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“Incredibly rare” find leaves historians awestruck

<p>Speaking to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-08-20/rococo-wallpaper-uncovered-in-historic-tasmanian-house/12567422" target="_blank">ABC</a>, historians have been left dumbfounded after finding a beautifully preserved and rare type of rococo wallpaper, along with a child’s drawing, hidden behind a cupboard in a Tasmanian property for more than 150 years.</p> <p>The owners of Jordan House in the southern Tasmanian town of Broadmarsh recently uncovered the section of wallpaper and a sketch of a coastal town while renovating.</p> <p>The rococo wallpaper has been called "incredibly rare" and Southern Midlands Council Heritage Projects Officer Alan Townsend said the find was significant.</p> <p>“Rococo wallpaper was big in the 18th century,” he told the ABC. “It’s full of shapes like scrolls and seashell, really over the top and curvaceous</p> <p>“This find is amazing because it's incredibly high quality.”</p> <p>After estimating the wallpaper’s installation in around 1850, soon after the time of the building’s construction Mr Townsend said, “We know the reason the paper has survived is because sometime in the 1870s, a set of matching built-in cupboards were put in, and they covered up the wallpaper.</p> <p>“Sometime later, someone has come along and done what everyone did, which is steam everything off the walls.”</p> <p>Mr Townsend put the odds of finding that particular wallpaper in Tasmania at “astronomical” – before adding that it was the child’s drawing discovered beneath the wallpaper that made the find all the more special.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837471/wallpaper2.jpg" alt="IMAGE / Natalie Geard" data-udi="umb://media/49da371b359e4f5497ed541894291a4a" /></p> <p>“It just puts you into the outer stratosphere in terms of likelihood It looks to me like a child's drawing of a wall harbour, which are of course common on the coast of England.</p> <p>“I've never seen anything like this in Tasmania before.”</p> <p>The owner of the property, Ben Geard, is currently looking at options for preserving and showcasing the rare find.</p> <p>IMAGES: Natalie Geard</p>

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The McDonald’s cleaning hack you NEED to try

<p>An Aussie mum has revealed her simple hack for vacuuming tricky areas using an unlikely item from McDonald’s. </p> <p>Taking to Facebook, Queensland mum Kythaya showed how she uses the lid and straw of a Macca’s drinking cup to suck up dust and insects.</p> <p>The trick works by holding the lid of the plastic cup against the end of the vacuum hose and threading the straw inside the hole.</p> <p><img style="width: 364.2384105960265px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837377/screen-shot-2020-08-14-at-21919-pm.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7f6e437dbdc34176899b8d15d19124d3" /></p> <p>When turning no the vacuum hold the lid and straw and move the hose around to suck up dirt and debris from hard-to-reach places.</p> <p>“Check this out, ladies,” she wrote on the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/mumswhoclean/" target="_blank">Mums Who Clean</a> page.</p> <p>“The flies that were stuck in the window sills are gone. There is probably an actual connection for this, but this works too.</p> <p>“Just don’t let the straw go!”</p> <p>The easy trick has gone viral, with thousands responding to Kythaya’s post.</p> <p>“Keep your Macca’s rubbish! Can’t wait to try this,” said one.</p> <p>Added another: “So going to try this! With five kids and Macca’s across the road we have way too many lids and straws.”</p> <p>Said a third: “I did this on my sliding doors and it was amazing. You are a genius.”</p>

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Why would you bother with a kettle?

<p>Kmart’s brand new $79 Instant Hot Water Dispenser hit shelves and online shops this week, to a clamour of rave reviews from early adopters of the magical speedy boiler.</p> <p>The machine claims to be able to boil a very respectable two litres of water in just three to five seconds – which is far, far quicker than anything else in your kitchen can promise.</p> <p>As a result, the positive reviews have been absolutely pouring in:</p> <p>“Goodbye kettle and the waiting,” one happy customer raved.</p> <p>“Jumped on the instant hot water dispenser bandwagon!” another shopper declared, “I’m loving it.”</p> <p>“Mine is on its way,” wrote another shopper who was a little slower on the uptake – but not by much.</p> <p>With three pour capacity options to choose from – 300, 200 or 150mL – and handy variable temperature settings of 98, 75 and 25 degrees, it’s been declared an instant bargain at just $79, with comparable high-end versions like the Westinghouse’s 2.7L dispenser selling for as much as $189.</p> <p>“I’m always amazed at the things Kmart comes up with. Take my money!” wrote another excited prospective customer – perhaps inadvertently borrowing from a recent KFC TV ad campaign.</p> <p>“It’s definitely hotter than the coffee machines,” chimed in another reviewer. “Highest temp on the machine is 95 and lowest 25.”</p> <p>“I'm so in love with my new Instant Hot Water Dispenser. Love that you can change the temperature to suit... Perfect for my green tea,” another happy customer shared.</p>

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Tradie’s heartwarming note to little boy goes viral

<p>A tradie's note to a young boy who helped out with work on a family home has captivated over 250,000 people on social media.</p> <p>Taking to Twitter to share the touching gesture, British woman Steph Kemp took a photo of the builder’s printed “pay packet” letter for her six-year-old son.</p> <p>Blown away by his “kind” gesture, she revealed she had her patio renovated her son Harry loved helping the builder out.</p> <p>“So it made his day to receive this. What an example of kindness,” she said alongside a snap of the note.</p> <p>The completed responsibilities of the “smashing little guy” includes passing bricks, passing “little pavers”, mixing cement and loading stone.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">We have just had our patio done and my 6yo has loved going out and helping the builder, so it made his day to receive this. What an example of kindness 😊 <a href="https://t.co/Wq39TU4uwL">pic.twitter.com/Wq39TU4uwL</a></p> — Steph Kemp (@steph_heathcote) <a href="https://twitter.com/steph_heathcote/status/1287688369905033217?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 27, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>It also appears the little boy went above and beyond during his short stint as a tradie, “taking pictures of black birds and spiders”.</p> <p>He was rewarded a grand total of £10 ($A18) for all of his hard work, “minus tax and national insurance”, of course.</p> <p>The tweet has attracted more than 250,000 likes and been shared more than 22,000 times.</p> <p>“This is lovely – what a kind man! Keeping him in mind for future projects – the builder, not your son!” one person replied.</p> <p>“This is so special, thoughtful and empowering, I am sure that your son as he gets older will reflect on that act of respectful kindness,” wrote another.</p> <p>But, in usual internet fashion, not all replies saw the adorable side to the innocent note.</p> <p>“Yeah show him from a young age that all his hard work will be rewarded very minimally and show him he will not be adequately trained for the job,” one user responded. “This is actually bullying of a young child and it’s horrific.”</p> <p>And another: “As a builder I’d like to add the other side. Construction sites are dangerous places and I’ve lost track of the amount of times I’ve had to have stern words with customers that insist on letting their little darlings run around freely after already being asked nicely to stop them.”</p> <p>While others had a lighthearted reaction.</p> <p>“Love it but he shouldn’t be getting tax and national insurance deductions based on his age and income,” one person joked.</p>

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Jacinda Ardern shows off thrifty item in dining room tour

<p><span>Sometimes, we seem to think we know everything about public figures, but it turns out until yesterday, we didn’t know Jacinda Ardern was a serious thrifter.</span></p> <p><span>During a Facebook Live video yesterday, the Prime Minister of New Zealand started off the live stream but giving a tour of her dining room, which she said was “pretty stock standard, really” despite living at Premier House, the PM’s official residence.</span></p> <p><span>“It’s just a table with some of the features that usually you find in a family home – chalkboard,” Ardern said, gesturing to a chalkboard behind her that had some scrawlings from (we assume) her two-year-old daughter Neve.</span></p> <p><span>However, Ardern showed off an “unusual” feature in her dining room, as she revealed her chairs lived a life before she got her hands on them. </span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img style="width: 500px; height: 330.173775671406px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836759/screen-shot-2020-07-01-at-110755-am.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/35e256186ae44ac59de43d2be0d97c1e" /></span></p> <p><span>“Probably the one unusual piece of furniture that is here, I’ll share this with you,” she explained, gesturing to the red leather chairs.</span></p> <p><span>“These are the old Cabinet chairs from back in the day.</span></p> <p><span>“We of course make sure that nothing goes to waste so they’ve been recycled and they’re now our dining room chairs.”</span></p> <p><span>She was quick to admit the chairs weren’t the most comfortable, which is most likely why she added a cushion.</span></p> <p><span>“Not always the most comfortable,” she said, “which perhaps back in the day may have kept Cabinet meetings short.”</span></p> <p><span>Ardern appeared on Facebook to discuss the latest coronavirus developments for New Zealand. </span></p> <p><span>Like Australia, New Zealand was successful at flattening the curve of coronavirus cases early on but has faced challenges as restrictions lifted.</span></p> <p><span>While she had previously declared New Zealand coronavirus-free, a recent spate of cases thanks to travellers has seen her under increased pressure to keep the country’s borders closed.</span></p> <p><span>Speaking to reporters, Arden said opening New Zealand’s borders was “dangerous” and shouldn’t be considered until coronavirus cases drop around the world.</span></p> <p><span>“Any suggestion of borders opening at this point, frankly, is dangerous and I don’t think we should put New Zealand in that position,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>However Ms Ardern was open to the idea of travel between New Zealand and COVID-19-free Australian states, but it would be a matter for Australia when it opened its borders to international travel.</span></p> <p><span>“Ultimately, it’s up to Australia to decide whether or not they’ll go for a whole country approach or a state-by-state approach,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>“Obviously, where there is community outbreak, that is a no-go for New Zealand.</span></p> <p><span>“Where they have border controls in place and where they’ve had no community transmissions for sustained periods of time … that may be a different scenario.”</span></p>

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“Something hatched!" Mum’s disturbing backyard discovery

<p><span>A woman’s terrifying discovery in her yard has left a number of social media users baffled.</span></p> <p><span>The woman, believed to be from Australia, posted a video of a small black mound sitting on top of dirt to a Facebook group last week, as she asked members to help her figure out what it is.</span></p> <p><span>“Has anyone seen these before? Just appeared today in a few spots around the yard. It has been raining here overnight,” she said. </span></p> <p><span>In the footage, the woman touched the mound, causing what appears to be thousands of tiny alive bugs to move.</span></p> <p><span>They seem to go right back to where they were as she pulls her fingers back.</span></p> <p><span>Horrified users on Facebook jokingly told the mum to burn her house down or move away from the “alien eggs”.</span></p> <p><span>“I have never seen anything like that before!” one woman said.</span></p> <p><span>“It looks like kinetic sand,” another wrote. </span></p> <p><span>“Something hatched!” a third chimed in. </span></p> <p><span>But one person revealed that the bugs appear to be springtails, otherwise known as Anurida Maritima.</span></p> <p><span>“Springtails for sure! We have the same thing happen to us and know they come every year. Hate it lol,” someone responded to her. </span></p> <p><span>Springtails are a common occurrence in gardens, but they’re still relatively unknown due to their small size, according to the agricultural school of Texas A&amp;M University.</span></p> <p><span>“Springtails are common insects that live in leaf litter, compost piles and lawn soils, recycling dead plant material into nutrients to fertilise your lawn,” according to the school.</span></p> <p><span>“Only about a millimetre long, springtails are rarely seen, but given the right environmental conditions, they can multiply to become a nuisance.”</span></p> <p><span>They are not harmful and do not bite people, pets, spread disease or damage homes. </span></p>

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The special meaning behind Queen Elizabeth’s favourite flower

<p>The Queen has revealed her favourite flower for the Royal Horticultural Society’s Chelsea Flower Show this year.</p> <p>In honour of the first day of the show, which was moved online this year in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the monarch shared that one of her favourite blooms was lily of the valley.</p> <p>“Members of the Royal Family are taking part in the #MyChelseaGarden campaign, sharing a selection of their favourite plants and flowers at this time of year,” an Instagram post on the Royal Family account read.</p> <p>“The Queen has chosen lily of the valley, pictured here in the Buckingham Palace gardens. Lily of the valley featured in Her Majesty’s coronation bouquet and has held special associations since.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAVRMEpHS4c/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAVRMEpHS4c/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">On the first day of the virtual Chelsea Flower Show, members of the Royal Family are taking part in the #MyChelseaGarden campaign, sharing a selection of their favourite plants and flowers at this time of year. 🌿🌸 . As this year's show coincides with #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek, @the_rhs are encouraging people to brighten their social media feeds with images of plants and gardens, to provide a moment of respite in these challenging times. The Queen has chosen lily of the valley, pictured here in the Buckingham Palace gardens. Lily of the valley featured in Her Majesty’s coronation bouquet and has held special associations since. Visit our website to see #MyChelseaGarden images shared by other members of the Royal Family (link in bio). . #MyChelseaGarden #VirtualChelsea #RHSChelsea</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/theroyalfamily/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> The Royal Family</a> (@theroyalfamily) on May 18, 2020 at 7:19am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The spring flower is the May birth flower, and is said to bring luck in love.</p> <p>The white buds were also featured in the wedding bouquets of many royals, including Queen Victoria, Princess Astrid of Sweden, Grace Kelly, and Duchess Kate.</p> <p>Other royals also shared their favourite flowers on the Royal Family website. The Queen’s daughter Princess Anne opted for hellebores, stating: “Not only do they flower early but they keep flowering for two months, and they are often beautifully marked with endless variations.”</p> <p>Prince Charles picked delphiniums, while his wife Duchess Camilla chose Alchemilla Mollis. The Duke of Gloucester celebrated daisies, and his wife the Duchess of Gloucester chose sweet peas.</p> <p>Her Majesty’s cousin Princess Alexandra picked the Golden Celebration rose, saying it “gives me great pleasure to look at and has the most extraordinary and unique scent”.</p> <p>The Queen released a special message of support for the show on Monday.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAU3LeuH3HI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAU3LeuH3HI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">The Royal Horticultural Society Chelsea Flower Show is moving online for the first time. 🌸💻 . Visit @the_rhs for a unique timetable of events from Monday 18th to Saturday 23rd May, including gardening advice and virtual sessions. The RHS have been supporting gardeners old and new, with more people than ever accessing the advice pages on their website over recent weeks. Her Majesty has been Patron of the Royal Horticultural Society since 1952 - she first attended the show as Monarch in 1955, and has visited almost every year since. The Queen has today sent her best wishes to all those associated with the RHS: ‘My family and I have always enjoyed visiting the Show, and I know that your Members and Supporters will be disappointed that they are unable to attend in person this year. . ‘I am sure that my grandmother, Queen Mary, who first attended the Chelsea Flower Show in 1916, would be delighted that many people today have an enthusiasm for horticulture, and that gardening remains a popular pastime in the United Kingdom.’ . #RHSChelsea #VirtualChelsea #ChelseaFlowerShow Images: ©️ @the_rhs Lindley Library</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/theroyalfamily/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> The Royal Family</a> (@theroyalfamily) on May 18, 2020 at 3:32am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I am sure that my grandmother, Queen Mary, who first attended the Chelsea Flower Show in 1916, would be delighted that many people today have an enthusiasm for horticulture, and that gardening remains a popular pastime in the United Kingdom,” she said.</p>

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Outrage over neighbour’s “unfair” letter to family working from home

<p>A mother in Victoria has vented her frustrations after receiving an anonymous note from her neighbours complaining about the noise that her children make in the backyard.</p> <p>The woman shared the note in a private Facebook group, which led to hundreds of people saying that the letter was “passive aggressive” and “unfair”.</p> <p>“As if life isn’t hard enough at the moment with work and home schooling,” the mother wrote.</p> <p>“But now I can’t let my kids in the back yard because they will make noise.”</p> <p>The letter was addressed to “residents at this address” and was signed by “your neighbours”.</p> <p>“Due to the current climate of COVID-19, I and a few other family members have been working from home,” the note reads.</p> <p>“This involves multiple phone calls, Zoom meetings and corresponding with colleagues in the day.”</p> <p>“We (myself and other neighbours) have found it difficult to be able to conduct our workday as per usual, due to the screaming and noise that your children make in the yard throughout the course of the day,” the letter said.</p> <p>“I know that it is great for children to be outside, and we praise you for the time that yours do spend outside, but it is extremely difficult when my colleagues on the other side of the screen are asking me to mute my microphone as they can hear your children in the background.</p> <p>“There is no need for the screaming to be so loud.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835767/note-from-neighbours.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9791766bcce542db820f4c26bf71ae2a" /></p> <p>The mother quickly clarified in the post that her children get 15 minutes outside for recess and half a hour for lunch when they learn from home.</p> <p>The letter asks if the noise can be avoided between the hours of nine to five so that the neighbours can “continue to be productive”.</p> <p>“We are all living together in this space and it is best if it works for all of us.”</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Not many people were sympathetic to the neighbours who wrote the letter.</p> <p>“Our kids can’t be held prisoners in their own homes more than they already are,” one woman said, pointing out the sun has usually set by 5 pm and most kids aren’t out of bed by 9am.</p> <p>“That is very unfair of them!” another person wrote.</p> <p>“If they are asking you to understand their current situation, then they should understand yours! I'd write back telling them to refrain from having conferences during recess and lunch time.”</p> <p>One woman wrote: “Full passive aggressive bulls**t excuse for communication”.</p> <p>“So sorry you’ve had to deal with this. Regardless of what you do, it must be so uncomfortable knowing that there is someone out there who would write this.”</p> <p>One woman explained that she was in a similar situation to the neighbours who wrote the note, saying that she can hear children “houses away” screaming.</p> <p>“Sorry, but it’s annoying,” she said.</p> <p>“I agree, it’s great that kids are outside, and I understand noise, but screaming continually is just not necessary.”</p> <p>Another woman added: “You can let you kids in the backyard, just teach them some common courtesy and keep the noise down”.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/mum-outraged-by-complaint-letter-from-neighbours-042500619.html" target="_blank">Yahoo! News</a>  </em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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Doctor evicted from home over coronavirus fears

<p>An Australian doctor has been evicted from her sharehouse after she refused to stop working.</p> <p>Hannah*, a doctor specialising in anaesthesiology, was working a 10-hour shift at a hospital near Brisbane when her landlord sent her a text message asking to talk about “isolating the house”.</p> <p>When she called her landlord after the shift, she was told she had to either stop working or move out.</p> <p>“He essentially said I could either stop working or I had to move out as soon as possible,” Hannah told the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-22/coronavirus-fears-doctor-evicted-during-crisis/12162880">ABC</a></em>.</p> <p>“He felt that I was at high risk of being exposed and thus bringing COVID-19 back to the house, I suppose.”</p> <p>One of the text messages from the landlord read: “If you opt to stop work and isolate with the girls there is no need to move…”</p> <p>The landlord’s announcement came a day after Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a six-month <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-01/coronavirus-eviction-moratorium-in-australia-what-does-it-mean/12105188">freeze on evictions</a>.</p> <p>Hannah said she was at the time helping out at the intensive care unit with one patient had COVID-19, but she did not have direct contact with the patient.</p> <p>“We are helping to provide a service through the COVID-19 crisis. So, I don’t think it’s fair to stop me helping with the delivery of that service because of his desire to protect the house,” she said.</p> <p>“It doesn’t seem that he quite made the connection that if he came in with a serious infection, it’d be people like me at work who would be looking after him and making sure that he got through that.”</p> <p>When Hannah told her landlord she was considered an essential worker and could not find a new residence due to having to work overtime, he said he was “very understanding” but maintained that he needed the house “isolated”.</p> <p>The landlord said she should cook, shower and brush her teeth at work and remain only in her room when at home. He also offered to help her look for a new place and asked if the hospital could provide her with accommodation during the pandemic.</p> <p>Hannah went on to contact a property lawyer who drafted a letter informing the landlord of the Prime Minister’s eviction moratorium, which was met with “a lot of anger”.</p> <p>Hannah said the landlord’s daughter, who was also her housemate, told her she was not wanted at the house.</p> <p>“She said, ‘stay if you want, but I’ll make sure it’s not pleasant for you’.”</p> <p>Hannah left the residence two days after the first text. She stayed at a motel which her hospital put up for one night and moved to her colleague’s accommodation the next day.</p> <p>According to the Residential Tenancies Authority, property owners and managers who are not “significantly impacted” by COVID-19 should continue to honour their responsibilities under the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.</p>

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The easiest foods to grow at home during quarantine

<p><strong>First, don't panic. There's no shortage of food</strong></p> <p>As alarming as it has been to see bare shelves in the supermarket, food producers and reports confirm there's plenty of food to go around. Unfortunately, news of the coronavirus has scared us into panic-buying and hoarding. Sometimes we can't find the basic foods we want, such as pantry staples like flour and rice. Then again, some of us are avoiding going into the stores at all, unsure how to protect ourselves from this invisible enemy. All this has led to a bump in buying seeds and plants and searching for gardening tips online, so we can grow our own foods at home. The good news is that many fruits and veggies are easy to grow, even for beginners, and they'll thrive whether you're gardening in a backyard plot or in containers on your patio, porch or apartment balcony.</p> <p><strong>Grow beans in a snap</strong></p> <p>You might be surprised to know you don’t need a big garden to grow green beans. Bush beans are space-savers, but you can also grow beans vertically, by choosing pole varieties and training their vines onto a trellis, fence, or other support. Full sun, regular waterings and moderately rich soil will pay off in a plentiful harvest, and beans don’t need much fertiliser, although they’ll benefit from a side-dressing of compost in mid-season if you didn’t work a lot of compost into the soil before you planted. Check your seed packet to know approximately when your variety will be ready to harvest, and keep the plants picked so they’ll keep producing. Freeze your green beans to enjoy them all year long.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-how-to-grow/how-to-grow-runner-beans" target="_blank">Find out more about how to grow runner beans. </a></p> <p><strong>Raise crunchy radishes</strong></p> <p>Many gardeners love fresh radishes for that crunch that you get when you bite into them – but these simple root veggies are good for more than eating. Because the seeds sprout quickly – often within a week – you can use them in the garden to mark the rows of other crops that don’t come up as fast. Simply sow the seeds outdoors about 1-2cm deep as the temperature cools. Wait ten days and plant again for a continuous crop. They’ll thrive in a sunny spot that has loose soil amended with organic matter. Thin the seedlings to 5cm apart, so their roots won’t be crowded, and keep the plants evenly moist. Some varieties are ready to harvest just three weeks after planting.</p> <p><strong>Cultivate cucumbers</strong></p> <p>Like zucchini, cucumbers are prolific and easy to grow. Just give them a spot with moist, fertile soil and lots of sunshine. Start the seeds a couple of centimetres deep into the ground. They’ll sprout in a few days. Keep them happy with regular waterings and, if you didn’t work a lot of organic matter into the soil before you planted, side-dress them with a balanced, soluble fertiliser when the fruits set. The cucumbers are ready to harvest when they’re still small and the skins are tender. To keep a steady supply for the table, make successive plantings. If you’re short on space, train vining cucumber varieties onto a support like a fence or trellis, or plant a bush variety in a container or raised bed. Use your cukes in salsas, salads, gazpacho and smoothies or turn them into pickles.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-how-to-grow/how-to-grow-cucumbers" target="_blank">Learn more about growing cucumbers. </a></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><strong>Crack out some capsicum</strong></div> <p>Capsicums thrive in sunny climes, so make sure they have a warm, sunny spot not prone to wind or frost. They can also be grown in pots. Capsicums like a deep, warm, well draining soil, mulch and room to breathe, so leave about 50–60cm between your capsicums when planting out. Prepare the soil a month before planting by throwing in some fertiliser, then mulch.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-how-to-grow/how-to-grow-capsicums-chillies" target="_blank">Discover more about growing capsicums and chillies.</a></p> <p><strong>Plant tasty tomatoes</strong></p> <p>The hardest thing about growing tomatoes might be choosing your favourite kind. There are cherry tomatoes, grape tomatoes, heirlooms with rich flavours, Romas for stews, pasta and sauces, and hearty beefsteaks. Gardeners in cool regions may want to start with transplants to save time over growing tomatoes from seeds. The plants need full sun and soil that drains easily. For best results, your soil should contain lots of compost and be slightly acidic, with a pH of 6.2 to 6.8. As the plants grow, apply a fertiliser recommended for tomatoes as directed on the label. This raised garden bed with an automatic watering system makes it easy to grow compact or patio-type tomatoes, even in a small space.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-how-to-grow/how-to-grow-tomatoes" target="_blank">Here’s more great advice on growing tomatoes. </a></p> <p><strong>Sow lettuce for salads</strong></p> <div id="page8" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Lettuces are great for beginning gardeners. They grow fast, take full sun but tolerate some shade, and can be tucked between other fruits and veggies or into containers. They’re also available in lots of tasty, colourful varieties. If you don’t have an ideal garden spot – for example, your soil contains a lot of clay or rocks – use a raised bed instead. Add good quality planting soil, you won’t have to dig. The loose soil will also make it easy to pluck any weeds that pop up. Sow your lettuce seeds in early autumn or spring and keep the plants watered regularly. Lettuce started in spring will last until the summer heat arrives and autumn-sown lettuce will grow until a killing frost. Harvest the outermost leaves first but don’t pull up the plants, so they can keep producing.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardeing-tips/7-fertilizers-for-your-garden" target="_blank">Discover 7 surprising fertilisers for your garden. </a></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><strong>Set out onions</strong></div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page9" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Make a little hole in the ground, tuck in a bare-root onion seedling, and stand back. In two or three weeks, the small plants will be ready to pull and use as green onions, or you can wait until the bulbs are bigger and then harvest them. Mature onions will let you know they’re ready when their tops turn yellow and bend over. Just brush off the soil and put the onions, with the tops still attached, in a warm, dry, well-ventilated place to cure for a week to 10 days. Then remove the top foliage and roots and store the onions in a cool, airy place until you’re ready to use them. Slice and fry them for onion rings, chop them for salsas and salads, or grill, roast or pickle them. Chopped or sliced onions can be refrigerated in sealed containers for seven to 10 days.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><strong>Fill a windowsill with herbs</strong></div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="tg-container categorySection detailSection"> <div id="primary" class="contentAreaLeft"> <div id="page10" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>During a quarantine, a herb garden makes a thoughtful gift for a housebound friend or a fun and easy growing project you can enjoy without leaving home. Although the types of herbs you’ll want to include may vary, good choices include basil to make into pesto, mint to steep for tea or dill to add flavour to homemade pickles. So many herbs are easy to grow, you may not want to stop.</p> <p><strong>Plant prolific zucchinis</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Zucchinis have a reputation for being so easy to grow, and so prolific, gardeners joke about having to leave their extras on a neighbour’s doorstep, ring the bell, and run away. Just one plant can yield 2.5-4.5kg of zucchinis in a single growing season. Plant their seeds directly in your garden or a large container. They need full sun and moist, easily-draining soil amended with compost. Give them a couple of centimetres of water each week, if there’s no rain, and harvest when the fruits are small (botanically speaking, zucchinis are fruits) and the skins are tender. You can freeze zucchinis or bake them into breads, slice them into strips for pasta, grate them for fritters or chop them into vegetable chillis. They’re also delicious when you know how to roast vegetables until they’re crispy and caramelised.</p> <p><strong>Grow a bagful of potatoes</strong></p> <div id="page1" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Humble, nutritious potatoes are a great choice for beginning gardeners, especially when you use good potting soil and compost. Start with seed potatoes that haven’t been treated to resist sprouting. Cut them into chunks with two eyes per chunk and let them dry overnight before planting them. Then give them full sun and regular water. Add more soil to the bag when the plants are about 8 inches tall, leaving the top set of leaves uncovered. Add more soil when the plants grow another 8 inches tall and repeat this process until the bag is full. When the foliage turns yellow, stop watering and wait about a week before you dig up the potatoes with your gloved hands. Many grow bags are reusable and available in different sizes.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardeningtips/16-ways-to-kill-garden-weeds" target="_blank">Here are 16 ways to kill garden weeds. </a></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><strong>Plant a bushel of peas</strong></div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page2" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>There are lots of delightful types of peas. Choose disease-resistant varieties, and you won’t need to do much more than plant them, water regularly and harvest them. Sow the peas in wide rows, covering them with an inch of soil and planting 5cm deep. Peas grow well during the cooler months but the flowers can be damaged by frost so, in very cold areas, wait until spring to sow. They don’t usually need fertiliser, but they do need a deep, weekly watering if rain is scarce. For best results, grow your peas, including dwarf varieties, on a trellis or other support. Read your seed packet to know when to harvest, and pick often, so the plants will keep producing. Fresh peas have the best taste, but you can freeze or dry them to use later.</p> <p><strong>Grow chillies for fiery flavour</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page3" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>You’ve heard that variety is the spice of life – well, so are jalapenos, habaneros and other spicy chillies. The seeds can be sown from August to December in temperate areas and from September to mid-November only in cold climates. They are also available as seedlings. Sow seeds 6mm deep in punnets, gently pricking out the seedlings and transferring them to 100mm pots, giving them a sunny position. Plant them in the garden in a sheltered spot in full sun when they are 150mm high. The soil should be free-draining and enriched with either compost, aged cow manure or Yates Dynamic Lifter before planting.</p> <p>Use scissors to snip off your chillies when they’re the size you want. Chillies don’t just add heat and flavour to your foods. They also contain capsaicin, which is thought to act as an antioxidant to help fight infection and prevent some types of heart disease.</p> <p><em>Source:<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rd.com/home/gardening/easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home/" target="_blank">RD.com</a></em></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine"><em>Written by <span>Lynn Coulter</span>. This article first appeared in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/food-home-garden/gardening-how-to-grow/the-easiest-foods-to-grow-at-home-during-quarantine" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>.</em></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Police remind residents to wear pants when getting the mail

<p>A US police department has reminded local residents to put on their pants when they go outside.</p> <p>The Taneytown Police Department, which serves about 7,200 citizens in the Maryland town, advised people who are obeying the stay-at-home order to wear their pants when they check their mailbox.</p> <p>“Please remember to put pants on before leaving the house to check your mailbox,” the department said in a Facebook post on Wednesday. “You know who you are. This is your final warning.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FTaneytownPolice%2Fposts%2F2355019031463367&amp;width=500" width="500" height="173" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>The post has since gone viral with more than 800 comments and 5,300 shares. Many responded with gif images with the caption “Life’s too short for pants”, while one commented that wearing underwear outside may not necessarily be in breach of the <a href="https://statelaws.findlaw.com/maryland-law/maryland-indecent-exposure-laws.html">law</a> on indecent exposure.</p> <p>In Australia, people have been getting creative with their looks on bin day as they dress up to take the rubbish out.</p> <p>Aussies have taken to the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/306002627033697">Bin Isolation Outing Facebook group</a> and other social media sites to share pictures of their outfits on their walk out, including graduation gowns, character costumes, animal onesies and more.</p> <p>“So basically the bin goes out more than us SO let’s dress up for the occasion!” the group wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-_K6tnhl8J/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-_K6tnhl8J/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Laura (@laurakeet101)</a> on Apr 14, 2020 at 8:50pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote>

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“It works!”: Mum reveals genius hack to save toilet paper during pandemic times

<p>An Aussie mum has shared her latest hack that makes toilet paper last longer.</p> <p>She shared the hack on the<span> </span>Mums Who Budget &amp; Save<span> </span>Facebook page, the mum explained that she squashes the toilet paper roll down before placing it on the holder.</p> <p>This hack means that the toilet paper can’t spin easily on the holder, meaning her kids use less toilet paper with each trip to the loo.</p> <p>“Kids home from school?,” the mum wrote.</p> <p>“Going through toilet paper faster than usual?</p> <p>“Try squashing the roll - so it doesn’t spin so quickly and then not as much will be pulled off.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835581/toilet-paper-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a647a15db7834275bab8756cf6c8c96a" /></p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p><em>Photo credit: New Idea Food</em></p> <p>Others described it as a game-changer and the hack has thrilled other mums.</p> <p>“Mind blowing!,” one mum said.</p> <p>“I’m definitely trying this - for me!”</p> <p>“Will be doing this for hubby,” another shared, adding: “I hear that toilet roll holder spin &amp; I just cringe!”</p> <p>“My kids would just pull it until it stops.”</p> <p>“How can something so simple be so genius,” a third person said.</p> <p>Others shared their hacks, including measuring a line that was three or four squares long.</p> <p>“Draw a line three or four squares down,” she advised. “Easy measurement for all.”</p> <p>One mum said that removing the roll all together is an easy fix.</p> <p>“[This is the same as] me putting the toilet paper out of my kids reach so he has to yell out to me to ration out to him,” she wrote.</p> <p>“We don’t put it on the roll as kids use a lot less when it not on,” another agreed.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Russell Crowe's figgy gift for Bindi Irwin: "You’ll always be part of our family”

<p>Bindi Irwin and Chandler Powell surprised the world by getting married in an intimate ceremony at Australia Zoo before the lockdowns came into place in Australia.</p> <p>Russel Crowe, long-time friend of the Irwins, thoughtfully gifted the newlyweds a fig tree as a wedding present.</p> <p>As the coronavirus pandemic continues around the world, the pair decided to celebrate Crowe’s 56th birthday in a sweet way by hugging the tree that Crowe gifted them.</p> <p>“Happy birthday Russell. You'll always be part of our family,” Bindi, 21, wrote on Tuesday.</p> <p>She added: “Even though we can't see you right now, we're giving the beautiful fig you gifted us a hug and thinking of you. Hope your day is extraordinary!”</p> <p>Bindi then shared a second photo of the sweet gift tag attached to the Port Jackson fig tree.</p> <p>“Presented to Bindi and Chandler to commemorate their wedding.  Love from Russell Crowe and family,” it read.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-qt4W7BRyb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-qt4W7BRyb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">‪Happy Birthday, @russellcrowe 💙‬ ‪You’ll always be part of our family. Even though we can’t see you right now, we’re giving the beautiful fig you gifted us a hug and thinking of you.‬ ‪Hope your day is extraordinary.‬</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bindisueirwin/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Bindi Irwin</a> (@bindisueirwin) on Apr 6, 2020 at 10:11pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Fans were quick to praise Crowe’s unique wedding gift to the newlyweds.</p> <p>“What an Amazingly thoughtful gift. The gift that keeps giving. Anniversary after anniversary. I’d take pictures of that tree it’s kinda symbolic it changes as it grows as will your marriage,” one fan wrote.</p> <p>The newlyweds tied the knot in front of only three people at the zoo, with Bindi’s mother Terri, brother Robert and Steve’s best friend Wes Mannion in attendance.</p>

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Here’s how often you should actually be changing your sheets

<p>Whether you wash your sheets once a week or wait to do a sniff test, you’ve most likely wondered how often you should be changing your bed sheets at the moment. Like many things in life, the answer isn’t so black and white, but we’re here to answer it for you in these unprecedented times. </p> <p>To increase your protection against the new coronavirus, the US Centres for Disease Control (CDC) recommends daily cleaning and disinfecting of “high-touch areas”. That includes doorknobs, light switches, tables, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, sinks, and chairs – but what about your bed sheets?</p> <p><strong>Why do we need to change our sheets?</strong></p> <p>“There are a lot of things that can get in your sheets,” says Dr. Robb Akridge, Co-Founder of Clarisonic and Skin Expert, PhD in Microbiology specialising in Immunology and Infectious Diseases. “First, you need to understand that everyone has tiny mites all over their bodies and these mites feed off dead skin. (You can’t see them, but they are there.) For our skin to be healthy, we need these mites on the body. When these mites — commonly known as dust mites — excrete feces, it is the fecal matter that then causes irritation, inflammation and other allergy responses. When we shower, we wash off the feces, which is often why we can minimise irritation. When you sleep, you often shed skin and mites into your sheets, and remember, dead skin is food for these dust mites which are transferred from your skin to the sheets. If you don’t change your sheets, you create a breeding ground of mites (and they breed very rapidly), and the more mites, the more feces. The more feces, the more likely you will have irritation, especially if you are more sensitive to this.”</p> <p>But that’s not all, as you could also have fungi growing within your sheets. “For example, if you have athlete’s foot, the fungi can live in your sheets and can be passed on to someone who you are sharing a bed with,” Akridge says.</p> <p><strong>What type of sheets are best?</strong></p> <p>“It is important to use sheets that are breathable,” Akridge says. “Cotton is really the best. Also, if you have any skin infections, acne or mite allergies, you should stick to white cotton sheets. That way you can clean them with super-hot water and bleach. You obviously cannot use bleach if your sheets are coloured, so this is something to consider when purchasing. Bleach and extremely hot water will help to get rid of the mites and kill microbes in the sheets.” To deal with dust mites, you need to use water that is at least 55 degrees Celcius and the highest heat setting on your dryer.</p> <p>Get yourself a mattress cover if you don’t already have one. They are designed to keep your mattress safe from mites and prevent their feces from going into the mattress. “You can get an allergy mattress cover and allergy pillowcase covers,” Akridge says. “Your mattress and pillows have ample area for dust mites to expand and multiply, and therefore, over the years, if you don’t have a protective cover, it can easily become the source of irritation and other allergy-related symptoms.”</p> <p><strong>What if my pet sleeps in my bed with me?</strong></p> <p>Then you need to make sure you’re washing your sheets more often. “We see lots of skin rashes and conditions due to pets,” says Board Certified dermatologist Dr Dhaval G. Bhanusali.  “It’s better to do at least once or twice a week to minimise the chance of negative effects.”</p> <p><strong>So how often do you need to change your sheets?</strong></p> <p>Many sources suggest changing your bedsheets weekly even under normal circumstances, and the CDC has not made any specific recommendations about doing it more frequently due to the new coronavirus. However, paying attention to bedding is important because germs can collect there. So, if it soothes you to change your sheets more frequently, go right ahead.</p> <p>“Overall, the amount of times you change your sheets really depends on your lifestyle, personal habits and living conditions,” Akridge says. “For example, if you are active or if you are someone who perspires a lot when you are sleeping, then you should change your sheets at least once a week. Also, if you have acne, then you may want to change your sheets more often.” To be on the safe side, aim to wash your sheets once a week, but try not to stretch it past two weeks.</p>

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"Think before you lash out": Bunnings worker breaks down over cruel customers

<p>An overworked and exhausted Bunnings worker broke down in tears on air while describing the abuse and entitlement caused by customers during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p>The employee, only identified as Luke, spoke with GOLD104.3’s<span> </span><em>Breakfast Show</em><span> </span>host Christian O’Connell and begged for customers to be respectful.</p> <p>“I work at Bunnings and the amount of disrespectful, impatient people coming through is disgusting. We are run off our feet, we are trying our best – understand that everyone, and for those that are giving us respect and are being patient we can’t thank you enough,” he said before being overcome with emotion.</p> <p>“It’s a struggle … we are trying, we are definitely trying 100 per cent … trying not to have a breakdown is impossible. Woolworths, Coles any retail worker, we are doing our best.”</p> <p>O’Connell asked how Luke and his team are getting through the challenging period.</p> <p>“We just lean on each other at work, we just get together and support each other,” Luke replied.</p> <p>“I don’t know how people can go home and feel good about themselves making others feel like rubbish and sending them home in tears or making me feel as little as anything.</p> <p>“I understand people are losing their jobs but there’s no excuse to come in and be rude or think you’re the one that should be served first. There are lines, there is self-distancing put in place, and you’ve got people that won’t respect that. And if you’re not going to respect it, then we won’t serve you.”</p> <p>Luke said he hoped his call would prompt people to “think about their actions before they lash at someone”.</p> <p>O’Connell then thanked him and other “frontline” workers for their “bravery and courage”.</p>

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Malibu royal abode? Prince Harry and Meghan Markle scoping out $7 million mansion

<p>Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are reportedly scoping out a gorgeous Malibu mansion that is available for $7 million.</p> <p>The couple will end all official royal duties on March 31 and in the meantime are checking out where they will be living next after Megxit is all said and done.</p> <p>The Sussexes are due to split their time between the UK and the US, and during their six-week Christmas holiday, they spent it at a waterside mansion on Vancouver Island.</p> <p>Reports made by the<em><span> </span>Daily Mail</em><span> </span>say the couple are looking to be closer to Meghan’s mother Doria Ragland, as well as Silicon Valley and Hollywood.</p> <p>The gorgeous home they may be considering is one once owned by<span> </span><em>Baywatch</em><span> </span>star David Charvet and his wife Brooke Burke. Altogether the glorious mansion boasts an incredible eight bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, a cosy home cinema and a stylish wine cellar.</p> <p>Along with a view that goes on and on is a chic and meticulously manicured garden, as well as a pool and tennis court.</p> <p>The pad will provide plenty of room for Prince Harry, his wife and their son, Archie who turns one in May, as the home sits on 1.75 acres of land and 12,249 feet of gorgeous living space.</p> <p>Caitlyn Jenner, who starred alongside her former wife, Kris Jenner and their six children, in<span> </span><em>Keeping Up With The Kardashians, </em>was the first to reveal the Sussex couple were looking for a home in Malibu.</p> <p>When asked what she thought about the pair, she said: “I can't predict as I've tried to raise our royal family in the US. It was probably very difficult for Meghan, coming into the Royal Family.</p> <p>“It was a big shock to her, she's probably had enough. Good for them, we'll see how it goes. I heard they were looking for a house in Malibu. It must have been tough. Everyone deserves to be happy.”</p> <p>The 70-year-old added it would have been “very difficult” for Meghan to adjust to her royal lifestyle.</p> <p>The house in question would be just 30 miles away from her Meghan's Doria, 63, in the Windsor Hills.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the Malibu mansion.</p>

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Inside Princess Mary’s secret Swiss chalet listed on Airbnb

<p>Pictures of the “secret” Swiss home belonging to Australian-born Princess Mary and husband Prince Frederik have emerged after it was revealed the couple had rented it out to travellers in the past.</p> <p>According to<em> <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/world/princess-mary-in-airbnb-scandal-over-sky-chalet/news-story/09c4aa604c005cc91758a335f8818994" target="_blank">Herald Sun</a></em>, the Danish royals are said to have let the luxe ski chalet in Verbier, Switzerland for $14,000 a week (65,400 Kroner) on Airbnb.</p> <p>The spacious wooden lodge, which features a lux sauna, three bathrooms and a room for up to 10 guests, has been in possession of the Tasmanian royal and her hubby for over a decade.</p> <p>It was recently discovered that the property was rented out on Airbnb, which disrupted the blissful bubble their supporters living in Denmark had been in, as reported by<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://royalcentral.co.uk/europe/denmark/denmarks-crown-prince-couple-cancels-further-hidden-income-from-private-ski-lodge-136554/" target="_blank">Royal Central</a>.</em></p> <p>“I was very surprised when I found out that the family does not just have such a house, they have had such a house for 10 years, without any ordinary Danes knowing about it,” parliamentarian Mai Villadsen said.</p> <p>“We are the ones who pay the money so we must know about the house,” she added.</p> <p>The Danish royals live on a public allowance and are not allowed to spend money on foreign assets - such as a Swiss ski chalet - without approval.</p> <p>Conservative member of parliament Birgitte Bergman, shared a different opinion to Ms Villadsen, saying she didn’t see “anything wrong” with the pair owning the home.</p> <p>Following the backlash, the Royal Court released an official statement stating the couple had both dipped into their own funds to purchase the property but would no longer accept revenue by renting it out.</p> <p>“Now it is no longer an anonymous property, so the conditions for rent are no longer the same,” the family’s communications manager said.</p> <p>“In addition, for the Crown Prince Couple, this makes a difference compared to the possibility of having some privacy. In addition to that, there is also a safety aspect.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the "secret" Swiss chalet. </p>

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4 ways green living can make you healthier

<p>We all know we should be good to the environment, but the benefits sometimes don’t seem like enough of a draw when being green is inconvenient. But here’s the thing: Green living is clean living, and every step you take to be kind to the environment pays you back in health benefits. Read on to find out how being good to Mother Earth is good for your mind, body, and soul.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/thought-provokinginspirational/13-ways-green-living-can-make-you-healthier"><strong>1. Eating less red meat could lengthen your life</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/thought-provokinginspirational/13-ways-green-living-can-make-you-healthier"> <p>A study of more than 120,000 men and women found that the more red and processed meats they ate, the more likely they were to die of any cause, including cancer and heart disease. Subbing beef out for poultry or plant-based protein can help you avoid risks like diabetes and stroke, but it’s also doing your part to reduce greenhouse gases. Cattle use more grains and produce more methane than chickens or pigs, and some experts say that giving up beef would be even better for the Earth than giving up your car.</p> </div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/thought-provokinginspirational/13-ways-green-living-can-make-you-healthier"> <p><strong>2. A reusable water bottle could keep your body functioning normally</strong></p> <p>Humans worldwide create 359 million metric tons of plastic every year, yet only about nine percent of plastic waste has been recycled, according to a study published in the journal<span> </span><a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2017/07/plastic-produced-recycling-waste-ocean-trash-debris-environment/">Science Advances</a>. Switching to a reusable water bottle will keep that plastic out of landfills (or cut energy that would normally go toward recycling it), but it can also keep your hormones functioning in the way they should. You might have already heard that bisphenol A (BPA) might disrupt oestrogen, but even though manufacturers are shying away from the chemical, some evidence suggests that one of its substitutes, fluorene-9-bisphenol (BHPF) can block hormones too.</p> <p><strong>3. Local produce could mean more nutrients</strong></p> <div id="page6" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>You’ve heard all about the perks of buying local – you support small businesses and get food that’s as fresh-from-the-farm as it can be. But is there anything really in it for you except a sense of well-being for doing farmers a favour? You bet! The produce in your supermarkets probably spent days in transit before finally reaching your local grocer, and even then it’s spent a few days on the shelves before you take it home – and all the while it’s been losing nutrients. By picking it up from your farmer’s market, though, it can spend less time just reaching its destination, so it’s still in peak ripeness by the time you buy.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/thought-provokinginspirational/13-ways-green-living-can-make-you-healthier"><strong>4. Growing a garden gives you tasty, eco-friendly food</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/thought-provokinginspirational/13-ways-green-living-can-make-you-healthier"> <p>If you make space for a garden in your yard, the environment will thank you. A garden provides space where native plants can attract bees – and considering about 35 percent of crops rely on pollinators like bees to help them thrive, helping bees thrive is a big environmental concern – and where you can grow your own produce. Anything that only needs to travel as far as your backyard to your table is using fewer fossil fuels than anything that had to go from a mass-production farm to a supermarket (and then your table). And if those tasty, fresh veggies weren’t enough of a pull, gardening itself torches about 840 to 1770 kilojoules an hour.</p> <div id="page14" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p><em>Source:<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rd.com/health/wellness/green-living-can-make-you-healthier/" target="_blank">RD.com</a></em></p> <p><em>Written by Marissa Laliberte. This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/thought-provokinginspirational/13-ways-green-living-can-make-you-healthier"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/thought-provokinginspirational/13-ways-green-living-can-make-you-healthier"></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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6 things you didn't know you could compost

<p>As more people aim to lessen their carbon footprint, there’s been a quest to learn about all the things you can upcycle, recycle and compost. And you may be surprised to learn some of the things you can add to your compost bin.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/10-things-you-didnt-know-you-could-compost"><strong>1. Natural-fibre clothes</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/10-things-you-didnt-know-you-could-compost"> <p>If you have natural-fibre clothing – pure wool, cotton, silk, or linen – that is too old or damaged to donate, then cut it up in chunks so it breaks down faster and add it to your compost pile! If you do compost clothes, be sure that there are no synthetic threads, plastic buttons, metal zippers, or stains from motor oil, paint, wood stain and other non-compostable substances.</p> <p><strong>2. Wine corks</strong></p> <p>The next time you’re recycling your wine bottles, throw their corks into the compost pile. Corks are a natural product, and although some wineries are now using plastic corks that look a lot like the real thing, remember that you can compost the wine stoppers if they are made of natural cork.</p> <p><strong>3. Fur, hair and nail clippings</strong></p> <p>If you have a pet pup or cat that sheds more than you like, hopefully you can find at least some solace in the fact that you can compost their fur! You can also clean out your and your family’s hair brushes and add all nail clippings to the compost heap. It may be a little gross but your compost will be happy about it.</p> <p><strong>4. Vacuum bag contents</strong></p> <div id="page9" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Typically, the stuff your vacuum picks up is composed of compostable materials: dust, hair, dirt, etc. In some cases, even the vacuum bag itself can be composted if it’s made from natural products (be sure to check the bag to see what it’s made of). If you have a bagless vacuum, the contents of the dirt collection cup can be dumped directly into your compost pile. So, unless you’re vacuuming up after a glittery birthday party, your vacuum dirt should be okay to compost.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/10-things-you-didnt-know-you-could-compost"><strong>5. Used loofahs and sponges</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/10-things-you-didnt-know-you-could-compost"> <p>If you’re using a natural loofah, then remember that you can tear that thing up and compost it the next time you’re ready to replace it. If you’re currently using synthetic sponges, consider making the switch to a natural one. Man-made sponges can carry germs and add a ton of waste to the environment if you’re going through them regularly.</p> <p><strong>6. Cotton swabs and balls</strong></p> <div id="page10" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Consider adding a tiny compost rubbish bin to your bathroom so you can collect all the compostable bathroom garbage. As long as the cotton swabs you’re using are plastic-free, you can add those to the bin along with cotton balls and toilet paper rolls. Just be sure that the dental floss doesn’t get in there.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/10-things-you-didnt-know-you-could-compost"> <div id="page11" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p><em>Source:<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rd.com/home/cleaning-organizing/things-didnt-know-could-compost/" target="_blank">RD.com</a></em></p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/10-things-you-didnt-know-you-could-compost"> <p><em>Written by Hannah Louise. This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/10-things-you-didnt-know-you-could-compost"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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