Placeholder Content Image

5 tips to ensure your supermarket is listening to you on social media

<p>Making yourself heard by big businesses can be tricky. Even when companies have a presence on social media, you might question whether they are genuinely interested in providing opportunities for meaningful dialogue. Is anyone really listening, or are we just talking to ourselves?</p> <p>There have been refreshing signs that supermarkets can be persuaded to listen to the demands of their customers.</p> <p>So how do you make yourself heard by retailers on social media? After qualitatively examining over <a href="https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/publications/the-never-ending-story-discursive-legitimation-in-social-media-di">68,000 supermarket social media posts</a> with colleagues at the University of Nottingham, here are my five tips for communicating with corporations – and getting noticed.</p> <p><strong>1. Introduce yourself</strong></p> <p>There are countless posts vying for attention in the virtual world of social media, so you need to carve out a unique voice. Why should the retailer listen to you?</p> <p>Begin by making it clear who you are. Start with: “As a loyal customer…”, “As a farmer…”, “As a woman…” or “As a dad…” and you give yourself an identity. Do you live near a polluted river that is full of discarded plastic bags? Are you a parent who volunteers in the local community and needs help? Have you been a loyal consumer for years? This is a strategy used particularly well by the #stopfundinghate campaign, which is targeting retailers who advertise in <em>The Sun</em>, <em>Daily Mail</em> and <em>Daily Express</em>:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/coopuk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@coopuk</a> As a member &amp; regular shopper i would 💙 to see you <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/stopfundinghate?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#stopfundinghate</a>. Jars with <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/thecoopway?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#thecoopway</a> ethics?? Make a stand! <a href="https://twitter.com/StopFundingHate?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@StopFundingHate</a></p> — Dominique Wedge (@MistyWedge) <a href="https://twitter.com/MistyWedge/status/833970051111870464?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 21, 2017</a></blockquote> <p>Building authority is key to establishing a legitimate base upon which to launch your argument. Do not underestimate the voice of experience.</p> <p>2. Back up your argument</p> <p>You may well have a valid point to make. But no amount of ANGRY CAPITAL LETTERS, repeated exclamation marks or sad face emojis will communicate a reasoned argument. Instead, a strong case can be built by linking to the content of the organisation’s own policy, relevant legislation, a news article, or even a key image or video:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Tesco <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesco?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesco</a>, I wanted to buy Organic produce from you today but I kept walking. I bought my produce elseware today just because of your needless plastic packaging. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/refusingplastic?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#refusingplastic</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/organic?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#organic</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/tesco?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#tesco</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/plasticfree?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#plasticfree</a> <a href="https://t.co/AKL8WOclCv">pic.twitter.com/AKL8WOclCv</a></p> — Betty's Garden 🌻 (@BettyInCork) <a href="https://twitter.com/BettyInCork/status/957305468594065408?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 27, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>In lobbying supermarkets to stop stocking <em>The Sun</em> newspaper back in 2012, the <a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/no-more-page-3-our-grassroots-campaign-took-on-a-huge-corporation-and-we-won-9992371.html">“No More Page 3” (#NMP3) campaign</a> provided a masterclass in rational argument of an emotive issue. Through a whole host of <a href="https://twitter.com/NoMorePage3?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor">social media discussions</a>, campaigners skilfully drew on <a href="http://proceedings.aom.org/content/2015/1/16085.short">facts, figures and feelings</a> to persuade retailers such as Tesco, Sainbury’s and the Co-op to stop selling <em>The Sun</em> newspaper until it removed Page 3.</p> <p>In a world of fake news, make sure you are armed with facts.</p> <p><strong>3. Go compare</strong></p> <p>Competition between UK supermarkets is stiff – so holding retailers to account against their rivals is a great way to galvanise action. Back in 2013, Co-op bowed to social media pressure and announced that it would only sell “lads mags” that were covered by <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/jul/29/loaded-owner-cooperative-lads-mags-ban">“modesty wraps”</a>. Days later, Tesco did the same, saying it had <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23558211">“listened carefully”</a> to consumer suggestions (and perhaps those of its competitors). Today, we have seen a similar approach taken to the under-16 energy drink ban:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">VICTORY for <a href="https://twitter.com/jamieoliver?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@jamieoliver</a> and the <a href="https://twitter.com/DailyMirror?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@DailyMirror</a> on our energy drinks campaign that can make the nations children healthier. <br /><br />All these supermarkets have now banned the sale of energy drinks to under 16s<br /><br />✅ Waitrose<br />✅ Aldi<br />✅ Asda<br />✅ Tesco<br />✅ Sainsburys<br />✅ Morrisons <br />✅ Lidl</p> — Johnny Goldsmith (@MirrorJohnny) <a href="https://twitter.com/MirrorJohnny/status/956841243438469120?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 26, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>You can even compare supermarkets to themselves. Does the talk match the walk? Are there inconsistencies between what the supermarket said it would do, and what it actually did?</p> <p><strong>4. Tell a story</strong></p> <p>On social media, arguments should be short and concise. But that doesn’t mean you can’t have a narrative. Making an emotional connection is key and what better way to do this than setting the scene with a dramatic plot, personal triumph, unresolved mystery, happy ending or tale of woe?</p> <p>On the topic of <a href="https://theconversation.com/whatever-happened-to-bans-on-gm-produce-in-british-supermarkets-51153">genetically modified organisms</a>, for example, we found evidence of retailers being construed both as villains (“I will no longer be shopping in your stores now you are to use GMO fed meat”) and heroes (“Thank you for your reassurance, I will continue to happily shop in your stores”). Characterisation helps to convey an opinion:</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Thanks for the heads up <a href="https://twitter.com/ProfTimLang?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ProfTimLang</a>, will start building my own network of trusted suppliers now, don't trust supermarkets anymore. not interested in <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GMO?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#GMO</a> corn fed chicken and all that crap. Sorry <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesco?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesco</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/asda?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@asda</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/LidlUK?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@LidlUK</a> etc. <a href="https://t.co/E7pT9vMAvE">https://t.co/E7pT9vMAvE</a></p> — Anna Lehmann (@BusterOnAir) <a href="https://twitter.com/BusterOnAir/status/951141308093075456?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 10, 2018</a></blockquote> <p><strong>5. Play devil’s advocate</strong></p> <p>Social media is seen by some as something of a <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/nov/29/vortex-online-political-debate-arguments-trump-brexit">vortex</a> – a negative time drain that consumes far too much emotional energy. But there is a benefit to online rage, in that it makes conversations continue.</p> <p>The more vibrant and charged discussions involve a plurality of perspectives and some healthy antagonism, particularly around complex socio-political topics such as gender objectification or animal welfare. Keep fuelling the fire and stoking the debate with original and divisive opinions. Keep disagreeing with each other – and the companies. It is when organisational boundaries are truly tested that the real learning can occur.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">why is it going to take 5 years to replace plastic packaging with card or paper packaging? especially when compared with much larger stores like asda or tesco you do not have as many own label products as them? would be nice if could be done in 2 years</p> — Kev (@kevcampbell) <a href="https://twitter.com/kevcampbell/status/955018179499188224?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 21, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>So whether it’s consumer reward schemes, customer convenience or issues of social responsibility, every comment in supermarket social media adds to the rich tapestry of online debate. There are ways to make yourself heard, and to improve the way retailers serve their customers. Social media channels can be effective online petri dishes for organisational learning – the companies just have to keep listening.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/90634/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Sarah Glozer, Senior Lecturer in Marketing, Business &amp; Society, University of Bath</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/five-tips-to-ensure-your-supermarket-is-listening-to-you-on-social-media-90634"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Retirement Income

Placeholder Content Image

Grace was her name

<p> </p> <p>I have never met Grace Monte. But not a day goes by when I don’t think about her and what her life was like, her few happy moments along with her many difficult ones. I’ve always wondered about the sound of her voice and the kind of life she had once imagined having before she married my father. Her actual life was short and troubled, stuck on a dead-end path with a deadbeat man, with a child to raise and the threat of physical violence a constant presence.</p> <p>In late October 1946, Grace was 24, and my father, Mario Carcaterra, was 29 and already set in his troubled ways. Their daughter, Phyllis, was six. Grace and my father were separated for the third or fourth time – their few friends couldn’t keep track of the on-again, off-again marriage. Grace had taken a small room in a third-rate hotel about 1.6km from the cramped New York apartment they’d shared. She was weary of the unpaid bills, angry outbursts, and painful blows that were inflicted on her and then followed by tearful apologies and pleas for forgiveness. She could no longer tolerate the affairs my father carried on with a string of women – some of them her friends – and the near-daily interference from her mother-in-law, a domineering figure with a hypnotic hold over her son.</p> <p>Grace opened the hotel-room door after my father’s second knock. She stood there in a slip, her dark hair covering one side of her face. He barged in and began the routine that she was all too familiar with: he spoke of a new job coming through, a new place to live, a better life for them. His words had worked in the past but not on this cold autumn morning. Years of lies, abuse, and frustration weighed on Grace, and she wanted so much to be free of them. She lashed out at my father, telling him their marriage was over, the love she’d once felt for him had dissipated, and this time their separation was final.</p> <p>Then Grace said she was in love with another man.</p> <p>The short leash that barely held my father’s temper in check snapped. He tossed her on the bed. They struggled, Grace scratching, kicking, and clawing at him, but my father was much too strong a man. Straddling her thin body, he grabbed a pillow. He saw the fear in his wife’s eyes, pushed the pillow against her face, and held it there, his hands and arms keeping it tight.</p> <p>Within several minutes that must have felt like hours, my father, his body drenched in sweat, removed the pillow and stared down at the woman he loved.</p> <p>Grace Monte was dead.</p> <p>My father was no longer a wayward husband and a gambler. He was no longer a man dominated by his mother. My father was a murderer.</p> <p>I was 14 years old in 1969 when I heard the name Grace Monte. I was in Italy, visiting relatives on Ischia, an island off the coast of Naples. It was there on a beautiful beach in the middle of a sun-soaked morning, the two of us walking along the shore, that my mother shared with me the dark secret she carried in her heart. She was concerned that I was spending too much time in my father’s company and that of his friends. She dreaded the possibility that I would become who he was, a man she lived with and feared. She felt that this spot, far from our Manhattan neighbourhood, was the safest place to tell me the truth about my father.</p> <p>In short order, I learned he had confessed to the crime and was convicted of second-degree murder. He served nearly eight years in prison. Shortly after his release, he married my mother in an arrangement brokered by their families. She was a widow with a son – my half-brother, Anthony. She knew that my father had been in prison but claimed to have not known about the murder until the first night of their honeymoon.</p> <p>I have no choice but to believe her, to be convinced that even in her loneliness, in her desire to offer a better life for her son, she would not have married a wife killer. She said that she felt numb when he told her of the homicide in a manner as relaxed as if he were ordering a late-night meal. From that moment, she knew she had made the gravest mistake of her life.</p> <p>I spent the rest of the day alone and in stunned silence. I sat on that beach until well into nightfall. I had thought I knew my father as well as any son my age could. But after that day, I would never think of him in the same way again.</p> <p>I had, to that point, not been close to my mother. At best, she and I had had a frosty relationship. I couldn’t understand why she harboured such anger toward me. She seemed to resent the fact that I resembled my father. A deeply religious woman, she had few friends, detested my father’s family, and never learned to speak English. Yet she was dependent on an undependable man for all her needs.</p> <p>As I grew older, I came to understand her anger. She had made a horrific choice and was a prisoner in a loveless marriage for 34 years, not to be freed until my father’s death from cancer in 1988. She then moved back to Italy, where she lived, a shell of a once-vibrant woman, until her death in 2004. We spoke regularly during that time, and I sent her money whenever I could. But our relationship had been poisoned from birth.</p> <p>Years passed before I spoke to my father about the murder. But my knowing about it altered our close bond. I no longer felt at ease in his company, and I looked for excuses not to spend time with him. Our laughter-filled days at the racetrack and nights cheering on fighters at Madison Square Garden became distant memories. Instead, I devoted the bulk of my free time to finding out what I could about the woman he had killed and the child he’d left behind.</p> <p>My father’s family shut the door to any questions I had about Grace. To them, her murder was a shame and a horror that they did not want to relive. Over the years, a few pieces of the stained puzzle of my father’s past slipped out. Once, at a relative’s house, I spotted a copy of a true-crime magazine from the 1940s. The cover story was about my father and Grace, with a headline that blared “No Other Man Could Have Her”. And there was the photo that fell out of a family album. I didn’t have to be told whose picture it was; all I needed to see was the reaction of the other people at the table, frantically hiding it. But I had seen enough. She was as beautiful as I’d imagined her to be, her eyes filled with passion and with a smile as bright as any light.</p> <p>I did meet my half-sister once at a wedding reception I attended with my father. I was ten, and she was 24. We were introduced by a cousin who told me she was a family friend, but as drinks were poured, lips became looser. An old woman from the neighbourhood pulled me aside, smiled, pointed at her, and said, “That young girl is your sister. You’re not supposed to know about her, and that’s wrong. But you should know – a brother deserves to know.” I was struck by how much she resembled my father.</p> <p>My most lingering memory of my half-sister occurred at the end of the evening. She and I were sitting in the backseat of a crowded car. With one arm around my shoulders, she leaned down and kissed me gently on the top of my head. “I hope we see each other again,” she whispered.</p> <p>After the car pulled to a stop, she got out and walked away. I wanted to jump out and hug her. I felt a connection to her, a bond. I was later told by relatives that she was prohibited by law from having anything to do with her father or his family. But she and my father secretly kept in contact and, I came to learn, met once or twice a year. Later still, I found out that she had five children and had moved numerous times. Although I want answers, my half-sister has wanted peace. At the very least, I feel I owe her that much.</p> <p>I was a married man with two children of my own by the time I finally spoke to my father about Grace Monte. Although I had tried numerous times to broach the subject, I could never muster the words or the courage. In 1988, he was dying of cancer, in the late stages of a disease that had sapped him of his strength and forced him to direct his anger at his illness instead of at others. He knew that I had been told about his crime, and he wanted to tell me that while he had loved my mother in his own way, Grace Monte was his one true love.</p> <p>His powerful sense of loss, the emptiness and loneliness he had endured in silence for all those years since that horrible day in the hotel room in 1946 – that was his real punishment. “I ask myself one question every day,” my father said. “The same question. Why? Why? Why did I kill her? Why?” He had mourned for Grace every day since her death. My father was a tortured man, sentenced to live and die under the weight of an unforgivable crime.</p> <p>Grace Monte is as much a part of my life as she was a part of my father’s. Even now, I try to learn as much about her as I can. I know she loved to dance and heard Frank Sinatra sing live at the Rustic Cabin in New Jersey. She enjoyed going to the movies and, like my father, preferred James Cagney to Humphrey Bogart. She had a sharp sense of humour and a quick temper, and she doted on her only child. She didn’t care much for religion or neighbourhood gossip. She liked reading, and despite her lack of money, she always looked stylish.</p> <p>Grace Monte is my constant shadow, a woman never known but always seen, a woman I will never be able to forget. I have come to think of her in the same way that one thinks of an old friend long gone or a first love. We are linked – Grace and I – and we always will be. It is a link forged by murder and blood, but it exists, and nothing can sever it.</p> <p>Not now.</p> <p>Not ever.</p> <p><em>Written by Lorenzo Carcaterra. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/survival/Grace-Was-Her-Name"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Small ship cruising New Zealand

<p>The myriad wonders and blockbuster scenery of Aotearoa (the land of the long white cloud) are well known thanks to movies like Lord of the Rings and it seems everyone wants a piece of the action.</p> <p>But looking at the map, it’s easy to see how much of this intricate coastline would be overlooked if one were restricted to port-hopping with the larger cruise ships. Captain Cook himself, aboard the tiny Endeavour, was perhaps the first European to sing the praises of his new found southern paradise and he used every opportunity to return and rest his men in the peaceful surrounds of places like Queen Charlotte Sound. Tasman, a century earlier, had received unwelcome attention from the Māori and wasn’t so keen to hang around.</p> <p>From my own experience, many great attractions exist in the smaller cities and towns where large numbers of disembarking passengers could well spoil the special appeal of these out of the way places. One cruise I enjoyed immensely was in the Bay of Islands where kilometre after kilometre of intricate coastline, little nooks, coves and crannies, thickly wooded islands and headlands are all interwoven to create a convivial natural latticework perfect for smaller vessels.</p> <p>Another time I dropped in to little Kaikoura where I discovered their secret – a very deep secret. But now the word is out. Only a few hundred metres off shore, the seabed rapidly plunges into a massive submarine canyon well over a kilometre deep. When warm tropical currents flowing southward crash head-on into the cold Antarctic stream heading north, a swirling mass of nutrient-rich water is sucked up from the depths. This marine smorgasbord attracts an array of aquatic mammals, fish, birds and tourists. Whales, dolphins, seals and all manner of aquatic birds abound in and around Kaikoura.</p> <p>One of the cruise areas that you will see on many itineraries is the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Fiordland which encompasses Milford Sound, Dusky Sound and Doubtful Sound. If you want to get pedantic, it was James Cook who named them ‘sounds’ when in fact they are proper, glacial fjords. No one has dared correct him. While the big ships cruise in and out, it is the smaller ships which will occasionally land guests ashore and conduct excursions as far afield as Queenstown.</p> <p>Napier is another intriguing port. Totally destroyed by an earthquake in 1931, it was rebuilt in the art deco style. Many buildings remain and the city is making full use of its unique assets which, apart from the heritage architecture, include the vast Hawke’s Bay, widely recognised as New Zealand’s leading wine and food region. Walking the ornate streets is a thrill in itself and guided walking tours are great fun.</p> <p>Around the corner from Napier is the Bay of Plenty, regularly visited by the big ships, but an attraction for smaller ones as well. While the large vessels send their guests off to Rotorua from the deep sea port at Tauranga, ,ore adventurous types head out to volcanic White Island where, depending on weather and volcanic activity, tenders may put guests ashore for a steamy excursion.</p> <p>Way down at the very foot of the South Island is Stewart Island, insulated from the world by its remoteness, Stewart Island is a haven for travellers looking for nature, tranquillity and adventure. While it is ideal for small ship visits, bigger ships occasionally creep in too, putting passengers ashore by tender to visit the small village or take shore excursions into the Rakiura National Park which makes up 85 per cent of the island.</p> <p>Now for those really looking for a dash of adventure, New Zealand has a whole bunch of sub-Antarctic islands hundreds of kilometres south of Stewart Island. These little specks of land have been variously used for agriculture, seal hunting and even military surveillance, but all are now returned to national parks and are occasionally visited by expedition ships. Names like Auckland, the Snares, Enderby and Campbell Island all contain wonderful birdlife, particularly albatross and petrels as well as rare fur seals.</p> <p>Thankfully several specialist cruise lines have taken a particular interest in New Zealand and its potential for boutique travel. Bear in mind, you’ll be paying a bit more for these cruises.</p> <p>Cruise lines regularly visiting New Zealand on comprehensive itineraries include Silversea Cruises, Seabourn, APT, Hapag-Lloyd, Ponant and Regent Seven Seas. Niche adventure operator, Heritage Expeditions regularly sail from Bluff, near Invercargill and local small (tiny) ship line Island Escape are also of note.</p> <p><strong>Writer’s Tip: </strong>There’s no bad decision about cruising in New Zealand, so don’t be too worried about choice. Small ship cruises, however, require a bit more attention to detail. Identify as closely as you can what you want to see and do, then go after a vessel that does it. Some of the waters down south can get ‘choppy’.</p> <p><em>Written by Roderick Eime. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/new-zealand-small-ship-cruising-for-mature-adventurers/"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Cruising

Placeholder Content Image

How to become better at crosswords

<p>Like any activity, the more you practise, the better you get. When it comes to crossword-solving, there are quite a few ways to improve your game.</p> <p>First of all, you don’t have to start with 1 across. Have a look at all the clues and start with the ones you know. That will then give you some crossed letters, for the answers you don’t know.</p> <p>The shorter answers are usually easier to guess, so try tackling the 3 and 4-letter answers. Remember that these words crop up often in crosswords, as they are the stepping stones. The most common are those with lots of vowels, so look out for answers such as aria, iota and ooze etc.</p> <p>Look carefully at the clue to see if it’s plural, in which case the answer will probably end in s, (except for the irregular plurals such as children or cacti). Also, the past tense of a verb will most likely give you a word ending in –ed, a present participle will end with –ing, and a superlative clue, such as ‘Most beautiful’ will probably end in –est as in ‘fairest’.</p> <p>Another thing to look out for is a clue that indicates an occupation. The answer often ends in –er (painter, butcher) or –or (doctor, sailor) or –ist (chemist, artist).</p> <p>Many puzzlers use a pencil and have a guess, keeping an open mind if it doesn’t seem to be working. Keep that rubber handy!</p> <p>If you’re not getting anywhere, take a break and clear your head. Sometimes, after a night’s sleep, the elusive answer suddenly comes to you when you next pick up your crossword. I don’t know how that happens, maybe a part of your brain never sleeps and is thumbing through all the million bits of information stored in your grey matter, to find the answer.</p> <p>Finally, if you just can’t finish that crossword, is it cheating to take a peek at the solution? Certainly not, it’s a learning tool. But try just looking at the unfilled answers one at a time, because when you fill in the letters, it sometimes gives you letters to other tricky answers. Sometimes, just one letter can trigger an AHA! moment, and away you go.</p> <p>When it comes to solving those devious mind-bogglers known as Cryptic crosswords, the secret is to keep a very open mind, as clues can be so deceptive. For instance, “Fashion sense shown by trusty leader” might have you racking your brains for a trusty leader of fashion, when all the while, the trusty leader is merely hiding the answer inside.</p> <p>A daily crossword is the perfect way to spend a coffee break. Click here to play online</p> <p>Look out for the trigger words, that indicate what sort of cryptic device is being used. For instance, an anagram clue will have a word or phrase suggesting reorder, going astray, being jumbled or running amok. For example, “Paces around room (5)” – the word ‘around’ is the trigger here, and as ‘paces’ is the only word with 5 letters, it must be an anagram – space, meaning ‘room’.</p> <p>When solving an anagram, you might find it helpful to write the letters around in a circle.</p> <p>Another cryptic signal is a word that is read backwards. Triggers might be ‘reverse’ or ‘back’, such as “Gateman takes back identification (7)”. When you read ‘gateman’ backwards it reads nametag.</p> <p>When a clue contains the words ‘initial’ or ‘at first’, look out for an acronym clue, such as “First impressions never divulge discovery (4)” and then look at the first letter of the first four words – they spell out find.</p> <p>I could go on forever giving tips for solving cryptic clues because unlike other skills, which you can master on your own, solving cryptic clues doesn’t necessarily come naturally. Our ‘How To Do Cryptic Crosswords’ booklet explains the various types of cryptic clues and how to solve them. Our puzzlers have often written to tell us that, having previously thought they would never be able to tackle these mysterious enigmas, they gradually break through - and what a satisfying feeling it is!</p> <p>So practise with an open mind, and don’t give up, is my advice. Your hard work will pay off eventually, when you become puzzle champions!</p> <p><em>Written by</em> <em>Christine Lovatt. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/how-to-become-better-at-crosswords.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p> <p> </p>

Art

Placeholder Content Image

Discover beautiful Ballarat

<p>There’s plenty to do and see in Ballarat. Here are a few things that you can do whilst you’re visiting the town in Victoria.</p> <p><strong>Gold country<br /></strong>The grand streetscape of Melbourne was created from the wealth of the goldfields, specifically Ballarat and Bendigo in the 1850s. Both cities now have populations of less than 100,000 but boast grandiose buildings you’d expect in much larger cities. These, too, were funded by gold.</p> <p><u><a href="http://www.sovereignhill.com.au/">Sovereign Hill</a></u> is a sprawling open-air museum at Golden Point, a suburb of Ballarat. It’s a clever recreation of a goldfields town, complete with volunteer actors. Some of the buildings have been transported here and others have been built from the original plans. Even if you can’t find kids to bring along it is definitely worth a visit. Watching over $150,000 worth of molten gold poured into an ingot can induce gold fever in the most stable personality. Or you can have fun panning for gold yourself. The Gold Museum tells the history of the goldfields, displays gold in all its forms – and you can even buy a gold nugget of your own in the gift shop.</p> <p><strong>Afternoon tea<br /></strong>A surprise highlight of the adventure was churning butter. Perhaps it was Enid Blyton’s depiction of bucolic English farm life but I’ve always wanted to do this (ideally followed by a picnic tea complete with lashings of cream of course). Ask at the desk because at various times during the day, cream and pikelets are made in the Postmaster’s kitchen. Be aware that you’ll earn your treat because after you ha vebeaten the cream and it seems to be firm you’ll still be only about a quarter of the way to ending up with butter and buttermilk.</p> <p>Sovereign Hill, along with the Great Ocean Road and Phillip Island’s penguins, attracts over half a million visitors each year. One show that’s certainly for adults is the sound and light spectacular entitled “Blood on the Southern Cross” that tells the controversial tale of the Eureka Rebellion across the open-air set. Don’t miss it.</p> <p><strong>Downtown Ballarat<br /></strong>In downtown Ballarat it is a joy to simply wander around and take in the streetscape. One of the most impressive buildings is the Mining Exchange that now houses a gold shop with the main hall used for functions. <u><a href="http://www.artgalleryofballarat.com.au/">The Ballarat Art Gallery</a></u>, Australia’s oldest regional gallery, houses remnants of the original Eureka Flag and an impressive permanent collection. The Town Hall and Her Majesty’s Theatre are also worth a look, as is the historic George Hotel.</p> <p>A unique feature of Ballarat is Lake Wendouree, set in the middle of town but still around three kilometres from the CBD. The <u><a href="http://www.ballarat.vic.gov.au/lae/gardens/ballarat-botanical-gardens.aspx">Ballarat Botanic Gardens</a></u> cover 40 hectares on the western side of the lake and is a stunning formal garden surrounded by open parkland. It’s a significant cool-climate garden with many well-established trees and a begonia weekend each March. In 1884 the gardens were adorned with several statues brought from Italy. The garden’s Prime Ministers Avenue is lined by the busts of the 26 Prime Ministers since federation.</p> <p><strong>Famous historical faces<br /></strong>There’s one place in town where history, architecture, the paranormal and horse racing all come together. From the heavily decorated street lamps to the large rooms, imposing façade and turrets, <u><a href="http://www.craigsroyal.com.au/">Craig’s Royal Hotel</a></u> at 10 Lydiard St at the heart of the city has long been a grand hotel. Prince Alfred stayed here in 1867; Adam Lindsay Gordon operated the stables behind the hotel at that time; Lord Kitchener and Mark Twain also chose this as their Ballarat address. In 1911, Dame Nellie Melba serenaded the city from Craig's balcony. It has recently been through an extensive four-year restoration and has transformed into a fine boutique heritage hotel.</p> <p><strong>Fascinating stories</strong><br />One of Australia's most endearing horse racing stories is based around Craig's. The flamboyant Walter Craig, who bought the hotel in 1857 when he was 32, told everyone of a dream he had in which his racehorse "Nimblefoot" won the 1870 Melbourne Cup. In the dream, when he approached the jockey to congratulate him, Craig asked why he was wearing a black armband. The jockey replied "because the horse belonged to Walter Craig who died three months ago". So Craig backed his horse heavily but expected not to see the win. The story was well known and even appeared in a newspaper a day before the Cup. Nimblefoot did indeed win the race at long odds. The jockey was wearing a black armband for Craig who had died three months earlier.</p> <p><strong><em>Have you ever been to Ballarat? Or wanted to go? Join our conversation below…</em></strong></p> <p><em>Written by David McGonigal. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/discover-beautiful-ballarat.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

International Travel

Placeholder Content Image

The beauty of Zambian safari

<p>In Africa the lion may sleep tonight, but on Zambia’s Nanzhila Plains he rises early.</p> <p>Every sense stood to attention as the male lion gave his family a predawn roar-up along our camp perimeter. Thinking ahead to our morning game drive, I took comfort knowing I’d be layered up against the morning cold and hopefully harder to unwrap. But, for now, I revelled in the sanctuary of my cosy bed as I listened for a response from his pride.</p> <p>There was none. Leo was alone in the wilderness, and I knew the feeling. However, while he was trying to rustle up company, I was mighty glad not to have much of it. Nanzhila Plains Safari Camp in Kafue National Park is part of Zambia’s best and longest kept secret, and I wanted it to stay that way.</p> <p>It may not for long, as increasing numbers of safari lovers discover what has been right under their noses. Until now, Zambia visitors were more likely to head for the tourist hotspots of Livingstone, Victoria Falls and Luangwa National Park, or Botswana’s busy Chobe National Park. However, with the market ever seeking fresh frontiers, eyes have suddenly opened to Kafue’s rich resource.</p> <p>Proclaimed in the 1950s but with vast tracts still unexplored, Kafue is Zambia’s oldest and largest national park at roughly the size of Wales. With Nanzhila Plains Safari Camp being the closest true safari experience to Livingstone, and southern Kafue’s only accommodation option, the rumble of safari trucks may not be far away.</p> <p>A new road between Livingstone and the park’s southern Dundumwezi gate will hasten that. Due for completion by the 2019 tourist season, it will cut a three hour drive to the gate almost in half. Once there, the Camp is another hour into the park through pretty miombo woodland, although only in the dry and high season of April to October. Travel in the wetter months along the longer, higher access can add another two hours to the journey.</p> <p>Flying in is another possibility, although it costs. Airstrips service each of Kafue’s distinct regions -southern plains, central lakes and northern rivers - which can also be reached along Kafue’s spinal main road, making self driving an option. Each sector of the park has its unique character and wildlife, so they are worth a look if you have the time.</p> <p>We had just four days, so elected to spend them all at Nanzhila Plains Safari Camp. Its proximity to Livingstone, affordable rates, range of accommodation options and activities, easy booking and transfer arrangements attracted us, as did its diversity of wildlife.</p> <p>This included Leo and his buddies. While the big cats become more prolific the further north in the park you go, the south’s burgeoning antelope numbers now draw all the large predators, including hyena and wild dogs.</p> <p>As I lay in bed listening to Leo’s frustrated rant, I chuckled over our wild leopard chase of the previous day. Many times we drove the same few kilometres of track looking for the maker of leopard prints in the dirt, only to discover the elusive feline had walked over our previous tyre marks in our short absence and vanished once more. In the end we left him to his game playing and returned to camp, to have our host hear him rasping later that night, as if teasing us again.</p> <p>While it may not have the animal numbers of other parks, Kafue hosts greater diversity of wildlife than almost any other African nature preserve. Nearly 500 bird species call it home, some found nowhere else in southern Africa. The rare sable and roan feature among its 21 antelope species, and it boasts all the major predators, buffalo and large populations of elephant. Yet, in 2017 it attracted just over 11,000 visitors, compared with similar sized parks like South Africa’s Kruger, which got almost a million.</p> <p>Tucked up in bed anticipating a morning’s wildlife viewing, I considered that a good thing. There is no jostling for view here, and the few safari trucks have little impact. The animals haven’t retreated from frenzied human activity and are easily visible, particularly in the drier months when they congregate near waterholes like the reedy oasis directly in front of Nanzhila Plains Safari Camp.</p> <p>They dictated our daily schedule. When the wildlife was active early morning or late afternoon, we got active, and when it rested in the midday heat, we retired to our comfortable chalet or the open-walled communal lounge to chat with other guests.</p> <p>Come evening we would be back on the safari truck searching for animals and a scenic spot to enjoy a sundowner and the glorious sunset. Only as the dense African night descended would we turn the truck for camp, eagerly anticipating an haute-cuisine dinner and lively discussion around the open fire.</p> <p>Here the topic would often turn to poaching. Hosts, Steve and Cindy, and their local villager staff know the park, its animals and threats well, and seemed positive about their recovery from decades of plunder by poachers. For Leo’s sake, I hope they are right.</p> <p>Early indications are promising. An October 2017 Wilderness Safari survey reported Kafue’s antelope numbers increased exponentially from 2007, populations of red lechwe up by an astounding 487%. This is no doubt due to the colossal and combined anti-poaching efforts of the Zambian Wildlife Authority, local operators like Steve and Cindy, villagers, Game Rangers International and other conservation NGOs.</p> <p>The time had come to see some of these recovering populations for myself; leave my luxurious bed and roar up my own buddies and breakfast. Leo had gone quiet, although he wasn’t fooling me, and I would still be layering up, at least from the cold.</p> <p>Kafue mornings are so unadulterated you want to pull them over the rest of the day to seal in the purity and promise. I stepped into this one not knowing what was ahead of me or around the corner, except that it wouldn’t be many other humans. I liked that.</p> <p>I liked that I was in a fresh safari frontier where people now help animals to thrive but don’t yet overwhelm them with their presence. I could see wildlife as nature intended it to be, which is what a true safari experience – for both animals and humans – is all about.</p>

International Travel

News

Placeholder Content Image

“He’s keeping us on our toes”: Duchess Kate reveals what Prince Louis is really like

<p>As Prince Louis has turned one on April 23, Duchess Kate has revealed that he is a handful to keep up with and hinted that he’s already walking.</p> <p>Duchess Kate spoke about Louis during an outing to Bletchley Park on Tuesday afternoon.</p> <p>She spoke to former Bletchley Park worker Georgina Rose, and then the Duchess admitted he is keeping her and Prince William “on their toes”.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-7031393/Kate-reveals-boisterous-Prince-Louis-one-keeping-toes.html" target="_blank">The<span> </span><em>Daily Mail</em></a><em> </em>reported that Rose, who was a teleprinter operator in WWII, offered Duchess Kate her “congratulations” on her “beautiful family”.</p> <p>The Duchess replied: “Thank you so much. Louis is keeping us on our toes. I turned around the other day and he was at the top of the slide – I had no idea!”</p> <p>The duchess also revealed in March that the little prince was “cruising”, which is when a child pulls themselves up and uses furniture to move around.</p> <p>“Louis just wants to pull himself up all the time. He has got these little walkers and is bombing around in them.”</p> <p>Louis has already appeared to be a handful due to the outtakes of Prince Charles’ royal portrait for his 70th birthday.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwlmzlbh9Z6/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwlmzlbh9Z6/" target="_blank">Here’s to Prince Louis, here’s to moments like this 📸 - Happy Birthday!!! 🥳 🎁 #princelouis #happybirthdayprincelouis</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/chrisjacksongetty/" target="_blank"> Chris Jackson</a> (@chrisjacksongetty) on Apr 22, 2019 at 11:14pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>As Prince Louis has now reached his first year birthday milestone, it’s clear he’s eager to get up to more mischief and explore.</p>

News

Placeholder Content Image

Duchess Kate stuns in blue as she honours her grandmother

<p>The Duchess of Cambridge has visited Bletchley Park, which is the home of British codebreaking.</p> <p>Bletchley played a massive role in gathering secret intelligence information during the Second World War.</p> <p>The Duchess’ grandmother and great aunty, Valerie and Mary Glassbrow, both worked at Bletchley during the war and were recently added to Bletchley’s Codebreaker’s Wall of Honour.</p> <p>Duchess Kate, mother of three, visited the estate yesterday and honoured her late grandmother by wearing a golden brooch that used to belong to her.</p> <p>The royal member also met with budding codebreakers while viewing a special D-Day exhibition to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings.</p> <p>Joining the young kiddos in a codebreaking workshop, the Duchess was able to watch as boys and girls re-enacted what it would have been like in June 1944 to intercept and decipher German communications.</p> <p>“My Granny and her sister worked here which is really cool,” the mother of three told young codebreakers.</p> <p>“She was sworn to secrecy and she found it very difficult to talk about.”</p> <p>Duchess Kate looked simply stunning in a navy-blue polka dot dress by Alessandra Rich – an outfit she wore once before for the official royal family portraits to celebrate Prince Charles’ 70th birthday in 2018.</p> <p>The outfit, a flowing, figure-hugging frock looked gorgeous on the Duchess and can be bought for AUD$3,259 and some change.</p> <p>The dress features large white buttons and collar, as well as a daring split the royal managed to pull off with grace and elegance.</p> <p><em>Suits</em><span> </span>actress, Abigail Spencer, also wore the same dress last year while attending the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s wedding ceremony.</p> <p>The Duchess of Cambridge went for her staple, glowing makeup look and long curls along with light blue pumps.</p> <p>The 34-year-old royal last visited Bletchley Park in 2014 where she met with veteran codebreakers who worked alongside her grandmother and great aunty.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Duchess of Cambridge’s stunning polka-dot look.</p>

News

Placeholder Content Image

Prince Harry admits to “missing” mum Princess Diana after birth of first child

<p>Prince Harry has opened up about the impact the death of his mother Princess Diana had on him following the birth of his son Archie.</p> <p>Speaking to former soldier Dennis van der Stroon, the Prince got candid over the loss of his mother, as he visited The Hague for the one year countdown to the Invictus Games.</p> <p>Speaking to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7010891/Prince-Harry-opens-death-mother-Diana-birth-Archie.html" target="_blank"><em>Daily Mail</em></a>, Mr van der Stroon said: “He [Prince Harry] said missing a mother is like missing some kind of security, how you need that as a son, and it falls away when you lose your mother.”</p> <p>The royal also mentioned how his perspective on life has changed after the birth of his son as he donned a jacket that said, “I am daddy”.</p> <p>The former Dutch soldier also said that, “Harry talked about how having a small child was his new focus and new goal and I told him how a couple of months ago, I was struggling with my mental health, but my wife’s pregnancy has given me a goal.</p> <p>“Above all he said he was just amazed by the miracles in the world, and how his child has made a lot of people happy. He also told me he’s really happy that his son is so far very quiet."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxQrQI4gtru/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxQrQI4gtru/" target="_blank">Love this! Credit to rightful owner. #babysussex #princeharry #princessdiana</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/diary.of.a.duchess/" target="_blank"> 𝒟𝓊𝒸𝒽𝑒𝓈𝓈 𝑜𝒻 𝒮𝓊𝓈𝓈𝑒𝓍</a> (@diary.of.a.duchess) on May 9, 2019 at 4:40pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Mr van der Stroon, who is hoping to represent Netherlands at the Invictus Games in track and field and sitting volleyball, said his moment with the Prince was “amazing and emotional”.</p> <p>“At a certain moment, we just got connected on this level,” said Dennis.</p> <p>“We talked about how my wife, Mireille, is 20 weeks pregnant with our first child, a girl, and he told me how special it was that his son has just been born.</p> <p>“But he also told me not to make too many plans and that there’s no way you can plan for when the baby arrives.</p> <p>“I was involved in a couple of IED strikes and thought nobody was wounded, the whole experience was like living with 24/7 anxiety and stress," the athlete continued,</p> <p>“I told Harry about my mother and we talked about our shared experience of missing a mum,” he said.</p> <p>“He said he meets a lot of people in his work who have lost a mother, father, sister, brother or relatives and when he hears their story, as he heard my story, he said he doesn’t feel so alone."</p>

News

Travel

Placeholder Content Image

New Zealand aviation experiences you need to try

<p>New Zealand’s diverse landscapes offer an ever-unfolding natural backdrop for flight-seeing and aerial adventures so it’s no wonder that aviation tourism is a popular activity all over the country.</p> <p>New Zealand by air makes for spectacular sightseeing. Vast coastal expanses, high mountain peaks, deep fresh-water lakes, braided rivers, dramatic fiords and colourful volcanic landforms are some of the scenic highlights of the land – celebrated as the home of Middle-earth – that are best revealed from above.</p> <p>Most regions have multiple aviation adventures and activities – from flight-seeing and helicopter landings on an active volcano or a grand tour of the highest peaks in the Southern Alps, to champagne picnics in wilderness locations, West Coast glaciers heli-hikes or heli-ski excursions into remote snowy expanses.</p> <p>Many luxury lodges, wilderness retreats and city hotels have helipads offering easy access, transfers to and from, and the-skies-the-limit activity options – including weddings in majestic natural locations.</p> <p><strong>North Island aviation activities</strong></p> <p>White Island – an active marine volcano off the North Island’s Bay of Plenty coast – is a spectacular and unique landmark. Scenic flights over the island operate from Tauranga, Rotorua and Whakatane, along with helicopter tours that land on the island for a hiking option.</p> <p>New Zealand’s famed central North Island volcanic plateau also sets the scene for flights over Lake Taupo, a cluster of volcanic peaks – Tarawera, Ruapehu, Tongariro and Ngauruhoe – and the treasured dual world heritage Tongariro National Park.</p> <p><strong>South Island aviation activities</strong></p> <p>The South Island, with its sweeping Southern Alps mountain chain, and the continuous parade of lakes and glaciers is an aerial feast.</p> <p>Early morning balloon flights take in the vast expanse of the Canterbury Plains, Pacific seaboard and the snowy mountain peaks while The Grand Traverse is a dramatic scenic flight exploring the highest peaks on both sides of the island and over Mt Cook and Westland national parks.</p> <p>Aviation pioneer Mount Cook Ski Planes has been landing fixed-wing planes on a glacier for more than 50 years – and it’s still the only opportunity in the world for tourists to make this kind of glacier landing.</p> <p>In Westland National Park, helicopters take tourists on a spectacular ascent onto the twin West Coast glaciers – Franz Josef and Fox – with an ice landing and hike across the frozen landscape.</p> <p>The ski fields of the Southern Alps are the launching pad for heli-ski excursions away from the crowds on resort slopes. Methven Heliski operates from a Canterbury high country sheep station, taking powder hounds into the mighty glaciated Arrowsmiths mountain range to make first tracks across the fresh powder.</p> <p>Queenstown’s Over the Top luxury helicopter excursions reveal stunning hidden gems that set the scene for gourmet picnics, extreme golfing, exclusive wine and fly fishing experiences.</p> <p><strong>Home of Middle-earth</strong></p> <p>Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit film fans from around the world know New Zealand as the home of Middle-earth, and flying is the best way to see some of the top Lord of the Rings tourism destinations – guided by locals who helped find the locations and transport the stars during filming.</p> <p>In the Nelson Tasman region, Reid Helicopters operates flights to stunning Lord of the Rings locations in the beautiful Abel Tasman and Nelson Lakes national parks.</p> <p>From Queenstown, Glacier Southern Lakes, Trilogy Trail and Heli Works share insider stories on a string of Middle-earth locations throughout the Southern Lakes region.</p> <p><strong>In the pilot seat</strong></p> <p>New Zealand is an attractive destination for experienced pilots who want to take the controls while experiencing scenic highlights.</p> <p>Flight charter companies and aero clubs throughout New Zealand rent planes for self-fly excursions or offer flying lessons.</p> <p>Omarama, surrounded by the Southern Alps, is a renowned destination for gliding enthusiasts from around the world.</p> <p>At Wanaka, U-Fly Wanaka offers budding aviators the opportunity to pilot a dual-control Light Sports aircraft while enjoying the stunning alpine and vineyard landscape below.</p> <p><strong>Aviation heritage</strong></p> <p>New Zealand’s national symbol might be the flightless kiwi bird but that has never held back the human Kiwi population whose love-affair with the skies and all things aerial – from planes, helicopters, gliders and hot air balloons, to airborne adventure sports like skydive and paragliding – goes back to the earliest days of flight.</p> <p>New Zealanders embraced the aviation revolution as inventors, pilots and passengers. Some rose to fame – including solo pilot Jean Batten for her record-breaking journeys, early inventor-aviator Richard Pearse, and tourism pioneer Sir Henry (Harry) Wigley whose Kiwi ingenuity developed the world’s first retractable skis for planes.</p> <p>At New Zealand’s oldest aerodrome – Mandeville airfield near Croydon, in Southland – the Croydon Aircraft Museum has a collection of planes from the 1930s era including de Havilland aircraft. Visitors can take a nostalgic flight in a Tiger Moth or, for the daring, experience the adrenalin rush of an acrobatic joy ride. They can also watch activities in the workshop which is recognised as a world leader in aviation restoration and, once a year in February, the Mandeville Fly-In Weekend attracts incredible vintage aircraft from the 1920s and 1930s.</p> <p><strong>Aviation museums &amp; collections</strong></p> <p>New Zealand’s aviation heritage and heroes are celebrated in a series of museums and collections throughout New Zealand. Notable world-class aviation collections are open to visitors in Auckland, Tauranga and Masterton (in the North Island), Marlborough and Wanaka (in the South Island). Many smaller collections are also open to the public:</p> <p><strong>Auckland:</strong> MOTAT Aviation Display Hall – one of the southern hemisphere’s most impressive aircraft collections.</p> <p><strong>Tauranga:</strong> Classic Flyers Aviation Museum – includes classic aircraft that regularly take to the skies and aviation memorabilia.</p> <p><strong>Masterton:</strong> The Vintage Aviator Fighter Collection – rare rotating collection of airworthy WWI and WWII fighter aircraft on display at Hood Aerodrome.</p> <p><strong>Marlborough:</strong> Omaka Aviation Heritage Centre – not just another museum, this is an inspiring multi-sensory experience featuring film-maker Sir Peter Jackson’s incredible collection of WWI and WWII aircraft displayed in out-of-this world movie sets.</p> <p><strong>Christchurch:</strong> Air Force Museum – features several generations of classic aircraft, and entry is free.</p> <p>Wanaka: Wanaka Airport – home of the biennial Warbirds over Wanaka airshow – draws together several aviation experiences. Warbirds &amp; Wheels Museum is a collection of rare fighter aircraft and vintage vehicles that tells the stories of the New Zealand flying aces of WWI and WW2 and documents the life of local flying legend Sir Tim Wallis. The National Transport and Toy Museum is one of the world’s largest private collections and includes rare and unusual aircraft and vehicles. Classic Flights will take nostalgic punters up and away in a vintage Tiger Moth.</p> <p><strong>Aviation events</strong></p> <p>New Zealand hosts several high profile aviation airshows and events:</p> <p>Wings over Wairarapa – three-day biennial event (February)</p> <p>Mandeville Vintage Aircraft Fly-in – two-day event (March)</p> <p>Classic Fighters at Omaka – three-day biennial event (April)</p> <p>Balloons over Waikato – five-day event (March)</p> <p>Wairarapa Balloon Festival – held annually (April)</p> <p>Warbirds over Wanaka – three-day biennial event (April)</p> <p><strong>More information</strong></p> <p>Aero Clubs: <a href="http://www.flyingnz.co.nz">www.flyingnz.co.nz</a></p> <p>Air licensing requirements: <a href="http://www.caa.govt.nz">www.caa.govt.nz</a></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/new-zealand-aviation-tours-experiences/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Travel Tips

Placeholder Content Image

4 reasons to book a holiday to Italy

<p>Just four? That means leaving out several thousand more reasons to love Italy. This European nation is heaven for lovers of food, wine, fashion, history, art, culture, beaches and mountains … and the good life, la dolce vita, of course.</p> <p><strong>1. Food</strong></p> <p>According to popular tradition, the original pizza Margherita was dreamed up in Naples in 1889 in honour of Queen Margherita of Savoy and the colours of the Italian flag – red (tomato), white (mozzarella) and green (basil). Whether that’s strictly accurate, there’s no doubt that Italian cuisine is a splendorous thing. From antipasti – charcuterie and cheeses – to 300 different types of fresh pasta and delicious desserts such as tiramisu and zabaglione, every region has its own speciality dish. </p> <p><strong>2. Cities </strong></p> <p>Italy’s most famous cultural and historic hot spots – Rome, Florence and Venice – are best visited in early spring, late autumn or winter as they are heaving with tourists at the height of summer. A guided cycling tour offers an enthralling overview of ancient Rome. You will need to choose which of Florence’s treasures you most want to see. That will be a difficult choice. In Venice, a vaporetto (public water ferry) trip along the Grand Canal is a wonderful introduction to La Serenissima. You might want to add Milan, Verona, Naples and Genoa to your big-city hit list – and then there are many exquisite smaller cities such as Lucca, Ravenna and Parma. The Cinque Terra offers colourful villages built into the hillside overlooking the Mediterranean. So much to see, so little time! </p> <p><strong>3. Mountains &amp; lakes</strong></p> <p>Seasoned hikers, climbers and skiers should head for the Dolomites — a majestic mountain range in north-eastern Italy. Less sporty types will love the picturesque villages and glamorous towns. Cortina d’Ampezzo, where the Bond movie For Your Eyes Only was filmed, is best known as a sophisticated ski resort but is stunningly beautiful year-round. The region’s scenic lakes have attracted travellers for centuries. Maggiore and Como are a magnet for jet-setters. Lake Orta is a less-visited jewel.</p> <p><strong>4. Island life</strong></p> <p>Sicily and Sardinia, the two biggest islands in the Mediterranean, belong to Italy (along with about 350 smaller ones). Sicily has beaches, small elegant cities such as Palermo and Syracuse, picturesque villages and the towering active volcano, Mount Etna. Sardinia is dotted with ancient ruins, medieval towns and is renowned for its glorious Costa Smeralda, a haven for the rich and famous. Both islands have their own distinctive cuisine and traditional Sardinian vineyards are a drawcard for wine aficionados. World Heritage Sites Italy is home to more UNESCO World Heritage Sites than any other country in the world. There are 47 cultural sites and four natural sites and the whole of Rome’s historic centre and the Holy See comprise just one.</p> <p><em>Written by Sally MacMillan. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/italy-holiday/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Travel Tips

Placeholder Content Image

4 most common cruise questions – answered

<p><strong>1. Are all cruise ships the same?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cruise ships are each built incredibly differently, and believe it or not, one is not like the other. Cruise ships have a myriad of variations: Big ships, small ships, luxury ships, family ships and so forth. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It is important to research what sort of cruise will best suit you. </span></p> <p><strong>2. Are cruise ships all-inclusive?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While cruises may seem all-inclusive, they are not. Depending on your cruise, you may be required to pay for alcohol, soft drinks, or even a cup of coffee. The same line can offer you free soft drinks and amenities, if you got a good deal. </span></p> <p><strong>3. Will I get sick?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You may be aware that cruise air is not the cleanest (depending on where you are on a cruise ship) but diseases like the norovirus (a stomach bug that can spread easily if you’re not washing your hands properly or practicing proper hygiene) are a little harder to get than you may think. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stay healthy by washing your hands often and use the hand santisiation systems that are usually on every deck with multiple locations. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sea sickness can be treated with a trip to your local GP. If you know you are prone to sickness easily, ask for a prescription. If you prefer to buy some on board, you can do so but be aware it might be a little pricier. </span></p> <p><strong>4. Is cruising safe?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ships have a number of rules and regulations that not only staff must follow, but passengers as well. The reason why you shouldn’t be too worried about safety concerns, keep in mind being onboard a vessel is like a floating mini city. Protect your personal and valuable items by not leaving them lying around, and placing them in your cabin safe.</span></p>

Cruising

Placeholder Content Image

“Shameless”: Roger Federer fans left speechless over controversy

<p>Fans in Rome were ecstatic when tennis legend Roger Federer announced that he was returning to the clay courts in the Italian Open after a three-year hiatus.</p> <p>Federer took to his Instagram account to let fans know that he would be playing in Italy. The video says:</p> <p>“Just finished speaking to the team and happy to say I’m coming back to Rome to play in Italy,” he said.</p> <p>“Can’t wait. It’s so exciting. It’s been too long. I’ll see you there. Ciao tutti. Bye bye.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxUkTOugJDl/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxUkTOugJDl/" target="_blank">😃🇮🇹🇮🇹🇮🇹🎾</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/rogerfederer/" target="_blank"> Roger Federer</a> (@rogerfederer) on May 11, 2019 at 4:56am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>However, that joy quickly turned to anger once fans realised that tournament organisers had doubled the ticket prices after the announcement.</p> <p>The tickets have been bumped from €60 to €132 ($96 to $212). The Italian Tennis Federation tried to justify the price bump by saying:</p> <p>“We want to reward fans who had bought tickets before they knew Federer would play.”</p> <p>But many fans weren’t happy with that explanation.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Federer plays the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/IBI19?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#IBI19</a> in Rome. The President of the Italian Federations: "We have doubled the price of tickets for Wednesday, the day Federer will play. We want to reward fans who had bought tickets before they knew Federer would play"<br />That's one way of looking at it</p> — Vanni Gibertini (@vgibertini) <a href="https://twitter.com/vgibertini/status/1127616616244625408?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">12 May 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">The most ridiculous reason for a price increase I have evr heard. I mean, if Federer wasn't coming, wouldn't they still prefer to sell the tickets?😂</p> — Timi Tennis (@tennisrambling1) <a href="https://twitter.com/tennisrambling1/status/1127619791378890752?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">12 May 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Boo hiss to this tournament for the shameless grifting. It really is adding insult to injury to then try to spin it by saying the motivation was to reward those who'd already bought their tickets. Yuck.</p> — 2centsannandale (@2centsannandale) <a href="https://twitter.com/2centsannandale/status/1127637286332530688?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">12 May 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Federer himself isn’t a fan of the decision either. He recently explained in Rome that it was “disappointing to hear”.</p> <p>“That’s obviously disappointing to hear,” said Federer to <a rel="noopener" href="https://scroll.in/field/923554/disappointing-federer-criticises-italian-open-organisers-for-increasing-ticket-price-of-his-match" target="_blank"><em>Scroll</em></a>.   </p> <p>“They made it in a way like they rewarded the fans who bought tickets earlier, which is sort of strange,” he added, saying there wasn’t anything he could do about it.</p> <p>“Look, I just really hope it doesn’t take away the fact I’m really happy to be here. There’s going to be good crowds hopefully, good atmosphere. I’m pumped up to play well. I mean, my excitement couldn’t be bigger.”</p> <p>Federer explained that his decision to play in Italy is to get more match practice on clay.</p> <p>“I think I was playing well in Madrid, so I just said, again, ‘Let’s come to Rome, a city I like so much as well’.</p> <p>“Madrid is a tough place to play. I felt like playing somewhat maybe more sea level conditions would be good for me. There would be excitement, more excitement than me coming to a practice court in Switzerland,” he said on his last-minute decision to play.</p> <p>“I think this week, then next week in Paris, it’s going to be interesting to see how I play the points, how I do it all.”</p>

Travel Trouble

Health

Placeholder Content Image

5 misleading foods that claim to be healthy

<p>Food gives us the nutrients we need to survive, and we know a balanced diet <a href="https://www.who.int/behealthy/healthy-diet">contributes to good health</a>.</p> <p>Beyond this, many people seek out different foods as “medicines”, hoping eating certain things might prevent or treat particular conditions.</p> <p>It’s true many foods contain “<a href="https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/bioactive-compound">bioactive compounds</a>” – chemicals that act in the body in ways that might promote good health. These are being studied in the prevention of cancer, heart disease and other conditions.</p> <p>But the idea of food as medicine, although attractive, is easily oversold <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4404/How-cloves-garlic-guard-cancer.html">in the headlines</a>. Stories tend to be based on studies done in the lab, testing concentrated extracts from foods. The effect seen in real people eating the actual food is going to be different to the effects in a petri dish.</p> <p>If you do the maths, you’ll find you actually need to eat enormous amounts of particular foods to get an active dose of the desired element. In some cases, this might endanger your health, rather than protecting it.</p> <p>These four foods (and one drink) show the common healing claims around the foods we eat don’t always stack up.</p> <p><strong>1. Cinnamon</strong></p> <p>Cinnamon, which contains a compound called cinnamaldehyde, is claimed to <a href="https://www.ibtimes.sg/cinnamon-your-best-companion-fight-obesity-study-suggests-side-effects-20788">aid weight loss and regulate appetite</a>.</p> <p>There is evidence cinnamaldehyde <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24019277">can reduce cholesterol in people with diabetes</a>. But this is based on studies of the chemical in large doses – not eating the spice itself.</p> <p>These studies give people between 1 and 6 grams of cinnamaldehyde per day. Cinnamon is about <a href="http://www.orientjchem.org/vol30no1/extraction-of-essential-oil-from-cinnamon-cinnamomum-zeylanicum/">8% cinnamaldehyde</a> by weight – so you’d have to eat at least 13 grams of cinnamon, or about half a supermarket jar, per day. Much more than you’d add to your morning porridge.</p> <p><strong>2. Red wine</strong></p> <p>The headlines on the health benefits of red wine are usually because of a chemical in grape skins called resveratrol. Resveratrol is a <a href="https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/79/5/727/4690182">polyphenol</a>, a family of chemicals with <a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-the-untrue-story-of-antioxidants-vs-free-radicals-15920">antioxidant</a> properties.</p> <p>It’s been <a href="https://theconversation.com/resveratrol-in-a-red-wine-sauce-fountain-of-youth-or-snake-oil-12743">claimed resveratrol</a> protects our cells from damage and reduces the risk of a range of conditions such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and heart disease.</p> <p>There is some limited evidence that resveratrol has benefits in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4942868/">animal models</a>, although studies done in humans <a href="https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article/71/12/822/1833632">have not shown a similar effect</a>.</p> <p>It varies by wine, but red wine contains about 3 micrograms (about 3 millionths of a gram) of resveratrol <a href="https://www.ajevonline.org/content/43/1/49">per bottle</a>. The studies that have shown a benefit from resveratrol use at least 0.1 grams per day (that’s 100,000 micrograms).</p> <p>To get that much resveratrol, you’d have to drink roughly 200 bottles of wine a day. We can probably all agree that’s not very healthy.</p> <p><strong>3. Blueberries</strong></p> <p>Blueberries, like red wine, are a <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf034150f">source of resveratrol,</a> but at a few micrograms per berry you’d have to eat more than 10,000 berries a day to get the active dose.</p> <p>Blueberries also contain compounds called anthocyanins, which <a href="https://academic.oup.com/advances/article/2/1/1/4591636">may improve some markers of heart disease</a>. But to get an active dose there you’re looking at 150-300 blueberries per day. More reasonable, but still quite a lot of fruit – and expensive.</p> <p><strong>4. Chocolate</strong></p> <p>The news that dark <a href="https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1114811/high-blood-pressure-diet-foods-dark-chocolate-lower-reading">chocolate lowers blood pressure</a> is always well-received. Theobromine, a chemical in chocolate has been shown to lower blood pressure in doses of about <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20823377">1 gram of the active compound</a>, but not at lower doses. Depending on the chocolate, you could be eating 100g of dark chocolate before you reached this dose.</p> <p>Chocolate is a discretionary food, or “junk food”. The <a href="http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/national/resource/australian-dietary-guidelines-standard-serves">recommended serve for discretionary foods</a> is no more than 600 kilojoules per day, or 25g of chocolate. Eating 100g of chocolate would be equivalent to more than 2,000kJ.</p> <p>Excess kilojoule consumption leads to weight gain and being overweight increases risk of heart disease and stroke. So these risks would likely negate the benefits of eating chocolate to lower your blood pressure.</p> <p><strong>5. Turmeric</strong></p> <p>Turmeric is a favourite. It’s good in curries, and recently we’ve seen hype around the tumeric latte. Stories pop up regularly about its healing power, normally based on <a href="https://theconversation.com/science-or-snake-oil-can-turmeric-really-shrink-tumours-reduce-pain-and-kill-bacteria-76010">curcumin</a>.</p> <p>Curcumin refers to a group of compounds, called curcuminoids, that might have some health benefits, like reducing inflammation. Inflammation helps us to fight infections and respond to injuries, but too much inflammation is a problem in diseases like <a href="https://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/inflammatory-arthritis/">arthritis</a>, and might be linked to other conditions like <a href="https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/01.CIR.0000129535.04194.38">heart disease or stroke.</a></p> <p>Human trials on curcumin have <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261561413002501">been inconclusive</a>, but most use curcumin supplementation in very large doses of 1 to 12 grams per day. Turmeric is about 3% curcumin, so for each gram of tumeric you eat you only get 0.03g of curcumin. This means you’d have to eat more than 30g of tumeric to get the minimum active dose of tumeric.</p> <p>Importantly, curcumin in turmeric is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3918523/">not very bioavailable</a>. This means we only absorb about 25% of what we eat, so you might actually have to eat well over 100g of turmeric, every day, to get a reasonable dose of curcumin. That’s a lot of curry.</p> <p><strong>What to eat then?</strong></p> <p>We all want food to heal us but focusing on single foods and eating mounds of them is not the answer. Instead, a balanced and diverse diet can provide foods each with a range of different nutrients and bioactive compounds. Don’t get distracted by quick fixes; focus instead on enjoying a variety of foods.</p> <p><em>Written by Emma Beckett and Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/these-5-foods-are-claimed-to-improve-our-health-but-the-amount-wed-need-to-consume-to-benefit-is-a-lot-116730"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

4 life changing TED Talks

<p><span>Hearing words of inspiration and enlightenment can be truly empowering – which explains why TED Talks have amassed so many fans across the world. Here are some of the best TED Talks that people say have transformed their perspectives and changed their lives.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>My year of saying yes to everything</span></em><span> by Shonda Rhimes</span></strong></p> <div style="max-width: 854px;"> <div style="position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/lang/en/shonda_rhimes_my_year_of_saying_yes_to_everything" width="854" height="480" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> </div> <p><span>Television titan Shonda Rhimes may be one of the world’s busiest women – but when work started to define her, her decision to say “yes” to the things that scared her turned out to enrich her life in unexpected ways and help her find fulfilment outside of her career.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>The power of vulnerability </span></em><span>by Brené Brown </span></strong></p> <div style="max-width: 854px;"> <div style="position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability" width="854" height="480" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> </div> <p><span>Shame and vulnerability might seem like a weakness in today’s world, but author and researcher Brené Brown argued that they are essential in enabling us to love, empathise and belong. “In order for connection to happen, we have to allow ourselves to be seen, really seen,” she said.</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>The art of asking</span></em><span> by Amanda Palmer</span></strong></p> <div style="max-width: 854px;"> <div style="position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/amanda_palmer_the_art_of_asking" width="854" height="480" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> </div> <p><span>Ever felt hesitant to ask for a favour? Musician Amanda Palmer made an argument for forgoing shame, opening up and expressing your needs. “Through the very act of asking people, I'd connected with them, and when you connect with them, people want to help you,” said Palmer. “When we really see each other, we want to help each other.”</span></p> <p><strong><em><span>The danger of a single story</span></em><span> by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie</span></strong></p> <div style="max-width: 854px;"> <div style="position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.25%;"><iframe src="https://embed.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story" width="854" height="480" style="position: absolute; left: 0; top: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> </div> <p><span>Putting ourselves in other people’s shoes is often easier said than done, especially when we only know what Adichie described as “the single story”. In this talk, the Nigerian author emphasised the importance of narratives as a way to connect and empathise with other people, as well as to humanise and empower the stigmatised.</span></p>

Mind

Placeholder Content Image

Memory loss? Here's how you can reverse it

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Memory loss has been a longstanding concern amongst the ageing community. However, two new studies have shown that it is possible to restore working memory and reverse age-related memory impairment.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The two studies, conducted separately by Boston University and the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, found that people in their 60s and 70s can boost their brain function through various methods of stimulation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Following the experiments, the memory of the older people in both studies was boosted to a level that was indistinguishable from that of younger adults. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Older people’s memory got better up to the level that we could no longer tell them apart from younger people,” said Joel Voss, associate professor and lead author of the Northwestern study.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the Northwestern research, to be published in the </span><em><a href="https://n.neurology.org/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Neurology</span></a></em> <span style="font-weight: 400;">journal, 16 people aged 64 to 80 with normal age-related memory problems underwent Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). The method was aimed at stimulating the hippocampus, a part of the brain which is involved in the formation of new memories. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s the part of the brain that links two unrelated things together into a memory, like the place you left your keys or your new neighbour’s name,” said Voss. In older people, the hippocampus tends to atrophy and shrink, resulting in memory decline.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After the stimulation was applied for 20 minutes a day for five consecutive days, the participants’ performance in memory tasks improved to the level of young adults.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Meanwhile for the Boston University study published in </span><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41593-019-0371-x"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Nature Neuroscience</em></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, a group of people in their 60s and 70s was tested with a memory game against a group of people in their 20s. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At baseline, the younger group outperformed the older group significantly – however, after the latter received 25 minutes of mild electro-stimulation tuned to their individual brain circuits, “the difference between the two groups vanished.” The effect lasted at least until the experiment ended, or 50 minutes after the stimulation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The benefits of the stimulation are not limited to older people – some younger adults who performed poorly on the game also gained better results after getting the same treatment. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the researchers, this is because the electrical currents helped neural circuits in the brain find their rhythm back and become more coordinated.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We showed that the poor performers who were much younger, in their 20s, could also benefit from the same exact kind of stimulation,” said Robert Reinhart, assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences at Boston University and lead author of the study. “We could boost their working memory even though they weren’t in their 60s or 70s.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the results are promising, it is yet to be seen whether these approaches can be applied more widely to help more people with age-related cognitive decline. </span></p>

Mind

Placeholder Content Image

5 ways sex could save your life

<p>From burning calories to boosting your immune system, here are 5 ways scientists have found sex can enhance your health.</p> <p><strong>1. Sex protects your heart</strong></p> <p>Men who make love once a month have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease over men who have nookie at least twice a week.</p> <p><strong>2. Passion relieves pain</strong></p> <p>Your pain threshold can leap by up to 74 per cent as you reach orgasm.</p> <p><strong>3. Sex burns calories</strong></p> <p>It’s the equivalent of a 1km walk followed by a climb up two flights of stairs.</p> <p><strong>4. Making love reduces stress</strong></p> <p>Volunteers who’d had intercourse were least stressed, with blood pressure returning to normal faster.</p> <p><strong>5. Intimacy boosts your immune system</strong></p> <p>Having sex once or twice a week may result in higher levels of an antibody called IgA, which protects against infections.</p> <p><em>Written by Susannah Hickling. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/5-ways-sex-could-save-your-life">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Caring

Lifestyle

Placeholder Content Image

Princess Diana’s niece is dating a 60-year-old millionaire

<p>Lady Kitty Spencer is a well-known face, not just for her successful career as a high-fashion model, but for being the niece of the beloved Princess Diana.</p> <p>However, the model has come to attention again for her love life.</p> <p>The 28-year-old was seen leaving a hotel in Manhattan, New York with her 60-year-old millionaire “boyfriend” Michael Lewis who is the head of the high-end fashion brand, Whistles.</p> <p>The couple have managed to keep a pretty low profile since their relationship went public in August of 2018, and despite rumours of the couple’s 32-year age gap being the main reason for wanting to be unseen by paparazzi, others insist both Lewis and Spencer want to keep their matters together private.</p> <p>Spencer has managed to live a fairly low-profile life, except for her connections to royalty and her successful modelling career until last year when she attended one of the biggest events of 2018 – Prince Harry and Meghan's royal wedding. </p> <p>The princess look-alike blew royal fans away for her striking appearance, stealing the show in her emerald and floral Dolce &amp; Gabbana gown.</p> <p>Spencer signed on as an ambassador with Bulgari who also became aware of her stunning appearance after photos of Princess Di’s niece caused a storm online.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw6gQ6BBQvd/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw6gQ6BBQvd/" target="_blank">A post shared by Kitty Spencer (@kitty.spencer)</a> on May 1, 2019 at 2:01am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Kitty touched down in Australia this week, surprising her own fans down under.</p> <p>“I love you Sydney! So happy to be back,” she wrote to social media.</p> <p>“Australia is the best! Welcome back darling one,” a fan commented.</p> <p>Another added: “Your Aunt Diana loved Sydney, so I’m glad you do too!”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Lady Kitty Spencer’s stunning outfit worn at the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s wedding.</p>

Relationships

Placeholder Content Image

Want to know if your partner's cheating on you? Just listen to their voice

<p>Picture Morgan Freeman, Donald Trump or Margaret Thatcher. Most likely you can hear their voices in your mind, and the characteristic inflections that they put on certain words, as well as their tone and pitch. Even without listening to the words, when you hear someone speak you can pick up important information about them from characteristics such as how loud or deep their voice is.</p> <p>At the most basic level, voices convey biological characteristics such as whether someone is <a href="http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/279/1728/601">male or female</a>, their <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347204003987?via%3Dihub">body size</a> and <a href="http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/277/1699/3509">physical strength</a>, <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/s15327027hc0803_2">age and sexual maturity</a>. For example, Donald Trump’s voice can signal to you that he is a man, and that he has passed middle age. But did you know that voices can also signal a person’s attractiveness, fertility and even the likelihood of them being unfaithful?</p> <p>A popular theory with evolutionary psychologists, known as <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12110-003-1008-y">“cads versus dads</a>”, suggests that more masculine, dominant men are not as paternal and generally invest less in their children and grandchildren than less masculine men. Yet research shows women generally prefer <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347204003987?via%3Dihub">deeper voiced, more masculine-sounding men</a>, especially when these women are <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0018506X05001704">near ovulation</a>.</p> <p>This may be because partnering with deeper-voiced men could lead to genetically healthier children. Deeper voices have been linked to having more <a href="http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/3/6/682">surviving children and grandchildren</a>, <a href="http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1829/20152830">higher testosterone and</a> lower stress hormones, and longer-term survival in men.</p> <p>On the other hand, deeper-voiced men are also rated by women as more likely to <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/147470491100900109">cheat on a partner</a> and as <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090513816300368?via%3Dihub#f0005">less trustworthy</a> in general. Women who judge men with lower-pitched voices as more likely to cheat also <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886913012324?via%3Dihub">prefer those men for short-term</a> rather than long-term partners. Meanwhile, when women <a href="https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2008.1542">are breastfeeding</a> and so currently taking care of a child, they are more likely to prefer men with higher-pitched voices than at other times.</p> <p>This suggests women use something in men’s voices to try to assess how likely to cheat they are, as well as their general trustworthiness. This in turn can affect their attractiveness as a partner, depending on whether the women are drawn towards the paternal care of a potential long-term mate or just good genes.</p> <p><strong>Spotting a cheater</strong></p> <p>But can our voices really indicate whether we are likely to cheat? A <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/1474704917711513">recent study</a> from researchers in the US suggests that they can. Participants were played recordings of people speaking and given no other background information about them, and successfully rated cheaters as “more likely to cheat” than non-cheaters. Interestingly, women were better at this task than men.</p> <p>The recordings were taken from people with voices of similar pitch and attractiveness, who were of similar size and shape, and had similar sexual histories (aside from cheating). This means that none of these factors affected the results. So we currently don’t know what cues the participants used to judge whether the voices came from cheaters.</p> <p>It is not only women who can pick up on men’s vocal cues of good genes and likelihood to cheat, and use it to their benefit. A woman’s voice changes during her menstrual cycle when she is not using contraceptive pills. Perhaps unsurprisingly, men find women’s voices most attractive when the women are <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090513808000263?via%3Dihub">near ovulation</a> (most fertile), than at other times of the month. This information is important to pick up on, as women do not display very explicit signals that they are fertile (unlike baboon females whose bottoms turn red, or female deer who release scents to advertise their fertility).</p> <p>Voices can also signal whether someone is <a href="http://www.ehbonline.org/article/S1090-5138(14)00078-6/fulltext">interested in you</a>. In one clever study, participants were asked to judge the voices of individuals who spoke in a different language to attractive or unattractive potential partners or competitors.</p> <p>The researchers found that, when talking to attractive people, men’s voices tend to reach a deeper pitch, and both men and women increase how varied their pitch is so their voices sound more dynamic than monotonous. Practically speaking, picking up on these types of cues could allow someone to decide whether a person they are talking to might be attracted to them or not.</p> <p>In these ways, the non-verbal characteristics of voices can play a significant role in signalling health, fertility, attraction and potential infidelity, to name a few. Picking up on these cues, alongside the many other cues we receive when talking to someone, can help us make more informed and well-rounded choices about who to spend time with and who to avoid. But the next time you find yourself listening to and judging someone’s voice for these subtle cues, remember that they are judging yours, too.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/92387/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Viktoria Mileva, Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology, University of Stirling and Juan David Leongómez, Assistant Professor of Evolutionary Psychology, El Bosque University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/want-to-know-if-your-partners-cheating-on-you-just-listen-to-their-voice-92387"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Relationships

Placeholder Content Image

What your airline pilot won’t tell you

<p><strong>I’ve been struck by lightning twice</strong></p> <p>Most pilots have. Airplanes are built to take it. You hear a big boom and see a big flash and that’s it. You’re not going to fall out of the sky. – Airplane pilot for a regional US carrier</p> <p><strong>You may not be getting the airline you paid for</strong></p> <p>You may go to an airline website and buy a ticket, pull up to its desk at the kerb and get onto an airplane that has a similar name painted on it, but half the time you’re really on a regional airline. The regionals aren’t held to the same safety standards as the majors: their pilots aren’t required to have as much training and experience, and the public doesn’t know that. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>If you’re a nervous flier, book a morning flight</strong></p> <p>The heating of the ground later causes bumpier air, and it’s much more likely to thunderstorm in the afternoon. – Jerry Johnson, LA pilot.</p> <p><strong>The smoothest place to sit is often over or near the wing</strong></p> <p>The bumpiest place to sit is in the back. A plane is like a seesaw. If you’re in the middle, you don’t move as much. – Patrick Smith, airplane pilot and author of Cockpit Confidential.</p> <p><strong>Sit in the back if you’re always cold</strong></p> <p>The general flow of air in any airplane is from front to back. So if you’re really concerned about breathing the freshest possible air or not getting too hot, sit as close to the front as you can. Planes are generally warmest in the back. – Tech pilot at a regional US airline.</p> <p><strong>There’s a reason you can’t use your phone</strong></p> <p>Well, what can happen is 12 people will decide to call someone just before landing, and I can get a false reading on my instruments saying that we are higher than we really are. – Jim Tilmon, retired American Airlines pilot.</p> <p><strong>Listen when I tell you to put your laptop away</strong></p> <p>We don’t make you stow your laptop because we’re worried about electronic interference. It’s about having a projectile on your lap. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to get hit in the head by a MacBook going 200 miles per hour. And we’re not trying to ruin your fun by making you take off your headphones. We just want you to be able to hear us if there’s an emergency. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>Turbulence is not the problem</strong></p> <p>Pilots find it perplexing that so many people are afraid of turbulence. It’s all but impossible for turbulence to cause a crash. We avoid turbulence not because we’re afraid the wing is going to fall off but because it’s annoying. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>It’s updrafts we really worry about</strong></p> <p>A plane flies into a massive updraft, which you can’t see on the radar at night, and it’s like hitting a giant speed bump at 500 miles an hour. It throws everything up in the air and then down very violently. That’s not the same as turbulence, which bounces everyone around for a while. – John Nance, aviation safety analyst and retired airline captain.</p> <p><strong>Being on time is more important than getting everyone there</strong></p> <p> [In the United States], the Department of Transportation has put such an emphasis on on-time performance that we pretty much aren’t allowed to delay a flight anymore, even if there are 20 people on a connecting flight that’s coming in just a little late. – Commercial pilot from North Carolina.</p> <p><strong>We fudge numbers when it comes to flight time</strong></p> <p>No, it’s not your imagination: airlines really have adjusted their flight arrival times so they can have a better record of on-time arrivals. So they might say a flight takes two hours when it really takes an hour and 45 minutes. – AirTran Airways captain, US.</p> <p><strong>We are often low on fuel</strong></p> <p>I’m constantly under pressure to carry less fuel than I’m comfortable with. Airlines are always looking at the bottom line, and you burn fuel carrying fuel. Sometimes if you carry just enough fuel and you hit thunderstorms or delays, then suddenly you’re running out of gas and you have to go to an alternate airport. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>You’ll never hear this phrase</strong></p> <p>You’ll never hear “One of our engines just failed.” What they’ll say instead: “One of our engines is indicating improperly.” (Or more likely, they’ll say nothing, and you’ll never know the difference. Most planes fly fine with one engine down.) You’ll also never hear, “Well, folks, the visibility out there is zero.” Instead they’ll say: “There’s some fog in the area.” – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>There’s no such thing as a water landing</strong></p> <p>It’s called crashing into the ocean. – Airplane pilot, South Carolina, USA.</p> <p><strong>The truth is, we’re exhausted</strong></p> <p>Our work rules allow us to be on duty 16 hours without a break. That’s many more hours than a truck driver. And unlike a truck driver, who can pull over at the next rest stop, we can’t pull over at the next cloud. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>We’re actually jealous of your onboard meal</strong></p> <p>Sometimes the airline won’t give us lunchbreaks or even time to eat. We have to delay flights just so we can get food. – First officer on a US regional carrier.</p> <p><strong>This is why you get sick after flying</strong></p> <p>Most people get sick after travelling not because of what they breathe but because of what they touch. Always assume that the tray table and the button to push the seat back have not been wiped down, though we do wipe down the lavatory. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>This is when to REALLY pay attention</strong></p> <p>It’s one thing if the pilot puts the seat belt sign on for the passengers, but if he tells the flight attendants to sit down, you’d better listen. That means there’s some serious turbulence ahead. – John Greaves airline accident lawyer and former airline captain, Los Angeles.</p> <p><strong>Driving is WAY scarier than flying</strong></p> <p>People always ask, “What’s the scariest thing that’s ever happened to you?” I tell them it was a van ride from the Los Angeles airport to the hotel, and I’m not kidding. – Jack Stephan, US pilot.</p> <p><strong>What pilots like to hear the most</strong></p> <p>Most of the time, how you land is a good indicator of a pilot’s skill. So if you want to say something nice to a pilot as you’re getting off the plane, say “Nice landing.” We do appreciate that. – Joe D’Eon, pilot at a major US airline who produces a podcast at flywithjoe.com.</p> <p><strong>Is travelling with a baby in your lap safe?</strong></p> <p>No. It’s extremely dangerous. If there’s any impact or deceleration, there’s a good chance you’re going to lose hold of your kid, and he becomes a projectile. But the government’s logic is that if we made you buy an expensive seat for your baby, you’d just drive, and you’re more likely to be injured driving than flying. – Patrick Smith. Here are 7 more incredibly dangerous parenting moves even careful parents make by mistake.</p> <p><strong>Keep your seatbelt on</strong></p> <p>Most of you wouldn’t consider going down the highway at 60 miles an hour without your seatbelt fastened. But when we’re hurtling through the air at 500 miles an hour and we turn off the seatbelt sign, half of you take your seatbelts off. But if we hit a little air pocket, your head will be on the ceiling. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>You can recline but be mindful of who’s behind you</strong></p> <p>If you’re going to recline your seat, please check behind you first. You have no idea how many laptops are broken every year by boorish passengers who slam their seat back with total disregard to what’s going on behind them. – John Nance.</p> <p><strong>We don’t wear our hats in the cockpit, by the way</strong></p> <p>On TV and in the comics, you always see these pilots with their hats on, and they have their headsets on over the hat, and that always makes us laugh. – Joe D’Eon</p> <p><strong>There’s a good reason for everything we ask you to do</strong></p> <p>We ask you to put up the window shade so the flight attendants can see outside in an emergency, to assess if one side is better for an evacuation. It also lets light into the cabin if it goes dark and helps passengers get oriented if the plane flips or rolls over. – Patrick Smith</p> <p><strong>We hear some dumb things</strong></p> <p>I am so tired of hearing “Oh my God, you’re a girl pilot.” When you see a black pilot, do you say “Oh my God, you’re a black pilot”? –Pilot for a US regional carrier.</p> <p><strong>Leave flip-flops in your luggage</strong></p> <p>I always tell my kids to travel in sturdy shoes. If you have to evacuate and your flip-flops fall off, there you are standing on the hot tarmac or in the weeds in your bare feet. – Joe D’Eon</p> <p><strong>We do have control of the temperature</strong></p> <p>Cold on the airplane? Tell your flight attendant. We’re in a constant battle with them over the temperature. They’re moving all the time, up and down the aisles, so they are always calling and saying, “Turn up the air.” But most passengers I know are freezing. – Captain at a major US carrier.</p> <p><strong>Here’s the truth about airline jobs:</strong></p> <p>You don’t have as much time off as your neighbours think you have, you don’t make as much money as your relatives think you make, and you don’t have as many girlfriends as your wife thinks you have. Still, I can’t believe they pay me to do this. – Commercial US pilot</p> <p><strong>Don’t ask for directions</strong></p> <p>I may be in uniform, but that doesn’t mean I’m the best person to ask for directions in the airport. We’re in so many airports that we usually have no idea. – Pilot for a regional US carrier.</p> <p><strong>We sleep in the cockpit</strong></p> <p>Do pilots sleep in [the cockpit]? Definitely. Sometimes it’s just a ten-minute catnap, but it happens. – John Greaves.</p> <p><strong>We don’t dress up for cargo flights</strong></p> <p>One time I rode in the jump seat of a 747 freighter, which carries cargo, not passengers. As soon as the doors closed, the first officer went in back and put on a bathrobe and slippers. No kidding. He said, ‘I’ll be damned if I’m going to wear a tie for a bunch of boxes.’ – Tech pilot at a US regional airline.</p> <p><strong>Don’t complain</strong></p> <p>Remember this before you complain about the cost of a ticket: fares today are about the same as they were in the 1980s. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Crouch. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/34-things-your-airline-pilot-wont-tell-you">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Clever uses for ammonia you’ll wish you knew sooner

<p><strong>Powerful cleaning product</strong></p> <p>Ammonia often plays second fiddle to bleach, but it’s one of the most powerful cleaning products in your arsenal. Here are 20 smart ways to use ammonia all around the house.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean your electric oven</strong></p> <p>Here’s a practically effortless way to clean an electric oven: First, turn the oven on, let it warm to 65°C and then turn it off. Place a small oven-safe bowl containing ½-cup ammonia on the top shelf and a large pan of boiling water on the bottom shelf. Close the oven door, and let it sit overnight. The next morning, remove the dish and pan, and let the oven air out a while. Then, wipe it clean using the ammonia and a few drops of dishwashing liquid diluted in a quart of warm water. Even old baked-on grease should wipe right off!</p> <p><strong>WARNING: Do not use this cleaning method with a gas oven unless the pilot lights are out and the main gas lines are shut off. </strong></p> <p>Always take caution using ammonia! Never mix ammonia with bleach or any product containing chlorine. The combination produces toxic fumes that can be deadly. Work in a well-ventilated space and avoid inhaling the vapours. Wear rubber gloves and avoid getting ammonia on your skin or in your eyes. Always store ammonia out of the reach of children.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove soap and grease scum</strong></p> <p>To get rid of those unsightly soap and grease scum build-ups in your porcelain enamel bath and sink, scrub them with a solution of one tablespoon ammonia in 3.7 litres hot water. Rinse thoroughly when done. Find out more about the best ways to clean the most popular room in the house.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean bathroom tiles</strong></p> <p>Make bathroom tiles sparkle again – and kill mildew while you’re at it – by sponging tiled floors, splashbacks and shower enclosures with ¼-cup ammonia in 3.7 litres water.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to repel moths</strong></p> <p>Pesky kitchen moths seem to come out of nowhere! Send them back to wherever they came from by washing your cupboards, drawers, and pantry shelves, with ½-cup ammonia diluted in 1 litre of water. Leave drawers and cabinet doors open to thoroughly air-dry. Head here for the best kitchen and dining room cleaning hacks.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to make crystal sparkle</strong></p> <p>Has the sparkle gone out of your good crystal? Bring back its lost lustre by mixing several drops of ammonia in 2 cups of water and applying with a soft cloth or brush. Rinse it off with clean water, then dry with a soft, dry cloth.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean oven racks</strong></p> <p>Get the cooked-on grime off your oven racks by laying them out on an old towel in a large washtub. You can also use your bathtub, though you might need to clean it afterward. Fill the tub with warm water and add ½-cup ammonia. Let the racks soak for at least 15 minutes, then remove, rinse off, and wipe clean. Check out the ultimate 10 step whole-house cleaning plan here.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to eliminate paint odours</strong></p> <p>Your freshly painted home interior sure looks great, but that paint smell is driving you up the wall! There’s no need to prolong your suffering, though. Absorb the odour by placing small dishes of ammonia in each room that’s been painted. If the smell persists after several days, replenish the dishes. Vinegar or onion slices will also work. Head here for more on how to banish bad smells from your home.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean fireplace doors</strong></p> <p>Think you’ll need a blowtorch to remove that blackened-on soot from your glass fireplace doors? Before you get out the goggles, try mixing 1 tablespoon ammonia, 2 tablespoons vinegar, and 1 litre of warm water in a spray bottle. Spray on some of the solution; let it sit for several seconds, then wipe off with an absorbent cloth. Repeat if necessary – it’s worth the extra effort. FInd out 16 clever house cleaning hacks the professionals use.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean gold and silver jewellery</strong></p> <p>Brighten up your gold and silver trinkets by soaking them for 10 minutes in a solution of ½-cup clear ammonia mixed in 1 cup warm water. Gently wipe clean with a soft cloth and let dry. Note: Do not do this with jewellery containing pearls, because it could dull or damage their delicate surface.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove tarnish from brass or silver</strong></p> <p>How can you put that sunny shine back in your varnished silver or lacquered brass? Gently scrub it with a soft brush dipped in a bit of ammonia. Wipe off any remaining liquid with a soft cloth – or preferably chamois.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to restore white shoes</strong></p> <p>Brighten up your dingy white shoes or tennis sneakers by rubbing them with a cloth dipped in half-strength ammonia – that is, a solution made of half ammonia and half water.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove stains from clothing</strong></p> <p>Ammonia is great for cleaning clothes. Here are some ways you can use it to remove a variety of stains. Be sure to dilute ammonia with at least 50 per cent water before applying it to silk, wool, or spandex.</p> <p>Rub out perspiration, blood, and urine stains on clothing by dabbing the area with a half-strength solution of ammonia and water before laundering.</p> <p>Remove most non-oily stains by making a mixture of equal parts ammonia, water, and dishwashing liquid. Put it in an empty spray bottle, shake well, and apply directly to the stain. Let it set for two or three minutes, and then rinse out.</p> <p>To erase pencil marks from clothing, use a few drops of undiluted ammonia and then rinse. If that doesn’t work, put a little laundry detergent on the stain and rinse again.</p> <p>You can even remove washed-in paint stains from clothes by saturating them several times with a half-ammonia, half-turpentine solution and then tossing them into the wash.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean carpets and upholstery</strong></p> <p>Lift out stains from carpeting and upholstery by sponging them with 1 cup clear ammonia in 2 litres warm water. Let dry thoroughly, and repeat if needed. Find out 14 cleaning hacks every cat or dog owner should know.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to brighten up windows</strong></p> <p>Dirty, grimy windows can make any house look dingy. But it’s easy to wipe away the dirt, fingerprints, soot and dust covering your windows. Just wipe them down with a soft cloth dampened with a solution of 1 cup clear ammonia in 3 cups water. Your windows will not only be crystal-clear, but streak-free to boot.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to strip wax from resilient flooring</strong></p> <p>Wax build-up on resilient flooring causes it to yellow in time. Remove old wax layers and freshen up your floor by washing it with a mixture of 1 cup ammonia in 2 litres water. Let the solution sit for three to five minutes, then scrub with a nylon or plastic scouring pad to remove the old wax. Wipe away leftover residue with a clean cloth or sponge, then give the floor a thorough rinsing.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia as plant food</strong></p> <p>Give the alkaline-loving flowering plants and vegetables in your garden – such as clematis, lilac, hydrangea, and cucumbers – an occasional special treat with a shower of ¼-cup ammonia diluted in 3.7 litres water. They’ll especially appreciate the boost in nitrogen. Head here to find other surprising fertilisers for your garden.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to stop mosquito bites from itching</strong></p> <p>If you forget to put on your insect repellent and mosquitoes make a meal of you, stop the itching instantly by applying a drop or two of ammonia directly to the bites. Don’t use ammonia on a bite you’ve already scratched open, though: the itch will be replaced by a nasty sting.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to keep animals out of your bin</strong></p> <p>Few things can be quite as startling as an animal leaping out of your garbage bin just as you’re about to make your weekly rubbish deposit. Keep away strays by spraying the outside and lids of your garbage bins with half-strength ammonia or by spraying the bags inside.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove stains from concrete</strong></p> <p>Tired of those annoying discolourations on your concrete work? To get rid of them, scrub with 1 cup ammonia diluted in 3.7 litres water. Hose it down well when you’re done.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to fight mildew</strong></p> <p>Ammonia and bleach are equally effective weapons in the battle against mould and mildew. However, each has its own distinct applications and under no conditions should the two ever be combined. Reach for the ammonia for the following chores, but be sure you use it in a well-ventilated area, and don’t forget to wear rubber gloves:</p> <p>Clean the mildew off unfinished wooden patio furniture and picnic tables with a mixture of 1 cup ammonia, ½-cup vinegar, ¼-cup baking soda, and 3.7 litres water. Rinse off thoroughly and use an old terrycloth towel to absorb excess moisture.</p> <p>To remove mildew from painted outdoor surfaces, use the same combination of ingredients.</p> <p>To remove mildew from wicker furniture, wash it down with a solution of 2 tablespoons ammonia in 3.7 litres water. Use an old toothbrush to get into that hard-to-reach twists and turns. Rinse well and let air-dry.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/home-tips/20-clever-uses-ammonia-youll-wish-you-knew-sooner?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

Finance

Placeholder Content Image

Want to live to 100? Follow these 18 simple rules

<p>Follow these 18 simple rules and you won’t just live longer—you’ll make those (many, many) years count.</p> <p><strong>1. Stop smoking</strong></p> <p>Four years after doing so, your chance of having a heart attack falls to that of someone who has never smoked.</p> <p>After ten years, your lung cancer risk drops to nearly that of a nonsmoker.</p> <p><strong>2. Exercise daily</strong></p> <p>Thirty minutes of activity is all that’s necessary. Three ten-minute walks will do it.</p> <p><strong>3. Eat your produce</strong></p> <p>Fruit, vegetables … whatever your favourites are, just make sure you eat them every day.</p> <p><strong>4. Get screened</strong></p> <p>No need to go test-crazy; just get the health screenings recommended for your stage of life.</p> <p>Check with your doctor to make sure you’re up-to-date.</p> <p>Just be honest. How much you smoke, drink, eat, exercise and whether you use protection during sex or while out in the sun matters.</p> <p><strong>5. Make sleep a priority</strong></p> <p>For most adults who want to live to 100, that means seven to eight hours every night.</p> <p>If you have a tough time turning off the light, remember that sleep deprivation raises the risk of heart disease, cancer, and more.</p> <p><strong>6. Ask your doctor about low-dose aspirin</strong></p> <p>Heart attack, stroke, even cancer—a single 81 mg tablet per day may fight them all.</p> <p>(Aspirin comes with risks, though, so don’t start on your own.)</p> <p>If you’re older, you are at risk from the major problem of over-prescribing.</p> <p><strong>7. Know your blood pressure numbers</strong></p> <p>It’s not called the silent killer just to give your life a little more drama.</p> <p>Keep yours under 120/80 if you want to live to 100.</p> <p><strong>8. Stay connected</strong></p> <p>Loneliness is another form of stress.</p> <p>Friends, family, and furry pets help you feel loved.</p> <p><strong>9. Cut back on saturated fat</strong></p> <p>It’s the raw material your body uses for producing LDL, bad cholesterol.</p> <p>For decades, doctors and medical organisations have viewed saturated fat as the raw material for a heart attack.</p> <p><strong>10. Get help for depression</strong></p> <p>It doesn’t just feel bad; it does bad things to your body.</p> <p>In fact, when tacked onto diabetes and heart disease, it increases risk of early death by as much as 30 percent.</p> <p><strong>11. Manage your stress</strong></p> <p>The doctors we surveyed say that living with uncontrolled stress is more destructive to your health than being 30 pounds overweight.</p> <p><strong>12. Have a higher purpose</strong></p> <p>As one physician advised, “Strive to achieve something bigger than yourself.”</p> <p>By giving back, you give to yourself.</p> <p>Just try to keep your energy levels up for the personal journey ahead.</p> <p><strong>13. Load up at breakfast</strong></p> <p>People in “Blue Zones”—areas with high life expectancies—eat the most at breakfast, then have little or nothing for dinner.</p> <p>Front-loading calories can ward off hungry all day, keeping your weight in check.</p> <p><strong>14. Start fasting</strong></p> <p>You don’t need to go days without food.</p> <p>Simply limiting eating to eight hours of the day gives your body more time to finish its six to twelve hours of digestion.</p> <p>After that, it goes into “fasting” mode, burning stored fat.</p> <p><strong>15. Cook at home</strong></p> <p>Not only do you get to control the ingredients and make healthier choices, but the act of cooking is a mini workout.</p> <p>New to the kitchen and want to save some money?</p> <p><strong>16. Have a sit-down meal</strong></p> <p>Multi-tasking during meals, such as while driving or rushing to get out the door, can put stress hormones in the way of your body’s ability to digest, which won’t help you live to 100.</p> <p>Sit down, or better yet, gather the family together to get the bonus of social time while enjoying a meal together.</p> <p><strong>17. Save up</strong></p> <p>Most people who live to 100 are financially secure.</p> <p>Worrying about money (and how to pay for healthcare) could get in the way of a long, healthy life.</p> <p><strong>18. Focus on the good stuff</strong></p> <p>Research shows people who live to 100 tend to complain less than younger adults.</p> <p>Their lack of gripes could mean they’re better at handling bad situations.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/want-live-100-follow-these-18-simple-rules?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

"We're waiting for you": Madeleine McCann’s parents pay tribute on her 16th birthday

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Madeleine McCann’s parents have marked her 16th birthday with a touching message.</p> <p>Earlier this month marked 12 years since Madeleine disappeared from the family’s resort apartment room in Praia da Luz, Portugal on May 3, 2007, just days before her fourth birthday.</p> <p>On Madeleine’s birthday, which falls on May 12, parents Kate and Gerry McCann marked the date with a message to their daughter on a Facebook page.</p> <p>“Happy 16th Birthday, Madeleine!” they wrote alongside a photograph of Madeleine. “We love you and we’re waiting for you and we’re never going to give up. #ForAsLongAsItTakes”</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FOfficial.Find.Madeleine.Campaign%2Fposts%2F10157177274719931&amp;width=500" width="500" height="645" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe> <p>In an 2017 interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-39757287" target="_blank">BBC</a>’s Fiona Bruce, the parents said they still celebrated Madeleine’s birthday with presents. </p> <p>“I obviously have to think about what age she is and something that, whenever we find her, will still be appropriate,” said Kate.</p> <p>“But I couldn’t not, you know; she’s still our daughter, she’ll always be our daughter.”</p> <p>In her 2011 book <em>Madeleine: Our Daughter’s Disappearance and the Continuing Search for Her</em>, Kate also wrote about how her family would leave presents in Madeleine’s bedroom.</p> <p>“As we’ve continued to do since, we had a tea party at home with balloons, cake, cards and presents,” she wrote, as reported by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/1124423/madeleine-mccann-disappearance-netflix-documentary-birthday-kate-mccann-gerry-mccann-spt" target="_blank"><em>Express</em></a>.</p> <p>“The presents go into Madeleine’s room to await her return. Her pink bedroom remains exactly as it was when she left it but it’s a lot busier now.”</p> <p>On the 12th anniversary of Madeleine’s disappearance, Kate and Gerry shared a statement expressing their gratefulness for the support they received from around the world. </p> <p>“There is comfort and reassurance though in knowing that the investigation continues and many people around the world remain vigilant,” they wrote.</p> <p>“Thank you to everyone who continues to support us and for your ongoing hope and belief.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

3 ways to be generous on a budget

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When it comes to spending on your loved ones, it can be easy to go overboard. But giving does not have to be expensive – after all, it’s the thought that counts. Here are the various ways you can show your love and generosity to those around you without breaking the bank.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Buy in bulk</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instead of coming up with ideas on a unique present for each recipient, buying items in bulk can help you save more and simplify your gift-giving plans. It can be thoughtful, too – a touch of personalisation can make a big difference. For example, you can get plain mugs and add your drawing or handwriting with permanent markers along with small, affordable extras like chocolate, soap bars or cards. </span></p> <p><strong>2. Do it yourself</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is nothing like receiving gifts that have been handmade from scratch. Try to look into the things you already love doing, and go from there. If you like to spend your time baking, prepare a special batch of brownie or pie to share. Enjoy knitting? A handmade sweater or pair of gloves could go the distance. You can also appeal to the shared memories between the two of you through sentimental DIY projects such as photo albums, mixtapes, scrapbooks, drawings and more.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Spend time, not money</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your presence can truly be a present. Instead of getting some gifts off the store, you can try giving more of yourself – be it by helping in the kitchen, reorganising old cabinets and closets, or taking care of the overgrown lawn. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apart from giving your service, you can also suggest a gathering where family members and/or friends can spend time and have fun with low-cost food and activities, such as hiking, playing games, or simply chatting over toasted marshmallow and a hot cuppa. Spending some quality time and creating new memories together can indeed be the true gift.</span></p>

Retirement Income

Placeholder Content Image

Madeleine McCann: The emerging key witness who is a friend of the Queen's

<p>A tourist who may have spotted Madeleine McCann’s kidnapper is a friend of the Queen, reports said.</p> <p>British tourist Carole Tranmer, who was staying in the flat above where Madeleine was staying with her parents in the Praia da Luz resort in May 2007, is once again in the spotlight after a man resembling her e-fit image was reported to emerge as the “person of interest” in the case.</p> <p>Tranmer, who used to work at Windsor Castle, claimed she saw a “prowler” coming out of the ground floor apartment gate “very carefully and quietly” hours before the then 3-year-old girl disappeared.</p> <p>In her police statement, Tranmer said: “Looking down below the McCann flat I saw someone come out of the ground floor apartment closing the gate very carefully and quietly.</p> <p>“It looked very strange to me. He looked to one side and the other, shut the gate and walked very quickly below.”</p> <p>The man resembled convicted German serial killer <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/new-madeleine-mccann-development-convicted-child-murderer-emerges-as-main-suspect/" target="_blank">Martin Ney</a>, who has been speculated to be the “figure of interest” for the Portuguese police.</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/9018686/madeleine-mccann-british-witness-saw-chief-suspect-helped-produce-cop-sketch-queens-friend/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>, 71-year-old Tranmer has been interviewed three times in the past by the British and Portuguese police about “the man acting suspiciously” in the holiday apartment.</p> <p>To help assess her reliability as a witness, Tranmer shared with the police that she worked for the Royal Collection and that she knew the Queen personally. She also makes frequent, private visits to the royal family.</p> <p>Madeleine vanished from her room in May 2007 when her parents were dining nearby with some family friends. Earlier this month, Madeleine's parents, Kate and Gerry McCann, marked the 12th anniversary of the disappearance with a statement: “Madeleine will be 16 this month. It’s impossible to put into words just how that makes us feel … Thank you to everyone who continues to support us and for your ongoing hope and belief.”</p>

Legal

Entertainment

Placeholder Content Image

Why Doris Day's grandson was "cut off" from seeing her

<p>Doris Day’s grandson has revealed that he was prevented from seeing his grandmother in the final years of her life by her manager.</p> <p>Ryan Melcher, the only child of Day’s late son Terry Melcher, wrote in a statement that he found out about the iconic actress’s passing through social media.</p> <p>Doris died on Monday at the age of 97 from pneumonia.</p> <p>Melcher, who works as a real estate agent, shared that he had “not been allowed to see my grandmother for quite some time” due to his parents’ divorce.</p> <p>After his father’s death in 2004 from melanoma, Ryan was invited to a dinner with Doris. However, according to him, Doris' new manager intervened before the meeting took place.</p> <p>“I was asked by this man: 'Why do you want to see Doris?' I was shocked not only at the question, but also that it was coming from someone who was a stranger and outsider,” Ryan wrote.</p> <p>“I just responded, 'Um... She is my grandmother!'</p> <p>“He replied, 'I’m afraid you aren’t going to be able to see your grandmother,' citing the divorce between my parents as his excuse.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxdpfN1AEYn/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxdpfN1AEYn/" target="_blank">A post shared by Ryan Melcher (@ryan_melcher_properties)</a> on May 14, 2019 at 5:35pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Ryan continued, “Looking back, I should have said more; should have drove to her home and not let a stranger come between us, but unfortunately the tall fences and 24-hour guard under her new business manager’s direction prevented me taking a stand and reconnecting with my family. She had been so happy to talk to me and we were both excited for our upcoming dinner together just a week before, and this man was clearly manipulating the situation.”</p> <p>He said he would continue to look back on his memories with her fondly, as he spent a lot of time with her in his childhood. </p> <p>“I would go to her home every day after school and those are memories I will always cherish,” he wrote. “She instilled a drive and confidence that I will carry with me the rest of my life.”</p> <p>In a statement, the Doris Day Animal Foundation said that the actress died at her home in California “surrounded by a few close friends”.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">With heavy hearts, we share the news that Doris Day passed away peacefully this morning at her home in Carmel, Calif. She was 97. More info: <a href="https://t.co/P1UuOhL69m">https://t.co/P1UuOhL69m</a> <a href="https://t.co/JDQf4XaG8I">pic.twitter.com/JDQf4XaG8I</a></p> — DDAF (@DDAF_org) <a href="https://twitter.com/DDAF_org/status/1127941728340664320?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 13, 2019</a></blockquote>

Movies

Placeholder Content Image

The brilliant way Disney celebrated the birth of baby Archie

<p>Plenty of babies and young children have Disney products in their possession, but not many can say they have a special gift directly from the animation company itself.</p> <p>Following the arrival of baby Archie Mountbatten-Windsor on May 6, Disney created a Winnie-The-Pooh animation video to celebrate his birth.</p> <p>The brilliant clip details the honey-loving bear travelling all the way to Windsor Palace to bring a special book to the Duke and Duchess of Sussex and the newborn son in a cradle.</p> <p>In the animation, Winnie-the-Pooh travels all the way from the Hundred Acre Wood to the new royal parents, with a book with a crown on the cover under his arm.</p> <p>The bear then is seen sitting beside the Duke and Duchess as they flip through the book with a smile on their faces.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">To celebrate the birth of Archie Mountbatten-Windsor, <a href="https://twitter.com/Disney?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Disney</a> have created a special Winnie-the-Pooh animation as a gift for Harry and Meghan. The short was hand-painted in watercolour by Disney’s senior principal artist Kim Raymond. Really special🎨 <a href="https://t.co/PrY5wlMeBQ">pic.twitter.com/PrY5wlMeBQ</a></p> — Omid Scobie (@scobie) <a href="https://twitter.com/scobie/status/1126580022150598657?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 9, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The video was shared to social media, garnering in over 7,000 likes and retweets with the caption: “The short was hand-painted in watercolour by Disney’s senior principal artist Kim Raymond.”</p> <p>Royal commentator Omid Scobie shared the sweet animation, one that might have had quite a profound impact on Prince Harry in particular.</p> <p>When his nephew Prince Louis was born in April last year, the Prince reportedly bought a very special gift for the latest royal arrival, which was a rare first-edition of the AA Milne classic.</p> <p>The book, <em>Winnie-The-Pooh </em>was published originally in 1926 and is reported to cost upwards of $15,000.</p> <p>Royal insiders claimed the first-of-its-kind novel was just a small part of a number of first editions Prince Harry planned to obtain for his young nephews and niece.</p> <p>“He originally wanted to get Lewis Carroll’s <em>Through The Looking Glass</em>, which was on sale for £24,000 ($AU45,000), but decided Winnie-The-Pooh would be more suitable reading material,” they told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6727671/prince-harry-louis-winnie-the-pooh-christening/" target="_blank" title="The Sun">The Sun</a></em> last year.]</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the special animation for baby Archie through images.</p>

Books

Placeholder Content Image

“We’ve been in the studio”: AC/DC confirms new music is in the works

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There have been rumours surrounding Aussie rock band AC/DC and whether or not they have been working on a new record.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Their sound engineer, Mike Fraser, can confirm that the band have been back in the studio.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With guitarist Malcolm Young passing away in 2017, fans were worried about the sound of the new album. However, he </span><a href="https://musicfeeds.com.au/news/late-acdc-guitarist-malcolm-young-new-album/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">reportedly</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> worked on “hundreds” of songs with Angus Young, with insiders saying that some of his riffs will be featured on the new album.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BM698gqBts2/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BM698gqBts2/" target="_blank">Thunderstruck ⚡️ Photo by @rp_goldenfotos #rockorbust</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/acdc/" target="_blank"> AC/DC</a> (@acdc) on Nov 17, 2016 at 10:30am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Fraser let it slip on Tony Mantz </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mastering Music Mastering Life</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> podcast that the band were back in the studio.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Well, yeah, I could say that we’ve been in the studio doing something,” Fraser said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What’s come of that I can’t discuss yet.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With Fraser being the sound engineer for the band since 2000, he explained on the podcast why he’s been with the band for so long.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They found a lot of guys they work with are always trying to change [their sound],” Fraser explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Lucky for me, I was a huge AC/DC fan, so I kind of knew what it is, and what it should be. I think that sort of helped. They keep coming back to me.”</span></p>

Music