestos is not only found in fibro homes. Australia was among one of the largest consumers of asbestos-containing materials in the world with asbestos-containing products still found in one in three brick, weatherboard, fibro or clad homes built or renovated before 1987.</p> <p>Asbestos was also used in the manufacture of a broad range of products. It can literally be anywhere! Under-floor coverings including carpets, linoleum and vinyl tiles, behind wall and floor tiles, in cement floors, internal and external walls, ceilings and ceiling space (insulation), eaves, garages, roofs, around hot water pipes, fences, extensions to homes, garages, outdoor toilets, backyard and farm structures, chook sheds and even dog kennels.</p> <p>Without knowing where these types of asbestos-containing products might be located or how to manage and dispose of asbestos safely, you can end up at risk when you try to renovate your house yourself.</p> <p><strong>Asbestos exposure is common during home renovations</strong><br />To find out more about asbestos and where it could be in your house, take a look at the <a href="http://asbestosawareness.com.au/">Asbestos Awareness site here</a>. This site will make it easy for you to identify the sorts of products you need to look out for, the locations where asbestos might be found and how you need to get professional help to manage and dispose of asbestos safely.</p> <p>The video below with Cherie Barber will help you identify the various locations in homes where asbestos might be found in your home, providing the most practical and easily accessible resource for homeowners, renovators and tradespersons.</p> <p><strong>Asbestos Safety Check</strong></p> <p>1. At least 1 in 3 Australian homes contains asbestos including brick, weatherboard, fibro and clad homes. </p> <p>2. Asbestos was widely used in building materials before 1987 so if your home was built or renovated before 1987 it most likely contains asbestos in some form or another.</p> <p>3. If asbestos is disturbed during renovations or maintenance your health and the health of your family could be at risk.</p> <p>4. DIY is not recommended where asbestos is present.</p> <p>5 When renovating or working in and around homes, if in doubt assume asbestos materials are present and take every precaution.</p> <p>6. Dealing with asbestos is important and serious, but it’s not overwhelming – it is manageable!</p> <p>7. If you’re not sure if asbestos is in your home you can have it inspected by a licenced removalist or a licensed asbestos assessor.</p> <p>8. Products made from asbestos cement include fibro sheeting (flat and corrugated), water, drainage and flue pipes, roofing shingles, guttering and floor and wall coverings.</p> <p>9. If left undisturbed asbestos materials in good, stable condition are unlikely to release dangerous fibres and pose a health risk. Generally, you don’t need to remove the asbestos. Paint it and leave it alone but remember to check it occasionally for any signs of wear and tear.</p> <p>10. There are legal requirements regarding asbestos management, its removal and disposal</p> <p>11. While some might follow the regulations and safety requirements to remove small amounts of asbestos, the safest way to manage its removal is to retain a licenced professional asbestos removalist equipped to protect you and your family from the dangers of asbestos dust and fibres.\</p> <p>12. Where asbestos fibres are friable (loose and not bonded into building materials), ONLY licenced friable asbestos removalists are allowed to remove it.</p> <p>13. The cost of asbestos removal by a licenced professional is comparable to most licenced tradesmen including electricians, plumbers and tilers.</p> <p>14. If you must work with any material that may contain asbestos or remove asbestos yourself, protect yourself and your family and follow the legal and safety requirements for the management of asbestos to minimise the release of dust or small particles from the asbestos materials.</p> <p>15. Never use tools on asbestos materials as they will make asbestos fibres.</p> <p><em>Written by Pamela Connellan. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/what-you-should-know-about-renovating-and-asbestos.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Legal

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Drug laws on possession: several countries are revisiting them and these are their options

<p>Many countries are changing the way they approach people who use drugs. The Irish government <a href="http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/Final_Report_of_the_Working_Group.pdf/Files/Final_Report_of_the_Working_Group.pdf">has just announced</a> possible alternatives to criminalisation for possession of some drugs. Other countries, including <a href="https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/norway-decriminalize-drug-use_n_5a387b70e4b0860bf4aa96c4">Norway</a> and <a href="https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/06/malaysia-decriminalise-drug-health-minister-190628060223845.html">Malaysia</a>, are weighing options. But what can countries do if they don’t want to arrest or convict people because they use drugs?</p> <p>To inform the Irish government’s decision, we carried out a <a href="http://www.justice.ie/en/JELR/ANNEXE_I_-_Hughes_Stevens_Hulme_Cassidy_-_2018_-_Review_of_approaches_taken_in_Ireland_and_in_other_jurisdictions_to_simple_possession_drug_offences.pdf/Files/ANNEXE_I_-_Hughes_Stevens_Hulme_Cassidy_-_2018_-_Review_of_approaches_taken_in_Ireland_and_in_other_jurisdictions_to_simple_possession_drug_offences.pdf">detailed review</a> of approaches in various countries. These countries were Australia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Jamaica, the Netherlands, Portugal, the UK and the US. We found three main approaches: depenalisation, diversion and decriminalisation. (We did not review models of legally regulating the production and sale of drugs. Decriminalisation is not the same as legalisation.)</p> <p><strong>Depenalisation</strong> is where the crime remains in law, but the police stop imposing penalties for some people. For example, police in England and Wales can issue written <a href="https://theconversation.com/policing-of-cannabis-possession-is-largely-accidental-and-many-officers-dont-think-it-makes-a-difference-100102">warnings</a> to people found to be in possession of small amounts of cannabis for the first time, instead of arresting them.</p> <p><strong>Diversion</strong> is when people found to be in possession of drugs are sent to education sessions, treatment or social services, instead of being charged and prosecuted. These schemes have been adopted in Australian states, such as <a href="https://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au/sites/default/files/ndarc/resources/DPMP%20Monograph%2027%20-%202019%20-%20Criminal%20justice%20responses%20relating%20to%20personal%20use%20and%20possession%20of%20illicit%20drugs.pdf">New South Wales</a>, and in some parts of England and the US. Some schemes, including one in Queensland, are written into law. Others, like County Durham’s <a href="https://www.durham.police.uk/Information-and-advice/Pages/Checkpoint.aspx">Checkpoint</a> scheme and the <a href="http://leadkingcounty.org/">LEAD programme</a> in Seattle, are based only on changes in police practice.</p> <p><strong>Decriminalisation</strong> involves legal changes so that it is no longer a criminal offence to possess a small quantity of drugs for personal use. But there are three approaches to this model.</p> <p>Since the 1970s, many US states have replaced criminal sanctions and prison sentences with civil sanctions, such as fines for the possession of less than an ounce of cannabis. Similar schemes operate in the Czech Republic, Jamaica and some Australian states, such as South Australia.</p> <p>Other countries and states, such as <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002204260403400302">Germany</a> and <a href="https://eu.burlingtonfreepress.com/story/news/politics/government/2018/01/22/vermonts-legal-marijuana-law-what-you-should-know/1045478001/">Vermont</a> have decriminalisation with no sanction at all. Still others, like Portugal, have favoured decriminalisation with diversion to targeted health and social responses.</p> <p>In 2001, Portugal decriminalised the possession of small amounts of all kinds of drugs, combined with the possibility to impose civil sanctions (such as fines or suspension of driving licences) and diverting people into treatment, via a meeting with a “commission for the dissuasion of addiction”. In practice, most cases end with no sanction. Portugal also expanded access to treatment, health and social services with <a href="https://academic.oup.com/bjc/article/50/6/999/404023">positive results</a>.</p> <p><strong>How the models stack up</strong></p> <p>Each approach has its own advantages and drawbacks. Depenalisation, for example, is easy to implement and lets police use their discretion in deciding who to arrest. But this may lead to discriminatory enforcement, as black people are often <a href="https://www.release.org.uk/publications/ColourOfInjustice">far more likely</a> to be stopped, arrested and punished for drugs.</p> <p>Decriminalisation requires legal changes to be made. Some may argue that it leaves authorities without legal opportunities to intervene in undesired activities, such as public drug use. But these can still be banned by separate rules. Indeed, possession of cannabis has been formally decriminalised in New York State since 1977, but it has still been an offence to have the drug “in public view”, leading to hundreds of thousands of arrests for low-level drug offences, again falling most heavily on <a href="http://www.drugpolicy.org/new-york/marijuana-reform">people of colour</a>.</p> <p>But decriminalisation also brings the potential for health, social and criminal justice benefits, by reducing stigma surrounding drug use - a known barrier to treatment and harm reduction - and <a href="http://www.ndlerf.gov.au/sites/default/files/publication-documents/monographs/monograph-66.pdf">improving employment prospects and housing stability</a>. It can also reduce the burden on police and courts. In Portugal, the extra spending on health services was offset by savings in the criminal justice system and other benefits, meaning the <a href="https://www.sciencediret.com/science/article/pii/S095539591400231X?via%3Dihub">overall social cost of drugs fell</a></p> <p><strong>No models lead to increased drug use</strong></p> <p>Importantly, we did not find evidence that any of these alternative measures consistently increased the use of drugs. A <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955395919300210?via%3Dihub">study</a> of over 100,000 teenagers in 38 countries did not show higher rates of drug use in countries with more liberal approaches. Recent decriminalisations in five US states produced big reductions in arrests but <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955395918301786?via%3Dihub">no apparent increase</a>in cannabis use among young people.</p> <p>As countries look for ways to implement <a href="https://www.unsceb.org/CEBPublicFiles/CEB-2018-2-SoD.pdf">UN recommendations</a> to avoid criminalising people for using drugs, they will need to consider these different options carefully. They will, <a href="https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/first-time-drug-offenders-to-be-referred-to-hse-in-policy-overhaul-1.3974643">as Ireland has found</a>, need to adapt them to their own legal, social and drug use contexts. They can do so with a fair amount of confidence that removing the harms of punishment is not likely to increase drug use. But, given some models bring greater long-term gains, there is merit in arguing that governments ought to be bold.</p> <p><em>Written by Alex Stevens and Caitlin Hughes. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/drug-laws-on-possession-several-countries-are-revisiting-them-and-these-are-their-options-121221"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

Legal

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Here is what William Tyrrell would look like today

<p>A team of experts has released a projection of what William Tyrrell would look like today, five years since the boy disappeared.</p> <p>Newcastle University criminologist Xanthé Mallett and her team generated an age progression image using the latest technology in her forensic services company.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7830711/william-tyrrell-10-xm.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/294b328cf15f407d9a23e26cca570dac" /></p> <p>Tyrrell was last seen at his foster grandmother’s yard in Kendall on the New South Wales mid-north coast on September 12, 2014.</p> <p>He would be eight years old today.</p> <p>“He will have changed quite a lot in the intervening five years so it helps people imagine what he would potentially look like now,” Mallett told <a rel="noopener" href="https://10daily.com.au/news/crime/a190911dvaio/this-is-what-william-tyrrell-would-look-like-today-20190911" target="_blank"><em>10 News</em></a>.</p> <p>“Most interestingly for a child, the dentition would’ve change. Their adult teeth would’ve come through and that would have changed the lower part of William’s face.”</p> <p>Despite being one of the largest investigations in the state’s history, Tyrrell has not been found.</p> <p>A <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/major-development-in-william-tyrrell-inquiry-as-local-claims-sighting" target="_blank">part-heard inquest into the disappearance</a> will continue next year.</p>

Legal

Entertainment

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"I miss to be hugged": Celine Dion's emotional confession

<p>Award-winning singer Celine Dion has confirmed that she’s still “not ready to date” after her husband <span>René's</span> passing back in 2016.</p> <p>Dion sat down with NBC’s Sheinelle Jones on the<span> </span><em>TODAY</em><span> </span>show and admitted that she pours herself into her work and a new tour instead of dating.</p> <p>“I don't date,” Dion said matter-of-factly.</p> <p>“I'm not ready to date. I'm very lucky and happy to have so many people in my surrounding to make me — they make me laugh, but I miss to be touched.”</p> <p>Dion also said that she misses being “hugged”.</p> <p>“I miss to be hugged. I missed to be told "you're beautiful." I miss what a boyfriend and I miss what a husband would do.'”</p> <p>Dion also recalled her last conversation with her husband of more than 12 years back in 2016.</p> <p>“He called me before a show and give me a little message: ‘I love you’ and when I came home that night, it was very, very late ... And I didn't want to come and wake him up to give him a kiss, to wake him up and then he can't find sleep again. </p> <p>“And the next morning, he was gone. So, we talked before. And he sent me a text message. So we said goodbye.'”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BPO3dQkgotI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BPO3dQkgotI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Il y a un an, le 14 janvier 2016, René Angélil nous quittait. Son souvenir reste à jamais gravé dans nos cœurs. Today, January 14th, it’s been a year since René left us. He will always be in our hearts. -Team Céline ❤</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/celinedion/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Céline Dion</a> (@celinedion) on Jan 13, 2017 at 9:01pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Despite Dion focusing on the love and support of her close friends and her three children, she still finds things difficult.</p> <p>“This is my first English album without René,' she said. 'When I say without René, without René physically, because René will always be part of me.”</p> <p>“Before I talk, he goes through my mind,” she said. 'Would he do that? Is it too edgy? Would he be like approving that?’ I believed in him so much. And I still do. </p> <p>“But there's a point that he's not here anymore. I have to take charge of my life.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Celine Dion, her late husband René and their three children through the years.</p>

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5 books on work by French authors that you should read

<p>An emerging genre of fiction in France is providing an unlikely brand of escapism. Growing numbers of French writers are choosing work as their subject matter – and it seems that readers can’t get enough of their novels.</p> <p>The prix du roman d'entreprise et du travail, the French prize for the <a href="https://www.prixduromandentreprise.fr/">best business or work-related novel</a>, is testament to the sustained popularity of workplace fiction across the Channel. The prize has been awarded annually since 2009, and this year’s winner will be announced at the Ministry of Employment in Paris on March 14.</p> <p><a href="https://www.placedelamediation.com/">Place de la Médiation</a>, the body which set up the prize, is a training organisation specialising in mediation, the prevention of psychosocial risks, and quality of life at work. Co-organiser <a href="https://www.technologia.fr/">Technologia</a> is a work-related risk prevention consultancy, which helps companies to evaluate health, safety and organisational issues.</p> <p>The novels shortlisted for the prize in the past ten years reflect a broad range of jobs and sectors and a whole gamut of experiences. The texts clearly strike a chord with French readers, but English translations of these novels suggest many of the themes broached resonate in Anglo-Saxon culture too.</p> <p>The prize certainly seeks to acknowledge a pre-existing literary interest in the theme of work. This is unsurprising in the wake of the global financial crisis and the changes and challenges this has brought. But the organisers also express <a href="https://www.prixduromandentreprise.fr/">a desire to actively mobilise fiction</a> in a bid to help chart the often choppy waters of the modern workplace:</p> <blockquote> <p>Through the power of fiction, [we] want to put the human back at the heart of business, to show the possibilities of a good quality professional life, and to relaunch social dialogue by bringing together in the [prize] jury all the social actors and specialists of the business world.</p> </blockquote> <p>What better way to delve into this unusual genre than by reading some of the previous prize winners. Below are five books to get you started.</p> <p><strong>1. <em>Underground Time</em></strong></p> <p>The first prize was awarded to Delphine de Vignan for <a href="https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/underground-time-9781408811115/"><em>Les heures souterraines</em></a>. In this novel, the paths of a bullied marketing executive and a beleaguered on-call doctor converge and intersect as they traverse Paris over the course of a working day. A television adaptation followed, and an English translation was published by Bloomsbury in 2011. Work-related journeys and the underground as a symbol for the hidden or unseen side of working life have proved enduring themes, picked up by several subsequent winners.</p> <p><strong>2. <em>The Man Who Risked It All</em></strong></p> <p>Laurent Gounelle’s <a href="https://www.hayhouse.co.uk/catalog/product/view/id/21204/s/the-man-who-risked-it-all-1/"><em>Dieu voyage toujours incognito</em></a>, winner of the 2011 prize, takes us from the depths of the underground to the top of the Eiffel Tour, where Alan Greenmor’s suicide attempt is interrupted by a mysterious stranger. Yves promises to teach him the secrets to happiness and success if Alan agrees to do whatever he asks. This intriguing premise caught the attention of self-help, inspirational and transformational book publisher Hay House, whose translation appeared in 2014.</p> <p><strong>3. <em>The Reader on the 6.27</em></strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.panmacmillan.com/authors/jean-paul-didierlaurent/the-reader-on-the-6-27/9781509836857"><em>Le liseur du 6h27</em></a> by Jean-Paul Didierlaurent, the 2015 winner, tells the story of a reluctant book-pulping machine operative. Each day, Ghislain Vignolles rescues a few random pages from destruction, to read aloud to his fellow-commuters in the morning train. The novel crystallises the fraught relationship between intellectual life and manual work.</p> <p>It also illustrates the tension between culture and commerce, arguably at its most pronounced in France, where cultural policy has traditionally insisted on the distinction between cultural artefacts and commercial products. <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/reviews/the-reader-on-the-627-by-jean-paul-didierlaurent-book-review-set-to-woo-british-readers-and-become-a-10300236.html">The Independent review of the English translation</a> describes the book as “a delightful tale about the kinship of reading”.</p> <p><strong>4. <em>Undersea View</em></strong></p> <p>Slimane Kader took to the belly of a Caribbean cruise ship to research <a href="https://www.allary-editions.fr/publication/avec-vue-sous-la-mer/"><em>Avec vue sous la mer</em></a>, which claimed the 2016 prize. His hilarious account of life as “joker”, or general dogsbody, is characterised by an amusing mishmash of cultural references: “I’m dreaming of <em>The Love Boat</em>, but getting a remake of <em>Les Misérables</em>” the narrator quips. The use of “<a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/1892853.stm">verlan</a>” – a suburban dialect in which syllables are reversed to create new words – underlines the topsy-turvy feel.</p> <p>Unfortunately, there’s no English version as yet – I imagine the quickfire language play would challenge even the most adept of translators. But translation would help confirm the compelling literary voice Kader has given to an otherwise invisible group.</p> <p><strong>5. <em>Woman at Sea</em></strong></p> <p>Catherine Poulain’s <em><a href="https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/111/1112907/woman-at-sea/9781911214588.html">Le grand marin</a></em>, the 2017 winner, is a rather more earnest account of work at sea. The author draws on her own experiences to recount narrator Lili’s travails in the male-dominated world of Alaskan fishing.</p> <p><em>Le grand marin</em> (the great sailor) is ostensibly the nickname Lili gives to her seafaring lover. The relationship is something of a red herring though, as the overriding passion in this novel is work. But the English title perhaps does Lili a disservice – she is less a floundering Woman at Sea, and more the true <em>grand marin</em> of the original.</p> <p><a href="https://www.placedelamediation.com/prix/?service=la-selection-2017">This year’s shortlist</a> includes the story of a forgotten employee left to his own devices when his company is restructured, a professional fall from grace in the wake of the Bataclan terrorist attack, and a second novel from Poulain, with seasonal work in Provence the backdrop this time.</p> <p>The common draw, as in previous years –- and somewhat ironically, given the subject matter –- is escapism. We are afforded either a tantalising glimpse into the working lives of others, or else a fresh perspective on our own. English readers will be equally fascinated by French details and universal themes – and translators’ pens are sure to be poised.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/112115/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Amy Wigelsworth, Senior Lecturer in French, Sheffield Hallam University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/five-books-on-work-by-french-authors-that-you-should-read-on-your-commute-112115" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Skype users warned after Microsoft could be “listening” to calls

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A new investigation done by tech website </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Motherboard</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has revealed that Microsoft workers could be “listening in” on your Skype conversations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It has been revealed that some employees occasionally have to review real video chat that has been processed by translation software in order to check the quality of translations, according to </span><em><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/9680295/microsoft-caught-secretly-listening-to-skype-calls/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Microsoft spokesperson told Motherboard that Microsoft collects voice data to improve features on Skype.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They said: “We also put in place several procedures designed to prioritise users’ privacy before sharing this data with our vendors, including de-identifying data, requiring non-disclosure agreements with vendors and their employees, and requiring that vendors meet the high privacy standards set out in European law.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Paul Bischoff, a privacy advocate from Comparitech.com, told </span><em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/security/microsoft-could-be-listening-to-some-skype-calls/news-story/d92ee2c5f713af3a7252be645004a365"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">: “Microsoft clearly states that recordings and transcriptions are analysed to verify accuracy and make corrections.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The fact that humans are performing that analysis might make users uneasy, but I don’t think there’s much risk to end users.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That is, unless a contractor steals recordings and gives them to a Vice reporter. Microsoft ought to take steps to ensure this can’t happen in the future.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I recommend users refrain from revealing any identifying information while using Skype Translation and Cortana. Unless you identify yourself in the recording, there’s almost no way for a human analyst to figure out who you are.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Skype is an online video chat and voice call service that also provides an instant messaging platform.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Javvad Malik, a security awareness advocate at KnowBe4, said: “This latest revelation goes to show more needs to be done to ensure consumer data is being protected when customers use such services.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In this instance, there needs to be a clear level of transparency and honesty about the entire call-recording process to give people a true understanding of what they are signing up for.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There is a fine line between invading someone’s privacy and collecting data for business purposes; a line that if crossed, can lead to serious breaches of data privacy.”</span></p>

Technology