Money & Banking

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Woman THROWS AWAY winning scratchie

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Victorian woman almost lost $260,000 after throwing away a winning lottery scratchcard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The young St Helena woman told </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thelott.com/real-winners/instant-scratch-its/young-woman-accidentally-throws-away-instant-scratch-its-ticket" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Lott</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that her boyfriend had gifted her the Live the Life scratchie as a surprise.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“When I first scratched it, I thought it didn’t win anything, so I just tossed it in the bin,” the woman said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But when her boyfriend went to fish the card out and check it, he said: “What the hell, you’ve won the top prize!”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I didn’t believe a word he said. I assumed he was just pranking me, or it was some kind of novelty ticket,” she </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/melbourne-woman-throws-live-the-life-lottery-scratchcard-worth-fortune-in-the-bin-what-the-hell-c-4698835" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">explained</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It took quite a bit of convincing. We read the instructions on the back of the ticket a few times. He just kept saying to me, ‘You’ve won! You’ve won!’.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The $5 ticket was purchased from Aqueduct News and Lotto - and came with the prize of $1000 a week for the next five years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was a big shock. It was really hard to comprehend! I always dreamt of that moment, but it was very surreal when it happened,” the woman continued.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’ve never won anything like this, so it’s amazing!”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When asked about her plans for her winnings, she said there was only one thing on her mind.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I am not sure what I will do with it. I am still coming to terms with the news,” she laughed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I think we will definitely buy a house though!”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: The Lott</span></em></p>

Money & Banking

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5 personal finance tips you were never taught – but need to know

<p><span>We asked half a dozen personal finance experts money-saving and wealth-creating tips that most people are never taught. </span></p> <p><strong>Take a day to think about large purchases to avoid impulse buys</strong></p> <p><span>“Delaying your purchases for a day gives you time to think about whether or not you really need the items, and it curbs regrettable impulse buys,” advises Marc Diana, CEO of MoneyTips. “Sale items may be an exception to this rule, but even then, question how badly you need the item compared to saving or investing the money you would use to purchase it. When times are tough, and you’re cutting expenses, would you rather have a rarely worn $300 pair of shoes or $300 cash?”</span></p> <p><strong>Budgets are freeing, not constricting</strong></p> <p><span>Says financial educator Tiffany Aliche, “Keeping a budget allows you to say yes to your goals in a strategic way. If you have a budget, you can save for the holiday, house or car you want to get. You can look at it as ‘No dining out,’ but I see it as ‘Yes to a trip to Paris.’ A budget is not a NO plan, but a YES plan with actual steps towards achieving your goals.”</span></p> <p><strong>Budget with the 50/20/30 rule</strong></p> <p>Lynn Toomey, co-founder of Your Retirement Advisor, suggests following this easy budgeting rule:</p> <p>Use 50 per cent of your income for non-discretionary necessities like food, rent/house payment, utilities, and transportation.</p> <p>Put aside 20 per cent of your income for an emergency fund (three to six months’ salary is a good target), retirement, savings, and to pay off any debts.</p> <p>Use 30 per cent of your income for discretionary (non-essential) spending such as entertainment, holidays and gifts.</p> <p><strong>Penny-pinching is not the road to wealth</strong></p> <p><span>Spending less doesn’t mean you’ll have more. Saving is a good way to stabilise your finances, but you still need to invest. “Pretend there are two islands,” advises Aliche, who is also known as The Budgetnista: “Financially Stuck Island and Wealthy Island.” She says that your savings can be like a car – you can’t drive off Financially Stuck Island without a bridge. Investing is the bridge to financial success. “To get from one island to another, you need to get in your savings car and drive it over your investment bridge.”</span></p> <p><strong>Financial advisors aren’t only for wealthy people</strong></p> <p>Millions of people have trillions invested in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and other stock exchange investments, but just because you can easily make trades yourself doesn’t mean you should. “Why not do what you do best to earn money and let a trained professional invest it for you?” asks Brian Saranovitz, president of Your Retirement Advisor. “A recent Vanguard Investments study indicated that integrating proper retirement strategies can add as much as 3 per cent efficient return to a retirement portfolio.”</p> <p>Adds Aliche, “You need to purposefully seek out knowledge. If you break a leg, you know that you need to go to a doctor. With personal finance, people have got the notion that they could just fix it themselves. When it comes to investing, don’t be afraid to seek professional help.”</p> <p><em><span>Written by Jeff Hoyt. This article first appeared in </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/food-home-garden/money/14-personal-finance-tips-you-were-never-taught-but-need-to-know" target="_blank"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a><span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V" target="_blank"><span>here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p> <p><em><span>Image: Getty Images</span></em></p>

Money & Banking

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Mum turns tidy profit selling kids’ homewares

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When Eleanor Cullen went on maternity leave before the birth of her first child, she was bombarded by kids’ homewares solely decorated with TV characters and Disney princesses.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Melbourne designer decided to take matters into her own hands to make her own placemats for her newborn son, sinking $15,000 from the family’s savings into the venture.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After putting the design up on </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/wemightbetiny/?hl=en" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instagram</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> at the end of 2015, she said it “went crazy”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The widely popular placemat has since led her to launch her own business called We Might Be Tiny, which now stocks more than 32 products featuring a bear, bunny and cat: a signature part of her brand.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I love animals and cute things and it’s all from my childhood, so it's things I have loved as a child,” she told </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/small-business/melbournes-we-might-be-tiny-rakes-in-4m-from-stylish-childrens-homewares/news-story/e78097f144a85356ff81f9dc45dd8e03" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. “The products are then centered around the bear, bunny and cat theme and become iconic to the brand.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CRYi0xCg9sF/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CRYi0xCg9sF/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by MINIMALIST TABLEWARE FOR KIDS (@wemightbetiny)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I then designed some snack boxes in a similar shape to the bear, bunny and cat, divided plates that suction to the table, suctioned bowls, cutlery sets and moved into kitchenware. So there’s icy pole moulds and freezer moulds and I was working with silicone as it’s a great material for kitchenware as well.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Her bestselling products have been the suctioned plates, with 50,000 being sold for $29 to $32 since she launched the business.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 42-year-old said her designs appeal to parents wanting a “minimalist” look. Her placemats have also been so popular among parents that she has even made adult versions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Rather than having characters like P J Masks or Disney princesses printed on tableware it’s a neutral palette and that kind of thing appeals to mums,” she said.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CRV4xoGJW6W/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CRV4xoGJW6W/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by MINIMALIST TABLEWARE FOR KIDS (@wemightbetiny)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Her side hustle has gone from making Ms Cullen $100,000 in her first year to nearly $4 million six years later.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was a hobby. I wanted to earn a bit more money and pay off our mortgage and what happened was I ended up selling out and making the money I invested back in one month,” she revealed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I haven’t had to reinvest our own money, I am just reinvesting the profits.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The mother-of-two has credited the pandemic for the boost in sales, as people started eating at home with their kids more.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She also launched a new product in February called Stampies, which was around the time parents began looking for new ways to entertain their kids. The cookie stamp set features cute animal designs, and Ms Cullen says it can be used for baking or playing with playdough.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since her business started, Ms Cullen has seen a huge growth in competitors offering similar silicone products.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, she says hers stand out since they are made from scratch, rather than being “stock standard products that are templated from a factory” with a competitor’s label stuck on the front.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Looking to the future, Ms Cullen said she is looking to start creating products for kid’s play.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’ve got a bath book and some bath toys made from the material silicone, which means it’s dishwasher safe and lends itself to bath toys being thrown into the dishwasher so they are not going to get mouldy,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She added that sensory toys, such as teethers and textured toys, would also be rolled out by the end of the year.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: We Might Be Tiny (Facebook)</span></em></p>

Money & Banking

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‘Similar to ordering a pizza’: how buy now, pay later apps influence young people’s spending

<p>Young people are often blamed for making <a href="https://www.theaustralian.com.au/life/weekend-australian-magazine/moralisers-we-need-you/news-story/6bdb24f77572be68330bd306c14ee8a3">irresponsible choices</a> with money.</p> <p>But the real issue is not whether they eat too many <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2016/oct/18/are-millennials-actually-bad-at-saving-or-are-houses-just-unaffordable?CMP=share_btn_fb">expensive cafe breakfasts</a>. Young Australians today face an uncertain job market, rising university fees and astronomical house prices. Unfortunately, <a href="https://theconversation.com/home-ownership-falling-debts-rising-its-looking-grim-for-the-under-40s-81619">debt</a> is also an inevitable part of their lives.</p> <p>This comes amid a huge rise in the number of “buy now, pay later” apps, such as <a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-how-lending-startups-like-afterpay-make-their-money-86477">AfterPay</a>, and <a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/money/costs/ripoff-financial-experts-warn-of-the-dangerous-trap-of-payday-loans/news-story/1471cc4a61594cdb9e7a724a76e534d7">payday loan apps</a>, such as <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-08-18/payday-lending-consumer-risk-coronavirus-financial-hardship/12549412">Nimble</a>. It is possible to make purchases online with the the tap of a button, even if you don’t have the money in your account or on your credit card. It is also possible the able to borrow money <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/triplej/programs/hack/whats-up-with-payday-loans/7794806">within minutes</a>.</p> <p>To better understand how young people negotiate debt, we interviewed 31 people aged between 18 and 29 in the Newcastle and Hunter Valley area in 2020 and 2021. We asked them how they access credit and their views on different kinds of debt.</p> <h2>Our study</h2> <p>Our participants saw debt as a necessity if they are going to have an acceptable life in the present and plan for the future. As Steph, a 22-year-old university student, said:</p> <blockquote> <p>Large debts like the mortgage, the HECS debt […] things like that I suppose in a sense it’s useful debt. It makes sense and it gets you further by doing it because there’s still an equity in what you’re doing … It follows you not nearly as badly as some other debts.</p> </blockquote> <p>Young people also made distinctions about the way debt feels and how approachable it is. They acknowledged short-term consumer debts may not be “good”, but felt they were also part of being able to buy the things and have the experiences associated with being young.</p> <p>Those we interviewed talked about AfterPay (where you pay off the debt in four installments) as an everyday part of life. As Alexa, a 23-year-old university student, told us:</p> <blockquote> <p>AfterPay is for just those little wants that I don’t want to pay for up front.</p> </blockquote> <p>They also described it as a low-risk and almost friendly way to buy things. This was particularly when compared to a bank. Alice, a 21-year-old sales assistant, put it this way:</p> <blockquote> <p>AfterPay is like, ‘Oh, just pay this off in four quick things and you can have your item. We’ll send it out.’ But then banks are like, ‘If you don’t pay this back, you’re going to get so much interest and it’s going to suck, and you’ll have the sheriffs roll up at your house and you’re going to be sad.’</p> </blockquote> <h2>Like ordering a pizza</h2> <p>Interviewees attributed some of this friendliness to the process of accessing the money or goods. Mia, a 21-year-old paralegal, described applying for a small loan on the Nimble app:</p> <blockquote> <p>When you apply for the money […] you can track at any point on it. The Nimble app is so similar to ordering a Domino’s pizza […] Whereas a credit card through a banking app, it’s nothing like that […] They send me letters and even opening the mail terrifies me, nothing good comes via snail mail ever.</p> </blockquote> <p>The online, easy nature of these loan services closely relates to how young people engage with information more generally in their lives. In this sense, there is a familiarity and comfort to the way they work.</p> <p>As Mia continues:</p> <blockquote> <p>[It’s] positive, it’s not daunting, it’s informative, it’s instantaneous. The second the money comes out, I get a thank you email and a notification on the app. It’s like, ‘you have this many payments left, this is how much you’ve paid, this is how much you have left to pay, you will still be paid in full by this date’. I don’t have any of that with my credit card.</p> </blockquote> <h2>Familiar tactics</h2> <p>Inteviewees also spoke of how services like AfterPay and short-term loan apps used similar tactics to social media platforms to encourage increased engagement and make the experience feel informal and even social.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429684/original/file-20211102-10001-letons.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Young people using their phones and laptops." /> <span class="caption">Applying for a loan via an app does not involve ‘scary’ paperwork, according to interviewees.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">www.shutterstock.com</span></span></p> <p>These include “on this day” reminders (such as, “this time last year, you bought this pair of shoes”) and waiting time indicators. There are also <a href="https://theconversation.com/gamification-status-you-score-ten-points-for-reading-this-article-5068">game elements</a>, including “rewards” for early repayments.</p> <p>Interviewees were aware this was manipulative. Lilian (26) works at a chain clothing store and was “rewarded ” for paying off a purchase early.</p> <blockquote> <p>I got this thing the other day saying that my first payment [on a new purchase] is actually going to come out [later] now. Of course, I’ve been rewarded for paying everything off early [before] […] Yeah it’s like it’s delaying it, it’s not an issue now, but it’s going to be an issue in two weeks’ time.</p> </blockquote> <h2>What next?</h2> <p>Our interviewees may see debt as a necessity, but they are also aware they have (some) choices within this. So they prefer to go with providers or platforms that feel less threatening, especially as using “buy now, pay later” services sometimes does not feel like being in debt.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/429686/original/file-20211102-25-9gi5ho.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Young man on his phone with a coffee." /> <span class="caption">Young people see debt as an inevitable part of life, according to new research.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">www.shutterstock.com</span></span></p> <p>There is a need for <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/calls-for-tighter-regulation-as-buy-now-pay-later-costs-mount-20210610-p57zuc.html">greater regulation</a> of the ways these products are promoted. It should always be made clear that this is a form of debt, not just a way to pay.</p> <p>Beyond, this, instead of “<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2016/oct/18/are-millennials-actually-bad-at-saving-or-are-houses-just-unaffordable?CMP=share_btn_fb">blaming</a>” young people for their spending habits, we need a better understanding of the economy and society they are living and working in. And how debt it is all but inevitable for people on low wages, with poor job security and insecure housing.</p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/steven-threadgold-167968">Steven Threadgold</a>, Associate Professor, Sociology, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-newcastle-1060">University of Newcastle</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/david-farrugia-243862">David Farrugia</a>, Senior Lecturer, School of Humanities and Social Science, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-newcastle-1060">University of Newcastle</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/julia-coffey-129629">Julia Coffey</a>, Senior Lecturer in Sociology, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-newcastle-1060">University of Newcastle</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/julia-cook-869068">Julia Cook</a>, Lecturer in Sociology, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-newcastle-1060">University of Newcastle</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kate-davies-290466">Kate Davies</a>, Human Services Lecturer, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-newcastle-1060">University of Newcastle</a></em>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kate-senior-1284499">Kate Senior</a>, Associate Professor, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-newcastle-1060">University of Newcastle</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/similar-to-ordering-a-pizza-how-buy-now-pay-later-apps-influence-young-peoples-spending-170024">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Afterpay enters Aussie pubs, experts warn of “debt spiral”

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Afterpay – the popular buy now, pay later (BNPL) service – has made the jump from retail stores to over 160 Aussie pubs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But consumer advocates are worried that the move could send some people into a “debt spiral”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australian Venue Co (AVC) has become the first hospitality group to partner with Afterpay as part of its ‘Dine Now, Pay Later’ offering – which rolls out across its venues from November 15.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">AVC CEO Paul Waterson said the decision was driven by customer demand, who he said have shifted away from credit cards, as well as a desire to offer convenient experiences for guests, </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’re not afraid to go first. As a group, we seek out other industry leaders who we can work with to innovate on behalf of our customers,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are looking forward to our guests being able to choose an alternative, innovative way to pay for dining out at our pubs.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However Katherine Temple, the policy and campaigns director at the Consumer Action Law Centre, said the centre has seen more people struggling with BNPL debts, making the move from AVC all the more concerning.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Often buy now, pay later is part of a larger debt so people are also struggling with existing credit card debts or personal loans or utility loans, so it’s rarely the only type of debt when they come to us,” she told </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/money/costs/afterpay-moves-into-hospitality-with-australian-venue-co/news-story/b569dcf94efcde0e5eef2ba79852c24f" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The debt varies but it can be [from] a couple of thousand dollars up to tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt and we are hearing from people of all ages and walks of life that are using these products now.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">James Hunt, a policy advisor at Financial Counselling Australia, told </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.goodfood.com.au/eat-out/news/twobeer-pub-trip-or-sixweek-hangover-afterpay-comes-to-the-pub-20211104-h1zlwk" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Good Food</span></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">that Afterpay and other BNPL companies aren’t required to check if customers can afford the repayments, “so unfortunately many people are ending up with unmanageable debt”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Temple shares those concerns, citing a lack of safeguards “to ensure people can afford to make repayments”, which she says exacerbates “financial hardship and money problems”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Buy now, pay later is everywhere now and is normalising debt particularly for younger people,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A spokesperson for Afterpay said the company enters new consumer markets based on demand.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“As credit cards steeply decline, Australians are looking for smarter ways to manage their budget, using their own money, and avoiding interest and debt traps,” they said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They also said the Afterpay’s product has built-in spending rules to ensure customers don’t pay interest or revolve in debt.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Customers are unable to continue using Afterpay if they are late on a single instalment,” they added.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, customers do pay some fees if they miss a payment, with Afterpay collecting a whopping $70 million in late fees in 2020.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) also criticised Afterpay, Zip, and other BNPL providers for charging excessive fees.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a report released last year, the regulator found that one in five BNPL users are missing payments.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It also found that 15 percent of users had taken out additional loans to pay for the services.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As for Afterpay’s place in pubs, chief spokesperson for CANSTAR Steve Mickenbacker said it could be especially challenging to navigate.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You visit a pub, perhaps budgeting to buy two drinks … BNPL puts you in a position to turn those two drinks into eight,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Without self-discipline, that two-beer pub trip could become a six-week hangover.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Images: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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Can 'woke washing' lead to real change?

<p>With brands increasingly engaging in social change campaigns and leveraging their influence to be “purpose-led”, the time has come to ask a couple of big questions: is this a viable strategy, and how sceptical should we be of so-called “<a rel="noopener" href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0743915620947359" target="_blank">brand activism</a>”?</p> <p>In recent weeks alone, Ben &amp; Jerry’s <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/change-is-brewing-across-the-nation-301380626.html" target="_blank">has launched</a> a new ice-cream flavour called “Change is Brewing” to support Black-owned businesses and raise awareness of the <a rel="noopener" href="https://peoplesresponseact.com/" target="_blank">People’s Response Act</a>, proposed legislation to establish a new public safety agency in the US.</p> <p>Lego <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/oct/11/lego-to-remove-gender-bias-after-survey-shows-impact-on-children-stereotypes" target="_blank">declared</a> it would promote inclusive play and address harmful gender stereotypes with its toys. Mars Food <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.cmo.com.au/article/691655/mars-loses-face-uncle-ben-rebrand-ben-original/" target="_blank">rebranded</a> Uncle Ben’s rice to Ben’s Original in response to criticisms of the racial caricatures in its marketing.</p> <p>At the same time, businesses have a chequered history when it comes to engaging with societal problems, from self-serving “box ticking” <a href="https://sk.sagepub.com/books/the-end-of-corporate-social-responsibility">corporate practices</a> under the guise of social responsibility to <a rel="noopener" href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1470593115595674?journalCode=mtqa" target="_blank">shifting responsibility to consumers</a> to make ethical choices (such as reusable coffee cups).</p> <p>More recently, “<a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/woke-washing-what-happens-when-marketing-communications-dont-match-corporate-practice-108035" target="_blank">woke washing</a>” has seen brands promoting social issues without taking meaningful action. Consider <a rel="noopener" href="https://impactnottingham.com/2021/04/a-prime-example-of-woke-washing-fast-fashion-and-international-womens-day/" target="_blank">fast fashion brands</a> that promote International Women’s Day while simultaneously profiting from the exploitation of female workers.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/428405/original/file-20211026-25-n8xzaw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <em><span class="caption">Lego has pledged to combat gender stereotyping in its toys.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></em></p> <p><strong>Change from within</strong></p> <p>How then can brands legitimately shoulder responsibility to support or promote societal transformation?</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/02761467211043074?icid=int.sj-abstract.citing-articles.2#:%7E:text=challenging%20the%20DSP.-,We%20define%20transformative%20branding%20as%20a%20dynamic%20capability%20deployed%20by,hybrid%20market%20and%20social%20logics." target="_blank">Our research</a> introduces the idea of “transformative branding”. This involves companies working with customers, communities and even competitors to co-create brands that lead on both market and social fronts.</p> <p>Transformative branding can be achieved by for-profit organisations, not-for-profits and social enterprises. The common factor is balancing business and societal goals to create change from within the market system.</p> <p>Marketing concepts with a social edge have proliferated in the past 50 years, but finding actual solutions has been less successful. We ask how corporations can act to genuinely contribute to society and show how transformative branding can help brands shoulder that responsibility.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/428407/original/file-20211026-2099-1mk8l1h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <em><span class="caption">The Patagonia clothing brand’s ‘worn wear’ scheme promotes recycling over new purchases.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></em></p> <p><strong>Beyond making money</strong></p> <p>Transformative branding works via two main market-shaping elements: leadership and collaborative coupling. These enable companies to partner with stakeholders to change their business landscapes.</p> <p>First, leadership involves building a vision for the transformation. This requires leaders to think flexibly and creatively, work to long time horizons and stay attuned to changing ideologies. This involves fundamentally re-imagining what branding can do – beyond making money.</p> <p>Second, collaborative coupling involves implementing this vision across the different dimensions of the brand. Key to this is mobilising stakeholders, including customers, employees, investors, suppliers, governments, communities and competitors.</p> <p>When the brand and its stakeholders collectively throw their weight behind the goal of transformation, it signals commitment, distributes expertise and resources and establishes legitimacy.</p> <p>Leadership and collaborative coupling work together to change the business environment. Our research shows this has ripple effects, creating opportunities for transforming economic, regulatory, socio-cultural and political environments.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/428408/original/file-20211026-27-xx87ij.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <em><span class="caption">Ice-cream brand Ben &amp; Jerry’s builds social responsibility and activism into its corporate ethos.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></em></p> <p><strong>Transformative branding in practice</strong></p> <p>Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard is a good example of transformative branding at work, particularly in his candid admission that the notion of a fully sustainable business is “impossible”. Instead, Patagonia has reframed its priorities around <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.linkedin.com/business/talent/blog/talent-connect/ways-patagonia-built-ridiculous-culture" target="_blank">responsibility</a>, with Chouinard re-imagining the brand as a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.patagonia.com/product/the-responsible-company-what-weve-learned-from-patagonias-first-forty-years-paperback-book/BK233.html" target="_blank">solution to environmental degradation</a>.</p> <p>This vision is central to the brand’s iconic “demarketing” campaign, “<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.patagonia.ca/stories/dont-buy-this-jacket-black-friday-and-the-new-york-times/story-18615.html" target="_blank">Don’t buy this jacket</a>”, which aims to shift the consumption ideology from purchase to repair.</p> <p>More recently, Patagonia’s “<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.patagonia.ca/buy-less-demand-more/" target="_blank">Buy Less, Demand More</a>” campaign and its “<a rel="noopener" href="https://wornwear.patagonia.com/" target="_blank">Worn Wear</a>” scheme for used apparel have brought the notion of a circular economy into the company’s strategy to promote a culture of reuse rather than always buying new.</p> <p>Dutch chocolate brand Tony’s Chocolonely demonstrates collaborative coupling in its <a rel="noopener" href="https://tonyschocolonely.com/int/en/our-story/our-mission" target="_blank">campaign</a> to clean up production and supply chain practices in the chocolate manufacturing industry, and to eliminate illegal child labour and modern slavery.</p> <p>The company’s “<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tonysopenchain.com/" target="_blank">open chain platform</a>” helps all industry players, including competitors, to foster equitable and transparent supply chains and ensure a living income is paid to cocoa farmers. The brand actively erodes its own potential competitive advantage in the process.</p> <p><strong>Staying sceptical</strong></p> <p>But transformative branding is complex and dynamic, and authenticity is paramount. For instance, earlier this year, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dutchnews.nl/news/2021/02/tonys-chocolonely-removed-from-ethical-chocolate-list-due-to-belgian-link/" target="_blank">Tony’s was removed</a> from watchdog organisation <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.slavefreechocolate.org/ethical-chocolate-companies" target="_blank">Slave Free Chocolate</a>’s ethical producers list over its partnership with a major chocolate producer being sued for allegedly using slave labour.</p> <p>Tony’s responded by claiming it was important to educate and inspire business partners and competitors to adopt ethical principles and practices.</p> <p>This complex and often slow process of negotiating what it means to be ethical is all part of transformative branding. It adapts to the differing goals and values of many stakeholders.</p> <p>And while transformative branding offers a path towards a more sustainable and equitable future, we should continue to cast a critical eye on brands claiming to be a force for good, challenge them and hold them accountable where necessary.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/170190/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/amanda-spry-609844" target="_blank">Amanda Spry</a>, Lecturer of Marketing, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063" target="_blank">RMIT University</a>; <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/bernardo-figueiredo-336532" target="_blank">Bernardo Figueiredo</a>, Associate Professor of Marketing, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063" target="_blank">RMIT University</a>; <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jessica-vredenburg-532623" target="_blank">Jessica Vredenburg</a>, Senior Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Marketing, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/auckland-university-of-technology-1137" target="_blank">Auckland University of Technology</a>; <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/joya-kemper-609837" target="_blank">Joya Kemper</a>, Senior Lecturer in Marketing, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-auckland-1305" target="_blank">University of Auckland</a>, and <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lauren-gurrieri-5402" target="_blank">Lauren Gurrieri</a>, Senior Lecturer in Marketing, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063" target="_blank">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/consumers-are-wise-to-woke-washing-but-truly-transformative-branding-can-still-make-a-difference-170190" target="_blank">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Perfect revenge on a toxic boss

<div> <div class="reply-list-component"> <div class="reply-component"> <div class="reply-body-component"> <div class="reply_body body linkify"> <div class="reply-body-wrapper"> <div class="reply-body-inner"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p><em>Image: Reddit</em></p> <p>After leaving a toxic job, a woman has gotten the perfect revenge on her boss via a witty resignation letter.</p> <p>The electrician named Amber claims she was treated poorly by her “a—hole” boss, so she wrote a letter of resignation on a bereavement card that read “sorry for your loss.”</p> <p>In a thread posted on Reddit, Amber shared the post writing, “You ever worked for a company that just treated you like s----? I received a job offer today for a dollar more than I asked for, my own van, and they’ll sponsor me for school. I can’t wait to give this to my boss tomorrow.”</p> <p>Amber then revealed the text within the card, which was kept simple and straight to the point – “It’s me, I leave in two weeks.”</p> <p>In the comments, Amber predicts that her boss would ask her to resign immediately. She continued to explain that she had been underpaid and overworked.</p> <p>In a follow-up post, the electrician revealed her bosses response to the letter saying, “He said it aloud, gave a stank face, and just said ‘ok’. He didn’t tell me to leave so that means he wants me to work out my two weeks. He also didn’t ask why I’m leaving.”</p> <p>Many users were quick to praise Amber’s hilarious letter with one person writing “Congratulations on your new job! And this is the best resignation letter I’ve ever seen.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div> <div class="new-reply-component"></div> </div>

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Man ordered to repay $201,000 “inheritance” to the bank

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A grandfather has been left shocked by his bank, after they have ordered him to repay $201,000.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Russell Alexander, 54, contacted Barclay’s Bank after huge sums of money were deposited into his account. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Confused by the large sum, he reached out to Barclay’s and got no reply. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Eventually, representatives from the bank told Russell that the money was part of an inheritance and to keep it, he told </span><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/16694791/handyman-renovated-home-barclays-mistake/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He used the money to renovate a fixer-upper house he purchased after his divorce, and could now make more expensive changes to his renovation project. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, nine months after the money first hit Russell’s account, Barclay’s realised they had made a mistake and took all the money back, including an extra $11,000 of Russell’s own money. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Due to the brash withdrawal of funds, Russell has been left living in a semi-derelict home with no heating, and no money to improve his situation. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Barclay’s admitted that the money was transferred to Russell by accident, and he was “incorrectly advised that he could keep the funds”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Russell said, “I’m totally outraged at their offer of £500 ($A1000) compensation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’ve been a loyal customer for 40 years and they clearly told me twice the money was mine to spend.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I planned to renovate the house to rent out rooms on Airbnb, but I’ll need to work now to earn the money and it will take years.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I never would have bought it if I didn’t have the extra money.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Barclays have stolen my future plans and left me living like a stowaway.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Shutterstock</span></em></p>

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12 of the most expensive mistakes ever made

<p><span>Making a mistake is not the end of the world—but that does not mean it won’t break the bank. From losing an NASA orbiter in space to forgetting a Starbucks cup in an episode of a previously well-acclaimed TV series, there are some mishaps that came with very hefty price tags. For those of you wondering what they are, here are 12 of the most expensive mistakes ever made.</span></p> <p><strong>Continuity chaos</strong></p> <p><span>Game of Thrones fans couldn’t help but notice a Starbucks cup mistakenly left in a pivotal scene on the HBO series, but other television and movie mishaps actually cost studios a ton of money. When Warner Bros. gathered the cast of Justice League for some badly-needed reshoots, Henry Cavill (Superman) was in the midst of shooting another film that required him to have some pretty heavy facial hair. He had to film the reshoots with a moustache and, according to Looper, Warner Bros. spent millions of dollars digitally removing the pesky hairs from the Justice League film to make Superman appear as his smooth self.</span></p> <p><strong>Lost in space</strong></p> <p><span>Most people lose their sunglasses or a set of keys, which is frustrating and, sure, can be costly. But in 1999 NASA lost a $125M Mars orbiter because of what CNN referred to as a “metric mishap.” What happened? The mistake occurred because Lockheed Martin engineers used English measurements (inches, feet, etc.) in their calculations in contrast to NASA’s metric calculations (centimetres, metres, etc.). Because of this navigation information couldn’t properly transfer and the orbiter was lost.</span></p> <p><strong>Sizzling skyscraper</strong></p> <p><span>A London skyscraper nicknamed the “Walkie-Talkie” designed by architect Rafael Viñoly was originally notable for its unique shape, boasting curved eye-catching walls. Unfortunately, it became known for something much different when its south-facing wall, which is covered in reflective glass, began redirecting sunrays in such a way that was actually melting (yes, melting!) cars and causing fires. Fixes for the problem, included temporary netting and then a permanent sunshade, that cost in the estimated “low single-digit millions,” according to The Standard.</span></p> <p><strong>Bad apple</strong></p> <p><span>We’ve learned a lot about Apple founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak over the years, as the tech company changed the way we live and do business. But there was a third founder of the giant who at one time owned 10 per cent of the company and his name is Ronald Wayne. Wayne was an Apple founder for just 12 days before deciding to sell his share to Jobs and Wozniak for a mere $800. Unfortunate considering the company is worth $1 trillion, according to NBC News.</span></p> <p><strong>King Tut's beard</strong></p> <p><span>Ancient artefacts are priceless and curators go to great lengths to keep these irreplaceable items in exceptional condition. In 2015 a funeral mask belonging to King Tutankhamen was damaged at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo after its beard started coming loose. In an interview with the Associated Press, a curator admitted the restoration process didn’t go as planned. “Unfortunately he used a very irreversible material,” they said of the would-be fixer. “Epoxy has a very high property for attaching, and is used on metal or stone—but I think it wasn’t suitable for an outstanding object like Tutankhamen’s golden mask.” We all make mistakes—and this is the best way to handle failure, according to science.</span></p> <p><strong>Botched bridge</strong></p> <p><span>The last thing an architect wants to hear is their structure being referred to as “the wobbly bridge,” but that’s exactly what happened in London when the Millennium Bridge was unveiled in June 2000. It was shut down after only two days of use because the number of pedestrians using it (which, by the way, was its purpose) caused the bridge to shake and sway. It took two years of modifications for it to stop swaying and for the Millennium Bridge to reopen.</span></p> <p><strong>Fight or flight</strong></p> <p><span>Air travel is expensive for customers looking to book a getaway, but it was in 2006 when the airline Alitalia found itself stuck with the bill when a typo on their website allowed for $39 flights from Toronto to Cyprus (it was supposed to read $3,900), definitely one of the most expensive typos in the world. Two-thousand tickets sold before Alitalia could correct the price online. Instead of fighting customers on their mistake, they chose to honour the cheap tickets to the tune of $7 million.</span></p> <p><strong>Big dig</strong></p> <p><span>When an oil rig operated by Texaco drilled too far into the ground in Louisiana, it resulted in the collapse of salt pillars holding up Lake Peigneur. A sinkhole formed and the lake went from just 1.82 metres deep to a monstrous 60.96 metres. Texaco paid $44.8 million for the incredibly costly and troubling mistake.</span></p> <p><strong>High seas disaster</strong></p> <p><span>It’s hard not to think of the sinking of the Titanic when considering the most expensive mistakes in history. In 1912 the monetary loss of the ship, which was on its maiden voyage when it sank, was $7.5 million. According to </span><em>Business Insider</em><span>, that would be the equivalent of $168 million today. This doesn’t even account for the lives lost during the heartbreaking event.</span></p> <p><strong>Train trouble</strong></p> <p><span>You can’t fit a square peg into a round hole and you really can’t fit wide trains onto narrow railways. This was the lesson learned by SNCF, a French train company, after purchasing 2000 trains for $20 billion. Unfortunately they were too wide to fit into the majority of train stations for which they were intended to travel. The company had to shell out another $68 million to widen train platforms in an effort to make the trains fit.</span></p> <p><strong>Bitcoin blitz</strong></p> <p><span>While many of us are still trying to make heads or tails of Bitcoin, investing in the digital currency during its humble beginnings would prove to be a big payoff now. Sadly for James Howells, an IT worker in Wales, he lost his stash of 7500 bitcoins when he trashed his hard drive. The collection would have been worth $127 million today, according to CNBC.</span></p> <p><strong>New coke flavour flop</strong></p> <p><span>Coke has a classic, timeless flavour that they don’t change all that much—and for due reason. In 1985, believing that they could use a new flavour to compete with Pepsi, Coke came up with “New Coke”, a significantly sweeter tasting soda. Despite their ambitious intentions, according to History.com, the flavour was such a failure that it led to rising stocks for their competitors.</span></p> <p><em><span>Written by Kelly Bryant. This article first appeared in </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/culture/13-of-the-most-expensive-mistakes-ever-made" target="_blank"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a><span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V" target="_blank"><span>here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Sir Elton John honoured by Prince Charles

<p><em>Image: Aaron Chown</em></p> <p>Sir Elton John has been seen publicly for the first time since his recent hip surgery.</p> <p>Spotted with a walking stick, the 74-year-old singer met Prince Charles at Windsor Castle to be included into an exclusive club during an investiture held on Wednesday.</p> <p>The Rockstar and charity patron was made a member of the Order of the Companions of Honour – one of the Queen’s highest awards, given to citizens in Britian and across the Commonwealth.</p> <p>The 95-year-old monarch is also a member of the order, which can only have a maximum of 65 people, excluding the sovereign, at any one time.</p> <p>Introduced in 1917, by her grandfather King George V, the award recognises people who have made a “major contribution to the arts, science, medicine, or government lasting over a long period of time.”</p> <p>Current members include British environmentalist David Attenborough, Canadian author Margaret Atwood and Sebastian Coe, one of Britain’s greatest-ever athletes.</p> <p>In the past, the group has included British wartime prime minister Winston Churchill and scientist Stephen Hawking.</p> <p>Elton John was first Knighted by the Queen in 1998, a year after the death of his friend Princess Diana.</p> <p>He joined the Companions of Honour after being named in the Queen’s Honours list in late 2019 for his services to music and charity.</p> <p>Following the ceremony, John posed with his husband David Furnish on the grounds of Windsor Castle.</p> <p>“I’ve had an amazing life, music has been my life, and I got this for music and for work for charity,” he said, reflecting on his career and the honour.</p> <p>"So this is just a reminder that there's more to do. More work to do for music, more work to do for charity and life is great — I'm so lucky."</p> <p>The singer has been one of the few artists to release a hit single in every decade since the 1970s, including<span> </span><em>Your Song</em>,<span> </span><em>Rocketman</em><span> </span>and<span> </span><em>Candle in the Wind</em>.</p>

Money & Banking

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The most sought-after items on every burglar’s hit list

<p><strong>Jewellery</strong></p> <p><span>When you hear the word burglar, you’re probably already envisioning a masked man with a burlap sack full of jewels in hand. As it happens, this archetype arose because jewellery is extremely easy to resell illegally.  Security Awareness Expert Robert Siciliano says that it doesn’t even matter if your bling is authentic: “Burglars aren’t generally sifting through what’s real or fake until they get back to their evil lair,” he says. “They try to quickly get in and get out. But once they do, they can generally differentiate, and if they can’t, the pawnshop where they go can make the determination.”</span></p> <p><strong>Your AI assistants</strong></p> <p><span>“Your electronics are another prime target,” says home security expert Christina Mullen. “When it comes to electronics and appliances, the burglar is going to take the most accessible items. They do not want to spend more time trying to take an appliance that is mounted on the wall, hard to reach or hidden items.” Mullen says that burglars tend to like small yet expensive devices such as AI Assistants, like Alexa-enabled devices and Google Homes.</span></p> <p><strong>Cash</strong></p> <p><span>Maybe switching to credit or debit cards is the right idea – burglars love to sift through your drawers and purses for cold, hard cash. Unlike traceable debit and credit cards, once it’s gone, cash can’t be cancelled or found again. In addition, cash loss can be hard to prove to insurers, especially when excessive amounts are stolen.</span></p> <p><strong>Prescription drugs</strong></p> <p><span>Although the most popular items burglars are looking to steal are cash, jewellery and electronics, prescription drugs have become valuable, says investigator Patricia Vercillo. “If not for personal use, the burglar won’t have a hard time selling them on the street, which can make for a dangerous situation.” She recommends that homeowners dispose of old, leftover or expired medications so that they do not become a victim of this kind of theft.</span></p> <p><strong>Unmounted TVs and other electronics</strong></p> <p><span>Your child’s new Switch? Your PS4? These cutting-edge gaming consoles are sleek, powerful, and most of all, extremely portable. These two items – which could fit cosily in a briefcase – are high-cost and low-density, making them the perfect steal for any home invader. Thieves also love to steal TVs, but only unmounted ones. “Remember, convenience is key,” says Mullen. “If your TV is mounted on the wall and bolted in, it’s no longer an easy target and is less likely to get stolen.”</span></p> <p><strong>Power tools</strong></p> <p><span>Mullen notes that some of the least expected items might go missing in a robbery. “You wouldn’t expect the power tools in your shed to be a target, but they’re decently valued and easily re-sold…even kitchen appliances can fall victim to the burglar’s sweep of your house.” To prevent this theft, smart homeowners should check that they’ve locked their outdoor sheds and aren’t leaving their cars – which often contain garage door-opening remotes – unlocked overnight.</span></p> <p><strong>Personal information</strong></p> <p><span>Your burglar might just be someone you know. In more than half of all offences, the perpetrator is someone that homeowners know or trust. “What they steal may have more to do with their disdain of the homeowners,” says Leonard Sipes. “I know of a case where a laptop was stolen just to pry into the lives of the occupant.” According to Sipes, the homeowner’s dogs were also present at the scene of the crime, but the thief simply fed the dogs because they recognised him.</span></p> <p><strong>Your safe isn't safe</strong></p> <p><span>Safes and strongboxes aren’t guaranteed to protect your valuables, especially if they’re light, small or not installed in a wall. “Keep a small safe under your bed? They’ll probably check, and they just might carry the whole thing with them,” says Mullen. If you’re looking into buying a safe, remember that some new electronic safes can be hacked, and old-fashioned safes can be cracked open with enough force – finding a better hiding place might be the key.</span></p> <p><strong>Scrap metal</strong></p> <p><span>According to Dr Ben Stickle, scrap metal is a valuable material to home intruders. Since metals such as copper are valuable and can be easily resold, Dr Stickle says that scrap metal thieves target “air conditioners, hot water heaters, electrical cables, plumbing materials, and more.” Burglars will target homes under construction, but they don’t always stop there. “Be careful who you let work on your home,” says Stickle. “Many metal thieves had current or past experience as roofers, plumbers, electricians…and would often return after seeing items of metal that were valuable.”</span></p> <p><strong>Kitchen appliances</strong></p> <p><span>Do you love your NutriBullet? Your electric mixer? Your slow cooker or your Soda Stream? Well, so do thieves. These items can be re-sold and will easily fit into a duffel bag. “Even kitchen appliances can fall victim to the burglar’s sweep of your house,” says Mullen. Some thieves have even been known to steal refrigerators and stoves because of their expensive market prices, but it’s far harder to make a stealthy get-away with a stainless-steel fridge.</span></p> <p><strong>Your old iPod</strong></p> <p><span>Nervous thieves aren’t picky, and whatever’s visible is fair game. “[Thieves] won’t spend their time looking for specific items that are in-vogue – you’d be surprised at some of the low-profile items that get stolen, like corded headphones or even an iPod,” Mullen says. Most thieves are just trying to be speedy, but we like to think that some are into vintage tech, or just left their earphones at home.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Dani Walpole. This article first appeared in </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/food-home-garden/home-tips/the-most-sought-after-items-on-every-burglars-hit-list" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Australia’s best racehorses RANKED by their winnings

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australia and New Zealand have long histories as the home of many champion racehorses - from Phar Lap and Tulloch to Makybe Diva and Black Caviar.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over the years these horses have also earned some hefty prizes, with some totalling in the tens of thousands.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Alan Whiticker - a longtime racing fan - has compiled the stories, stats and images of these horses among 24 featured in his new book </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.simonandschuster.com.au/books/Immortals-of-Australian-Horse-Racing/Alan-Whiticker/9781925946963" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Immortals of Australian Horse Racing</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, including their winnings.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are the ten of the greatest, ranked by their total winnings (adjusted for </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rba.gov.au/calculator/annualDecimal.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">inflation</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">).</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845418/horses1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b108deac40cb47fc9439caf034137bf4" /></p> <p><strong>Winx ($26,421,176)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Winx, the ‘Wonder Mare’, not only collected more than $26 million in her five-year racing career, but also received a swathe of awards and honours. She was Australia’s Champion Racehorse of the Year for four years running, the World’s Top-Ranked Turf Horse in 2017 and 2018, and entered Australia’s Racing Hall of Fame in 2017.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Whiticker, “Winx had a V8 racing motor for a heart”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And like all champions, her will to win was freakish.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845419/horses2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5bf88fbabc9e4f5ea2921bb9589e48af" /></p> <p><strong>Sunline ($17,149,276)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Zealand-born racer was a popular contender both in her home country and Australia, with many arguing Sunline has been the best horse to come out of New Zealand since Phar Lap.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Between 1998 and 2002, Sunline collected more than $11 million in winnings, equivalent to about $17 million today. She was crowned both the Australian and New Zealand Racehorse of the Year three times, and entered the Hall of Fame in both countries in the early 2000s.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845420/horses3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b9f05f6a5a2c4f5e86bad5ba62e8fa92" /></p> <p><strong>Makybe Diva ($14, 526, 685)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Born in Somerset, England, Makybe Diva went on to win three Melbourne Cups - winning one in the same year that she placed first in the Sydney Cup.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Following her third Melbourne Cup win in 2005, owner Tony Santic declared she was officially retired.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845421/horses4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/62915e6d93e9451fae240a8f7a8349c3" /></p> <p><strong>Super Impose ($10,973,719)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Zealander has become well-known for winning both the Doncaster and Epsom handicap races twice - and is the only horse that has done so.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He retired in 1992 with a record $5.6 million in winnings, before going on to live a life of comfort until his death at 22-years-old.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845422/horses5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/211b76c03b66472c8b298bb9c4b0fff3" /></p> <p><strong>Octagonal ($10,233,179)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New-Zealand bred Octagonal, nicknamed ‘The Big O’, came into his own as a three-year-old and secured seven wins across Randwick, Rosehill, Canterbury, and Caulfield in just a year.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In 1997, Octagonal retired with a then-record $5.89 million in prize money, equivalent to $10 million now.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845423/horses6.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/62097a6ebe2a4a6fb528033a20bd7aae" /></p> <p><strong>Better Loosen Up ($9,097,380)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Better Loosen Up, named after his sire Loosen Up, achieved victory on an international scale with his win in the 1990 Japan Cup. In the same year, he also took the top spot in the Australian Cup and several other stakes races.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Retiring three years later, Better Loosen Up’s winnings totalled $4.77 million.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845424/horses7.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/98f76bda6d0144a29fb74fa5ba81ec90" /></p> <p><strong>Might &amp; Power ($8,489,287)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another winner hailing from New Zealand, Might &amp; Power secured his first win in 1997 at Randwick just before he turned three. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Before retiring in 2000, Might &amp; Power earned a hefty $5 million in winnings, which equates to just under $8.5 million today. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He was also crowned World Champion Stayer in 1998 and has since been entered into the Halls of Fame in both Australia and New Zealand.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845425/horses8.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/10fc9c06acd642759119155ff7f0aeb3" /></p> <p><strong>Black Caviar ($7,953,936)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another racehorse with plenty of accolades to her name, Black Caviar also achieved the near-impossible by winning every single one of her races across her four-year career.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Almost four years to the day of her debut at Flemington, it was announced that she would retire to stud, taking $7.9 million in prize money with her.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845426/horses9.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a9207975e82c4edfbea0d0c24bee12a6" /></p> <p><strong>Phar Lap ($6,659,594)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As one of racing history’s most well-known horses, Phar Lap became an icon in Australia and New Zealand and prompted both countries to claim him as their own.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New-Zealand born racer went on to win 37 of his 51 races, including the Melbourne Cup, and earned £66,738 in winnings that equates to over $6.5 million today.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His death in 1932 came as a shock to racing fans, with rumours emerging that claimed he was deliberately poisoned ahead of the Agua Caliente Handicap race in Tijuana, Mexico. However, Whiticker posits that his death may have been due to contaminated feed or travel sickness.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845427/horses10.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/af51500da737462ebcaba1da6a9d8e4c" /></p> <p><strong>Carbine ($6,028, 507)</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Whiticker, Carbine was “the 19th century’s giant” of horse racing in Australia. The New Zealand racer not only won the 1890 Melbourne Cup, but also carried a record weight, beat the largest number of racers, and ran the fastest time.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though he was eventually sold to the Duke of Portland in England, Carbine was considered an icon by Australians.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">By the time he retired in 1891, Carbine had earned 29, 626 in prizes and come first in all but six of his 43 races.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Images: Supplied</span></em></p>

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Jewellery belonging to royal families hits the auction market

<p>A series of beautiful and historically-important jewels are set to hit the auction market next week.</p> <p>They are expected to sell for record-breaking prices, as they are all linked to royalty throughout the world, and spanning hundreds of years.</p> <p>The collection includes a set of sapphire jewels once owned by a member of Russia's ill-fated Romanov dynasty, diamond bracelets from Marie Antoinette's collection and a bangle given to the Duchess of Windsor as an anniversary present from her husband.</p> <p><span>Two tiaras once owned by Empress Joséphine of France are also included in the sale, along with tiaras owned by other European royals. </span></p> <p><span>Jewels by Bulgari, Harry Winston, Van Cleef &amp; Arpels and Cartier are also among the spectacularly glitzy collection. </span></p> <p><span>Auction houses Christie's and Sotheby's are auctioning off the items next week to prospective buyers, as visitors try to outbid their chances of owning a </span>piece of history.</p> <p>The big ticket item at the Christie's auction, happening on November 9th in Geneva, is a pair of diamond bracelets that belonged to the last queen of France.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845362/marie-antoinette-jewels.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/528194fee718455bbae20343be1d372e" /></p> <p><em>Image credits: Christie's</em></p> <p>A blue velvet box, labeled 'bracelets off Queen Marie Antoinette', houses <span>the double bracelets, each composed of three strands of diamonds and a large barrette clasp, for a total of 112 diamonds.</span></p> <p>Now in the possession of a European royal family, the bracelets are said to sell for at $3 million.</p> <p><span>"To find jewels with over 200 years of French royal history is truly something that collectors and passionate jewellery people from all over the world will be keeping an eye on," Max Fawcett, head of Christie's jewellery department in Geneva, said.</span></p> <p><span>Also being auctioned at Christie's is a ruby and diamond bangle owned by Wallis Simpson. </span></p> <p><span><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7845363/ruby.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9b7a68eaa4d7489b90b0114a72e8a487" /></span></p> <p><em>Image credit: Christie's</em></p> <p><span>The former King Edward VIII ordered the Cartier bracelet for his American wife on their first wedding anniversary in 1938 after abdicating the throne.</span></p> <p><span>The jewellery is expected to sell for close to $3 million. </span></p> <p><span>The bangle features an inscription that reads, "For our first anniversary of June third".</span></p> <p><span>Featured at the Sotheby's Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels sale is a sapphire and diamond brooch and matching ear-clips once owned by the Romanov dynasty of Russia.</span></p> <p><span>They are from the collection of Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna, the cousin of Tsar Nicholas II. </span></p> <p><span>With a range of other royal jewels up for auction, the auction houses in Geneva are expecting a bidding war that will result in millions of dollars of </span>profit.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Sotheby's / Christie's</em></p>

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Treasure hunters “on the brink” of HUGE discovery

<p dir="ltr">A team of treasure hunters believe they are close to finding the “world’s largest treasure hoard” after searching for it for more than 30 years.</p> <p dir="ltr">The team, known as the ‘Temple Twelve’, have been searching for the treasure trove in Finland since 1987.</p> <p dir="ltr">The target of their search, the ‘Lemminkainen Hoard’, is said to be worth $27 billion and consists of gold, jewels, and artefacts.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/16606341/treasure-hunters-hoard-jewels-gold-finland/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>, the discovery of the hoard would make it the most valuable collection of treasures to be found.</p> <p dir="ltr">The hoard is believed to include 50,000 gems and around 1000 artefacts that are thousands of years old, as well as a number of 18-carat gold life-size statues.</p> <p dir="ltr">The team — who have come together from all over the world — have spent their summers searching for the treasure, working six hours a day, seven days a week.</p> <p dir="ltr">The exploits of the team have been detailed in the book<span> </span><em>Temporarily Insane</em>, written by the world-leading authority on the Lemminkainen Hoard, Carl Borgen.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I understand that significant progress at the temple has been made and that the crew are feeling especially excited about the months ahead,” Mr Borgen told<span> </span><em>The Mirror</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There is now talk in the camp of being on the brink of a major breakthrough, which in real terms could be the discovery of the world’s largest and most valuable treasure trove.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The hoard is believed to be in an underground temple in Sipoo which has remained sealed since 987 AD.</p> <p dir="ltr">With the team’s latest progress, it is believed they will be able to locate and excavate the site next summer when they resume work in September 2022.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: YouTube</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Billionaires taking action on climate change are part of a long tradition

<p>If governments won’t act quickly enough on climate change, who will?</p> <p>Enter the new breed of (mostly young) <a href="https://www.bcg.com/publications/2016/innovation-strategy-how-tech-entrepreneurs-are-disrupting-philanthropy">billionaire philanthropists</a>. Their goal is to use their influence and money to push the boundaries of science and technology for society’s benefit.</p> <p>One example is Mike Cannon-Brookes, billionaire co-founder of software developer <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlassian">Atlassian</a> and his partner Annie Cannon-Brooke who this month pledged <a href="https://www.afr.com/policy/energy-and-climate/mike-and-annie-cannon-brookes-pledge-1-5b-to-limit-global-warming-20211019-p591d7">A$1.5 billion</a> to invest in climate projects by 2030.</p> <p>$1 billion will be in financial investments and $500 million in philanthropic and advocacy work, with the aim of keeping global warming to 1.5 degrees. He wants other executives to follow suit.</p> <p>In the US the world’s largest funds manager Blackrock has injected funds into billionaire Bill Gates’ <a href="https://www.afr.com/companies/energy/climate-crisis-an-existential-threat-fink-20211020-p591oi">Breakthrough Energy</a>, which is using philanthropic money to accelerate investments in new technologies.</p> <p>Breakthrough has reportedly secured US$1 billion in investments from Microsoft, General Motors, American Airlines, Boston Consulting Group, Bank of America and ArcelorMittal.</p> <p><strong>In India, in Denmark, in Australia</strong></p> <p>In India, its richest citizen <a href="https://www.livemint.com/companies/news/the-aim-is-to-become-a-net-zero-carbon-company-by-2035-ambani-11594859016543.html">Mukesh Ambani</a> has pledged to take his energy giant net-zero by 2035, an undertaking he will fulfil by switching to renewable sources and converting carbon dioxide emissions into useful products and chemicals.</p> <p>Australia’s <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/16/business/energy-environment/green-energy-fortescue-andrew-forrest.html">Andrew Forrest</a> has established <a href="https://ffi.com.au/">Fortescue Future Industries</a> as part of Fortescue Metals with a mandate to invest billions in Green Hydrogen projects in Queensland and NSW and to take the mining group carbon-neutral by <a href="https://www.fmgl.com.au/docs/default-source/announcements/target-to-achieve-net-zero-scope-3-emissions.pdf?sfvrsn=195d0b1f_4">2040</a>.</p> <p>Elsewhere a Danish sceptic on carbon pricing Bjørn Lomborg has made a case for <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEjNVWV5jbs">innovation in energy research</a> in energy research as the way to limit carbon emissions, citing a parallel from the 1860’s when whales were hunted to near extinction for oil that was used to light homes.</p> <p>He says the solution was not to tax whales, it was the invention of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerosene">kerosene</a> that undercut the cost of whale oil.</p> <p><strong>What’s happening isn’t new</strong></p> <p>In 1919 businessman <a href="https://www.philanthropyroundtable.org/almanac/people/hall-of-fame/detail/raymond-orteig">Raymond Orteig</a> offered US$25,000 for the first person to fly non-stop from New York to Paris.</p> <p>The prize was won by an unknown 25-year-old US Army Reserve officer, <a href="http://www.charleslindbergh.com/history/">Charles Lindberg</a>, spurring enormous advances in aviation.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/428171/original/file-20211025-27-14o7oi4.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/428171/original/file-20211025-27-14o7oi4.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <em><span class="caption">Le Journals’ coverage of Charles A. Lindbergh’s 33 hour flight from New York to Pariswhich won him US$25,000 in prize money.</span></em></p> <p>Today, the X Prize Foundation and the Musk Foundation are offering a US$100 million <a href="https://www.xprize.org/prizes/elonmusk">X Prize for Carbon Removal</a> funded by billionaire Elon Musk.</p> <p>The prize will go to the team from anywhere on the planet who can invent a machine that extracts carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or oceans at gigatonne-scale.</p> <p>Previous X Prizes have been awarded for the application of artificial intelligence to global issues, turning carbon dioxide into useful products, developing cheaper methods of mass testing for COVID, and <a href="https://www.xprize.org/past-prizes">creating water from thin air</a>.</p> <p><strong>Horses for courses</strong></p> <p>There is a sound argument that important pledges and projects should be the responsibility of governments rather than individuals.</p> <p>Billionaires often get where they are by acting on self-interest, so it isn’t reasonable to expect them to act in the interest of the entire public.</p> <p>On the other hand, some problems are too important and time sensitive to leave in the hands of governments that can’t act with agility.</p> <p>If an individual loses their money, it’s their loss. If the government loses the money, its the taxpayer’s loss. So governments have to be cautious.</p> <p>It’s probably not a matter of one or the other. Governments shouldn’t abandon their responsibility to act in the public interest. On the other hand, wealthy philanthropists throughout history have been prepared to help.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/170463/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/david-tuffley-13731">David Tuffley</a>, Senior Lecturer in Applied Ethics &amp; CyberSecurity, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/griffith-university-828">Griffith University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/billionaires-taking-action-on-climate-change-are-part-of-a-long-tradition-170463">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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$1 million Cleo Smith reward status

<p>Image: Facebook</p> <p>Western Australia Police have said they do not anticipate the state’s landmark $1 million reward for information about Cleo Smith to be paid out.</p> <p>WA Premier Mark McGowan offered the hefty reward for information leading to Cleo’s location, or to the arrest and conviction of those involved in her disappearance. The reward was announced just six days after Cleo was abducted from her family tent at the remote Blowholes campsite on October 16th.</p> <p>While police remain tight-lipped about what prompted them to search the locked Carnarvon home where Cleo was found, they did credit the hard work of a 140-strong police taskforce.</p> <p>WA Police Minister Paul Papalia told ABC on Thursday morning: “It wasn’t a random tip off or clairvoyant or any of those sorts of things you might hear.</p> <p>“It was just a hard police grind,” he said.</p> <p>WA Police Deputy Commissioner Col Blanch previously said he doesn’t expect the $1 million reward to be claimed, but he told Channel Seven’s Sunrise on Thursday he’s not completely ruling out the possibility.</p> <p>“Look, the police collected so much information from day one for those 18 days that they were able to trawl through and put that jigsaw puzzle together,” Comm Blanch said.</p> <p>“Now part of that jigsaw puzzle was information from the community, but it all contributed to the outcome.</p> <p>“Look, we’re not going to discount that it’s not going to be paid out, but certainly the information that I have from the police is that really it was good, hard detective and analyst work."</p> <p><strong>Criteria for police paying reward</strong></p> <p>Associate Professor of Criminology and forensic anthropologist Dr Xanthé Mallet from the University of Newcastle told Yahoo News Australia there are specific rules around rewards regarding what they will be paid out for.</p> <p>Cleo’s reward was offered for location information, or details that could lead to an arrest and conviction.</p> <p>“Each reward has its own structure for what it will be paid out for,” she said.</p> <p>“If there was a genuine call on this reward I’m sure they’d be very happy to pay it,” she added.</p> <p>Speaking with the ABC, Dr Mallet said the Carnarvon community and the whole of Australia just really “wanted to see Cleo found alive and unharmed”.</p> <p>“…at the end of the day Cleo is home, and for most people the reward is seeing her in her parents’ arms in the hospital safe and unharmed.”</p>

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Man spends just $200 A YEAR on food

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A California man has used an unusual “hack” to spend only $USD 150 ($NZD 210) on food for an entire year – saving his money to pay off student debt, get married and buy a home instead.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">33-year-old Dylan’s savvy spending saw him purchase an unlimited, year-round pass to Six Flags Magic Mountain, which entitled him to parking and two meals every day.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You can pay around $150 for unlimited, year-round access to Six Flags, which includes parking and two meals a day,” he explained to </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://melmagazine.com/en-us/story/six-flags-dining-pass" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mel Magazine</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If you time it right, you could eat both lunch and dinner there every day.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The theme park offers a “premium season dining pass” which includes lunch and dinner items, a snack, and unlimited drinks during every visit on regular operating days.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVLHkOtLDj6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CVLHkOtLDj6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Six Flags (@sixflags)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dylan has been taking advantage of the deal for the last seven years, after finding out that the deal was being offered minutes away from his internship in 2014.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“One of my coworkers said she spent $1500 a month on eating out. I was like, ‘Yeah, I’m not going down that road!’,” he </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/money/budgeting/electrical-engineer-saves-thousands-and-pays-off-debts-with-theme-parks-annual-dining-pass/news-story/200b813929826ce5c5b3d52a40584631" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">said</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The electrical engineer estimated that he’s eaten about 2000 meals for around 50 cents each at Six Flags over the last seven years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That entire first year, I don’t think I ever went to the grocery store,” he said. “I timed it so I was able to go there during my lunch break, go back to work, then stop back for dinner on my way home.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As a result, Dylan was able to save his money for other things.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was crazy – I was saving money, paying off student loans,” he claimed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, he did admit that the menu “wasn’t healthy” until the recent introduction of some healthier options.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The first year, the menu was kind of lame – all you could get was a burger and fries, or a pizza and breadsticks, or this pathetic sandwich and a refillable soda cup,” he said. “It wasn’t healthy at all, which was rough.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9AyGh8lyyT/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9AyGh8lyyT/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Six Flags Magic Mountain (@sixflagsmagicmountain)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They’ve got decent options now,” he explained. “Still a lot of bad food, I mean it’s a theme park so you can’t expect too much from them. But you find the options that aren’t terrible – stuff like tri-tip sandwiches and vegan options like black bean burgers and meatless meatball subs.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He has also taken to countering his theme-park meals with 5,000-step trips from the Six Flags parking lot to its water park division.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But since meeting his wife six years ago, Dylan has scaled back his thrifty eating and has started eating three or four lunches at the park each week.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“My wife moved in and I stopped doing dinners and weekends, too, since she’s not as big into roller coasters as I am,” Dylan said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His savings also helped the young couple purchase a home in the area, which he said means, “I’m not really going anywhere”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“As long as they keep changing the menu I’m happy.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: @sixflagsmagicmountain / Instagram</span></em></p>

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World’s richest person, Elon Musk, issues challenge to the United Nations

<p dir="ltr">Tesla CEO Elon Musk, whose net worth<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.afr.com/world/north-america/elon-musk-is-now-three-times-richer-than-warren-buffett-20211102-p5955u" target="_blank">just rose</a><span> </span>by US$24 billion to reach a total of US$335.1 billion, has issued a challenge to the United Nations: prove that money will help solve global hunger, and I will give you that money, more or less.</p> <p dir="ltr">It was in response to a tweet made by David Beasley, director of the UN’s World Food Programme, which itself was a response to the news of Musk’s net worth soaring by<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-25/elon-musk-s-fortune-surges-to-281-billion-on-hertz-order" target="_blank">US$36 billion last week</a><span> </span>after Hertz ordered 100,000 Teslas. The tweet from Beasley reads, “$36 billion in one day - @elonmusk 's net worth increase due to a @Tesla / @Hertz deal. Congratulations, Elon! 1/6 of your one day increase would save 42 million lives that are knocking on famine's door. Unprecedented crisis. Unprecedented wealth. Help!!”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">$36 billion in one day - <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@elonmusk</a>'s net worth increase due to a <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesla?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesla</a> / <a href="https://twitter.com/Hertz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Hertz</a> deal. Congratulations, Elon! 1/6 of your one day increase would save 42 million lives that are knocking on famine's door. Unprecedented crisis. Unprecedented wealth. Help!! <a href="https://t.co/n4hfpl5NRE">https://t.co/n4hfpl5NRE</a></p> — David Beasley (@WFPChief) <a href="https://twitter.com/WFPChief/status/1453681782742818824?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 28, 2021</a></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Responding to a ‘fact-check’ of Beasley’s claims posted by a Dr. Eli David a few days later, Musk wrote, “If WFP can describe on this Twitter thread exactly how $6B will solve world hunger, I will sell Tesla stock right now and do it."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">If WFP can describe on this Twitter thread exactly how $6B will solve world hunger, I will sell Tesla stock right now and do it.</p> — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1454808104256737289?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 31, 2021</a></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Beasley responded, explaining that the CNN headline was inaccurate; while $6 billion won’t solve world hunger, it will “prevent geopolitical instability, mass migration and save 42 million people on the brink of starvation”. He invited Musk to have a chat, adding, “It isn’t as complicated as Falcon Heavy, but too much at stake to not at least have a conversation.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">.<a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@elonmusk</a> With your help we can bring hope, build stability and change the future. <br /><br />Let’s talk: It isn’t as complicated as Falcon Heavy, but too much at stake to not at least have a conversation. I can be on the next flight to you. Throw me out if you don’t like what you hear!</p> — David Beasley (@WFPChief) <a href="https://twitter.com/WFPChief/status/1454885078497103873?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 31, 2021</a></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Musk is known for firing off off-the-cuff tweets with little forethought or expectation of follow-through, so it’s not clear whether Beasley’s response satisfies his criteria. His response was characteristically brusque: “Please publish your current &amp; proposed spending in detail so people can see exactly where money goes. Sunlight is a wonderful thing.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Please publish your current &amp; proposed spending in detail so people can see exactly where money goes. <br /><br />Sunlight is a wonderful thing.</p> — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1454921466500222977?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 31, 2021</a></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Beasley invited Musk to meet him anywhere, “Earth or space”, to discuss the issue further and see the work the World Food Programme does. Time will tell whether tackling issues like world hunger is a genuine concern of Musk’s, or whether this was simply another day on Twitter for the tech mogul. It’s worth noting that $6 billion works out to be just over 2% of his current net worth.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images</em></p>

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Just TWO PERCENT of Elon Musk’s wealth could solve world hunger

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The director of the United Nations’ World Food Program has called on billionaires to “step up now, on a one-time basis” to solve world hunger, claiming it would require only a fraction of their wealth.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In an interview with CNN, David Beasley specifically mentioned Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk, the world’s richest men, in his appeal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“$USD 6 ($AUD 7.9 or $NZD 8.36) billion to help 42 million people that are literally going to die if we don’t reach them. It’s not complicated,” he </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/news/world/just-two-per-cent-of-elon-musks-wealth-could-solve-world-hunger-according-to-un-food-scarcity-organisation-c-4345980" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">said</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With Mr Musk’s net worth totalling almost $USD 289 ($AUD 384 or $NZD 402) billion according to Bloomberg, the sum Mr Beasley is asking for would equate to just two percent of his fortune.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">$36 billion in one day - <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@elonmusk</a>'s net worth increase due to a <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesla?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesla</a> / <a href="https://twitter.com/Hertz?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Hertz</a> deal. Congratulations, Elon! 1/6 of your one day increase would save 42 million lives that are knocking on famine's door. Unprecedented crisis. Unprecedented wealth. Help!! <a href="https://t.co/n4hfpl5NRE">https://t.co/n4hfpl5NRE</a></p> — David Beasley (@WFPChief) <a href="https://twitter.com/WFPChief/status/1453681782742818824?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 28, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Beasley has also taken to social media to call out the billionaires.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Congratulations, Elon!” Mr Beasley wrote on Twitter after Mr Musk’s wealth increased by $29 billion in a single day.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“1/6 of your one day increase would save 42 million lives that are knocking on famine’s door. Unprecedented crisis. Unprecedented wealth. Help!”</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Congratulations to <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@elonmusk</a> for passing up <a href="https://twitter.com/JeffBezos?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@JeffBezos</a> as the world’s richest person - worth a whopping $221B! 🥇 Elon, to celebrate I’m offering you a once in a lifetime opportunity: help us save 42M people from starvation for just $6.6B!! Offer expires SOON.. and lives do too.</p> — David Beasley (@WFPChief) <a href="https://twitter.com/WFPChief/status/1450388737444257797?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 19, 2021</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Beasley went on to say that many nations are “knocking on famine’s door”, due to a “perfect storm” of crises including climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“For example, take the United States and the region in Central America, the Dry Corridor, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Nicaragua - just down in that area alone,” Mr Beasley said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’re feeding a lot of people down there and the climate is just changing with hurricanes and flash flooding; it’s just devastating.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to a World Food Program (WFP) report released earlier in the week, 22.8 million people in Afghanistan - almost half the population - are facing an acute hunger crisis.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Meanwhile, the WFP estimates that 5.2 million people in Ethiopia urgently need food assistance. Mr Beasley said humanitarian organisations such as the WFP have also struggled to deliver supplies to people in the region due to ongoing conflicts between Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I don’t know where they’re getting the food from,” he said. “We’re out of fuel. We’re out of cash, in terms of paying our people and we are running out of money and we can’t get our trucks in.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The struggle to feed millions around the world comes as both Mr Bezos and Mr Musk make continued investments in private space travel, which has been criticised by environmentally-minded individuals such as Prince William.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: @elonmusk / Instagram</span></em></p>

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The key to fitness: walk more or lose money

<p><a rel="noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.118.009173" target="_blank">A clinical trial</a> led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine has revealed that playing on our instinctive <a style="font-size: 14px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/au/blog/science-choice/201803/what-is-loss-aversion" target="_blank">aversion to loss</a><span style="font-size: 14px;"> may be the key in the quest to bring about enduring lifestyle changes in patients.</span></p> <div class="copy"> <p>The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, provided a group of 105 patients with a wearable device which monitored their step counts over 24 weeks. The researchers gave the participants a two-week preliminary period to establish baseline counts, and then split the group in two. Half the volunteers, the control group, received the wearable and were asked to simply go ahead with their usual day-to-day activities. The other half, known as the intervention group, were asked to complete a schedule of three eight-week phases.</p> <p>The first phase, which featured increasing step goals, and the second, wherein the step goals were fixed, included a financial gain <a rel="noopener" href="https://insight.kellogg.northwestern.edu/article/to_motivate_better_to_take_away_than_to_give" target="_blank">framed as a loss</a> – a technique borrowed from behavioural economics.</p> <p>The patients were advised that a $14 deposit had been made into a virtual account on their behalf, with $2 being deducted for each day they fell short of their step goal. The $14 balance was restored each Monday, and the process repeated for each of the first 16 weeks. The final eight-week phase was scheduled as a ‘cool down’ phase of sorts, with no incentives offered.</p> <p>The results of the study showed a greater increase in physical activity in the intervention group of patients – their daily step counts increased by an average of 1368 compared to the control group. Even after incentives ceased, patients in the intervention group maintained the good habits they’d established, showing an increase of 1154 steps compared to controls.</p> <p>Regular exercise has long been established as an effective way to reduce the risk of a heart attack, but encouraging patients to make more time for physical activity has been a challenge that has stumped medical practitioners.</p> <p>“Regular exercise and cardiac rehab has shown to have significant benefit in those with heart disease but participation in such programs is extremely low for various reasons including patient motivation and access to exercise facilities,” says Neel Chokshi, medical director of the Penn Sports Cardiology and Fitness Program.</p> <p>His colleague Mitesh Patel adds that wearables alone were found not to increase physical activity levels, but using the loss-framing method led to significant changes in patient behaviour. During the course of the six-month trial, the step count of an average patient in the intervention group equated to 160 kilometres more walking than that of the average patient in the control group.</p> <p>The research team suggests the next research phase should involve similar studies over longer periods to assess the sustainability of the incentive model, and to measure the effects of variations in size and frequency of the rewards offered.</p> <p>“There is interest in developing creative remote strategies to engage patients in exercise programs but there is little research for guidance,” Chokshi says.</p> <!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=21430&amp;title=The+key+to+fitness%3A+walk+more+or+lose+money" alt="" width="1" height="1" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/body-and-mind/the-key-to-fitness-walk-more-or-lose-money/" target="_blank">This article</a> was originally published on <a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com" target="_blank">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/andrew-patterson" target="_blank">Andrew Patterson</a>. Andrew Patterson is a freelance science writer from Newcastle, UK.</em><em> </em></p> </div>

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