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"Everything is burning": Thousands watch in horror as iconic Notre Dame cathedral blazes

<p>A fire has engulfed the roof of Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral and has toppled its spire as thousands of people watch on in horror at the iconic landmark’s destruction.</p> <p>Notre Dame spokesman Andre Finot told French Media that “everything is burning, nothing will remain of the frame.”</p> <p>The famous cathedral is one of France’s most popular tourist attractions and draws 13 million visitors each year.</p> <p>French President Emmanuel Macron has said that this is a “terrible tragedy” but the cathedral will be rebuilt.</p> <p>“I’m telling you all tonight — we will rebuild this cathedral together. This is probably part of the French destiny. And we will do it in the next years. Starting tomorrow, a national donation scheme will be started that will extend beyond our borders,” Mr Macron said.</p> <p>The cause of the blaze is unknown, and earlier on Monday, there were fears that the great bells could fall.</p> <p>Paris Fire Department commander general, Jean-Claude Gallet, told reporters about the worry:</p> <p>“There’s a risk that the great bells fall. If the bells fall, it’s the tower that collapses,” Mr Gallet explained.</p> <p>“There are firefighters inside and outside.</p> <p>“We need to win this battle and block the spreading of the flames. The most efficient action is from the inside. We are not sure if we will be able to stop the spreading of the flames to the North Tower.”</p> <p>A crowd of hundreds has gathered outside the cathedral in shocked silence as they watched the 850-year-old building burn. Australian Divya Bala told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/world/europe/thousands-watch-iconic-notre-dame-cathedral-burn-in-the-heart-of-paris/news-story/aaeb7c0d39a3e7867b0afcbf6b230762" target="_blank">news.com.au </a>that watching the scene unfold was “shocking”.</p> <p>“Everyone just stayed out watching, very calmly, very quietly,” she said.</p> <p>“Some people were in tears, one older gentleman was holding himself up by the railing on the bridge and people were comforting him.</p> <p>“But I was really struck by how calm everyone was.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the devastating before and after shots of the Notre Dame Cathedral.</p>

Travel Trouble

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"We’re living with divorced dad right now”: Michelle Obama’s verdict on Donald Trump's presidency

<p>Michelle Obama has let her frustration be known over the Donald Trump presidency, as the current US president works hard to eradicate all the hard work that was done by her husband, former US President Barack Obama.</p> <p>Michelle was in London promoting her best-selling autobiography <em>Becoming</em>, when the host, US talk show host Stephen Colbert, asked how she felt about the Trump presidency.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7825976/obama.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/26857e195857431187914f81f1e900e0" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Michelle Obama with Stephen Colbert in London</em></p> <p>“We are a teenager, we’re changing all over the place and we come from a broken family,” Michelle explained.</p> <p>“We’re a little unsettled and having good parents is tough. Sometimes you spend the weekends with divorced dad and that feels like it’s fun, but then you get sick.</p> <p>“That’s what America’s going through. We’re kind of living with divorced dad right now.”</p> <p>After making the joke about living with “divorced dad”, the former First Lady took aim at Trump himself.</p> <p>“For anyone who had any problems with Barack Obama, let’s just think about what we were troubled by — there were never any indictments.”</p> <p>Michelle also told a personal anecdote about the Queen, which she broke royal protocol with by putting her arm around her in 2009.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7825975/obama-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ca99d383097c49b1a77e998a52dc2a81" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Barack Obama, Queen Elizabeth II, Michelle Obama and Prince Philip</em></p> <p>She told the story about how touched she had been by the Queen’s decision to wear a small pin badge that the presidential couple had given her as a gift and couldn’t contain her joy.</p> <p>“I don’t know that I could have done anything differently because it was a natural human reaction.”</p> <p>She’s also very fond of the Queen’s wit.</p> <p>“That was my experience, that has been my experience: that kind of warmth and graciousness and intelligence and wit — I like her.”</p> <p>Michelle’s book tour will take her all around Europe, with stops in Paris and Amsterdam.</p> <p>Have you read Michelle’s autobiography<span> </span><em>Becoming</em>? Let us know in the comments.</p>

News

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Why classical music is better than melancholy music every time

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many fans of classical music believe that access to the music of classical composers, such as Beethoven, Mozart and Bach, should be a fundamental human right.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It makes sense then that they would turn to classical music when they’re experiencing emotional upheaval, as Ian Warden found out.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Warden was most distressed that Robert Mueller found nothing impeachable about Donald Trump’s election campaign and turned to Beethoven to calm him down.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He told </span><a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/why-classical-music-trumps-melancholy-every-time-20190327-p5189u.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Daily Telegraph</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Classical-music-besotted I routinely listen to fine music and after listening to Beethoven's 7th Symphony (unless you are clinically dead, it is music that makes you break into a dance) my spirits were restored.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the online Canadian magazine called </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Walrus</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, there is a heartfelt and passionate piece written by orchestral conductor Kent Nagano. The piece is called </span><a href="https://thewalrus.ca/in-times-of-crisis-we-need-classical-music/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Times of Crisis, We Need Classical Music.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The essay outlines that those who live in western industrial societies are living in dreadful times of increasing materialism, consumerism, angst and alienation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, through the darkness, there is a light.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I want to show that, because of its powerful impact, classical music can play a significant role right now," Nagano explains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Composers address topics that are relevant to everyone. Their music highlights our worries and fears, our pain and joy. It can help us think more clearly, feel more profoundly, and live fuller lives than we could without it. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It can alter the way we treat our fellow humans and even our perceptions of ourselves. I want the music my orchestra performs to become a permanent, indispensable dimension of an audience's life.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"[There] are timeless compositions that address all the uncertainties and insecurities of this epochal period, and they can support us in our search for meaning. Beethoven, for example, was convinced that man had the capacity to change for the better and to grow throughout life. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is why there is so much hope in his music. His symphonies were meant to drive people forward. Can we hear this even today? I certainly think so."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Do you think classical music can inspire hope? Let us know in the comments.</span></p>

Music

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Five body hacks to perk you right up

<p><strong>1. Check your posture</strong></p> <p>While gazing at the floor from a standing position, you should be able to see the tops of your shoes without craning your neck. Slouching doesn’t just make you look tired – it makes you feel tired, too, because it places excess strain on your neck, back and hips; plus, when your joints aren’t properly aligned, your whole body has to work harder than it should. Additionally, standing tall will improve the flow of oxygen to your brain, which increases your alertness and attentiveness.</p> <p><strong>2. Expose yourself to light</strong></p> <p>Environmental cues play a huge role in the body’s energy cycles, and regular exposure to natural light has been shown to maintain higher energy levels in people suffering from fatigue. Open the curtains or step outside periodically and soak up some natural sunlight.</p> <p><strong>3. Use good scents</strong></p> <p>This isn’t about dousing yourself with your favourite perfume. It’s about harnessing the power of aromatherapy to lift your spirits when you need it. Take a whiff of peppermint, rosemary or jasmine when you feel droopy. Research shows these scents increase alertness and attentiveness.</p> <p><strong>4. Surround yourself with energising colours</strong></p> <p>Focusing your eyes on a vibrant shade of red, orange or yellow has an energy-boosting effect on the body, partly because these hues represent heat and radiant energy (think fire or sun).</p> <p><strong>5. Use your soundtracks</strong></p> <p>Studies have found that listening to soothing music helps you get a good night’s sleep, while upbeat tunes with over 120 beats per minute will rev your energy.</p> <p><em>Written by Dr Holly Phillips. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/Five-Body-Hacks-to-Perk-You-Right-Up"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Caring

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13 totally bizarre spa experiences around the world

<p>I always adopt a ‘treat yo’ self’ attitude when I’m on holidays. “I’m already splurging on hotels and dinners out so why not book myself in for spa treatments while I’m at it”, I tell myself as my bank account slowly slips into the red. I’ll try anything twice (within reason). I’ve enjoyed extremely thorough hammam scrubs in Morocco, deep tissue massages in Vietnam and rice paper body wraps in Thailand. Each involved a little too much nudity and not a lot of relaxation, but I embraced each experience, all in the name of travel. A Japanese Onsen experience is next on my list. I have since stumbled upon a few strange spa experiences that truly put my adventurous attitude to the test. Would you try these 13 whacky spa treatments?</p> <ol> <li><strong>Irish seaweed bath</strong></li> </ol> <p>Kilcullen’s Seaweed Baths, County Sligo, Ireland The Irish have been using this stuff to cure ailments since the 12th century. Monks would harvest a special type of seaweed called ‘dillisk’ and prescribe it to patients with all sorts of issues. The same seaweed used to eliminate parasitic worms could also apparently curb a “woman’s longing”. These days, Kilcullen’s Seaweed Baths in County Sligo use steamed seaweed to enhance a bather’s spa experience. The bath full of murky, salty brine draws out toxins and supposedly leaves you feeling delightfully tingly. If you can tolerate the lingering smell of sea urchins for a few days, this might be right up your alley.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Thai fish spa</strong></li> </ol> <p>Thailand A decade ago, the strange phenomenon of fish spas swept the tourist traps of Thailand. Since then, this fishy foot spa treatment has spread all over the world, even in the west. A species of Middle Eastern carp have earned their nickname, ‘doctor fish’, by eating away all the dead skin on your feet. Some say it feels like “little delicate kisses”. Ticklish types say it’s more maddening than it is relaxing. However uncomfortable, it is effective. My feet were soft as a baby’s bottom after I tried it in Phuket in 2010. I don’t think I’ll be dipping my toes in the tank again though.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>Japanese ramen noodle bath</strong></li> </ol> <p>Yunessun Spa House, Tokyo As a broke uni student living abroad in 2016, my diet consisted almost exclusively of ramen noodles. Today, I can barely look at the stuff, but it turns out, people are bathing in it. A theme park in Japan is offering visitors the chance to soak in a hot tub (shaped like a ramen bowl, of course) full of noodles and pork broth. It’s a family affair; up to 10 people can fit in the ramen bath at any given time. The treatment is supposed to give you a “healthy glow” for several days after. Unfortunately, the strong smell of soy sauce sticks around for just as long. This isn’t the only bizarre spa treatment at Yunessen Spa House. You can also bathe in coffee, red wine, green tea and sake.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Mexican cactus massage</strong></li> </ol> <p>Four Seasons Resort, Punta Mita, Mexico Massage therapists use the paddle of a cactus to work out your knots. Ouch, right? Well, actually, the needles are all removed prior to treatment. The strange service is offered at the luxury Four Seasons Resort spa and will set you back a spicy $245. The not-so-spikey massage is followed by a lathering of lotion made from indigenous plants and a splash of tequila. The treatment is said to leave your skin feeling hydrated and rejuvenated.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>Finish cryotherapy</strong></li> </ol> <p>Haikko Spa, Finland Cryotherapy is gaining momentum around the world. It’s a popular method of recovery for athletes after a hard workout or competition. Thought apparently beneficial, it’s not exactly a relaxing experience. It requires entering a chamber, sealing the door and enduring temperatures as low as -110 degrees Celsius. Yes, Celsius. On top of relieving sore muscles, it also aids in boosting your metabolism and making your skin glow. Although, that glow might just be from the layer of frost on your cheeks.</p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong>New Yorker bird poo facial</strong></li> </ol> <p>Shizuka Day Spa, New York, USA Controversially known as the ‘Geisha Facial’, this treatment involves having a concoction of nightingale droppings and rice bran spread all over your face. Celebrity facialist and namesake of the upscale Manhattan spa, Shizuka Bernstein, claims the traditional and natural Japanese ingredients help to soften and brighten the skin. Grossed out? This might ease your quease. The bird droppings aren’t collected from a local park. They’re sanitised under ultraviolet lights and milled down into a fine powder. The spa treatment is apparently highly sought after and costs US$180 for an hour session.</p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong>Japanese snail facial</strong></li> </ol> <p>Ci:z.Labo Spa, Tokyo, Japan It seems the Japanese will try just about anything. This slimy spa treatment is conducted by five celebrity snails. Raised in the spa on a strict, organic diet of carrots, Japanese mustard spinach, and Swiss chard, the snails are very well-looked after. This isn’t the first time these slippery suckers have been used in the name of beauty. Snail slime was all the rage in the 80s, praised for its miraculous healing properties. Today, the ‘Celebrity Escargot Course’ involves a human facialist rubbing snail slime into your skin for up to an hour, before setting a bunch of snails loose of your face for five long minutes.</p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong>Austrian beer bath</strong></li> </ol> <p>Moorhof Landhotel, Frankling, Austria Now this is a spa treatment that I can get around. Most people think alcohol introduces toxins to your body. A handful of Austrian spas claim it can do the opposite. Soaking in a barrel of foamy beer is said to draw out toxins and exfoliate the skin. Hedwig Bauer, an Austrian spa owner herself, goes a step further to say beer baths can help treat gout, eczema, kidney stones, strokes and stress. Beer baths have now spread to Germany and the Czech republic and are often treated us fun tourist experiences rather than legitimate healing practices. If you decide to give it a go, don’t be tempted to drink the beer from your bath because, well, that’s gross. Save it for the beirhaus.</p> <ol start="9"> <li><strong>Maldivian underwater spa</strong></li> </ol> <p>Huavafen Spa &amp; Pearl, Maldives The treatments themselves are not what make this spa unique. It’s the setting. The world’s first underwater spa transports you to an ethereal realm of underwater relaxation. Channel your inner mermaid as fish dart all around you just on the other side of the spa’s glass walls. A range of massages, facials, hair and beauty treatments are available and are performed by a team of renowned massage and beauty experts. The spa is part of the Huvafen Fushi Maldives resort whose luxury, overwater bungalows are so beautiful it hurts.</p> <ol start="10"> <li><strong>Balinese snake massage</strong></li> </ol> <p>Bali Heritage Reflexology and Sa, Jakarta, Indonesia In the interest of self-preservation, I refuse to give this one a go. However, the spa therapists at Bali Heritage Reflexology and Spa in Jakarta are adamant that their python massage spa treatments work wonders. The weight of the snake does little to penetrate sore muscles, but that’s not the point of the treatment. The idea is that the fear triggered by having a snake slither all over you will trigger an adrenaline rush that boosts your metabolism. The snakes are not venomous and a masseuse stands by at all times just in case things go awry. Still, it’s a no from me.</p> <ol start="11"> <li><strong>Chinese fire massage</strong></li> </ol> <p>Oriental Taipan Spa, Beijing, China Fire cupping is common practice in Chinese remedial therapy. The service is widely available in Australia too, but one spa in Beijing takes it one step further. Glass cups are strategically placed on a patient’s back and heated with a flame, creating a strong suction effect on the skin. It is said to relieve muscle tension and common colds but expect to be left with circular bruises for days after. At Oriental Taipan Spa in Beijing, the treatment is followed by a Chinese Meridian Oil Massage involves laying an oil-soaked towel over your back setting it alight. Sounds relaxing, doesn’t it?</p> <ol start="12"> <li><strong>Vietnamese Mud Bath</strong></li> </ol> <p>Nha Trang, Vietnam The medicinal properties of mud have been well-documented for centuries. You can buy powdered mud masks from the supermarket these days. But in Central Vietnam, these spa treatments have become a fun, social activity. The Vietnamese believe mud baths help to remove dead skin cells, strengthen bones, and reduce fatigue. They also use it to seek refuge from the heat. Nha Trang has developed a reputation for its mud bathing facilities, attracting locals and tourist alike. 100 Egg Mud Bath, 6km from the city of Nha Trang, has multiple mud pools and baths to choose from. Visitors can soak in their own private egg-shaped tub for around $18 per person.</p> <ol start="13"> <li><strong>Beverly Hills Vampire Facial</strong></li> </ol> <p>Nazarian Plastic Surgery, Beverly Hills, California, USA This is less of a spa facial and more a drastic, and potentially dangerous, cosmetic treatment. Even still, it didn’t stop Kim Kardashian from trying it out. Vampire Facials are a combination of microneedling (repeatedly puncturing the skin with tiny needles) and a mask made from your own PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma). Basically, a vial of you blood is drawn, placed in a centrifuge until the plasma has separated from the red cells. The plasma is then smeared all over your face, helping to repair skin damage. Supposedly this is a more “natural” option for skin rejuvenation, compared to botox and injectables. When you put it like that, I suppose it’s true. It’s just a little (a lot) creepy.</p> <p>Would you try any of these? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Bethany Plint. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/weird-spa-experiences-world/?slide=all"><em>MyDiscoveries.com.au.</em></a></p>

Cruising

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Discover who is following your profile on Facebook

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Did you know people are able to “follow” your personal or professional Facebook page without sending you a friend request? </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s important to know who is following you on Facebook, as this means that your posts are appearing in their News Feed without your knowledge and will appear more regularly than you think.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, people are only able to follow your personal Facebook account if your profile is public instead of private.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It can be a bit tricky to see how someone is following your Facebook page, so here are a few tips to work out how.</span></p> <p><strong>How to see if someone is following your Facebook page</strong></p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Go to your “Friends” tab and click on the “More” section.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click on “Following”.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll through who is following your Facebook page.</span></li> </ol> <p><strong>How to unfollow people on Facebook</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re tired of seeing someone’s specific posts in your News Feed, but don’t want to unfriend them, you’re able to “unfollow” them.</span></p> <p><strong>Unfollow them via their Facebook profile</strong></p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Go to their Facebook profile.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click the “Following” button so it doesn’t have the tick with “Following” any longer.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Done! You’ve unfollowed them on Facebook.</span></li> </ol> <p><strong>Unfollow them via your News Feed</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Have you just been reminded why you don’t like seeing this person’s posts? Unfollowing them from your News Feed is pretty simple.</span></p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Find a status update or post from the friend you want to unfollow.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click on the down arrow in the upper right corner of the post.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll down until you find the “Unfollow” option.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click on the “Unfollow” option.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">There! You have successfully unfollowed your friend.</span></li> </ol> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This means that their posts will no longer appear in your News Feed on Facebook but you’re still friends with them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Did you know about the “Unfollow” option on Facebook? Let us know in the comments.</span></p>

Technology

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Has Duchess Meghan already given birth to the royal baby?

<p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are known for breaking royal traditions and taking a modern approach to royal life – and supporters are not surprised in the slightest that Baby Sussex might just be another way the couple shows just how different they are to the rest of their family.</p> <p>Unlike their in-laws, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, the soon-to-be parents have opted to not share introduce their new baby to the public on the steps of the hospital.</p> <p>Instead, they are keeping their first moments with their new child private – which begs the simple question: Have the Duke and Duchess already welcomed Baby Sussex?</p> <p>Prince Harry has not been seen since the official Instagram page for the royal family announced they would not be indulging in a public royal baby photo call, which was on April 11.</p> <p>The<span> </span><span>@s</span>ussexroyal Instagram page has also dropped a small hint that perhaps the special arrival has already entered the world.</p> <p>The latest post signs off a special message, which says: “On behalf of The Duke and Duchess (and Baby Sussex), we thank you so much.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwR0wNFB1KI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BwR0wNFB1KI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Just one week ago, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex asked that you kindly consider supporting various organisations around the world in lieu of sending gifts for the upcoming arrival of their first born. Not only did many of you lend your support, you took action. Their Royal Highnesses wanted you to know the impact of your support – the direct effect your donation, energy, and action made! YOU chose to be part of the collective good, and you have made a real difference. Whether a $5 donation, £1000 contribution, offering to volunteer, or spreading the word – you’ve played your part. And on behalf of The Duke and Duchess (and Baby Sussex), we thank you so much. YOUR IMPACT: @thelunchboxfund will now be able to provide a minimum of 100,000 additional hot nutritionally fortified meals to children in dire need across South Africa @littlevillagehq received donations from all over the world (from UAE to Hong Kong and the US), they’ve increased their monthly donors, had a surge in volunteer applications, and re-energized their hard working team of 200+ staff and volunteers @wellchild can now provide 300+ additional hours of specialist care by a Well Child Nurse for a child with serious health needs, allowing families to stay together at home vs in hospital @Baby2Baby have received over 5,000 products to disperse to children in need, including cribs, books, backpacks, diapers and have received monetary donations from around the globe - from Guadalajara to Italy. You made this happen. Thank you.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sussexroyal/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> The Duke and Duchess of Sussex</a> (@sussexroyal) on Apr 15, 2019 at 6:51am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Royal fans have caused a storm among social media, many wondering whether the royal couple’s first child has already been born based off these words.</p> <p>“Have they had the baby yet?!” one person commented beneath the post.</p> <p>“Who else saw the notification and rushed over to see if this was a birth announcement,” another comment read.</p> <p>Meanwhile on Twitter, others speculated the baby is safe and sound in the arms of their mother.</p> <p>“Meghan and Harry probably have already had that baby. They chilling,” one tweet read.</p> <p>The rumours, however, have been well and truly alive for the last week, since Buckingham Palace announced the royal couple’s decision to avoid the cameras.</p> <p>“Their Royal Highnesses have taken a personal decision to keep the plans around the arrival of their baby private,” a statement read.</p> <p>“The Duke and Duchess look forward to sharing the exciting news with everyone once they have had an opportunity to celebrate privately as a new family.”</p>

News

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5 extraordinary uses for bananas

<p>We all know bananas are delicious, but did you know they can very useful around the garden?</p> <p>Here are five extraordinary uses for bananas you probably didn't know about. </p> <p><strong>Attract birds</strong></p> <p>Put an overripe banana on a raised platform in the garden, punching a few holes in it to make it accessible to butterflies as well as birds. Remove it at night so you don’t attract possums.</p> <p><strong>Polish leaves</strong></p> <p>Are the leaves on your indoor plants looking dull or dusty? Wipe down each leaf with the inside of a banana peel to remove the surface dust and replace it with a clean, lustrous shine.</p> <p><strong>Deter aphids</strong></p> <p>If aphids attack your roses, bury dried or cut-up banana peels a few centimetres deep around the base of the plant and they’ll soon leave. Don’t use whole peels as possums will dig them up.</p> <p><strong>Feed plants</strong></p> <p>Bananas are rich in potassium, an important garden nutrient. Dry the peels on screens in winter, grind them up in early spring and use as mulch for new plants, or cut into pieces and use as food.</p> <p><strong>Add to compost</strong></p> <p>With their high content of potassium and phosphorus, whole bananas and peels are welcome additions to a compost pile. The fruit breaks down especially fast in hot weather. </p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/5-extraordinary-uses-bananas"><em>Handyman Australia</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Home & Garden

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How Duchess Kate is preparing to become the future Queen

<p>She’s the future Queen consort of England, and the Duchess of Cambridge is preparing for the coveted role by taking on new responsibilities.</p> <p>While the 37-year-old won’t be taking up the role anytime soon, there are rumours circulating that the Queen plans to abdicate the throne and hand over the position to Prince Charles, who will then become King.</p> <p>If that occurs, Prince William will then become the Prince of Wales, marking his journey towards the head of the monarch as King. The Duchess will then be known as Queen Catherine.</p> <p>“Kate’s been taking on new responsibilities little by little over the last few years, so it won’t be a shock when the time comes,” said royal expert Rebecca Long to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/how-duchess-kate-is-preparing-to-become-the-future-queen/" target="_blank"><em>Us Weekly</em></a>.</p> <p>“William and Kate are the favourite royals to take the crown in many generations, so the people of the UK are very excited about it.”</p> <p>Kate<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="/lifestyle/relationships/duchess-kate-steps-out-for-her-first-ever-solo-outing-with-the-queen" target="_blank">accompanied the Queen</a><span> </span>at King’s College in London for the first time last month.</p> <p>“She’s really taken Kate under her wing,” another insider said to the publication.</p> <p>“The two of them will often spend hours discussing royal life and the future of the monarchy.”</p> <p>And while Kate is working on her skills as a future Queen, Prince William is also undertaking training to prepare him for when he becomes King.</p> <p>He is gearing up to acquire his father’s estate and has been regularly attending financial meetings as he discusses the management of assets within the royal family.</p> <p>Do you think the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are fit for the role of King and Queen? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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"I've never seen such leadership": Oprah Winfrey praises Jacinda Ardern in stunning speech

<p>Oprah Winfrey has praised Jacinda Ardern for her response to the Christchurch terror attacks.</p> <p>In a keynote speech at the 10th annual Women in the World summit on Thursday, Winfrey said the New Zealand Prime Minister’s handlings of the massacre that killed 50 people last month were a display of leadership that she has “never seen”.</p> <p>“I’ve never seen such leadership,” Winfrey said. “The prime minister is a woman who has such courage in her convictions and has set a global standard for leadership with her response.”</p> <p>Ardern’s response to the March 15 attacks has been widely lauded as <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2019/03/18/new-zealands-prime-minister-wins-worldwide-praise-her-response-mosque-shootings/?noredirect=on&amp;utm_term=.919ed278b725">“extraordinary” and “strong”</a>. Hours after a gunman opened fire at two mosques in Christchurch, Ardern appeared before the nation to condemn the shootings, saying that they could “only be described as a terrorist attack” and that the arrested suspect had “extremist views that have absolutely no place in New Zealand and, in fact, no place in the world”.</p> <p>The following day, the 37-year-old leader visited members of the Muslim community and reportedly told them that the country was “united in grief”. During the visit, she donned a Muslim-style headscarf known as a hijab.</p> <p>“People were quite surprised,” Ahmed Khan, a survivor of the attack, told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/03/19/asia/jacinda-ardern-new-zealand-christchurch-intl/index.html" target="_blank">CNN</a></em>. “I saw people’s faces when she was wearing the hijab – there were smiles on their faces.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">New Zealand PM Jacinda Adern wearing a hijab met the vctims of yesterday's attack. Plus she told Donald Trump: Send love to Muslims after mosque shooting. It really show how peaceful and welcoming country New Zealand is.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NewzealandMosqueAttack?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#NewzealandMosqueAttack</a> <a href="https://t.co/ZKOG3c6gD2">pic.twitter.com/ZKOG3c6gD2</a></p> — Hanzla Ali (@iamhanzla1) <a href="https://twitter.com/iamhanzla1/status/1106905428519251970?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 16, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Winfrey told the summit, “Women across the country then showed their solidarity by wearing headscarves to emulate the hijab that Ms Ardern chose to mourn in.</p> <p>“Fifty murders that could have brought even more destruction instead lead to a portrait of the Prime Minister displayed across Dubai’s tallest building with the word ‘peace’ shining above it, in English as well as in Arabic.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">New Zealand today fell silent in honour of the mosque attacks' martyrs. Thank you PM <a href="https://twitter.com/jacindaardern?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@jacindaardern</a> and New Zealand for your sincere empathy and support that has won the respect of 1.5 billion Muslims after the terrorist attack that shook the Muslim community around the world. <a href="https://t.co/9LDvH0ybhD">pic.twitter.com/9LDvH0ybhD</a></p> — HH Sheikh Mohammed (@HHShkMohd) <a href="https://twitter.com/HHShkMohd/status/1109124817888915461?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 22, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Speaking of the display of Jacinda Ardern’s image on Dubai’s Burj Khalifa skyscraper, Winfrey said, “Jacinda Ardern projected peace and goodness, and the Arab world projected it right back for all of us to take in. And suddenly we saw that the other didn't seem that much different from us.</p> <p>“So here, women in the world, we have to make the choice every single day to channel our own inner Jacindas.”</p>

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Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan’s baby could share a birthday with these royals

<p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have held back important details of their upcoming baby’s arrival, but one thing they have revealed is that the world can expect to see the little one late April or early May.</p> <p>And if everything goes according to plan, the newest member of the monarch can expect to share the same birthday as three other members of the family.</p> <p><strong>The Queen</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7825716/queen.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cbfff922a3804702832c941138b6f14c" /></strong></p> <p>Turning 93 on April 21, the Queen has lived a long and plentiful life. The most senior member of the monarch is already a great-grandmother to seven children – Savannah, eight, and Isla Phillips, six, Peter Phillips’ children with wife Autumn. Prince George, five, followed by Zara and Mike Tindall’s eldest child, Mia Tindall, who is also five.</p> <p>Also, in the mix is Princess Charlotte, Prince Louis and the newest member of the family, 9-month-old Lena Elizabeth Tindall.</p> <p><strong>Prince Louis</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7825715/louis.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/517c9addf45d431d986020b6a483a0dc" /></strong></p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have kept their youngest child out of the spotlight since his birth last year, but with Prince Louis set to turn one on April 23, fans are hoping an official photograph will be released to mark the special occasion.</p> <p>There’s also a chance Harry and Meghan may have their child around that time.</p> <p><strong>Princess Charlotte</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7825713/charlotte.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/589b9941b29f443eaadb334ac7e1368a" /></strong></p> <p>She’ll be the elder cousin of the upcoming royal baby, and if Meghan goes into labour in May, the child might end up sharing a birthday with Princess Charlotte.</p> <p>William and Kate’s only daughter will celebrate her fourth birthday on May 2 and will soon be starting school at Thomas’s Battersea in September – the same institution Prince George currently attends.</p> <p>With Duchess Meghan now on maternity leave, we don’t expect to see her in the public eye anytime soon as the couple prepare for their first child.</p>

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Camilla's redemption: How she revamped her image and won the public's heart

<div> <div class="replay"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>She was once labelled “Britain’s most hated woman,” however the Duchess of Cornwall seems to have come very far since then. At 71 years old, with over 90 charities under her belt and having completed 219 engagements in 2018 alone, it is safe to say she might have done just that.</p> <p>Blamed for being the person to “drive apart” Prince Charles and Princess Diana, Duchess Camilla has not had it easy from the public or the media in the slightest.</p> <p>However, she has not let that deter her and has been on a mission to change the public's view of her. According to royal expert Phil Dampier, Camilla has become “now quite popular.”</p> <p>“I think most people will accept her as Queen when the time comes,” he explained to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-6898105/How-Camilla-revamped-public-image-according-royal-insiders.html" target="_blank"><em>Daily Mail.</em></a></p> <p>The Duchess met 70-year-old Prince Charles in the summer of 1971 and was instantly taken to her because she was “not in any way overawed by him, not fawning or sycophantic,” according to royal biographer Penny Juror.</p> <p>But despite the undeniable chemistry that swirled around the couple, they were prevented from marrying back then, as the Duchess of Cornwall was deemed “unsuitable” with little aristocratic background despite her grandfather being a baron.</p> <p>She went on to marry Andrew Parker Bowles, with whom she shares two children, before they divorced in 1995 after 22 years of marriage.</p> <p>In April of 2005, the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall wed in a ceremony at Windsor Guildhall.</p> <p>With years of effort, Camilla has quietly refurbished her public image and given a new joy to the family.</p> <p>Frequently seen in the public eye with her husband, the two are often dissolving into giggles and smiles.</p> <p>She has even been described by a long-time friend as “witty,” and “100 per cent sure of who she is".</p> <p>“She has no side, no complexity,” they said.</p> <p>“She is warm, witty, endlessly cheerful and has the ability to laugh at everything and tease Charles out of his Eeyore grumpiness.”</p> <p>Not only has she been seen as an injection of playfulness into the royal family, she has also proven herself to be a tireless member with over 90 charities under her belt and having completed 219 engagements in 2018 alone.</p> <p><strong>Her sensitive approach to the Princess of Wales</strong></p> <p>While the public has largely pinned the Duchess as “the other woman” and the wedge that drove both Prince Charles and Princess Diana apart – even long after the late Princess of Wales’ death, Duchess Camilla has taken a sensitive approach.</p> <p>Although Camilla is technically the Princess of Wales, the royal chooses to not use the title due to its close association with Princess Di.</p> <p>Choosing to to known as the Duchess of Cornwall, her full official title is Her Royal Highness The Princess Charles Philip Arthur George, Princess of Wales, Duchess of Cornwall, Duchess of Rothesay, Countess of Chester, Countess of Carrick, Baroness of Renfrew, Lady of the Isles, Princess of Scotland, Dame Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order. </p> <p><strong>She has the Queen’s approval</strong></p> <p>As a wedding gift when the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall wed, the Queen bestowed a particularly special title as Princess Consort.</p> <p>In 2016, Her Majesty went a step further by making the Duchess a member of the Privy Council – her most senior advisory body.</p> <p>To royal insiders and fans alike, the clear regard for her daughter-in-law shows that when Prince Charles is pronounced king, his wife will be able to be “in the room".</p> <p>Although not all royal fans are convinced of Duchess Camilla, many have a newfound respect for the hardworking royal.</p> <p>Are you a fan of the Duchess of Cornwall? Let us know in the comments below.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div><span>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Duchess of Cornwall through the ages.</span></div>

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Travel

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4 modern man-made marvels in Southeast Asia

<p>Southeast Asia is well-known for its gorgeous natural and historical attractions. Just think of Angkor Wat in Cambodia, Halong Bay in Vietnam and Borobudur in Indonesia.</p> <p>Equally gorgeous and impressive, though, are these modern, man-made structures. Check out these four impressive sites that are also attracting large crowds.</p> <div class="view view-article-slider view-id-article_slider view-display-id-article_slider_block view-dom-id-c42fd07198902a614a7d8230cf786566"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>1. Golden Bridge, Vietnam</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>High up on Ba Na hill near Danang City in Vietnam sits a pair of giant hands holding up a pedestrian walkway.</p> <p>The 150-metre long Cau Vang, or Golden Bridge, rises more than 1400 metres above sea level and offers spectacular views of the surrounding area.</p> <p>Although brand new – the attraction just opened in June – the hands have been aged to look like they’ve been around for many decades. According to the principal architect, the project was designed to look like the hands of God pulling out a strip of gold from the land.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>2. Gardens by the Bay, Singapore</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Futuristic-looking giant trees and a man-made forest under a glass dome are all part of this 101-hectare multi-award winning horticultural destination that opened in 2012.</p> <p>The giant Supertrees are between nine and 16 storeys tall and you can take a stroll on a suspended walkway between two of these trees to enjoy the view from up above.</p> <p>A short walk away, you’ll come across the Flower Dome and the Cloud Forest. The former houses a collection of flowers found in deserts around the world, while the latter has the world’s tallest indoor waterfall and showcases plants that are usually found some 2000 metres above sea level.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>3. Statue of Lord Murugan, Batu Caves, Malaysia</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Located just 12 kilometres from the capital city of Kuala Lumpur, Batu Caves is the site of the tallest statue of a Hindu deity in Malaysia and the second tallest in the world.</p> <p>The statue of Lord Murugan, located at the Sri Murugan Perumal Kovil at the foot of Batu Caves, was completed in 2006 and stands a little over 42 metres tall.</p> <p>There are three limestone caves in the area, all of which house Hindu temples and shrines.</p> <p>Visitors have to scale 272 steps in order to reach the entrance of the caves.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>4. Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque, Brunei</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>With floors and walls made from gleaming Italian marble, made-in-England chandeliers, granite from Shanghai and millions of glass mosaic pieces covering the golden main dome, this is definitely no ordinary mosque.</p> <p>Named after the 28th sultan of Brunei, the grand mosque was completed in 1958.</p> <p>The impressive building is surrounded by an artificial lagoon, where a replica of a 16th century royal barge is docked at the end of a marble bridge.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/4-modern-man-made-marvels-southeast-asia"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

International Travel

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Are stand-up airplane seats the way of the future?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Italian seat manufacturer Aviointeriors’ have ruffled a few feathers with their new idea of standing seats on airplanes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The seats can be seen in the tweet below.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">On <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/The734?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#The734</a> today, we're talking about these new "standing" airline seats. I think most of us try to book the cheapest airline ticket, but would you ever pay to fly like this? Imagine it was $50 round trip to Ft. Myers - would you bite? <a href="https://t.co/1E2SXnTDrE">pic.twitter.com/1E2SXnTDrE</a></p> — Matt Brickman (@Matt_Brickman) <a href="https://twitter.com/Matt_Brickman/status/1113415339235336194?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">3 April 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many were quick to point out safety concerns with the seats, asking about what would be available for elderly, the disabled and for children. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another person inquired about what would happen to them, as they are 2 metres tall in height.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In shoes, I’m 6’6” (2m) and coach crushes my knees. Will my neck be above the so-called back rest? Will my head hit the ceiling?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the designers were quick to point out their intentions with the seats.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The message is, we do not want to put thousands of people in the cabin, we want to offer a multi-class configuration, which is nowadays impossible if you want to reach the maximum load of passengers," engineering advisor at Aviointeriors Gaetano Perugini explained to </span><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/travel/article/standing-up-airplane-seat-testing/index.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">CNN Travel</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"So that means that in the same cabin, you will have standard economy, premium economy or business class and ultra-basic economy -- which is an innovation for the airline and the passenger," Perugini continued. "This is the true reason for the Skyrider."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Perugini also admitted that the experience could be uncomfortable for some passengers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I will be honest, I don't think that somebody is happy to stay eight or ten hours in this configuration," he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"In the short haul, if you want to save money [...] you can hold this -- not fully comfortable position -- for a couple of hours. I think the majority of the people will accept this on a couple of hours flight, a three-hour flight."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Would you travel in these seats? Let us know in the comments.</span></p>

Travel Trouble

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Can you spot the mistake in this Aussie bus sign?

<p>Brisbane commuters have drawn attention to a typo in the city’s buses.</p> <p>About 100 buses operating in the Brisbane City Council have carried an information sticker advising passengers that smoking and consumption of food and drink are prohibited on the bus.</p> <p>However, passengers have identified an oversight on the sticker.</p> <p>The word “consumption” was misspelled as “comsumption”, leading many to question if the signs had been proofread before they were distributed to the vehicles.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 422.7212681638045px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7825842/reddit.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/161e2fb2e931443388d23896a1808030" /></p> <blockquote class="reddit-card" data-card-created="1554946472"><a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/brisbane/comments/baztj8/every_single_brisbane_bus_how_have_i_not_noticed/">Every. Single. Brisbane. Bus. How have I not noticed this?</a> from <a href="http://www.reddit.com/r/brisbane">r/brisbane</a></blockquote> <p>“Someone had one job...” one wrote on Reddit.</p> <p>“What an embarrassment,” another commented.</p> <p>One added, “I hate that you showed me this. Now I'm going to be irritated! You could have left me in my blissful ignorance.”</p> <p>Others pointed out that not all buses in the council were affected. “I'm on a bus right now and checked for this sign immediately. There's no typo and I'm actually disappointed,” one responded.</p> <p>A council spokesperson told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/can-spot-embarrassing-mistake-brisbane-bus-sticker-235649000.html" target="_blank">Yahoo News Australia</a></em> that it was aware of the misprint on the sticker, which was displayed in fewer than 100 of the city’s fleet of 1,200 buses.</p> <p>“An audit is underway and Council will ensure all stickers identified with a misspelled word are replaced by the end of the week,” said the spokesperson.</p>

Travel Trouble

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8 top tips for travel to China

<p>Between the great firewall, visas, money and the language barrier – travel to China can be a little bit daunting.</p> <p>But it is actually easier than you think – if you are prepared.</p> <p>A holiday in China offers a cultural experience like no other. You can walk on crumbling sections of the Great Wall, watch archaeologists at work digging out the Terracotta Warriors and chuckle at the antics of the pandas in Chengdu.</p> <p>Here’s our list of things you need to arrange and consider before you travel to China.</p> <p><strong>1. Visas</strong></p> <p>The thought of Chinese visas scared me so much that I put it off for months. The form looks huge. But once you get started, it’s actually incredibly easy.</p> <p>Many companies offer to do a Chinese visa for you – for a fee. But you can save that cash and do it easily yourself online. First you will need to find the Visa for China website for your capital city. <a href="https://www.visaforchina.org/SYD_EN/">The link here is for the one in Sydney</a>. You can read the step-by-step instructions or head straight to the Quick Access section. Fill in all the details in the form. Make sure you complete one for each person who will be going on the trip. Then book an appointment at your local visa for China centre.</p> <p>At that appointment comes, you will need to have print outs of your flight and accommodation details and photocopies of your passports. You will need to hand the passports over for processing.</p> <p>Don’t worry if you forget the print outs. The Visa centre has photocopiers and you can email the details to the security guard who will print out any documents you need for free.</p> <p>Take a number at the entrance to the Visa centre and wait your turn. Once at the counter, all you need to do is hand over the forms you filled in online, the passports, the photocopies and the details of all flights and hotels.</p> <p>One week later, you come back to the centre, pay the fee and collect your Visa. It really is that simple.</p> <p><strong>2. Internet</strong></p> <p>China could offer a chance to break free from social media, to unplug and take a technology break. Access to Google is limited. The Great Firewall of China really does exist. There’s NO Facebook access. No Instagram.</p> <p>But, if you can’t live without it, there is a way around the firewall. All you need is a VPN app. Install one before you go onto your phone and you will be able to access Facebook and Instagram and Google.</p> <p>We used Express VPN. Once installed on our devices it was as simple as logging into the app, choosing an internet connection in another city such as Hong Kong, LA or Tokyo and search away.</p> <p>If you don’t have a VPN, you won’t have access to Google. Try Bing.com for internet searching instead.</p> <p>Don’t even bother with Google maps in China. You are far better off downloading local maps of Beijing and other cities you plan to visit. Tales of tourists trying to find restaurants in the middle of the Forbidden City that don’t exist, simply because they are following Google maps about. It’s often wrong. Don’t use it.</p> <p><strong>3. Money</strong></p> <p>Your credit card will be fairly useless in China.</p> <p>Most Chinese locals pay for things using their phone. WeChat and AliPay are the two most common mobile payment systems. We tried to get access but failed. You need to have a Chinese bank account to make the WeChat wallet work. You could do this by asking a friend with a Chinese bank account to send you a “red packet” – a transfer of money. But you can’t keep asking them to do that all trip.</p> <p>The only other option really is cash. Before you go, find out which banks in China will accept Australian cards. Not all do. When you spot one of those banks – make it count. Avoid multiple withdrawals as much as possible so you reduce the bank fees.</p> <p><strong>4. WiFi</strong></p> <p>In most countries, it’s possible to pick up a portable Wifi device at the airport so you can reduce your use of data when out and about. But in China, that’s not your best option given the Great Firewall.</p> <p>You’re better off actually getting a Chinese Sim card and using the data on that when outside the hotel. Many companies will actually deliver Chinese sim cards to your hotel for arrival. We used one of these companies. They emailed instructions to us in both English and Mandarin. At check-in, all we had to do was show the receptionist the email and she immediately grabbed the package for us. Simple, easy, internet access. Pop the sim card in your phone and you are ready to go.</p> <p>You can set one person up as the main account holder and the other as a partner on that plan. One word of warning though – ignore every random text message in Mandarin that you are sent. If you don’t understand it – don’t click on it.</p> <p><strong>5. Trains</strong></p> <p>Think you can rock up to the station and jump on a bullet train? Think again.</p> <p>The best/fastest trains usually sell out a few days before, leaving only the option of a much longer multi-stop journey.</p> <p>If you want to avoid those extra hours – book ahead. You can go to the large train stations and seek out the English-language service window to book. Or – a really easy way – is to book online and just pick the tickets up with the email (with instructions in English and Mandarin) from the station before you travel.</p> <p>Another great tip is to download an app that plans subway travel in China – showing the connections you need to take to get somewhere in English. Some stations – like the one in the photo below, have limited English. This app will be your lifeline.</p> <p>Be prepared to put all your bags through an X-ray machine at every train station. You get used to it after a while.</p> <p><strong>6. Water and snacks</strong></p> <p>You CAN NOT drink the water in China. That means you will be carrying a lot of water each day.</p> <p>Market stalls often sell fresh fruit – grab items such as bananas and oranges whenever you see them.</p> <p>We found finding snacks was often difficult in both Beijing and Xian. Fill up on breakfast at the hotel before you head out. There are convenience stores such as Our Hours that sell snacks, but we found most of the items on offer had little nutritional value.</p> <p>Eat to your fill in restaurants.</p> <p><strong>7. Dining out</strong></p> <p>Many restaurants will have an English menu.</p> <p>If you have installed a VPN, you will be able to use Google translate to hover over menus to see what you want to eat. Then all you need to do is point when the waiter comes and tell them how many you want.</p> <p>Dumplings are always a good bet. As are noodles.</p> <p>Dandong Duck does tasty Peking Duck in Beijing. First Noodle Under the Sun in Xian is fantastic.</p> <p>Our best advice? Check Trip Advisor and see what other travellers recommend in your area. That way you can be fairly certain that it will be tasty and accommodate for your lack of Mandarin.</p> <p><strong>8. DIY? Or guide?</strong></p> <p>Unless you are prepared to speak a little Mandarin, do a LOT of pointing and use a translation app or sometimes just wing it, a guide is a good safe option.</p> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/top-tips-for-travel-to-china-visa-vpn-trains-internet/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Travel Tips

Health

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Should you weigh yourself regularly?

<p>For some, jumping on the scales is a daily or weekly ritual; while others haven’t seen a set of scales for years. Some may still be scarred by memories of being weighed in public with results broadcast to all.</p> <p>So, is it helpful to weigh yourself? And if so, how often should you do it?</p> <p>For adults carrying excess weight and who are trying to manage their weight, the answer is yes: weighing yourself regularly can help you lose more weight initially, and keep it off.</p> <p>But for adolescents or those who have experienced disordered eating, it’s best to keep the scales out of sight.</p> <p><strong>What does the research say?</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26293454">Most studies</a> have investigated the impact of self-weighing along with other weight-loss strategies such as a low-kilojoule diet.</p> <p>These studies show self-weighing is an inexpensive technique that may help with weight loss and maintenance, particularly for men, who often respond well to structured “weigh-ins”.</p> <p>Only one study has investigated the use of self-weighing as the sole weight-loss strategy. This <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26064677">US research study invited 162 adults</a> who were wanting to lose weight to a single educational weight-loss seminar.</p> <p>Half of the people were instructed to weigh themselves daily and got visual feedback on their weight change over two years. The other half were not asked to weigh themselves daily, until the second year.</p> <p>During year one, men in the daily self-weighing group lost more weight than the control group, but women did not. The average number of times people weighed themselves a week was four.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26064677">In the second year</a>, men in the daily self-weighing group maintained their weight loss. Those in the control group, who had now started daily weighing, lost weight, while the women stayed the same.</p> <p>Having regular weigh-ins with a health professional can also help. A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29520919">review of more than 11,000 overweight people</a> attending a weight management program in GP clinics in Israel found those who had regular weigh-ins with the nurse or dietitian were more likely to lose more than 5 per cent of their body weight. This amount of weight loss is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29114778">associated with a major reduction</a> in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.</p> <p><strong>How often should you weigh yourself?</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26293454">A review</a> of 24 randomised controlled trials found there was no difference in weight loss between those who weighed themselves daily versus weekly.</p> <p>No matter what other features the weight-loss program includes, the key to better results appears to be regular self-weighing, which means at least weekly.</p> <p>Making yourself “accountable” for weigh-ins either by having a set day to weigh-in or joining a weight loss program can <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28508330">help you lose more weight</a>.</p> <p>Another important point is that <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25397613">not weighing yourself</a> regularly when you are on a weight-loss diet is a risk factor for weight gain.</p> <p><strong>When is self-weighing harmful?</strong></p> <p>Regular weighing is not recommended for adolescents. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26566095">Research suggests</a> it doesn’t help with weight management and can negatively impact on young people’s mental health, especially for girls.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26566095">ten-year study</a> of the relationship between self-weighing, weight status and psychological outcomes of almost 2,000 teens in the US found that self-weighing had no helpful impact on weight or BMI.</p> <p>However, it was associated with weight concerns, poor self-esteem and trying to lose weight though unhealthy methods such as excessive fasting.</p> <p>Over the ten years, more frequent weighing was associated with a decrease in body satisfaction and self-esteem, and an increase in weight concerns and depression in the young women.</p> <p>For young men, with the exception of weight concerns, there were no significant relationships between self-weighing and other variables.</p> <p>An increased frequency of self-weighing throughout the high school years <a href="https://thebutterflyfoundation.org.au/our-services/">may flag</a> the need to investigate an adolescent’s overall well-being and psychological health.</p> <p>Self-weighing can also <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26627092">affect the self-esteem</a> and psychological well-being of adults, especially women. This is of particular concern for those with eating disorders, as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27188448">weighing frequency can be associated with greater severity of eating disorders</a>.</p> <p>For some people, self-weighing could be the key to losing or keeping weight off, while for others, it may do harm. Consider your life stage, pre-existing health conditions and your mental well-being when deciding whether regular weighing is worth it for you. <!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/92177/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Clare Collins, Professor in Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Newcastle and Rebecca Williams, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Newcastle</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-should-you-weigh-yourself-regularly-92177"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Mind

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"You will literally wait for hours!": Frustrated woman vents about husband's odd bathroom habit

<p>A woman has been left wondering whether she was in the right to complain about her husband’s odd bathroom habit.</p> <p>The wife and mother has been left frustrated by her partner, who would take over the house’s bathroom for anywhere from 45 minutes to two hours at a time.</p> <p>Writing on <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.reddit.com/r/AmItheAsshole/comments/bbvgh2/aita_for_getting_pissy_about_my_husbands_bathroom/" target="_blank">Reddit</a>, the woman said the long bathroom breaks often kept her and her young son from using the loo when needed. </p> <p>“Fortunately, my son has a private little corner of our backyard where he can go relieve himself in emergencies, but it can be torture for myself or any other women stuck waiting to tinkle,” she shared.</p> <p>Explaining that the situation had been going on for years, she said the wait would be longer if her husband decided to take a shower after relieving himself. </p> <p>“You will literally wait for hours! I have finally got him to where he will unlock the door before he jumps in the shower so we can at least get in to relieve ourselves.”</p> <p>She suspected that her partner has not been using the bathroom for anything related to bodily functions. </p> <p>“I have to go in after him and a lot of time it doesn’t even smell! Zero evidence that he was ‘using the facilities’,” she vented.</p> <p>“I really don’t want to know what he does with his bathroom time, I just want him to be more respectful of the fact that other people have needs too!”</p> <p>Many people jumped in to reassure the woman that her concerns are valid. </p> <p>“That sounds excessive and rude. Is he reading? Needs a quiet place?” one commented. “Something is up!”</p> <p>Another wrote, “He’s being really inconsiderate ... and honestly it kinda sounds like he’s just chilling in there to avoid his childcare responsibilities.”</p> <p>The woman was also encouraged to address the issue with her husband. </p> <p>“I think you really ought to ask the reason,” one advised. “It’s possible he has a condition he’s embarrassed about that you could help him with. Or it’s possible he needs alone time and tries to get it this way. In any case, I don’t see this getting better without you insisting on getting the reason.”</p> <p>Another user chimed in, saying, “The fact that your son has learned to pee in the yard because daddy monopolizes the bathroom is shocking. That isn’t normal … What you are dealing with is really terrible and this isn’t going to be easy to fix. Counselling would be a good idea.”</p> <p>What do you think of the bathroom dilemma? Share your thoughts in the comments.</p>

Body

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The simple eye test leaving people gobsmacked

<p>Getting behind the wheel at night can be a challenge even for the most experienced drivers. However, more difficulties await those with vision problems.</p> <p>According to a Twitter user, you can check if you need glasses for driving through this simple test.</p> <p>The account posted two pictures, claiming that they show what driving with astigmatism looks like compared with normal, healthy vision.</p> <p>In the first picture, the lights from the traffic appear with big streaks, while in the second picture the lights only have a slight blur around them.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Astigmatism is when the cornea is slightly curved rather than completely round..<br /><br />With astigmatism, light focuses on several points of the retina rather just one point. This is what people with Astigmatisms vs without. <a href="https://t.co/RXWWayFBRJ">pic.twitter.com/RXWWayFBRJ</a></p> — Unusual Facts (@UnusualFacts6) <a href="https://twitter.com/UnusualFacts6/status/1109996250273902592?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 25, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“This is what people with Astigmatisms vs without [see],” the post read.</p> <p>Astigmatism is a condition where the cornea or lens of the eye is not a smooth curve, resulting in asymmetric blur and distorted view.</p> <p>The post, published in late March, has surprised social media users who previously believed that the streaky image was “normal”.</p> <p>“Wait people can see lights normally? I thought everyone saw those lines,” one responded.</p> <p>“I thought everyone saw the lines, when I was little I would squint to make em longer to entertain myself, thought that was normal,” another commented.</p> <p>“My life and seeing is a lie, I thought everyone saw the lines,” another commenter added.</p> <p>Optometrist Ceri Smith-Jaynes told<span> </span><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8775288/how-two-photos-compare-astigmatism/"><em>The</em> <em>Sun Online</em></a> that the picture “is not a bad representation” what the condition might look like. “You do get a bit of streaking with astigmatism,” she said. “But it could also be a number of other things such as cataracts, opaqueness or even when a lash gets in your eye.”</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/astigmatism" target="_blank">Health Direct</a>, astigmatism may be present at birth, develop with ageing, or result from eye disease or injury. Symptoms may include headaches, difficulties seeing at night and tiredness.</p> <p>The condition could be corrected by glasses, contact lens or surgery.</p> <p>Do you see the streaky lights when driving at night? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Mind

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How to find strength in tough times

<p><span>There is an old saying – a cliché even – that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. And this seems to be true when it comes to those who have survived tragedies.</span></p> <p><span>From the parents who lost their child in a horrifying horse accident, to the young man whose brother committed suicide, to the middle-aged woman who was held-up and raped at knifepoint, there can be strength in adversity.</span></p> <p><span>Susan was in her early 30s when she was held up by a knife-wielding man in a balaclava at her local railway station, then bound, gagged and raped in her car. It was a truly horrifying experience, but she says that the actual incident seemed surreal at the time. Normality in the weeks after the attack was harder to adjust to. <br /><br />Now 54, she says that the attack ended up framing who she became and what she achieved afterwards.<br /><br />“In some ways it helped to give me perspective,” she says. “I was working in a fairly superficial industry and people spent a lot of time gossiping about each other. After the attack it just seemed pointless. I had faced death and survived! Those petty grievances seemed so silly. I decided I wanted to make a difference with my life and I started doing lots of volunteer work. I was a voluntary counsellor for about 15 years afterwards.”<br /><br />Susan says that one person she met through her recovery process told her that most “great” people in history had encountered a life-threatening experience in their formative years – from Winston Churchill to Nelson Mandela, to Kerry Packer and Marie Curie – even Agatha Christie. This resonated with her.<br /><br />“This man had survived a horrific ocean storm on his yacht and almost drowned,” she says. “He said that surviving almost certain death changed him and made him feel like an outsider; and a little different to everyone else. It made him realise that life was short and he was stronger than he thought.<br /><br />“I decided then that I needed to be strong, to rise above my experience and to grow as a person. I didn’t want the person who attacked me to win.” <br /><br />Juliana Waugh was in her 40s when her daughter Sarah was tragically killed by fall from a horse while on a TAFE course in the NSW countryside. Understandably devastated by Sarah’s death, she and her husband Mark spent the next seven years fighting to change the laws around horses and inexperienced riders, a battle they eventually won.<br /><br />NSW now has a new Code of Practice to reduce work-related horse injuries, which came into effect on the February 1 2017.<br /> <br />Called the “Code of Practice for managing Risks when new or inexperienced riders or handlers interact with horses in the Workplace”, it is the first of its kind in Australia. <br /><br />“I knew I could never save Sarah but I truly believed that if I didn't fight on and do something – bring change that would be lasting – I was not a good mother because now I knew what was wrong I felt it was up to me,” says Juliana. “I was compelled so no other child would die like Sarah did.”<br /><br />Marshall Dunn’s brother Mitchell committed suicide in 2002 at the age of 26, a month before his own 21st birthday. The next few years were difficult and unbearably sad, but ultimately a period of growth and insight. <br /><br />Now a life coach and author, Marshall wrote a book about the process of coming to terms with Mitchell’s death, published in the form of the letters he wrote to his dead brother while he was grieving. Called <a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fletters-to-mitch-marshall-dunn%2Fprod9780998080901.html"><em>Letters to Mitch</em></a>, it takes readers through Marshall’s journey after his brother’s suicide and his path to healing.<br /><br />As he says in the introduction of the book, he now feels that Mitch “gave me the opportunity of a lifetime – the opportunity to know myself, something I might not have done if he hadn’t passed. These days, it gives me great pleasure to write, coach, speak, and connect with people from all over the world as I help them peel back the layers of their own suffering.” <br /><br />Marshall says that he hopes that sharing his story will help others to cope with “whatever curveball that life has thrown at you”. He is now completing his second book and has plans for a “self-help” novel.<br /><br />“There is an invitation there to question your place in the world and the gifts you have and how you want to live your life,” he says. </span></p> <p><span>“When you have an event like that that brings you to your knees, questions are going to come up and it is really going to be up to the individual and the choice they make. Whether they want to keep going down the path that that may not be serving the highest values and priorities or if they want to muster their courage and go in the direction that and investigate their inner landscape and start to heal areas of their life that need attention.” </span></p> <p><span>Need help? Call <a href="https://www.lifeline.org.au/">Lifeline Australia</a> on 13 11 14 or visit <a href="http://www.thecompassionatefriends.org.au/">Compassionate Friends</a>.</span></p> <p><span>How have you coped with grief and adversity? Share your story in the comments section below.</span></p> <p><em><span>Written by Lynne Testoni. Republished with permission of </span></em><span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/strength-through-adversity.aspx"><em>Wyza</em></a><em>.</em></span></p>

Body

Lifestyle

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Palace photo album: The first photos of royal babies throughout history

<p>The Duchess of Sussex will give birth to her first child with Prince Harry very soon, and royal fans are waiting anticipation to see the adorable face of Baby Sussex.</p> <p>Although there is a classic royal protocol which sees every royal wife posing with their newborn on the hospital steps, there have been whispers questioning whether Duchess Meghan will follow the tradition or choose to make her own rules.</p> <p>While there are no clear answers on just how exactly the royal couple may choose to show their newest member to the world, supporters of the royal family are clearly torn down the middle on what they think may happen.</p> <p>Some royal insiders believe the Duchess is opting for a home birth, meaning publicly posing and cradling her newborn outside of a maternity ward, like Duchess Kate has done in the past, will be out of the question.</p> <p>Others, however, think she may choose to go for a more traditional route after “breaking” a few royal rules over the last year.</p> <p>If the Duke and Duchess of Sussex do not opt for a photo just days after the birth of their first arrival outside of a maternity ward, royal fans may just have to wait a little while longer to see the little bundle of joy.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the first photos of royal babies throughout history.</p> <p>The royal family are sticklers for tradition, but do you think this may be another refreshing twist for the British family if Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan choose not to pose on the hospital steps for the world to meet their newborn? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Family & Pets

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Scrumptious corn fritters

<p>In this recipe, crisp, juicy corn kernels are added to a thick batter flavoured with chilli and fresh coriander, and then pan-fried in big spoonfuls. Piled on a bed of watercress and drizzled with a minted spring onion and yogurt sauce, the fritters make a quick, easy meal.</p> <div id="ingredients"><strong>Ingredients:</strong> <ul> <li>1 cup (150g) plain flour</li> <li>1/2 teaspoon baking powder</li> <li>150 ml low-fat milk</li> <li>2 large eggs, lightly beaten</li> <li>3/4 cup (400g) frozen corn kernels, thawed and drained</li> <li>3 spring onions, finely chopped</li> <li>1 fat fresh red chilli, seeded and finely chopped</li> <li>3 heaped tablespoons chopped fresh coriander leaves</li> <li>salt and pepper</li> <li>1 tablespoon sunflower oi</li> <li>l100 g watercress, trimmed</li> </ul> <p><strong>Yogurt sauce</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 1/4 cups (310g) Greek-style yogurt</li> <li>4 spring onions, finely chopped</li> <li>2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint</li> <li>grated zest and juice of 1 lime</li> <li>salt</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <div> <ol> <li>First make the yogurt sauce. Put the yogurt into a serving bowl and stir in the spring onions, mint, lime zest and a pinch of salt. </li> <li>Cover and chill while you make the fritters (keep the lime juice for use later).</li> <li>Sift the flour and baking powder into a bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the milk and eggs. </li> <li>Using a wooden spoon, mix together the milk and eggs, then gradually draw in the flour from around the edges. </li> <li>Beat with the spoon to make a smooth, thick batter. </li> <li>Alternatively, the batter can be made in a food processor: put the milk and egg in the container first, spoon the flour and baking powder on top, and process for a few seconds to blend.</li> <li>Add the corn kernels, spring onions, chilli and coriander to the batter, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Mix well.</li> <li>Heat a large, heavy frying pan, then brush with a little of the oil. </li> <li>Drop large spoonfuls of the fritter batter onto the pan – make about 4 fritters at a time – and cook over a moderate heat for 2 minutes, or until golden and firm on the underside.</li> <li>Turn the fritters over using a palette knife, and cook on the other side for about 2 minutes, or until golden. </li> <li>Remove the fritters from the pan and drain on paper towel. </li> <li>Keep warm while cooking the rest of the fritters in the same way, adding more oil to the pan as necessary.</li> <li>Arrange the watercress on 4 plates and sprinkle with the lime juice. </li> <li>Arrange the corn fritters on top and serve hot, with the yogurt sauce to be drizzled over.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/corn-fritters"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

Food & Wine

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A day in the life of your knee

<p>It’s cosy beneath these blankets, but I want out. I am achy and inflamed, brittle from a motionless night. I wait for The Body to register my familiar morning stiffness. C’mon, get up already so we can work out these kinks.</p> <p>He flings his feet over the side of the bed and plants them on the floor. I’m not gonna lie: straightening out under all 95kg of him takes some serious grit. I brace myself for the load. My upstairs neighbour, the thigh muscle, contracts and yanks the quadriceps tendon, which pulls on my kneecap to make the leg extend. I’m a hinge, with pulleys that bend and straighten me.</p> <p>The other knee snickers. He’s not in as bad a shape as I am. The quads and hamstrings like to joke that I’m their little marionette. Yeah, real knee-slapper, guys.</p> <p>As he gets dressed, The Body flips on the TV to catch replays from last night’s football game. Oh, dear. What’s this? His team’s running back suffered an ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) tear? Side-tackled while all his weight was on one foot. Body, cover your eyes, for goodness’ sake! Why does he make me watch this? He’s wincing, too, because I suffered that same injury about 20 years ago. It still haunts us.</p> <p><strong>The story of my demise</strong></p> <p>The Body had been out of college for ten years and had let all of us (muscles, ligaments, and tendons) go to pot. Not that I blame him. You know the drill: sit all day at a desk, meet friends for happy hour. Who has time for exercise? Then, one weekend, he joined a pickup basketball game. Just ran right out there like the college athlete he no longer was – no warming up, no taking it easy – and snap! Tore my ACL. It’s the string that runs through my centre, connecting the thighbone to the shinbone, and it keeps me from wobbling all over the place. Worst day of my life. I heard a pop and felt a wave of excruciating pain wash over me as The Body fell to the ground.</p> <p>That’s the reason I’m so craggy before my time (I’m only 49). Surgery and physical therapy did get me working perfectly again. But ligament tears leave us knees with a 50-50 chance of getting arthritis within ten to 20 years. My cartilage, the protective tissue on the ends of bones that keeps them from grinding against each other, may not ever fully recover.</p> <p>Finally, The Body decides to switch the TV to the weather report. The meteorologist is calling for fair skies. Yeah, right – I know better. I get extra achy just before it rains, and I’m throbbing. The Body’s doctor says he hears that complaint all the time but isn’t quite sure why the pain worsens. His best guess: when air pressure drops, my already inflamed joint swells even more, irritating the nerves. Before he limps out the door, The Body grabs his umbrella to be safe. Good call, my man.</p> <p><strong>The scale makes me sad</strong></p> <p>The Body pulls into a drive-through on the way to work to get coffee. Thank goodness he’s nixed those sausage, egg and cheese breakfast sandwiches. With all this additional weight he’s put on, I’m like a toothpick supporting an anvil. Not only is The Body’s belly crippling me, it’s also putting my better half, the “good knee”, at serious risk for arthritis. My partner is almost three times more likely to get it, due to The Body’s extra-large size.</p> <p>Happily, the scale has been on a downward trend lately. This past month, The Body has lost 2kg, which has taken 9kg of stress off me.</p> <p>He shuffles into the office. Man, is it cramped under this desk. The Body feels my discomfort and swallows a couple of ibuprofen. They’ll help quell the pain for a few hours, but alas, they are not a permanent solution. Lately, the doc has been saying that eventually The Body will need to – gulp – replace me.</p> <p>Actually, it sounds worse than it is. I’ll say goodbye to my worn-out cartilage. My bones will be resurfaced and plated with metal. True, I’ll barely recognise myself, but what’s The Body’s alternative? Hobble around for the rest of his life? That’s not much fun for me either.</p> <p><strong>Can we get some exercise?</strong></p> <p>Ooh, it’s his wife on the phone. We’re going to the gym after work – hurrah!</p> <p>As we head inside, The Body sees his wife sprinting toward him in heels. Ouch. Glad I’m not one of her knees. She didn’t grab an umbrella and doesn’t want to get drenched. Hey, lady, worry about your joints, not a few raindrops. High heels are a torture device, and women are more prone to knee issues than men are to begin with. But she’s young and fit, which will protect her … for now.</p> <p>Not that I’m in love with The Body’s “comfy” sneakers. “Stability athletic shoes” sound good, but the more rigid the shoes are, the more stress they put on me. I wish he’d swap them for flat, flexible shoes with soles that let your feet bend.</p> <p>There are still plenty of activities he can do – swimming, biking, Tai Chi … old-people exercise, he calls it. But I love it all because it keeps me from getting worn and rusty. It used to be that if I got injured, they’d put me in a cast. Boy, was that dumb. In order to regenerate, cartilage needs to move and endure weight-bearing activity. The Body takes a spin on the elliptical. Woo-wee ! I feel better than I have in days. I can’t wait for the weight machines. Strong muscles help support and stabilise my joint.</p> <p><strong>My favourite meal</strong></p> <p>Back at home, The Body’s wife whips up a dinner of salmon, sweet potatoes and broccoli. I am pumped. The Body doesn’t think much about how his diet affects me, but it’s important. I’ve got low-grade inflammation, and fatty fish like salmon may slow down my disease. See, inflammation is the body’s defence against injury. It causes swelling and pain. That’s great when there’s an actual enemy. But with chronic inflammation, the body keeps fighting even when there’s no threat. And that can contribute to my arthritis.</p> <p>The Body yawns, and I’m relieved. He loves to burn the midnight oil and doesn’t realise that sleep can ease my pain. I think tonight’s gym session tuckered him out. The Body is being sweet to me tonight – sleeping on his side with a pillow wedged between me and the other knee. If I’m happy, The Body can get a good night’s rest. Now, that’s what I call a real joint effort.</p> <p><em>Written by Jill Provost. This article first appeared in<a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/A-Day-in-the-Life-of-Your-Knee"> Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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Zesty tomato salad

<p>Seek out the most delicious tomatoes available, preferably sun–ripened on the vine, and you will be rewarded with an incomparable flavour. Lemon, fresh coriander and mint add freshness and zest to the tomatoes in this tangy salad, which can easily be varied with other fresh herbs and flavourings.</p> <div id="ingredients"><strong>Ingredients:</strong> <ul class="no-bullet"> <li>500 g ripe tomatoes, sliced</li> <li>pinch of caster sugar, or to taste</li> <li>1 lemon</li> <li>3 spring onions, thinly sliced</li> <li>1 tablespoon chopped fresh coriander</li> <li>1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint</li> <li>sprigs of fresh mint to garnish</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <div> <ol> <li>Place the tomatoes in a large shallow dish and sprinkle with the sugar.</li> <li>Cut the lemon in half lengthwise.</li> <li>Set one half aside, then cut the other half lengthwise into 4 wedges.</li> <li>Holding the wedges firmly together on a board, skin side up, thinly slice them across, including the peel.</li> <li>Discard the pips.</li> <li>Arrange the pieces of thinly sliced lemon over the top of the tomatoes, then sprinkle with the spring onions, coriander and mint.</li> <li>Squeeze the juice from the remaining lemon half and sprinkle it over the salad.</li> <li>Serve immediately or cover and chill until ready to serve.</li> <li>Garnish with sprigs of mint just before serving.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/zesty-tomato-salad"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

Food & Wine

Finance

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"Nobody left the table that evening”: Explosive new claim in Madeleine McCann case

<p>A US private investigator has worked undercover at the holiday resort in Portugal where Madeleine McCann vanished and has made explosive new claims that cast doubt on the McCann’s parenting checking system.</p> <p>The system the McCann family told police that they conducted checks on the children throughout the evening whilst they were at dinner at a nearby restaurant.</p> <p>However, in an interview on the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/maddie" target="_blank">Maddie</a> podcast, Boston-based investigator Joseph Moura claimed a bartender and waitress told him otherwise.</p> <p>This bartender and waitress had served the McCanns and their friends that evening and told Moura that “nobody left the table that evening”.</p> <p>Nobody working at the tapas restaurant where the McCann family and their friends dined that evening knew that Moura was a private investigator.</p> <p>"[The employees] had no idea that I was working with<span> </span><em>48 Hours</em><span> </span>and CBS. I was just a tourist who happened to speak their language. So, I got to know them pretty well in that period of time, when you're spending a lot of time by the pool and you're spending time at the bar and the restaurant," he said.</p> <p>"They clearly told me that that particular night that nobody left the table. That goes by the bartender and that goes by the waitresses. Nobody left the table that evening."</p> <p>However, it is possible that the bartender and restaurant wait staff did not see Mr and Mrs McCann and their friends getting up to check regularly on their children.</p> <p>What do you think about the claims? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Legal

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Cashing out for happiness: Why you should outsource "negative" household chores

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to a Harvard professor, outsourcing “negative” experiences, such as laundry or mowing the lawn can result in more happiness.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ashley Whillans, who researches time-money trade-offs says that more people would be happier if they spent more of their money to “buy themselves out of negative experiences”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She spoke to the </span><a href="https://hbr.org/ideacast/2019/01/use-your-money-to-buy-happier-time"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Harvard Business Review’s IdeaCast podcast</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and explained the idea in more detail.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We really like to flip Benjamin Franklin’s adage on its head and say, ‘Well, if time is money, maybe also we can think that money can buy a happier time’,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Any way that we spend money in a way that might save us time — such as also buying ourselves into positive experiences — has reliable and positive effects on the happiness that we get from our days, our weeks, our months and our lives.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, Whillans has said that we need “retraining” in order to be comfortable with strangers helping them out.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I find in my studies that people feel really guilty about outsourcing even though they’re giving up money to have more time that they’ve earned … People feel guilty about burdening other people with their tasks.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whilst it might be tempting to outsource every chore you dislike, it can end up with negative consequences. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whillans noticed that people who outsource too much “experienced the lowest levels of happiness, in part probably because … they feel like their life must be so out of control if they can’t even do one load of laundry on the weekend”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">People on the lowest incomes also benefit more from time saving purchases.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whillans explained:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What we think is going on there is that people who are materially constrained also tend to be time-poor,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They might be working multiple jobs, they might be a single parent. They might have to commute really far away because the only place that they could live is somewhere that’s quite far away from where they work.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Do you outsource your chores? Let us know in the comments.</span></p>

Money & Banking

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10 secrets surgeons won’t tell you

<p>Surgeons have our lives in their hands, but most of us know more about the people who cut our hair than the doctors who cut our bodies. Here, insider tips to become a smarter, healthier patient.</p> <p><strong>1. To know which doctor is good, ask hospital employees</strong></p> <p>“Their word trumps a degree, prestigious titles, and charm.” - Marty Makary, MD, author of Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won’t Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionise Health Care.</p> <p><strong>2. Ask about their complication rate</strong></p> <p>“If they don’t have one, they’re hiding something or haven’t operated enough to have one. No one is immune to complications.” - Arnold Advincula, MD, division chief, gynecologic surgery &amp; urogynecology, Columbia University Medical Centre.</p> <p><strong>3. Surgeons have an inherent financial conflict of interest</strong></p> <p>“That’s because they are paid approximately ten times more money to perform surgery than to manage your problem conservatively.” - James Rickert, MD, an orthopedic surgeon in Bedford, Indiana.</p> <p><strong>4. Are they board certified?</strong></p> <p>“For the same reason, always check if your surgeon is board-certified in his specialty. Many are not.” - Tomas A. Salerno, MD, chief of cardiothoracic surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.</p> <p><strong>5. Don’t assume your doctor’s recommendation is best</strong></p> <p>“Referrals may be politically motivated or be given because the doctors work within the same multi-specialty group.” - Howard Luks, MD, chief of sports medicine and arthroscopy at Westchester Medical Center and University Orthopaedics.</p> <p><strong>6. Ask if you can talk to former patients</strong></p> <p>“It’s like getting references for a babysitter.” - Marc Gillinov, MD, author of Heart 411: The Only Guide to Heart Health You’ll Ever Need.</p> <p><strong>7. Some won’t mention procedures they don’t know how to do</strong></p> <p>“I’ll see patients who were told they needed an open hysterectomy, even though it could be handled laparoscopically. That’s one reason it’s good to get a second opinion.” - Arnold Advincula, MD</p> <p><strong>8. Find out who is going to take care of you after surgery</strong></p> <p>“You want to hear ‘I will see you on a regular basis until you have recovered fully.’ Often it can be residents or physician’s assistants. Sometimes it’s not anybody, especially after you’ve been discharged from the hospital.” - Ezriel “Ed” Kornel, MD, clinical assistant professor of neurological surgery at Cornell University.</p> <p><strong>9. It’s better to have an elective surgery early in the week</strong></p> <p>“Lots of doctors go away for the weekend and won’t be around to make sure you’re OK. If you go in on a Friday, and then on Saturday or Sunday something icky is coming out of your incision, you’re going to get someone who’s covering for your surgeon.” - General surgeon who blogs under the name Skeptical Scalpel</p> <p><strong>10. Some hire business management consultants</strong></p> <p>“The consultants may want the practice to sell equipment like knee braces or walkers at a markup. They may want the doctors to buy or build a surgery centre to capture facility fees. They usually want orthopedic surgeons to get an in-office MRI. Every time a doctor does this, he becomes more financially conflicted. As soon as you put in an MRI machine, you order more MRIs so you won’t lose money on it.” —James Rickert, MD</p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Crouch. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/48-secrets-surgeons-wont-tell-you?items_per_page=All"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Legal

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This is what Scott Morrison copied from a politician

<p>In what was supposed to be a cunning announcement foreshadowing the projected return to surplus from last week’s budget, turned out to be a copycat campaign from over five years ago.</p> <p>A series of self portraits of Prime Minister Scott Morrison accompanied by the “Back in Black” slogan were released to announce that the Budget would have a return on surplus for the first time in 12 years.</p> <p>The moody set of black and white pictures have been scrutinised heavily by Aussies for drawing inspiration from his fellow politician in New Zealand.</p> <p>Eagle eyed critiques pointed out that the social media campaign released over three weeks ago bears a striking resemblance to a similar campaign of then Prime Minster John Key back in 2014.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Who approved this theft <a href="https://twitter.com/ScottMorrisonMP?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ScottMorrisonMP</a>? You, John Key or a 'staffer'? <a href="https://t.co/SO0wvBv6ky">pic.twitter.com/SO0wvBv6ky</a></p> — John (@John_Hanna) <a href="https://twitter.com/John_Hanna/status/1114410024204242944?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 6, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The portrait taken of Mr Key was taken by Photographer Dave Richards at a Young Nationals event in 2014.</p> <p>The Kiwi snapper called it a “fast and fun shoot” with “such a busy subject.”</p> <p>“We had only four minutes to get the shot, which we somehow managed in just under two minutes,” Richards wrote on Facebook in May that year.</p> <p>Morrison’s photos were not received too well, many comparing his hunched demeanour to an album cover.</p> <p>However, Mr Key’s photograph had a positive response from Kiwi’s.</p> <p>Do you think the image of Scott Morrison is similar to John Key’s? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Legal

Entertainment

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How Duchess Kate will celebrate Prince Louis's first birthday

<p>Prince Louis, the third child of Prince William and Duchess Kate, will be celebrating his first birthday soon.</p> <p>The special milestone on April 23 is expected to be a private affair, but royal fans have predicted that the Duchess of Cambridge will continue her tradition of sharing special portraits through the palace.</p> <p>The 37-year-old royal has shared photos of her children to mark their birthdays, often snapping the pictures herself. In 2015, she shared two snaps of her second child Princess Charlotte that she had taken herself in celebration of the infant’s six-month milestone.</p> <p>When the princess turned one, Duchess Kate released more new portraits that she once again personally snapped.</p> <p>Last year, for her daughter’s third birthday, the Duchess also captured two photographs of Princess Charlotte with Prince Louis, only days after the young prince’s birth.</p> <p>According to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.hellomagazine.com/royalty/2019041572086/kate-middleton-plans-revealed-prince-louis-birthday/" target="_blank">HELLO!</a></em>, the last official royal photograph featuring Prince Louis was the family Christmas card, which featured all five members of the Cambridge family.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqIwkq8Ff2R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqIwkq8Ff2R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Kensington Palace (@kensingtonroyal)</a> on Nov 13, 2018 at 2:13pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The young prince’s father might not be around for his first birthday, as Prince William is set to travel to New Zealand in late April to honour the victims of the Christchurch terror attacks on behalf of the Queen.</p> <p>“The Duke will meet with those affected by the attack and will pay tribute to the extraordinary compassion and solidarity that the people of New Zealand have displayed in recent weeks,” Kensington Palace said in an <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.royal.uk/duke-cambridge-visit-new-zealand" target="_blank">announcement</a>.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see pictures of the Cambridge family.</p>

Art

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The awkward moment between Prince William and Emma Thompson

<p>Academy Award winning actress Emma Thompson was recently on <em>The Ellen DeGeneres Show</em> and shared some details about what happened whilst she was being awarded her damehood from Prince William.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Becoming a Dame was nothing compared to the honor I awarded Emma Thompson. <a href="https://t.co/DtMTMRNEh8">pic.twitter.com/DtMTMRNEh8</a></p> — Ellen DeGeneres (@TheEllenShow) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheEllenShow/status/1116814002401660928?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 12, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>As it turns out, Prince William had pinned the dame pins in a bit of an awkward position.</p> <p>Thompson re-enacted the moment with DeGeneres to explain just how awkward it was.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Congratulations to Dame Emma Thompson! Today at Buckingham Palace, the actor received her Damehood from The Duke for services to Drama. <a href="https://t.co/1gSfaawBii">pic.twitter.com/1gSfaawBii</a></p> — Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) <a href="https://twitter.com/KensingtonRoyal/status/1060200145969733632?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 7, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>"He placed it right there,” Thompson explained through laughter.</p> <p>"And it's a little bit of a nipple moment and you go, 'Gosh, I wasn't expecting that.'"</p> <p>Thompson, 59, also joked about how she was “pretty low slung these days”, so when Prince William placed the two pins on her, it hurt “both times”.</p> <p>Naturally, being hurt generates a reaction to the pain. However, Thompson revealed that she made an “inappropriate” noise in the palace.</p> <p>"I made a very loud and inappropriate noise in Buckingham Palace," she admitted.</p> <p>The joy of receiving a damehood couldn’t be overlooked though, as Thompson was thrilled to receive it.</p> <p>It’s not the first time Thompson has had an awkward run-in with Prince William.</p> <p>When she received her honorary title last November, she shared a joke with the Prince. She told the Associated Press:</p> <p>“I love Prince William. I’ve known him since he was little, and we just sniggered at each other,” she explained.</p> <p>“I said, ‘I can’t kiss you, can I?’ And he said, ‘No, don’t!'"</p>

Movies

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How to easily save videos on Facebook

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since Facebook wants to keep you on their app all the time, every second of the day, they make it difficult to save or “bookmark” things as they’d prefer it if you came back to watch it on the Facebook app.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, this doesn’t mean you can’t save or download videos to watch later, whether you’re on your computer, Android phone or iPhone.</span></p> <p><strong>Saving or “bookmarking” a video</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Facebook offers a bookmarking section that you’re able to use within the platform. You’re able to save videos to watch them again later.</span></p> <p>The steps to do this are as follows:</p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Find the video you want to save</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tap or click on the three dots at the top right of the post</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click on “Save video”</span></li> </ol> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’ve saved your first video!</span></p> <p>Now, if you want to watch it again later, this is easy to find as well:</p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re on a computer, click on the Facebook icon at the top left of your window. Click on “Watch” and then “saved videos”.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re on your phone, tap the three horizontal lines, then tap “saved”.</span></li> </ol> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Do you know any handy Facebook hacks? Let us know in the comments below.</span></p>

Technology