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Jane Fonda on more plastic surgery: “I’m not going to cut myself up anymore”

<p>Jane Fonda, 82, has decided to fully embrace her age and has urged her fans she has sworn off cosmetic procedures.</p> <p>“I can’t pretend that I’m not vain, but there isn’t going to be any more plastic surgery - I’m not going to cut myself up anymore,” she admitted to <em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.ellecanada.com/culture/celebrity/jane-fonda-elle-canada" target="_blank">Elle Canada</a>.</em></p> <p>The star debuted a stunning new white hairdo at the 2020 Academy Awards, and later said she has had to “work everyday to be self-accepting; it doesn’t come easy to me.</p> <p>“I try to make it very clear that it has been a long and continuing struggle for me. I post pictures of me looking haggard - and once with my tooth out!</p> <p>The Grace &amp; Frankie Netflix star went on to show one of her incisors to the magazine and told them: “This is a fake tooth. It came out in a restaurant in Portugal, and I posted it.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8mEt3iFnhp/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8mEt3iFnhp/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by EQUIPMENT (@equipmentfr)</a> on Feb 15, 2020 at 8:52am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Fonda took to the stage at the Oscars this year to present best picture, where she debuted her new silver icy blonde hue that blew away fans.</p> <p>Her hair colorist Jack Martin shared that “her goal color was a silver icy blonde to surprise everyone at the 2020 <em>Oscars</em> presenting the final award winner for the movie of the year."</p> <p>Choosing to embrace her skin and age is not new to the actress, who told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/may/21/jane-fonda-youth-plastic-surgery-sex-cannes" target="_blank">The Guardian</a></em><span> </span>in 2015 she believed she “brought myself a decade with plastic surgery,” but ultimately walked away from cosmetic procedures altogether.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8X9ldhAkos/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8X9ldhAkos/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Jane Fonda (@janefonda)</a> on Feb 9, 2020 at 9:20pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>In her new HBO documentary Jane Fonda In Five Acts, the title film star expressed some regret at having turned to plastic surgery for her face.</p> <p>“I love older faces. I love lived-in faces. I love Vanessa Redgrave's face. I wish I was braver,” she said.</p>

Beauty & Style

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A side-trip on the Bear Trek

<p><em>Justine Tyerman ventures deep into 007 territory, embarks on a short but hair-raising hike and learns about the history of the ‘</em><em>Village on the Wall’</em><em>...  </em></p> <p>Our Swiss guides casually sauntered down the steep, narrow track as if it was a sidewalk in downtown Zurich. I, on the other hand, exercised extreme caution, placing each foot carefully on the slippery mountainside strewn with loose rocks, making sure I came to a complete halt in a safe place before gazing around at the jaw-dropping views.</p> <p>It was Day 3 of our Swiss ‘Bear Trek’ expedition, and radically different from the previous two which involved strenuous, all-day hikes up and over mountain passes. Instead we deviated from the usual itinerary, taking a side-trip to the top of the Schilthorn. This involved catching a series of impressive cable-cars which whisked us from the Lauterbrunnen Valley far above the clouds to a mountain peak almost 3000 metres above sea level. Grey and drizzly in the valley, it was another world up there, bathed in bright sunshine, hobnobbing with mountain peaks.</p> <p>The 360-degree panorama from the Schilthorn summit gave us an entirely different perspective on the Bernese trio – the Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau – and more than 200 members of mountain royalty including Europe’s highest mountain, Mont Blanc, 4,808m, in neighbouring France. Communing eye-to-peak with such alpine giants was breath-taking. Below us, the clouds were neatly tucked into the folds of the valley like a fluffy white duvet.</p> <p>But there’s more to the Schilthorn than spectacular alpine scenery. The mountain featured in the sixth Bond movie, <em>On Her Majesty’s Secret Service </em>(1969), and the revolving restaurant, Piz Gloria, served as the headquarters of the <span>evil genius and super-villain Ernst Stavro</span> Blofeld. At the top of the mountain, there’s a highly-entertaining, interactive Bond World, replays of 007 movies, a Walk of Fame featuring the actors, stuntmen, cameramen and directors, and even Bond-themed toilets that won an international tourism award for ‘best bathrooms’. The restaurant serves 007 burgers. I just had to have one for lunch while I watched the parade of peaks drift by the revolving restaurant.</p> <p>The Schilthorn is also renowned for its vertiginous Skyline Walk, a 200m-long glass and steel bridge that clings to the rock face below the cablecar station at Birg. Only in Switzerland would I agree to do such a thing. I trust the engineering here – 100 percent. I felt so confident, I even crawled through an eight-metre steel-mesh tunnel above a sheer drop and walked along a wire suspended high above the rocks... enclosed inside a sturdy safety net. Thrilling but safe. My colleagues decided the tunnel was a fine spot for some relaxed sight-seeing but I wasted no time in there.</p> <p>The Schilthorn has another claim to fame. It’s the starting gate of the 15km ‘Inferno’ ski race to Lauterbrunnen, the largest amateur ski race in the world. The race dates back to 1928 on one of the longest pistes in Switzerland. There’s a summer version of the event too, the Inferno Triathlon from Thun to the Schilthorn, which began in 1992. One of the toughest endurance races in the world with an ascent of 5500 metres, it must also be one of the most scenic.</p> <p>Having explored the Schilthorn’s many attractions and magnificent views, our local guides Jana and Nick led us down the top section of the triathlon route, the only hiking we ended up doing that day. It was a short stint compared to previous days but one that required intense concentration and focus. A carelessly-placed foot could have led to a rather rapid descent. I was astounded to think triathletes could run up such a track... and even more astonished to see a sign at the top which read: ‘High-heeled shoes prohibited!’</p> <p>Jana said: “Believe me, it does happen!”</p> <p>Late afternoon, we took a cablecar down to Mürren where we checked into the lovely Hotel Alpenruh.</p> <p>Nick conducted a walking tour of his delightful, car-free village which sits on a ledge high above the Lauterbrunnen Valley. You wouldn’t want to be a somnambulant in Mürren – at the edge of the ledge, there’s a sheer drop of 800m to the valley floor.</p> <p>Mürren, the highest, continually-inhabited village settlement in the canton of Bern, has a fascinating history with records dating back to 1257 when the ‘Village on the Wall’ was first mentioned. Millions of years before that, 200 million to be precise, Mürren was submerged under the ocean, and 25,000 years ago, it was 1.2km under glacial ice which only began to recede 8000 years ago.</p> <p>Prior to the 1850s, the inhabitants of the high terrace survived by subsistence farming but as the region warmed and the snow and ice melted, Mürren became more accessible, and along came international tourism.</p> <p>It’s a place of many firsts, Nick explained as we walked around the pretty little village.</p> <p>With the opening of Mürren’s first hotel, the ‘Silberhorn’ in 1857, and the ‘Grand Hotel Des Alpes’ and the ‘Kurhaus’ in 1870, the village became the summer retreat of aristocrats, politicians, painters and scholars from all over Europe, especially Britain. In 1891, the Lauterbrunnen to Mürren railway was inaugurated and in 1910, Mürren enjoyed its first winter tourism season. We came across the original passenger car of a horse-drawn tramway opened in 1894 to transport guests and goods from the train stations to the Grand Hotel Kurhaus.</p> <p>Nick pointed out the Allmendhubel Funicular opened in 1912, and a memorial to British skier and mountaineer Sir Arnold Lunn who set the world’s first slalom course in Mürren in 1922, and organised the first world championship in downhill and slalom racing in 1931.</p> <p>In 1923, the British Ladies Ski Club was founded in Mürren and in1924, Lunn started the Kandahar Ski Club, the oldest, most distinguished British ski club whose 1400 members include royals and celebrities.</p> <p>The first Inferno Race (from Schilthorn to Lauterbrunnen) took place in 1928 organised by a bunch of British ski enthusiasts; in 1930, Switzerland’s first ski school was founded; and in 1937, Mürren celebrated the opening of the first ski lift in the Bernese Oberland.</p> <p>The mid-1960s saw the construction of cableways from Stechelberg to the Schilthorn and in 1969, the revolving restaurant ‘Piz Gloria’ opened, thanks to the makers of the Bond movie ‘On Her Majesty’s Secret Service’ who helped fund the completion of the project.</p> <p>I loved the tranquillity of the vehicle-free village, the deer grazing in the nearby meadows and sun-blackened walls of the traditional old chalets and barns with their window boxes and steep-pitched rooves. The oldest house in the village dates back to 1547.</p> <p>Nick joined us for dinner at the Hotel Alpenruh where we consumed a large cauldron of rich, creamy fondue made from local cheese. It was a fun evening, our last night together as a group - three Aussies, one Kiwi and our Swiss tour leader. I would miss the camaraderie of the Aussies and the immensely-capable Birgit, but I was excited to be heading to Montreux and then on to Zermatt.</p> <p>My travel itinerary for the next day looked terrifying with four tight changes in four hours involving cable cars, buses and trains.</p> <p>But I knew it would go smoothly, just like clockwork, with the various stations, timetables and modes of transport all perfectly synchronised and aligned. That’s Switzerland. Stress-free travel...</p> <p>See also the first two of Justine’s stories about the Bear Trek: <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/travel/international-travel/the-slow-coach" target="_blank">Part 1</a> | <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/travel/international-travel/in-the-company-of-mountain-gods" target="_blank">Part 2</a></p> <p><em>The Bear Trek is part of the Via Alpina, a classic among long-distance hikes in Switzerland. The Via Alpina is a challenging mountain hike through the picture-perfect landscapes of Switzerland’s Northern Alps. A series of 20 daily stages takes hikers over 14 alpine passes and through a great variety of alpine terrain, villages, flora and fauna - a hiking enthusiast’s dream. Mountain restaurants and hotels provide meals and accommodation along the way. Eurotrek organised our accommodation and luggage transfers so we just carried a light day pack. They also provided excellent detailed maps of the route.</em></p> <p><em>Justine Tyerman was a guest of </em><span><a href="https://www.myswitzerland.com/en-nz/"><em>Switzerland Tourism</em></a></span><em>, travelled courtesy of </em><span><a href="https://www.myswitzerland.com/en-nz/planning/transport-accommodation/tickets-public-transportation/"><em>Swiss Travel Pass</em></a></span><em> and hiked in the </em><span><a href="http://www.schilthorn.ch"><em>Schilthorn Region</em></a></span><em> with </em><span><a href="https://www.eurotrek.ch/en"><em>Eurotrek.</em></a></span></p>

International Travel

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Meghan Markle’s homeless brother says she helps charities more than her family

<p>Meghan Markle’s estranged half brother has spoken out about how he has been left homeless and is sick of his sister and Prince Harry not helping out family.</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Thomas Markle Jr, 53, fell on hard times after losing jobs and splitting up with his fiancee. He has since been forced to move in with his elderly mother in New Mexico after his life “fell apart”.</p> <p>Thomas told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.the-sun.com/news/408950/meghan-markles-homeless-brother-says-hes-sick-of-her-helping-charities-but-not-her-family/" target="_blank">The Sun</a></em><span> </span>how he lost out on jobs due to having the same last name as the famous royal.</p> <p> “Being associated with Meghan has nearly destroyed me.</p> <p>“I am homeless and could have been under a bridge with a cardboard sign begging for money.</p> <p>“But thankfully my Mom has taken me in.</p> <p>“Mentally, this has been a f***ing nightmare ever since Meghan got together with Harry.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8MjqZQpfba/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8MjqZQpfba/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal)</a> on Feb 5, 2020 at 11:02am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>He says that he has thought about changing his name to “escape the curse” and that the Palace or Meghan herself could have helped him out.</p> <p>“For her to sit there on her royal pedestal and watch this happening to her family — she should have done her humanitarian work for us.</p> <p>“I’m sick of hearing about her and Harry helping this charity, that charity — whatever cause is in this week.”</p> <p><em>Photo credits: The Sun</em></p> </div> </div> </div>

International Travel

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Prince William and Kate’s sweet message to Fire Fight supporters

<div class="body_text "> <p>Prince William surprised fans at Sydney’s ANZ stadium for the Fire Fight Australia concert as he shared a message of support about the devastating bushfires that have ravaged the country.</p> <p>The message was beamed to the tens of thousands inside the stadium as well as countless others watching the live broadcast at home.</p> <p>“Hello, everyone. Catherine and I just wanted to say that we were very shocked and saddened to see the damage and devastation caused by the bushfires recently,” Prince William said.</p> <p>“We know it’s been a terrible time for all of those affected by the bushfires.</p> <p>“We want to commend the bravery and resilience of all Australians involved, particularly the volunteer firefighters who have put their lives on the line to protect lives, livelihoods and wildlife. We think that’s been a fantastic effort all ‘round by everyone down there looking after each other.</p> <p>“We know there’s been lots of incredible acts of generosity as well and communities coming together to support each other.</p> <p>“We wish you all the best for the rebuild and have a good evening.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Thank you Prince William. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/FireFightAustralia?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#FireFightAustralia</a> <a href="https://t.co/uA66Ga4Xor">pic.twitter.com/uA66Ga4Xor</a></p> — Channel 7 (@Channel7) <a href="https://twitter.com/Channel7/status/1228961282251870208?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 16, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge sent their message of support ahead of the pair’s expected tour to bushfire-ravaged parts of the country.</p> <p>Communities on the bushfire-destroyed NSW south coast hope that a potential royal visit will boost tourism to the region and showcase its reconstruction efforts.</p> <p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison said that a formal invitation to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge will be extended “soon” once discussions with Kensington Palace are concluded.</p> <p>Cabinet minister Simon Birmingham said that previous visits from members of the royal family have boosted tourism.</p> <p>“We hope that can all be locked down with an announcement from the royals pretty soon because it is going to be a great opportunity to remind the rest of the world that Australia is still a fantastic place to visit full of rich and amazing experiences,” the senator told the Nine Network last week.</p> <p>It would be the couple’s first visit since 2014.</p> </div>

Domestic Travel

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High tech shortages in the future as coronavirus shuts down manufacturers

<p>There are now <a href="https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200212-sitrep-23-ncov.pdf?sfvrsn=41e9fb78_2">more than 45,000</a> confirmed cases of the coronavirus dubbed COVID-19 by the World Health Organization, and the disease has caused at least 1,115 deaths. The impact of the virus is now reaching way beyond public health: China is at the heart of global manufacturing, and as supply chains suffer, <a href="https://www.logisticsmgmt.com/article/coronavirus_and_the_global_supply_chain_rising_panic_part">panic</a> is beginning to set in.</p> <p>In many provinces across China the government has urged hundreds of millions of workers to <a href="https://www.afr.com/world/asia/virus-death-toll-above-900-as-workers-told-to-stay-home-20200210-p53zbr">stay home</a> to help reduce the spread of the virus. As a result, many factories have stayed closed since the Lunar New Year holiday in late January, halting the production of products and parts destined for countries around the world, including Australia.</p> <p>Apple is one of the most high-profile companies affected, with its <a href="https://www.wsj.com/amp/articles/rapid-spread-of-coronavirus-tests-apples-china-dependency-11580910743">manufacturing partner Foxconn hitting a lengthy production delay</a>, but they are far from alone.</p> <p><strong>Global supply chains, global problems</strong></p> <p>The sectors hit hardest <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevebanker/2020/02/10/global-high-tech-supply-chains-disrupted-by-the-coronavirus/amp/">appear to be</a> high-tech electronics, pharmaceuticals and the automotive industry.</p> <p>Globalised supply chains and just-in-time manufacturing mean many seemingly unrelated products are vulnerable to pauses in the flow of goods from China.</p> <p>It only takes one small missing part to bring entire supply chains to a standstill. If a tyre manufacturer in the United States doesn’t receive valves from a supplier in China, a car plant in Germany won’t receive any tyres, and therefore can’t ship finished cars to its customers.</p> <p>Something similar happened to automotive giant Hyundai, which had to <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/04/business/hyundai-south-korea-coronavirus.html">suspend all operations</a> at its manufacturing plant in South Korea due to a lack of parts from China.</p> <p>Even tech companies such as Samsung, Google and Sony, which have moved their factories out of China in recent years, are <a href="https://qz.com/1800540/how-coronavirus-is-upending-the-tech-industrys-supply-chain/">being affected</a>. They still rely on China for many components such as sensors or smartphone screens.</p> <p>It is not just large businesses that will feel these effects. Many small businesses around the world also source products and parts from China.</p> <p>The supply of these is now uncertain, with no sign yet as to when normal service may resume. For products and parts that are still being manufactured in China, new enhanced screening measures at all Chinese border crossings are likely to cause further delays.</p> <p><strong>How will Australia be affected?</strong></p> <p>The effects of the coronavirus are also being felt in Australia. China is our largest trading partner for both imports and exports. According to the United Nations Comtrade database, <a href="https://tradingeconomics.com/australia/imports/china">Australian imports from China</a> were valued at A$85.9 billion in 2018. The biggest product categories were electronics and electrical equipment, making up A$19.8 billion, and machinery, which accounts for another A$15.7 billion.</p> <p>Moreover, <a href="https://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/Parliamentary_Library/pubs/BriefingBook44p/China">90% of all Australia’s merchandise imports</a> are from China, and half of those are engineering products such as office and telecommunications equipment.</p> <p>Besides the well-publicised impact on airlines, universities and tourism, Australian construction companies are warning clients of upcoming project delays as a result of forecast disruptions in materials sourced from China. Aurizon, Australia’s largest rail operator, has said the coronavirus will delay the arrival of <a href="https://www.afr.com/companies/retail/coronavirus-fallout-hits-australian-companies-20200210-p53zfc">66 new rail wagons</a> being made in Wuhan, the city at the epicentre of the outbreak.</p> <p><strong>Expect shortages of high-tech goods</strong></p> <p>Product shortages could also soon be visible on retailers’ shelves, with electronics stores such as JB Hi-Fi and Harvey Norman expected to experience <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/12/coronavirus-fallout-could-leave-australian-tourism-and-retail-sector-in-the-doldrums">significant disruption</a> to their supply of computers, televisions and smartphones.</p> <p>When shortages like this occur, customers will struggle to buy the products they want, when they want them. The only channels available might be third-party resellers offering highly inflated prices. In extreme cases, supply shortages like these can also lead to <a href="http://personal.cb.cityu.edu.hk/biyishou/Consumer_panic_buying.pdf">panic buying</a> and stockpiling.</p> <p><strong>More uncertainty ahead</strong></p> <p>It is commonly said that “when China sneezes, the world catches a cold”. So what is the long-term diagnosis for the coronavirus breakout, and what will the economic symptoms be?</p> <p>As so much is still unknown about COVID-19, with no vaccine or formal means of preventing it spreading having emerged yet, it’s too early to predict what the full impact will be.</p> <p>For many industries the next few months will bring high levels of uncertainty, with disruptions certain to continue, before recovery programs can start to gain traction.</p> <p>This is obviously a worry for many organisations, but could also be a period of new opportunity for others, as the world comes to terms with this latest global health crisis. Supply chains that are agile enough to react quicker than their competitors’, or those with more robust risk management plans, might find themselves gaining greater market share as a result of this crisis.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/131646/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/john-l-hopkins-255434">John L Hopkins</a>, Theme Leader (Future Urban Mobility), Smart Cities Research Institute, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/high-tech-shortages-loom-as-coronavirus-shutdowns-hit-manufacturers-131646">original article</a>.</em></p>

Technology

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8 things we do that really confuse our dogs

<p>Dog behaviour is extraordinarily flexible – this is why we can keep them in our homes and take them to cafes with us at the weekend.</p> <p>Nevertheless, there are ways in which evolution has not equipped dogs for the challenges of living in our world, and puppies must learn how to cope.</p> <p>These are some of the things we do they struggle to understand.</p> <p><strong>1. We leave them alone</strong></p> <p>As born socialites, dogs make friends easily. Puppies are intensely interested in spending time with other dogs, people, and any species willing to interact with them socially. They usually play, rest, explore and travel with company. Yet we often leave dogs alone: at home, in kennels or the vet clinic.</p> <p>In these situations, naive dogs can’t be sure we’ll ever return to collect them. Only after experience are they likely to expect a reunion, and even then, their experience depends on the context.</p> <p>At home, we may try to enforce dog-free zones. Naturally, many dogs protest. How can they stay with their (human) social group when they’re separated behind impenetrable barriers (doors)? This explains why dogs so often demand to be let inside when their human family is there, and why those with separation-related distress frequently find some solace in being indoors.</p> <p><strong>2. We are visually driven</strong></p> <p>Dogs live in an olfactory world, while ours is chiefly visual. So, while TVs may offer a visual feast for humans, parks and beaches are an olfactory banquet for dogs.</p> <p>An additional challenge is dogs move while investigating the world, whereas we often sit still. They may not relish the inertia we enjoy in front of a noisy, flashing light-box.</p> <p><strong>3. We change our shape and smell</strong></p> <p>Shoes, coats, wallets, briefcases, bags and suitcases: countless smells cling to these items after we take them into shops and workplaces, then back to our dogs. Cleaning products, soaps, deodorants and shampoos also change the scents our dogs are used to.</p> <p>Towels, hats and bags change our shape when we’re using them. And when we’re pulling them on, jumpers and coats alter our visual outline and may catch dogs unaware.</p> <p>Dogs change their coats at least once a year. In contrast, we change our external cladding every day. This means the odours we carry are changing far more than dogs have evolved to expect.</p> <p>In their olfactory world, it must be puzzling for dogs to encounter our constantly changing smells, especially for a species that uses scent to identify familiar individuals and intruders.</p> <p><strong>4. We like to hug</strong></p> <p>How humans use their forelimbs contrasts sharply with how dogs do. We may use them to carry large objects a dog would have to drag, but also to grasp each other and express affection.</p> <p>Dogs grasp each other loosely when play-wrestling, and also when mating and fighting. Being pinned by another dog hinders a quick escape. How are puppies to know what a hug from a human means, when that behaviour from a dog might be threatening?</p> <p><strong>5. We don’t like to be bitten</strong></p> <p>Play-fighting is fun for many puppies and helps them bond with other dogs. But they must monitor the behaviour of other dogs in play-fights and know when they’ve used their tiny, razor-sharp teeth excessively.</p> <p>Humans are much more susceptible to pain from playful puppy jaws than other dogs are, and so we can react negatively to their attempts to play-fight with us.</p> <p>Dogs interact with objects almost entirely with their muzzle. And to feed, they use their jaws, teeth and tongue.</p> <p>Dogs also “mouth” other dogs when playing, expressing affection and communicating everything from “more” to “please don’t” to “Back off!”. So, naturally, they try to use their mouths when communicating with us, and must be puzzled by how often we take offence.</p> <p><strong>6. We don’t eat food from the bin</strong></p> <p>Dogs are opportunists who naturally acquire food anywhere they find it. In contrast, we present them with food in dishes of their own.</p> <p>Puppies must be puzzled by our reaction when we find them snacking from benches and tables, in lunchboxes and kitchen bins. We should not be surprised when dogs unearth food we left somewhere accessible to them.</p> <p><strong>7. We share territories</strong></p> <p>We visit the territories of other dogs, bringing back their odours, and allow unfamiliar human and canine visitors to enter our dogs’ home. Dogs have not evolved to accept such intrusions and threats to their safety and resources.</p> <p>We shouldn’t be surprised when our dogs treat visitors with suspicion, or when our dogs are treated with hostility when we bring them to the homes of others.</p> <p><strong>8. We use our hands a lot</strong></p> <p>Sometimes our hands deliver food, scratches, massages and toys. Other times, they restrain dogs, trim nails, administer ointments or tablets, and groom with brushes and combs that may pull hair.</p> <p>No wonder some dogs grow to fear the human hand as it moves about them. We can make it easier for dogs to accept many types of hand-related activities if we train them to cooperate with rewards.</p> <p>But humans often misread their fear and may even greet it with violence which compounds the problem. Hand-shy dogs can easily become defensive and find their way into pounds and shelters, where life expectancy for nippers and biters is poor.</p> <p>On the whole, dogs show a remarkable ability to adapt to the puzzles we throw at them. Their behavioural flexibility offers us lessons in resilience and how to live simply and socially. Our challenge is to understand the absence of guile and malice in everything they do.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/122616/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/melissa-starling-461103">Melissa Starling</a>, Postdoctoral researcher, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/paul-mcgreevy-139820">Paul McGreevy</a>, Professor of Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare Science, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/8-things-we-do-that-really-confuse-our-dogs-122616">original article</a>.</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Kirk Douglas’ grandson reflects on his passing in emotional interview

<p>Kirk Douglas’ grandson has honoured the late acting legend in an emotional interview.</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/cameron-douglas-legacy-grandfather-kirk-douglas-hard-imagine-anyone-doing-it-better-1278758">The Hollywood Reporter</a></em>, Cameron Douglas said it was difficult to lose his grandfather, who died on February 5 at the age of 103.</p> <p>“He was always there, always supportive and he believed in me even when maybe I had given up on myself,” said Cameron, who previously struggled with drug addiction.</p> <p>“Losing him is one of those things that, even when you sort of see it coming … it’s still difficult.</p> <p>“I take solace in the pride of being his grandson and having had the opportunity to spend as much time with him as I have. When I look at his life, what he accomplished and the way he carried himself, it's hard for me to imagine anyone doing it any better.”</p> <p>Cameron said he brought his partner Viviane Thibes and daughter Lua Izzy to Los Angeles so that the family could spend more time with Kirk.</p> <p>“I moved about 15 minutes away from them and have been spending a lot of time with him, bringing my daughter [and] Vivian over on weekends,” said the 41-year-old.</p> <p>“Just watching the bond between my daughter and grandfather was extremely special.</p> <p>“He would light up every time she was around. When she was in the same room, all she wanted to do was either be in his lap or be the focus of his attention. I'll remind her of that when she gets older, showing her that connection through photos.”</p> <p>Cameron followed in the footsteps of his father Michael and his grandfather to become an actor after serving nearly eight years in prison for possessing cocaine and <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/cameron-douglas-long-way-home-book-memoir-hollywood-life-prison-a9180571.html">distributing methamphetamine</a>.</p> <p>“He said to me, not that long ago, ‘Cameron, I’m so happy to see that you’re finally functioning’. That’s this kind of credo among the members of our family – to be ‘functioning’ – and I know that made him proud.”</p>

Family & Pets

News

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Royal fans shocked as Queen’s grandson “splits” from wife of 12 years

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>The Queen’s grandson Peter Phillips is reportedly separating from his wife of 12 years, Autumn Phillips.</p> <p>Princess Anne’s son married the Canadian-born Autumn in 2008 and are parents to nine-year-old Savannah and seven-year-old Isla.</p> <p>The news has reportedly come as a shock to both Peter and the Queen.</p> <p>One pal revealed to<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/10935833/peter-phillips-splits-wife-autumn-kelly-queen/" target="_blank">The Sun</a>: “Peter is absolutely devastated by this and just didn’t see it coming.</p> <p>“He thought he was happily married and had the perfect family with two lovely daughters. But he is now in total shock.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8aaUOFnAtr/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8aaUOFnAtr/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Royal Family (@royal_family_history)</a> on Feb 10, 2020 at 8:10pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Autumn is a wonderful wife and mother and a very intelligent woman, but she’s been telling her friends for some time that there were issues.</p> <p>“She is a favourite of the Queen and I’m sure Her Majesty will be very upset by this as well.</p> <p>“It’s the last thing she needs after all her recent troubles and you get the feeling that the Royal Family is falling apart a little bit.”</p> <p>The split comes just two weeks after Peter sparked controversy after starring in a Chinese milk advertising campaign while being promoted as a “British royal”.</p> <p>Those close to the couple are worried that Autumn might want to head back to her homeland Canada after the split.</p> <p>“What worries some of us is that Autumn may want to go back to Canada,” one friend said.</p> <p>“Maybe she has been influenced by Harry and Meghan’s departure. Perhaps she thought if that can happen then I can leave as well? That might be unfair on her but you have to consider it."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8cCsLQHEo1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8cCsLQHEo1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by ModernRoyalEra (@modernroyalera)</a> on Feb 11, 2020 at 11:22am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>A senior royal insider said that the Queen must be “crestfallen” by the news.</p> <p>“The Queen must wonder what she has done to deserve this.</p> <p>“Peter Phillips has always been a favourite of hers and Prince Philip and she will be crestfallen by this, especially on top of all the other bad news.</p> <p>“It makes you wonder what’s going to happen next.”</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="post-action-bar-component-wrapper"> <div class="post-actions-component"> <div class="upper-row"></div> </div> </div>

News

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“Unlimited damages”: Parents of toddler who fell to her death on cruise ship proceed with lawsuit

<p>Royal Caribbean have failed to stop a multi-million dollar negligence suit that’s brought on by the parents of a toddler who fell 11 decks to her death, according to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7974255/Parents-toddler-fell-death-Royal-Caribbean-ship-proceed-lawsuit.html" target="_blank">The Daily Mail</a></em>.</p> <p>Royal Caribbean’s lawyers argued there was no case as Chloe Wiegand’s grandfather, Salvatore ‘Sam’ Anello, was solely to blame for dropping the girl onto the deck.</p> <p>However, US District Judge Donald L Graham denied Royal Caribbean’s motion to dismiss on Wednesday, ruling that the parents can proceed with their complaint.</p> <p>Alan and Kimberly Wiegand could claim “unlimited damages” for pain and mental suffering if their suit succeeds.</p> <p>However, the heartbroken couple say that their sole motivation is to force the cruise ship line to make their windows safer so that their daughter’s death is never repeated.</p> <p>The couple’s suit say that there were no signs or notices to warn Anello that the “wall of glass” around a child’s splash fool featured windows that could be opened by passengers.</p> <p>The suit also said that despite the ship’s windows having handles and a blue-green tint, that was useless to Anello as he is colourblind.</p> <p>In its motion to dismiss, Royal Caribbean denied breaching industry safety standards, saying that Anello “unquestionably” knew that the window was open and would only have to had used his “basic senses” to realise he was putting his grandchild in danger.</p> <p>“His actions, which no reasonable person could have foreseen, were reckless and irresponsible and the sole reason why Chloe is no longer with her parents,” the motion stated.</p> <p>Judge Graham determined in a seven-page ruling that the Wiegands’ suit had presented a factual and plausible case at face value. He also denied the motion to dismiss, explaining that Royal Caribbean had woven images and statements into their filing that “catapulted” the case into the discovery stage.</p> <p>Prosecutors in the US territory are still pressing charges against Anello, despite Chloe’s parents wanting them to stop.</p> <p>“We have never wanted charges filed against Sam because we know with all of our hearts that he would never put Chloe in harm's way,” they said last week, in a statement provided exclusively to DailyMail.com.</p> <p>“We will stand with Sam as long as it takes - but we cannot grieve as a family until the criminal charges are dropped.”</p> <p><em>Photo credits:<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/family-chloe-wiegand-who-died-falling-cruise-ship-sues-royal-n1099576" target="_blank">NBC</a><span> </span><br /></em></p>

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Newborn tested positive for coronavirus 30 hours after birth

<p>A 30-hour-old infant born in a Wuhan hospital has become the youngest person to catch the new coronavirus.</p> <p>The newborn’s mother was found to have contracted the virus before giving birth on February 2 at Wuhan Children Hospital. The baby’s case suggested that the new virus could be passed on to unborn children, scientists said.</p> <p>“This reminds us to pay attention to mother-to-child being a possible route of coronavirus transmission,” said Zeng Lingkong, the chief physician at the hospital’s neonatal department.</p> <p>The infected infant has no fever or cough but experienced shortness of breath, according to <em>CCTV</em>.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">An infant in <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Wuhan?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Wuhan</a> has tested positive for the novel <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/coronavirus?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#coronavirus</a> just 30 hours after birth, said the city's children's hospital, raising concerns that infection could be contracted in the womb <a href="https://t.co/j8FIdqKgAS">pic.twitter.com/j8FIdqKgAS</a></p> — People's Daily, China (@PDChina) <a href="https://twitter.com/PDChina/status/1225042136980230144?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 5, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>The hospital also confirmed a second case of a newborn showing symptoms 16 days after their birth. The baby’s mother and nanny were <a href="https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/newborn-infected-with-coronavirus-raising-fears-illness-can-be-transmitted-from-mother-to-unborn-baby/ar-BBZGdIh?li=AAgfYrC">found to be infected</a> in the days following the birth on 13 January. The infant is not in a critical condition, doctors said.</p> <p>“Whether it was the baby’s nanny who passed to the virus to the mother who passed it to the baby, we cannot be sure at the moment,” Zeng said.</p> <p>“But we can confirm that the baby was in close contact with patients infected with the new coronavirus, which says newborns can also be infected.”</p> <p>However, Stephen Morse, an epidemiologist at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, told <em><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com.au/wuhan-coronavirus-in-infant-born-from-infected-mother-2020-2?r=US&amp;IR=T">Business Insider</a></em> that an in-utero transmission was unlikely.</p> <p>“It’s more likely that the baby contracted the virus from the hospital environment, the same way healthcare workers get infected by the patients they treat,” Morse said.</p> <p>“It’s quite possible that the baby picked it up very conventionally – by inhaling virus droplets that came from the mother coughing.”</p> <p>More than 24,500 people around the world have now contracted the virus, with the death toll approaching 500.</p>

News

Travel

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Identity of coronavirus "superspreader" revealed

<p>The British man who is believed to be a “superspreader” of coronavirus has been identified as businessman Steve Walsh.</p> <p>The 53-year-old was diagnosed with the disease on 6 February after he contracted the virus in Singapore while attending a business conference before heading off to the French Alps for a ski holiday, then returning to the UK.</p> <p>It is believed that he infected 11 other Britons with the virus.</p> <p>Currently Mr Walsh is in quarantine at St Thomas hospital, where he released a statement: “I would like to thank the NHS for their help and care – whilst I have fully recovered, my thoughts are with others who have contracted coronavirus.</p> <p>“As soon as I knew I had been exposed to a confirmed case of coronavirus I contacted my GP, NHS 111 and Public Health England.</p> <p>“I was advised to attend an isolated room at hospital, despite showing no symptoms, and subsequently self-isolated at home as instructed.</p> <p>“When the diagnosis was confirmed I was sent to an isolation unit in hospital, where I remain, and, as a precaution, my family was also asked to isolate themselves.</p> <p>“I also thank friends, family and colleagues for their support during recent weeks and I ask the media to respect our privacy.”</p> <p>His company, Servomex has also released a statement, saying: “We are very pleased that Steve Walsh has made a full recovery. We continue to provide support to him and his family.</p> <p>“We are working with Public Health authorities to ensure the welfare of our staff and communities and wish anyone with the virus a quick and full recovery.”</p>

Travel Trouble

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"Exploiting Diana's death": Piers Morgan unleashes on Harry and Meghan

<p>British TV host Piers Morgan has gone on an extraordinary rant against Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan, and claimed the pair are “exploiting Diana’s death to make millions form investment banks.”</p> <p>The controversial critic took a swipe at the couple after hearing Prince Harry discuss mental health at the JPMorgan Chase’s Alternative Investment Summit.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8eJ8z8Htmx/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8eJ8z8Htmx/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Meghan, Duchess of Sussex (@meghanmarklesource)</a> on Feb 12, 2020 at 7:04am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>During the speech, the Duke spoke openly to the high-profile guests about being in therapy for seven years in an attempt to emotionally deal with the intense trauma of losing his wife.</p> <p>A source told<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.the-sun.com/news/394676/piers-morgan-in-explosive-rant-at-harry-and-meghan-for-exploiting-dianas-death-to-make-millions/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>: “He talked about how the events of his childhood affected him and he has been talking to a mental health professional.</p> <p>“Harry also touched on Megxit, saying while it has been very difficult he does not regret their decision.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8e3MBTqFSC/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8e3MBTqFSC/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Diana My Princess 2 ❤️ (@diana_my_princess2)</a> on Feb 12, 2020 at 1:39pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The pair were seen for the first time together since fleeing the UK in attendance at the lavish event in Miami.</p> <p>Writing in an explosive column for the Mail Online, he said: “There’s a big difference between talking about it to raise public awareness of grief-related mental health issues – and doing it privately for a big fat fee to a bunch of super-rich bankers, business tycoons, politicians and celebrities.</p> <p>“By commercially exploiting his mother’s death to make vast pots of money like this, Harry is surely behaving in exactly the same way he professes to despise from the media?”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8eXs-sHQQU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8eXs-sHQQU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Royal Sussexes (@royalsussexler)</a> on Feb 12, 2020 at 9:04am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>It is unknown if or how much the Duke was paid for the event at 1 Hotel South Beach.</p> <p>However, the royal pair are understood to have been flown in a private jet, owned by JPMorgan Chase, from Vancouver for Palm Beach, Florida.</p> <p>Morgan also took the time to point out the couple had previously been criticised for their high-flying ways – taking four private jet flights in just 11 days despite speaking on the importance of preserving our earth.</p>

Travel Trouble

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4 signs you have high emotional intelligence

<p>Emotional intelligence can mean the difference between behaving in a socially acceptable way and being considered to be way out of line. While most people will have heard of emotional intelligence, not many people really know how to spot it – in themselves or in others.</p> <p>Emotional intelligence is essentially the way you perceive, understand, express, and manage emotions. And it’s important because the more you understand these aspects of yourself, the better your mental health and social behaviour will be.</p> <p>It might be these are things you do without even really thinking – which can be the case for a lot of people. Or it might be that these are skills you know you need to work on.</p> <p>Either way, improved emotional intelligence can be very useful in all sorts of circumstances – be it in work, at home, in school, or even when you’re just socialising with your friends.</p> <p>So if you want to know if you’re emotionally intelligent, simply check the list below.</p> <p><strong>1. You think about your reactions</strong></p> <p>Emotional intelligence can mean the difference between a good reaction and a bad reaction to circumstances. Emotions can contain important information that can be useful to personal and social functioning – but sometimes these emotions can also overwhelm us, and make us act in ways we would rather not.</p> <p>People who lack emotional intelligence are more likely to just react, without giving themselves the time to weigh up the pros and cons of a situation and really thinking things through.</p> <p>People who are less able to regulate their negative feelings are also more likely to have difficulty functioning socially – which can exacerbate depressive feelings.</p> <p>People with <a href="https://www.helpguide.org/articles/depression/depression-signs-and-symptoms.htm">major depression</a> have been shown to have <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1754073916650494">difficulties</a> understanding and managing their emotions. And research has also shown that more depressive symptoms are present in people with lower emotional intelligence – even if they are not clinically depressed.</p> <p><strong>2. You see situations as a challenge</strong></p> <p>If you are able to recognise negative emotions in yourself and see difficult <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1754073916650497">situations as a challenge</a> – focusing on the positives and persevering – chances are that you’ve got high emotional intelligence.</p> <p>Imagine for a moment you lost your job. An emotionally intelligent person might perceive their emotions as cues to take action, both to deal with the challenges and to control their thoughts and feelings.</p> <p>But someone with poor emotional skills might <a href="http://www.apa.org/monitor/nov05/cycle.aspx">ruminate</a> on their job loss, come to think of themselves as hopelessly unemployable, and spiral into depression.</p> <p><strong>3. You can modify your emotions</strong></p> <p>Of course, there are times when your feelings can get the better of you, but if you are an emotionally intelligent person, it is likely that when this happens you have the skills needed to modify your emotions.</p> <p>For example, while average levels of anxiety can improve cognitive performance – probably by increasing focus and motivation – too much anxiety can block cognitive achievement.</p> <p>So knowing how to find the sweet spot, between too much and too little anxiety, can be a useful tool.</p> <p>It is clear that <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-brain-and-emotional-intelligence/201203/the-sweet-spot-achievement">moderation</a> is the key when it comes to managing our emotions. Emotionally intelligent people know this and have the skills to modify their emotions appropriately.</p> <p>And this is probably why emotional intelligence has been shown to be <a href="http://emotional.intelligence.uma.es/documentos/pdf60among_adolescents.pdf">related</a> to lower levels of anxiety.</p> <p><strong>4. You can put yourself in other people’s shoes</strong></p> <p>If you are able to extend these skills beyond your own personal functioning, then that’s another sign that you have high levels of emotional intelligence.</p> <p>Emotional intelligence can be particularly important in workplaces that require heavy “<a href="https://hbr.org/2016/09/managing-the-hidden-stress-of-emotional-labor">emotional labour</a>” – where workers must manage their emotions according to organisational rules.</p> <p>This can include customer service jobs, where workers may need to sympathise with customers – despite the fact that customers may be yelling at them.</p> <p>This is why workplace emotional intelligence training is now common – with the <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1754073916650496">most effective training</a> focusing on management and expression of emotions, which are directly linked to communication and job performance.</p> <p>It’s also worth pointing out that emotional intelligence is a cognitive ability that can improve across your <a href="http://www.livescience.com/37134-emotional-intelligence-improve-aging.html">lifespan</a>. So if you haven’t recognised much of yourself in the traits listed above, fear not, there’s still time for you to work on your emotional intelligence.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/71165/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jose-m-mestre-286147">Jose M. Mestre</a>, Professor of Emotion and Motivation, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/universidad-de-cadiz-2934">Universidad de Cádiz</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kimberly-a-barchard-285790">Kimberly A. Barchard</a>, Associate Professor in Quantitative Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-nevada-las-vegas-826">University of Nevada, Las Vegas</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/four-signs-you-have-high-emotional-intelligence-71165">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Body language experts analyse the Queen’s relationship with her grandchildren

<p>She might be the Queen to the world, but to her <strong><u><a href="http://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/2017/04/prince-williams-adorable-nickname-for-the-queen/">grandchildren she’s simply “gan-gan” or “granny”.</a></u></strong></p> <p>With eight grandchildren (from her four children), we wonder what the Queen is like as a grandmother. <strong><u><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXi1vjJpenQ">Prince William has previously said</a></u></strong>: "She works very hard and she sees her service as important but behind closed doors, she worries and minds an awful lot about the rest of the family. She makes sure everyone is happy and finding their own path in terms of success." </p> <p>And body language experts back up Prince William’s assertion, with Susan Constantine, human behavioural expert and author of <em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Idiots-Guide-Reading-Language/dp/161564248X?tag=goodhousekeeping_auto-append-20&amp;ascsubtag=%5bartid|10055.a.48025%5bsrc|"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>The Complete Idiot's Guide to Reading Body Language</strong></span></a>, </em>telling <strong><u><a href="https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/a22607539/queen-elizabeth-grandchildren-body-language/">GoodHousekeeping</a></u></strong>: “It's incredible how attentive, hands-on, and engaging she is given the fact that she has a royal rulebook to follow."</p> <p><iframe width="320" height="240" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yb9MIJIjW3k?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Captured in the early 1990s, this video of Her Majesty with Zara Phillips, Prince William, Prince Harry, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie at Balmoral in Scotland shows the Queen being a typical grandma.</p> <p>"This particular instance is striking because she throws her 'royal body bubble' out the window and gets close with her grandkids," Patti Wood, body language expert and author of <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Snap-Making-Impressions-Language-Charisma/dp/1577319397?tag=goodhousekeeping_auto-append-20&amp;ascsubtag=%5Bartid%7C10055.a.47552%5Bsrc%7C">SNAP: Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language, and Charisma</a></em></strong></span> tells GoodHousekeeping.</p> <p>"Normally, we see the Queen in front and a few steps ahead of everyone else but here, she steps back and lets the kids lead the way," Wood continues.</p> <p><iframe width="320" height="240" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MI9KUymMybk?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>When the whole family is together however, it’s clear the Queen is in charge. While taking the official royal Christmas photo in 1990, the Queen is the one that shoos the photographers away and put her grandchildren in place.</p> <p>"The mums – Duchess of York and Princess Diana – step aside and let the Queen take over the parenting role, which is interesting to see," says Constantine.</p> <p>But the Queen has always had a close relationship with her grandchildren – and now, great-grandchildren.</p> <p>Just look at her with her very first grandchild – Peter Phillips. "Her movements such as bending forward and reaching out her hand are purposeful," explains Constantine. "She wants to be connected to the newborn but the royal standards simply hold her back from being as affectionate as she'd like to be."</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-peter-young-1533072980.png?crop=1xw:0.9997671169073126xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" alt="queen elizabeth with grandchildren" title="Queen Elizabeth with Grandchildren" data-srcset="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-peter-young-1533072980.png?crop=1xw:0.9997671169073126xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" data-src="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-peter-young-1533072980.png?crop=1xw:0.9997671169073126xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" /></p> <p>Or this adorably casual moment with Zara Tindall in June 1984.</p> <p>"You can sense just how relaxed the two of them are. It's evident that the Queen isn't afraid to show emotional connection despite the public setting," Constantine says.</p> <p>"The physical closeness between the two is a type of 'heart intimacy,' which is a telling sign of their close bond," adds Wood.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-zara-young-1533072974.jpg?crop=0.9997216035634744xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" alt="queen elizabeth with grandchildren" title="Queen Elizabeth with Grandchildren" data-srcset="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-zara-young-1533072974.jpg?crop=0.9997216035634744xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" data-src="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-zara-young-1533072974.jpg?crop=0.9997216035634744xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" /></p> <p>These close relationships have continued as the grandchildren have grown into adults.</p> <p>The Queen’s pursed lips when she goes in for a peck with her grandchildren actually has positive meaning behind it.</p> <p>"To feel close to someone and allow the body to completely focus on the moment, people may tightly close their eyes or lips," explains Constantine. "Here, the Queen's pursed lips indicate that she's deep in thought and feeling strong emotion."</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-harry-kiss-1533072977.png?crop=1xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" alt="queen elizabeth with grandchildren" title="Queen Elizabeth with Grandchildren" data-srcset="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-harry-kiss-1533072977.png?crop=1xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" data-src="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-harry-kiss-1533072977.png?crop=1xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" /></p> <p> </p> <p>And even though the Princess Beatrice of York isn’t a working royal, it’s clear that the Queen still loves her granddaughter, as evidenced by both their wide smiles.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-beatrice-smiling-1533072976.png?crop=0.99975xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" alt="queen elizabeth with grandchildren" title="Queen Elizabeth with Grandchildren" data-srcset="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-beatrice-smiling-1533072976.png?crop=0.99975xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" data-src="https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod.s3.amazonaws.com/images/queen-beatrice-smiling-1533072976.png?crop=0.99975xw:1xh;center,top&amp;resize=480:*" /></p> <p>"Beatrice, in particular, has all teeth on deck," Constantine tells us. " Even while putting on her gloves, the Queen is looking directly at her granddaughter and completely engaging in the moment."</p> <p>Ultimately, although the Queen may have an unconventional relationship with her grandchildren, she dearly loves them.  </p> <p>"Their relationship, while different than the idealized concept, may be peculiar to us but it's <em>their</em> normal," explains Wood. "Regardless, there's a genuine joy in her face when she's with her grandchildren and that's all that matters."</p>

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Adele shows off stunning weight loss after losing 20kgs

<p>A TV star has called Adele unrecognisable after her shocking weight loss of 20kgs.</p> <p>The 31-year-old looked stunning in a high-neck long-sleeved leopard print dress as she partied at Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7834519/adele-weight-loss.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/abdcb559d18b46698faed91abc97bb79" /></p> <p>Adele attended Jay Z and Beyonce’s Oscar’s party when she bumped into Polish TV presenter Kinga Rusin, who posted a photo of their encounter on Instagram.</p> <p>According to Rusin, Adele struck up a conversation after she noticed that Rusin wasn’t wearing the slippers provided at the door as she preferred to keep her heels on instead.</p> <p>“Honestly, I didn’t recognise her because she is so thin now,” Rusin wrote.</p> <p>There were reportedly 200 people at the party and despite the photo ban, Rusin snagged a photo with Adele.</p> <p>Adele’s weight loss has been a hot topic as of late as the singer split from her husband Simon Konecki. She has found a “new lease of life” after starting reformer pilates.</p> <p>“Adele has been out enjoying herself and she sees that as her priority at the moment, along with being a mum to Angelo.” The source told<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/tvandshowbiz/9324836/adele-reformer-pilates-ayda-field-loses-stone-marriage-split/" target="_blank">The Sun</a>.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B6bUG27gnWs/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B6bUG27gnWs/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Adele (@adele)</a> on Dec 23, 2019 at 11:32am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>“It’s a bonus that she has shifted some weight. Her mates are glad she’s letting loose and there’s nothing but good feelings towards her. She’s got a new lease of life.”</p> <p>Farnham Pilates owner, Hannah Louise Epps, explains how her reformer classes work: “It works in a slow, precise way, focusing on the core muscles and helping to build up heat and sweat to help you lose weight. It streamlines and tones muscles and helps align imbalances in posture.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

Body

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Why some people overeat when they're upset

<p>The idea of eating a tub of ice cream to cope with being upset has become a bit cliche. Though some might not need a tub of chocolate swirl to help perk themselves up again, there do seem to be systematic differences in the way that people cope with <a href="https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11892-018-1000-x.pdf">upsetting events</a>, with some more likely to find solace in food than others.</p> <p>This matters because when eating to cope with negative feelings is part of a broader tendency to overeat, it is likely to be <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1467-789X.2007.00426.x">associated with obesity and being overweight</a>. More people than ever are now overweight and obese, with <a href="https://www.obesityday.worldobesity.org/world-obesity-day-2017">recent estimates</a> suggesting that by 2025, 2.7 billion adults worldwide will be affected by obesity, risking health issues such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer.</p> <p>So why do some people manage their emotions with food while others don’t? One psychological concept that helps to explain this difference is <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2F0022-0167.47.3.283">adult attachment orientation</a>. Depending on the extent to which we fear abandonment by those we love, adults fall somewhere on the dimension of “attachment anxiety”. Where we fall on this dimension (high or low) determines a set of expectations about how we and others behave in personal relationships. These are developed as a response to the care we received as an infant and this can characterise your attachment style.</p> <p>A recent <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666317303525">meta-analysis</a> – a study bringing together the results of many other studies – showed that the higher a person’s attachment anxiety, the more they engage in unhealthy eating behaviours, with <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/ijo201072">a knock-on effect on body mass index (BMI)</a>. Two other studies have also shown that patients undergoing weight loss surgery are likely to have <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11695-017-2796-1">higher attachment anxiety</a> scores than a comparable lean population, and it is thought that this difference is <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/ijo2017157">partly explained by the tendency to overeat</a>.</p> <p><strong>Understanding attachment anxiety</strong></p> <p>For a long time, <a href="http://psycnet.apa.org/doiLanding?doi=10.1037%2F0022-3514.75.2.420">we have known</a> that people who are have high attachment anxiety are more likely to both notice upsetting things and find it harder to manage their emotions when upset. This is because of how attachment orientations come about in the first place. The dynamics and feelings relating to our most important long-term relationships, including in early life, act as a templates that guide our behaviour in subsequent relationships and in stressful situations.</p> <p>If we receive consistent care from a caregiver, which includes helping us to cope with problems in life, we develop a secure attachment orientation. For people high in security, when a negative life event occurs, they are able to seek support from others or soothe themselves by thinking about the sorts of things that their caregiver or other significant person would say to them in that situation.</p> <p>However, inconsistent care – where the caregiver sometimes responds to another’s needs but at other times does not – leads to attachment anxiety and a fear that our needs won’t be met. When negative life events occur, support from others is sought but perceived as unreliable. People with high attachment anxiety are also less able to self-soothe than people with a secure attachment.</p> <p>We <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666317318378">recently tested</a> whether this poor emotional management could explain why people with attachment anxiety are more likely to overeat. Importantly, we found that for people high in attachment anxiety it was harder to disengage from whatever was upsetting them and to get on with what they were supposed to be doing. These negative emotions were managed with food and this related to a higher BMI.</p> <p>It is important to note, however, that this is only one factor among many that can influence overeating and BMI. We cannot say that attachment anxiety causes overeating and weight gain. It might be that overeating and weight gain influences our attachment orientation, or it could be a bit of both.</p> <p><strong>Managing eating behaviour</strong></p> <p>There are two approaches that appear promising for attachment anxious individuals seeking to manage their eating behaviour. These involve targeting the specific attachment orientation itself and/or improving emotion regulation skills in general.</p> <p>To target attachment orientation, one possibility is a psychological technique called “<a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352250X1830037X">security priming</a>” designed to make people behave like “secures”, who cope well with negative life events. It results in beneficial effects more generally, such as engaging in more pro-social behaviours. <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0265407512468371">One study</a> showed that priming is related to snack intake. When people are asked to reflect on secure relationships in their life they eat less in a later snacking episode than when asked to reflect on anxious relationships in their life (though this work is very preliminary and needs replicating and extending).</p> <p>Looking at emotion regulation, a <a href="https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11892-018-1000-x.pdf">recently published paper</a> highlighted the importance of emotional eaters focusing on skills such as coping with stress rather than calorie restriction, when seeking to lose weight. This study did not look solely at those with attachment anxiety, however, so further work is needed explore this further.</p> <p>Of course, in an ideal world everybody would have relationship experiences that helped them to develop high attachment security, and perhaps this is a hidden third approach – facilitating better caregiving and interpersonal relationships for all.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/105872/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><em><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/laura-wilkinson-583732">Laura Wilkinson</a>, Lecturer in Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swansea-university-2638">Swansea University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/angela-rowe-256122">Angela Rowe</a>, Reader in Social Cognitive Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-bristol-1211">University of Bristol</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/charlotte-hardman-109457">Charlotte Hardman</a>, Lecturer in Appetite and Obesity, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-liverpool-1198">University of Liverpool</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-some-people-overeat-when-theyre-upset-105872">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

Lifestyle

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Chocolate sour cherry slice

<p>A sultry taste sensation for those who love sweet things with a touch of cherry sour.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p><strong>For the base</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 cups raw cashew nuts</li> <li>2 cups unsweetened desiccated coconut</li> <li>1/2 cup raw cacao powder</li> <li>Pinch of sea salt</li> <li>1/4 cup extra virgin coconut oil + 1/4 cup cacao butter* (or 1/2 cup extra virgin coconut oil)</li> <li>1/2 cup rice malt syrup</li> <li>1 x 20ml tablespoon pure vanilla extract</li> <li>3/4 cup unsweetened dried sour cherries</li> </ul> <p><strong>For the topping</strong></p> <ul> <li>200g dark chocolate</li> <li>2 x 20ml tablespoons extra virgin coconut oil</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <p>1. Line a 22 x 11 cm loaf tin with baking paper or cling film.</p> <p>2. Process the cashew nuts and desiccated coconut in a food processor until you get fine crumbs.</p> <p>3. Add the cacao powder and salt and process until well combined.</p> <p>4. Melt the coconut oil (and cacao butter, if using) in a large saucepan over the lowest heat on your stove.</p> <p>5. Add the rice malt syrup and vanilla extract and stir to combine.</p> <p>6. Take the saucepan off the heat, tip the dry ingredients from the food processor and the sour cherries into the saucepan and stir everything together until well combined. Press the mixture into the prepared tin, smoothing the surface with the back of a spoon (and your hands, if need be). Place the tin in the freezer to chill.</p> <p>7. To make the topping, melt the chocolate and coconut oil together in a double boiler or in the microwave. Remove the slice from the freezer and pour over the topping. Return the slice to the fridge for a few hours to set. Once set, remove the slice from the tin and cut into squares. Store in the fridge or freezer.</p> <p><strong>Tips:</strong></p> <p>The recipe uses 1/4 cup coconut oil + 1/4 cup cacao butter for the smooth and creamy texture that cacao butter provides. You can buy cacao butter at health food stores or online, or just use 1/2 cup coconut oil if you prefer.</p> <p><em>Recipe originally appeared on <a href="https://www.rfhb.com.au/blog/chocolate-sour-cherry-slice/">Real Food Body Health</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/chocolate-sour-cherry-slice.aspx" target="_blank">Wyza.com.au</a>. </em></p>

Food & Wine

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Cherry choc chip ice-cream sandwiches

<p>These are the heavenly ice-cream sandwiches of your childhood. Even better – the ice-cream recipe doesn’t begin with a custard, and so avoids the ‘will it or won’t it?’ curdling fear.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 cups (500 ml) thickened cream</li> <li>1 cup (250 ml) full-cream milk</li> <li>¾ cup (165 g) caster sugar, plus 1 teaspoon extra</li> <li>1½ cups (225 g) frozen cherries, partially thawed</li> <li>85 g dark chocolate (70 per cent cocoa), roughly chopped</li> <li>36 plain chocolate biscuits (Choc Ripple biscuits or similar)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. In a large bowl, whisk together the cream, milk and sugar, and stir until the sugar dissolves. Churn in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions.</p> <p>2. Toss the cherries with the extra teaspoon of sugar. Add the cherries, along with any juice, and the chocolate to the ice-cream mixture. Transfer to a container with a lid and freeze until firm enough to scoop.</p> <p>3. To assemble the sandwiches, spread 1/3 cup (80g) of ice-cream over a biscuit and top with another biscuit. Repeat with the remaining biscuits and ice-cream. Wrap tightly in baking paper and freeze until ready to serve.</p> <p><strong>Tip:</strong></p> <p>The sandwiches will keep for 24 hours in the freezer.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fthe-edible-city-indira-naidoo%2Fprod9781921383816.html" target="_blank"><em>Recipe from<span> </span><span>The Edible City by Indira Naidoo</span>, published by Penguin Books.</em></a></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/cherry-choc-chip-ice-cream-sandwiches.aspx" target="_blank"><em>Wyza.com.au</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Food & Wine

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Lemon curd cheesecake eggs

<p>Perfect for wowing your guests - these lemon curd cheesecake eggs are the ideal treat for your next function!</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>225g cream cheese, at room temperature</li> <li>400g sweetened condensed milk</li> <li>2 teaspoons finely grated lemon zest (from 2 lemons)</li> <li>60ml lemon juice</li> <li>12 hollow white chocolate Easter eggs (6 cm tall), store-bought or homemade (see Tips below)</li> <li>60g lemon curd</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Beat the cream cheese using an electric mixer until smooth. Beat in the condensed milk until smooth. Add the lemon zest and juice and beat again until smooth and creamy. Refrigerate for 1 hour.</p> <p>2. Gently knock the top off the Easter eggs to create a small opening, creating a cracked shell effect.</p> <p>3. Place the chilled cheesecake mixture into a piping bag, snip off a 1cm opening and pipe the cheesecake into the eggs to just below the rim. (You will have leftover cheesecake filling; this can be frozen for up to a month.) Refrigerate the eggs for 1 hour.</p> <p>4. Scoop a small well in the centre of each egg with a teaspoon, fill with 1 teaspoon of lemon curd and tap gently on a work surface to help flatten it (to look like the yolk in the centre of the egg).</p> <p><strong>Tips:</strong></p> <p><strong>Make Homemade White Chocolate Easter Eggs</strong></p> <p>Melt 250g of white compound chocolate. Paint a layer into an Easter egg chocolate mould about 6cm tall by 4cm wide. Set in the fridge, then paint a second coat of melted chocolate. Return to the fridge. Remove the eggs from the mould. Heat a small frying pan over a medium heat. Lightly touch the rims of two egg halves onto the hot surface for 3 seconds so they just start to melt, then quickly press the melted edges together. You will need 12 eggs in total.</p> <p><em>Images and recipes from<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fsweet-celebrations-elise-strachan%2Fprod9781743369197.html" target="_blank"><span>Sweet! Celebrations by Elise Strachan</span></a><span> </span>(Murdoch Books).</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lemon-curd-cheesecake-eggs.aspx" target="_blank">Wyza.com.au</a>. </em></p>

Food & Wine

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World’s oldest man at 112 reveals secrets for a long life

<p>A retired Japanese farmer was named the world’s oldest man on the 12th of February 2020 at the age of 112 years and 344 days.</p> <p>Grinning Chitetsu Watanabe was given a certificate by the Guinness World Records at his care home in Niigata, the city in northern Japan where he was born in in 1907.</p> <p>The father of five was thrilled with his award and says he still has his sweet tooth despite not having any. He also loves custard pudding and cream puffs as they don’t need to be chewed.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WCGWuH51Irk"></iframe></div> <p>Chitetsu returned to his home town after 18 years in Taiwan, where four out of five of their children were born there. Taiwan was also where he married his wife, Mitsue.</p> <p>According to Yoko Watanabe, wife off Tetsuo, the first son of Chitetsu, moving back was the one of the most difficult times for the family.</p> <p>"Both Chitetsu and Tetsuo told me that getting to places and sourcing food was a struggle. Having to live under that circumstance with four young children must have been tough", Yoko said to the<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/news/2020/2/japans-chitetsu-watanabe-confirmed-as-the-worlds-oldest-man-living-at-112-years-607687?fbclid=IwAR0UfHi2am1kCSihd9LnxAuCoTWWQ9uVPHDBXm6dykE8JeG5ZbQgVEN2NNw" target="_blank">Guinness World Records.</a></em></p> <p>However, Chitetsu hasn’t let anything get him down in his long life. When he spoke to a local paper, he explained that the secret to his long life was “not to get angry and keep a smile on your face”.</p> <p>Yoko explained his temperament to the local paper.</p> <p>"I've lived together with him for over 50 years, and I've never seen him raise his voice or get mad,” she said.</p> <p>“He's also caring. When I was working on my patchwork hobby, he was the one who praised my work the most. I think having lived with a big family under one roof, mingling with his grandchildren and great-grandchildren helped keep a smile on his face as well."</p> <p>Chitetsu now lives in a rest home and is not as active as he was before. However, up until last summer, his daily activity included exercises as a part of rehabilitation, origami, calligraphy and math exercises.</p> <p>He is just four years shy of the record for the oldest man ever, which was held by Jiroemon Kimaru who was born on 19th April 1897 and passed away at the age of 116 and 54 days on the 12th of June 2013</p>

Retirement Life

Finance

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New witness speaks out about Prince Andrew

<p>A new witness has come forward in the case against Prince Andrew, claiming she saw the Duke of York dancing with his accuser Virginia Roberts Giuffre in a London nightclub.</p> <p>Lawyer Lisa Bloom, who represents five women who say they were sexually assaulted by financier Jeffrey Epstein, said an <a href="https://lawandcrime.com/high-profile/lisa-bloom-new-witness-saw-prince-andrew-with-jeffrey-epstein-victim-at-nightclub-in-2001/">unnamed witness</a> saw Prince Andrew with Giuffre in London’s Tramp nightclub in 2001.</p> <p>Bloom told a press conference in New York that the witness stepped on Prince Andrew’s foot by mistake while dancing next to him, and a friend told her who he was. The witness then noticed the prince was with a young girl that she later recognised from pictures as Giuffre.</p> <p>Bloom said the witness stepped forward with the information because she was “incensed” that Prince Andrew had denied meeting Giuffre in his <em>BBC Newsnight </em>interview. “Because he is a very powerful person, she is in fear of the repercussions to her,” Bloom said on Wednesday.</p> <p>“On behalf of my client, I have relayed the details of her story to the FBI, and she is ready, willing and able to speak to them when they are ready.”</p> <p>In her interview with <em><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-50607705">Panorama</a></em>, Giuffre said she was in 2001 taken by Epstein and socialite Ghislaine Maxwell to Tramp and introduced to Prince Andrew, who asked her to dance.</p> <p>“He is the most hideous dancer I’ve ever seen in my life,” Giuffre said. “His sweat was like it was raining basically everywhere.”</p> <p>Giuffre said after they left the club, Maxwell instructed her “to do for Andrew what I do for Jeffrey”. She alleged she had sex with Prince Andrew later that evening at Maxwell’s house in Belgrave.</p> <p>The Duke has repeatedly denied having any form of sexual contact or relationship with Giuffre. He stepped back from his royal duties in November following backlash from his <em>Newsnight </em>interview.</p>

Legal

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5 ways to protect yourself from identity theft

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s hard to guarantee total protection against hackers and with more people losing money to scammers, it’s important to do your best to stay vigilant.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Recent Scamwatch figures show that in 2019, Aussies lost $4.3 million to scammers, which is almost three times more than was lost the year before.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With scams becoming more sophisticated, the onus is on you to stop your money from being stolen.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are five ways to protect yourself from identity theft. (</span>AN: will number later, just hate doing it in a word doc as it doesn’t copy properly to umbraco) </p> <p><strong>1. Always check your emails</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In order to get into your accounts, a hacker will try many different passwords or sometimes reset it. If you see a password reset email and you can’t remember requesting one, this can be a major red flag.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Set up two-factor authentication</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a two-step process that you can add to your account login. This increases security on your account as it requires a different piece of information outside your password.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It is usually a temporary code which is sent as a text message to your phone.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">How does it work?</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After you enter your password, you’ll be asked to enter in the code that has been sent to your phone. Some websites have a time limit on the code so if you don’t enter it before the time limit expires, the code will no longer work.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This also means that if hackers gain access to your password, they won’t receive the temporary code and won’t be able to get into your account.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Consider a PO box</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Having an outdoor mailbox makes you more vulnerable to identity theft as anyone can help themselves to the personal documents that are sent to your home.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your mail provides information like your full name, bank account details, tax file number and your address. Hackers can also steal bank cards if they’re sent to your home address.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you decide to get a PO box, your mail will be kept in a secure place under lock and key.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, if you don’t want to get a PO box, you can request to send personal documents and bank cards to a secure location.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Monitor your credit report</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Every time you apply for a loan or a credit card, it’s listed on your credit report. You are able to check your credit for free every few months to make sure all listing are correct.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you notice any suspicious activity, contact the relevant bank or lender and let them know that the listing is fraudulent.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Check your transaction history</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Review your purchases every couple of weeks to make sure there aren’t any suspicious transactions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you notice any transactions that aren’t yours, put your card on hold and contact your bank immediately. You may also need to cancel your existing card and order a replacement.</span></p>

Money & Banking

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British coin sparks grammar controversy

<p>Britain’s new 50 pence coin has sparked debate after a renowned author pointed out the absence of a certain punctuation mark on the piece.</p> <p>On January 31, the Royal Mint launched three million coins with the slogan “Peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations” to mark the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union.</p> <p>Novelist Philip Pullman called for a boycott against the new coin ahead of its release, citing what he perceived as a grammatical error.</p> <p>“The ‘Brexit’ 50p coin is missing an Oxford comma, and should be boycotted by all literate people,” Pullman wrote on Twitter.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The 'Brexit' 50p coin is missing an Oxford comma, and should be boycotted by all literate people.</p> — Philip Pullman (@PhilipPullman) <a href="https://twitter.com/PhilipPullman/status/1221365577157087232?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 26, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>The <em>Times Literary Supplement </em>editor Stig Abell also wrote, “The lack of a comma after ‘prosperity’ is killing me.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Not perhaps the only objection, but the lack of a comma after “prosperity” is killing me. <a href="https://t.co/ZCN6Zt45cH">pic.twitter.com/ZCN6Zt45cH</a></p> — Stig Abell (@StigAbell) <a href="https://twitter.com/StigAbell/status/1221405487725453312?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 26, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>According to the Associated Press, Oxford commas should be used whenever necessary to clarify.</p> <p>“We say: If omitting a comma could lead to confusion or misinterpretation, then use the comma. But: If a comma doesn’t help make clear what is being said, don’t use it. ‘The flag is red, white and blue’ is clear.”</p> <p>Writing for <span><a href="https://theconversation.com/comma-again-philip-pullmans-oxford-comma-rage-doesnt-go-far-enough-130699"><em>The Conversation</em></a></span>, Associate Professor Roslyn Petelin of the University of Queensland’s School of Communication and Arts said the absence of Oxford comma is not the coin’s only shortcoming.</p> <p>“Does ‘Peace with all nations’ make grammatical sense? No. Does ‘Prosperity with all nations’ make grammatical sense? No,” Petelin wrote.</p> <p>“As admirable … as Pullman might be in advocating for the use of the Oxford comma on the coin, it’s clear this coin has committed more than one crime against the rules of grammar.”</p>

Retirement Income

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Should I tell my lawyer the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth?

<p>When engaging a criminal defence lawyer, clients are sometimes unsure about how much to say at the first meeting – concerned that telling their lawyers everything all at once could make it harder to achieve the best possible outcome.</p> <p>Indeed, in serious cases, lawyers may not obtain full instructions from their clients until they have received the statements and other materials upon which the prosecution relies, and until both they and their clients have gone through those materials.</p> <p>So, what are the rules that affect how a lawyer can deal with information from clients?</p> <p><strong>Legal professional privilege</strong></p> <p>The client/solicitor relationship is one of the most fundamental of our legal system.</p> <p>As such, principles have been established so that clients can provide full and frank disclosure to their lawyer without fear that this information will be used against them.</p> <p>Chief of these principles is ‘legal professional privilege’ also known as ‘client legal privilege’ which protects conversations between lawyers and clients. In the words of Dean J in <em>Baker v Campbell </em>(1983) 153 CLR 52:</p> <p><em>“That general principle represents some protection of the citizen – particularly the weak, the unintelligent and the ill-informed citizen – against the leviathan of the modern state. Without it, there can be no assurance that those in need of independent legal advice to cope with the demands and intricacies of modern law will be able to obtain it without the risk of prejudice and damage by subsequent compulsory disclosure on the demand of any administrative officer with some general statutory authority to obtain information or seize documents.”</em></p> <p>Legal professional privilege protects against the disclosure of communications between client and lawyer made for the dominant purpose of seeking or providing legal advice or for use in anticipated legal proceedings.</p> <p>This means your lawyer is generally prohibited from disclosing communications made for the purpose of your cases, subject to the exceptions outlined below.</p> <p>Privilege applies to both verbal and written communications between a lawyer and his or her client; whether in person, over the phone, by mail or over the internet – so it’s a broad protection which seeks to facilitate free communication between the parties.</p> <p><strong>Exceptions to client legal privilege</strong></p> <p>There are, however, a number of exceptions to client legal privilege that you need to be aware of.</p> <p>In NSW, sections 121 to 126 of the Evidence Act provide a number of situations where client legal privilege does not apply to the admissibility of evidence, which are:</p> <p><a href="http://www5.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/nsw/consol_act/ea199580/s121.html">121</a> – Where the client has died or where disclosure is necessary to enforce a court order,</p> <p><a href="http://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ea199580/s122.html">122</a> – Where the client waives privilege, or consents to the lawyer disclosing information or producing materials, or where the client acts in a manner inconsistent with maintaining the privilege (eg discloses to others),</p> <p><a href="http://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ea199580/s123.html">123</a> – Where a defendant is giving evidence in criminal proceedings, unless it is a a confidential communication or document between an associated defendant and a lawyer acting for that person in connection with the prosecution of that person.</p> <p><a href="http://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ea199580/s124.html">124</a> – Where two or more clients have jointly retained a lawyer in civil proceeding and one or more of them wishes to disclose a confidential communication or contents of a confidential document,</p> <p><a href="http://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ea199580/s125.html">125</a> – Where a communication is made or document prepared in furtherance of a <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/offences/fraud-charges/">fraud</a>, an offence or an act which would render a party liable for a civil penalty, and</p> <p><a href="http://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ea199580/s126.html">126</a> – Certain information necessary to understand material to which privilege does not apply as a result of the preceding sections.</p> <p>What if I’m actually guilty but want to plead not-guilty?</p> <p>There are some circumstances where being too frank with your lawyer may limit how they can advocate for you inside the courtroom.</p> <p>And it should be said that if you are indeed guilty, pleading that way will entitle you to <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/what-is-a-guilty-plea-discount/">a guilty plea discount</a> – which could result in a less serious type of penalty than if your were to plead not guilty and be found guilty. For example, an early plea of guilty could result in a penalty such as an <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/penalties/nsw/intensive-correction-orders/">intensive correction order</a> or <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/penalties/nsw/community-correction-order/">community correction order</a> instead of a prison sentence.</p> <p>However, an experienced criminal defence lawyer will be able to ask you questions in a way that reduces the risk of future prejudice.</p> <p>If you do admit to the offence, but wish to plead not-guilty to it – your lawyer will be limited in how he or she can present your case in court.</p> <p>This is because all lawyers are required to abide by professional ethics and conduct rules which can limit the questions that can be asked in certain situations, and the way cases can be argued.</p> <p>The rules <u>do not</u> prohibit lawyers from representing clients who admit their guilt to their lawyer; however, lawyers are strictly prohibited from lying or knowingly misleading the court on behalf of their clients.</p> <p>A lawyer who knows their client is guilty can still ‘put the prosecution to proof’; which means they can ask questions of prosecution witnesses and make submissions to the court to the effect that the prosecution has failed to prove each of the ‘essential elements’ (or ingredients) of the charge case beyond a reasonable doubt, and that their client should therefore be acquitted.</p> <p>But again, the lawyer will not be able to elicit false or misleading evidence, or make false or misleading submissions to the court.</p> <p>For example, a lawyer to whom you admit your guilt can assist by questioning and challenging prosecution witnesses. But he or she cannot allow you or another person to tell lies on the witness stand. If this nevertheless occurs, the lawyer would be well advised to submit to the court that he or she is ‘embarrassed’ and withdraw from the case.</p> <p>Often honesty is preferable, as you may be guilty of a lesser offence than the one you have been charged with, in which case your lawyer can push for the charge to be downgraded, or tailor your defence to ensure you are found not guilty of the charged offence in court.</p> <p>So it’s a bit of a tricky area, but experienced defence lawyers are well-aware of the rules, the pitfalls and how to act in the best interests of their clients whilst abiding by their other ethical obligations.</p> <p><strong>Changing</strong> <strong>lawyers</strong></p> <p>If you don’t feel your lawyer can adequately represent you – whether this is because you have told them something you shouldn’t have, or you believe they are not suitably experienced, or for another reason – it may be in your interest to obtain new legal representation.</p> <p>Changing lawyers is a simple process, and when making that decision you should always bear in mind that choosing the right lawyer may be one of the most important decisions you ever make, and that you should always be looking out for your own best interests.</p> <p>If you want to change lawyers, you will normally need to sign an ‘authority to uplift’. Your new lawyer will be able to provide you with this document, and can send it to your previous lawyer on your behalf in order to obtain the materials they have.</p> <p>If you have unpaid fees with your previous lawyer, it is advisable that you pay these to enable a smooth transfer and ensure your previous lawyer doesn’t seek to exercise a ‘lien’ over your materials – which means to refuse to forward your materials on to your new lawyer.</p> <p><strong>Going to Court?</strong></p> <p>If you are going to court and require expert advice <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/about/lawyers/">from experienced, specialist criminal defence lawyers</a>, call Sydney Criminal Lawyers anytime on (02) 9261 8881 to arrange a free first conference.</p> <p><em>Written by Jarryd Bartle. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/should-i-tell-my-lawyer-the-truth-the-whole-truth-and-nothing-but-the-truth/"><em>Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</em></a></p>

Legal

Entertainment

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3 things historical literature can teach us about the climate crisis

<p>New novels about climate change – climate fiction, or cli-fi – are being published all the time. The nature of the climate crisis is a difficult thing to get across, and so <a href="https://theconversation.com/imagining-both-utopian-and-dystopian-climate-futures-is-crucial-which-is-why-cli-fi-is-so-important-123029">imagining the future</a> – a drowned New York City, say; or a world in which water is a precious commodity – can help us understand what’s at stake.</p> <p>This is unsurprising in these times of crisis: fiction allows us to imagine possible futures, good and bad. When faced with such an urgent problem, it might seem like a waste of time to read earlier texts. But don’t be so sure. The climate emergency may be unprecedented, but there are a few key ways in which past literature offers a valuable perspective on the present crisis.</p> <p><strong>1. Climate histories</strong></p> <p>Historical texts reflect the changing climatic conditions that produced them. When Byron and the Shelleys stayed on the shores of Lake Geneva in 1816, the literature that they wrote responded to the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-a-volcano-frankenstein-and-the-summer-of-1816-are-relevant-to-the-anthropocene-64984">wild weather</a> of the “year without a summer”.</p> <p>This was caused largely by the massive eruption of the Indonesian volcano Mount Tambora the previous year, which lowered global temperatures and led to harvest failures and famine. Literary works such as as Byron’s <em><a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/43825/darkness-56d222aeeee1b">Darkness</a></em>, Percy Shelley’s <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/45130/mont-blanc-lines-written-in-the-vale-of-chamouni"><em>Mont Blanc</em></a>, and Mary Shelley’s <a href="https://theconversation.com/eight-things-you-need-to-know-about-mary-shelleys-frankenstein-93030"><em>Frankenstein</em></a> reveal anxieties about human vulnerability to environmental change even as they address our power to manipulate our environments.</p> <p>Many older texts also bear indirect traces of historical climate change. In<em> <a href="http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20170419-why-paradise-lost-is-one-of-the-worlds-most-important-poems">Paradise Lost</a> </em>(1667), Milton complains that a “cold climate” may “damp my intended wing” and prevent him from completing his masterpiece. This may well reflect the fact that he lived through the coldest period of the “Little Ice Age”.</p> <p>Even literature’s oldest epic poem, <em><a href="https://www.britannica.com/topic/Epic-of-Gilgamesh">The Epic of Gilgamesh</a></em> (c. 1800 BC), contains traces of climate change. It tells of a huge flood which, like the later story of Noah in the Old Testament, is probably a cultural memory of sea level rise following the melting of glaciers at the end of the last Ice Age.</p> <p>These historical climatic shifts were not man made, but they still provide important analogues for our own age. Indeed, many cultures have seen human activity and climate as intertwined, often through a religious framework. One of the ironies of modernity is that the development of the global climate as an object of study, apparently separate from human life, coincides with the development of the carbon capitalism that has linked them more closely than ever.</p> <p><strong>2. How we view nature</strong></p> <p>Reading historical literature also allows us to trace the development of modern constructions of the natural world. For example, the Romantic ideal of “sublime” nature, which celebrated vast, dramatic landscapes like mountains and chasms, has influenced the kinds of places that we value and protect today in the form of national parks.</p> <p>When we understand that such landscapes are not purely natural, but are produced by cultural discourses and practices over time – we protect these landscapes above others for a reason – we can start to debate whether they can be <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/feb/28/britain-national-parks-reclaim-rewild">better managed</a> for the benefit of humans and non-humans alike.</p> <p>Or consider how in the 18th and early 19th centuries, the work of nature writers such as <a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/A_Memoir_of_Thomas_Bewick_written_by_him.html?id=CLtcAAAAcAAJ&amp;redir_esc=y">Thomas Bewick</a>, <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/charlotte-smith">Charlotte Smith</a> and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/science/grrlscientist/2013/nov/05/natural-history-selborne-gilbert-white-anne-secord-book-review">Gilbert White</a> played a powerful role in promoting <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08905490903445478?scroll=top&amp;needAccess=true&amp;journalCode=gncc20">natural theology</a>: the theory that evidence for God’s existence can be found in the complex structures of the natural world. Past literature has also been crucial in disseminating new scientific ideas such as <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/25733437">evolutionary theory</a>, which understood natural phenomena as entirely secular. Literature does not just reflect changing views of the natural world; it shapes them.</p> <p>Studying historical texts helps us to understand how modern cultural attitudes towards the environment developed, which in turn allows us to perceive that these attitudes are not as “natural” or inevitable as they may seem. This insight allows for the possibility that today, in a time in which our attitude towards the environment could certainly improve, they can change for the better.</p> <p><strong>3. Ways of thinking</strong></p> <p>Some of the attitudes towards the natural world that we discover in historical literature are contentious, even horrifying: for example, the normalisation of animal cruelty portrayed in books such as <a href="https://www.mimimatthews.com/2016/04/22/animal-welfare-in-the-19th-century-an-earth-day-overview/">Black Beauty</a>.</p> <p>But we can find more promising models too. Voltaire’s <a href="https://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Po%C3%A8me_sur_le_d%C3%A9sastre_de_Lisbonne/%C3%89dition_Garnier">poem</a> on the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, for example, has been used to think about the ethics of blame and optimism in responses to modern disasters, like the 1995 <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/lessons-from-earthquakes-there-isnt-always-someone-to-blame-when-the-earth-goes-from-under-our-feet-1569149.html">Kobe earthquake</a> and the 2009 <a href="http://blog.practicalethics.ox.ac.uk/2009/04/an-earthquake-in-the-theodicy-doctrine/">L’Aquila earthquake</a>.</p> <p>Reading past literature can also help us to appreciate the natural world for its own sake. Samuel Johnson commented of the natural descriptions in James Thomson’s poems <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/52409/the-seasons-spring">The Seasons</a> (1730) that the reader “wonders that he never saw before what Thomson shows him and that he never yet has felt what Thomson impresses”. Amid the frenzied distractions of modern life, the work of authors like Thomson, Dorothy Wordsworth and John Clare can help us to slow down, notice and love nature.</p> <p>Historical literature can remind us of our own vulnerability to elemental forces. The famous depiction of a storm in King Lear, for example, mocks Lear’s attempt:</p> <blockquote> <p>In his little world of man to out-scorn<br />The two-and-fro-conflicting wind and rain.</p> </blockquote> <p>Shakespeare might appear to aestheticise dangerous weather, but the play reminds us that the storm is far bigger and messier than any human attempt to represent and interpret it.</p> <p>At the same time, literature can remind us of the need to take responsibility for our own impacts upon the environment. We may not want to follow pre-modern and early modern literature in viewing climate change as divine punishment for bad behaviour. But when Milton suggests that it was the fall of man that brought in “pinching cold and scorching heat” to replace the eternal spring of Eden, his narrative has clear figurative resonance with our present crisis.</p> <p>Historical literature can show us how writers responded to climate change, trace how they influenced modern ideas about nature, and reveal valuable ways of relating to and thinking about nature. The climate crisis cannot be addressed only through technological solutions. It also requires profound cultural shifts. To make those shifts requires an understanding of past ideas and representations: both those that led to our current predicament and those that might help us address it.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/127762/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/david-higgins-287911">David Higgins</a>, Associate Professor in English Literature, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-leeds-1122">University of Leeds</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/tess-somervell-896321">Tess Somervell</a>, British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in English, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-leeds-1122">University of Leeds</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/three-things-historical-literature-can-teach-us-about-the-climate-crisis-127762">original article</a>.</em></p>

Books

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He's back! Billion-dollar actor returns to the big screen after two decades

<p>After a decades-long hiatus, Rick Moranis will be returning to acting for the live-action version of the Disney classic "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids".</p> <p>Moranis became one of the most in-demand comic actors of the 1980s and 1990s after blowing up on the Canadian sketch series SCTV. He went on to star in 1984’s “Ghostbusters” and its 1989 sequel, Mel Brooks’ 1987 “Star Wars” spoof “Spaceballs,” the 1978 cinematic version of the stage musical "Little Shop of Horrors", Ron Howard’s 1989 ensemble dramedy “Parenthood,” and the 1994 live-action “The Flintstones” remake.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8fb5xdHrrJ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8fb5xdHrrJ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by E! News (@enews)</a> on Feb 12, 2020 at 7:00pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Altogether, his films have earned an incredible $1 billion at the domestic box office, not adjusting for inflation.</p> <p>Since 1997, however, Moranis has worked sporadically, doing voice-over work (2003’s “Brother Bear,” a 2018 episode of “The Goldbergs”) as well as a couple comedy albums, after stepping away from acting to raise his children in the wake of his wife’s death from cancer. </p> <p>In this, his triumphant return, the sequel to the 1989 blockbuster "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" will see Moranis return to his role as Wayne Szalinski - the bizarre and quirky scientist who accidentally shrunk his children, along with his neighbour's kids, then went on to accidentally make his toddler enormous in 1992’s "Honey, I Blew Up the Kid". He eventually came back in 1997 for the sequel "Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves!" – one of Moranis’ last major works on camera.<br /><br />In the new movie, "Shrunk", Josh Gad will play Szalinski’s son, who will go on to unsurprisingly shrink his family.<br /><br />The original director, Joe Johnston, is returning to make the sequel, with Todd Rosenberg writing the script.</p>

Movies

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Charging your phone using a public port is dangerous

<p>Have you ever used a public charging station to charge your mobile phone when it runs out of battery? If so, watch out for “juice jacking”.</p> <p>Cybercriminals are on the prowl to infect your mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers and access your personal data, or install malware while you charge them.</p> <p>Specifically, <a href="https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/2732198.2732205">juice jacking</a> is a cyber attack in which criminals <a href="https://securelist.com/wired-mobile-charging-is-it-safe/74804/">use publicly accessible USB charging ports or cables</a> to install malicious software on your mobile device and/or steal personal data from it.</p> <p>Even a <a href="https://media.blackhat.com/us-13/US-13-Lau-Mactans-Injecting-Malware-into-iOS-Devices-via-Malicious-Chargers-WP.pdf">60-second power-up</a> can be enough to compromise your phone’s data. This is because USB cables allow the transmission of both power and data streams simultaneously. Victims can be left vulnerable to identity theft, financial fraud, and significant stress.</p> <p>USB charging stations are a common sight in shopping centres, airports, hotels, fast-food restaurants, and even on public transport. While juice jacking is neither <a href="https://securelist.com/wi-fi-security-and-fake-acdc-charges-threaten-your-data-at-the-2014-world-cup/63759/">new</a> nor particularly widespread so far, it was recently highlighted by <a href="http://da.lacounty.gov/about/inside-LADA/juice-jacking-criminals-use-public-usb-chargers-steal-data-ff">Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office</a> as a significant threat, especially to travellers who can easily find themselves caught short and in need of a battery boost.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>First, the attackers tamper with the charging stations or cables in public areas, and install malicious software on them. This software then infects the phones of unsuspecting users who subsequently plug into the tampered charger.</p> <p>The software can invade, damage or even disable your phone. It can also steal or delete data from your phone and possibly spy on your usage activity, to the extent of transmitting your personal information such as account numbers, usernames, passwords, photos, and emails to the perpetrator.</p> <p><strong>How can I tell if I’ve been juice jacked?</strong></p> <p>Hacked mobile devices will often go undetected. But there are a few telltale signs that your device may have been hacked. These include:</p> <ul> <li> <p>a sudden surge in battery consumption or rapid loss of charge, indicating a malicious app may be running in the background</p> </li> <li> <p>the device operating slower than usual, or restarting without notice</p> </li> <li> <p>apps taking a long time to load or frequently crashing</p> </li> <li> <p>excessive heating</p> </li> <li> <p>changes to device settings that you did not make</p> </li> <li> <p>increased or abnormal data usage.</p> </li> </ul> <p><strong>How do I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>The tampering of USB charging stations or USB cables is almost impossible to identify. But there are some simple ways to guard against juice jacking:</p> <ul> <li> <p>avoid USB power charging stations</p> </li> <li> <p>use AC power outlets rather than USB ports</p> </li> <li> <p>use a portable battery power bank (your own, not a borrowed one!)</p> </li> <li> <p>carry your own charging cable and adaptor</p> </li> <li> <p>use a data-blocker device such as <a href="http://syncstop.com/">SyncStop</a> or <a href="https://www.amazon.com.au/Juice-Jack-Defender-Security-purchased-employees/dp/B00XYTQ4Q8">Juice-Jack Defender</a>. These devices physically prevent data transfer and only allow power to go through while charging</p> </li> <li> <p>use power-only USB cables such as <a href="https://www.4cabling.com.au/portapow-fast-charge-micro-usb-cable-300cm.html">PortaPow</a>, which don’t pass any data.</p> </li> </ul> <p>And finally, if you must use a charging station, keep your phone locked while doing so. USB ports typically don’t sync data from a phone that is locked. Most mobile phones will ask your permission to give the USB port access to your phone’s data when you plug in. If you’re using an unknown or untrustworthy port, make sure you decline.</p> <p><strong>I think I might have been juice jacked – what can I do?</strong></p> <p>If you suspect you have fallen prey, there are several things you can do to protect your device’s integrity:</p> <ul> <li> <p>monitor your device for unusual activity</p> </li> <li> <p>delete suspicious apps you don’t recall installing</p> </li> <li> <p>restore your device to its factory settings</p> </li> <li> <p>install anti-virus software, such as <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.avast.android.mobilesecurity&amp;hl=en_AU">Avast Antivirus</a> or <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.antivirus&amp;hl=en_AU%22">AVG AntiVirus</a></p> </li> <li> <p>keep your mobile device’s system software up to date. Developers continually release patches against common types of malware.</p> </li> </ul> <p>A lot of data is stored on our mobile devices these days, and protecting our privacy is crucial. While juice jacking may not be a widespread threat, it is important to ensure the safety of our mobile devices. So, the next time you consider using a public USB charging station or cable, ask yourself if it is worth it, particularly as your personal information is at stake.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/130947/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ritesh-chugh-162770">Ritesh Chugh</a>, Senior Lecturer/Discipline Lead – Information Systems and Analysis, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/cquniversity-australia-2140">CQUniversity Australia</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/charging-your-phone-using-a-public-usb-port-beware-of-juice-jacking-130947">original article</a>.</em></p>

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What it feels like to perform Beethoven on today's stage

<p><em>In a series marking the 250th year of his birth, we analyse the brilliance of Ludwig van Beethoven.</em></p> <p>When Beethoven died in 1827, thousands of pages of highly notated music were bequeathed to posterity. Yet unlike arts such as painting and sculpture, which communicate directly from the artist to the observer, these otherwise silent pages demand resuscitation. They require performance.</p> <p>From all accounts, Beethoven was an extraordinary pianist. In playing his own compositions, however, he combined two roles that are now necessarily separate: those of composer and performer.</p> <p>How, then, might one recapture the essence of Beethoven’s music in modern times?</p> <p><strong>Playing the part</strong></p> <p>Performing music is akin to acting, where words by long-dead playwrights are given new life. It is a subtle art, honed over years, and is successful only when the “voice” of the performer finds alignment with that of the author, neither one cancelling out the other.</p> <p>Similarly, the role of the performer is distinct and important when interpreting classical music. As with drama it has an added power, as both the content of the music and its performance can be art. When the two synthesise, great music can truly live.</p> <p>Finding a composer’s individual voice takes careful study, and Beethoven’s music is a notable case. He lived at a pivotal time, when the role of composers evolved from functionaries of courts and chapels to artists in their own right. Famously, he wrote some of the first music considered “absolute” - music conveying something of great significance, without reference to a programmatic story or other form of text.</p> <p>Through decades of <a href="https://www.abcmusic.com.au/scott-davie">experience</a> as a pianist, I’ve found Beethoven’s music requires a different approach to that of his Viennese contemporaries. With Mozart, it is often best to stand back, to let the composer do the talking. With Schubert one needs patience, and an empathy for moments of simple bliss.</p> <p>By contrast, Beethoven’s music needs to be championed. One needs to grasp it with both hands, to join in the fight (so to speak), as the following three examples illustrate.</p> <p><strong>A virtuoso musician</strong></p> <p>Beethoven was a virtuoso at the keyboard, as much of his music attests. There are few works harder to perform at the piano than the famous Hammerklavier sonata, and great dexterity and flair are required in works such as the Waldstein and Appassionata sonatas.</p> <p>Beethoven’s earliest sonatas are dedicated to Joseph Haydn, his “teacher” in Vienna. This could be read as a mark of respect, yet, more cynically, one suspects he was ensuring they caught his eye, for what follows is Beethoven trying to out-Haydn Haydn.</p> <p>With unassuming simplicity, the C major sonata summarises brilliantly the thematic kernel of its opening movement in just four bars. Yet the phrase simultaneously presents a technical problem that stumps many pianists: clever fingering is required with the right-hand double thirds, or else they’ll never be crisp!</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/u_ugeUaKo1s"></iframe></div> <p>The movement’s following pages at times require the keyboard to be played as if invoking the force of a full symphonic orchestra, while other passages are more soloistic. The unexpected inclusion of a dramatic solo cadenza highlights further the cross-genre “tease” of the musical content.</p> <p>It’s masterly stuff, and to succeed in performance it’s beneficial to understand the clever wit of its subtext. This includes both the quick moves between soloist and orchestral roles, and the furtive wink back to <a href="https://www.classicfm.com/composers/beethoven/guides/beethoven-and-haydn-their-relationship/">Haydn</a>, which seems to say “See what I can do? I have no need of a teacher now”.</p> <h2>A philosopher</h2> <p>We don’t often credit the young as capable of profound sentiment, but many of Beethoven’s early works feature moments of the sublime.</p> <p>Of note is the slow movement of the early Sonata in D major, written when he was 28. However seven years later, the slow movement of the Fourth Piano Concerto reveals Beethoven as a fully matured philosopher.</p> <p>The orchestra begins with fierce outbursts, yet the piano is unmoved as it responds. At length, the pianist’s passivity and arching melodic lines gain dominance as the orchestra subsides, only to be momentarily undermined by a solo passage of trembling and unresolved harmony.</p> <p>Eventually, all conflict resolves. As an exchange, the movement is dialectical in its structure. From the viewpoint of the pianist, it is like participating in Greek tragedy; it’s a role that must be played with great conviction for the powerful drama to succeed.</p> <h2>A modernist</h2> <p>Given Beethoven’s iconic status among audiences, it’s easy to forget he was a modernist. Even today, performers flinch at the original final movement of his late B flat major string quartet - a movement that still astounds in its dissonance, and which the composer felt obliged to replace.</p> <p>Similar glimpses of music’s future lie in other late works, not least the quixotic final set of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagatelle_(music)">Bagatelles</a> for piano, published in 1825.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_mi8CQmeupI"></iframe></div> <p>In the last piece, the noisy opening recalls the closing bars of the Ninth Symphony, yet this is but a curtain-raiser to the music’s quiet core. The thematic material is disarmingly simple, consisting initially of offbeat, right-hand chords, while the harmony is rudimentary, the static left-hand part suggesting a rustic drone.</p> <p>This is music that stretches notions of time, even, in places, apprehending minimalism. Yet moments of profundity are swept away, as it slips into a carefree waltz. The eschewing of complexity is prescient.</p> <p>To perform this piece well is to be transported and transformed, the audience carried to the long-forgotten realm of a composer who, despite the stresses of his final years, appears to have found peace.</p> <p>Like J. Alfred Prufrock in T. S. Eliot’s famous <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/44212/the-love-song-of-j-alfred-prufrock">poem</a>, it is as if we linger in “the chambers of the sea” for a while. Until the opening bars return to wake us, and we drown.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/129184/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/scott-davie-406049">Scott Davie</a>, Lecturer in Piano, School of Music, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/australian-national-university-877">Australian National University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/performing-beethoven-what-it-feels-like-to-embody-a-master-on-todays-stage-129184">original article</a>.</em></p>

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