Retirement Life

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Have you seen this pic before? Royal family shares sweet throwback snap of Queen Elizabeth and Princess Anne

<p>To celebrate the 69th birthday of Princess Anne, the Royal Family have shared a heartwarming throwback snap of the Princess Royal posing with her mother, Queen Elizabeth. </p> <p>The picture was taken by Annie Leibovitz in 2016 and appears to have been a snap from the monarch’s 90th birthday shoot. </p> <p>"Happy Birthday to The Princess Royal!" the Royal Family posted to social media. </p> <p>"The Princess Royal, the second child of Her Majesty The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, was born at Clarence House on this day in 1950," they added. </p> <p>Reports believe the Princess is spending her birthday alongside her mother and other family members, who may be in Balmoral with the Queen. </p> <p>Younger brother, Prince Andrew also took to social media to wish his big sister a merry birthday - along with a sweet snap of them as children. </p> <p>"Wishing Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal a very Happy Birthday!" he wrote with the Instagram post.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1LjGleJ1Fa/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1LjGleJ1Fa/" target="_blank">Wishing Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal a very Happy Birthday! #happybirthdayhrh</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/hrhthedukeofyork/" target="_blank"> The Duke of York</a> (@hrhthedukeofyork) on Aug 15, 2019 at 2:58am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Princess Anne’s two children, Peter Phillips and Zara Tindall are not on social media, so royal fans were not treated to a gushing tribute for their mother. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Princess Anne and Queen Elizabeth throughout the years.</p>

Retirement Life

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How to overcome 3 common barriers to mature age employment

<p><span><a href="https://www.smh.com.au/money/super-and-retirement/welcome-to-the-minefield-that-is-21st-century-retirement-20190409-p51c98.html">Retirement isn’t for everyone</a>. Growing numbers of Australians have consciously decided to <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/australians-delaying-age-of-retirement-working-longer/news-story/3fa00e382d5dc98a804a99536535505e">continue working</a>, although they are old enough to retire Some realise they are <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/business/workplace/too-poor-to-retire-more-australians-than-ever-will-work-past-70-20160408-go1ubf.html">too poor to retire</a>. Some have retired, but have become bored with the retired lifestyle. They’ve decided to come out of retirement and return to work.</span></p> <p><span>Some seniors are facing obstacles to continued employment after retirement age, despite the fact that experts have documented how older workers could significantly <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/retirement-income/older-workforce-could-boost-australia-economy/">boost Australia’s economy</a>. Common <a href="https://nationalseniors.com.au/uploads/201208_PACReport_Research_BarriersMatureAgeEmployment_Full_1.pdf">barriers to mature age employment</a> include the following:</span></p> <ul> <li><span> </span><span>Illness, Injury and Disability</span></li> <li><span> </span><span>Outdated Skills</span></li> <li><span> </span><span>Age Discrimination</span></li> </ul> <p><span>Let’s discuss solutions for these common problems senior Australians face as they seek to remain in the workforce.</span></p> <p><strong><span>How to prevent a disability that could keep you from working</span></strong></p> <p><span><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/body/back-pain-explained/">Lower back pain</a> is one of the most prominent <a href="https://www.woombyechiro.com.au/single-post/2017/05/18/Lower-Back-Pain---top-causes-of-Disability">causes of disability</a> in Australia. According to <a href="https://physioworks.com.au/Injuries-Conditions/Regions/lower_back_pain">J. Miller and Z. Russell at Physioworks</a>, lower back pain is one of the most frequent reasons Australians miss work or seek a doctor’s care.  So educating yourself about how to prevent lower back injuries is one step you can take to empower yourself to remain in the workforce longer. </span></p> <p><span>We’ve posted a helpful list of things you can do to <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/body/beat-lower-back-pain/">prevent lower back pain</a>. Familiarizing yourself with the items on this list, and implementing these suggestions, could help you to prevent serious lower back injury.</span></p> <p><span>Researchers have determined that people who stick to a regular exercise programme endure less back pain. In general, regular exercise is an important key to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12424867">preventing and treating</a> a broad variety of injuries and disabilities. If your goal is to continue working past retirement age, it is essential for you to implement and adhere to an <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/the-exercises-you-need-to-do-to-stay-fit-over-60">exercise programme</a> that includes aerobic activity, strength training, and balance building exercises. </span></p> <p><span>If you’ve previously been sedentary, it’s wise to speak with your GP about this. Your GP is well equipped to advise you on how to incorporate a selection of proper exercises into your daily routine.</span></p> <p><strong><span>How to overcome outdated skills</span></strong></p> <p><span><a href="https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/01/the-secret-to-lifelong-success-is-lifelong-learning">“Lifelong learning”</a> has become one of the most vital buzzword phrases of the <a href="https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/03/continuous-learning-changing-world-work/">fourth industrial revolution</a>. </span></p> <p><span>In the past, it was standard for people to gain education in childhood and young adulthood. Then, later in adulthood, people applied what they’d studied as they pursued careers where that education could be put to good use.</span></p> <p><span>Experts at the World Economic Forum are warning us that this clear-cut transition from academic life to work life is fading. This is because shifting technologies are now creating constant demand for workers to acquire new skills. This, in turn, is making old skills obsolete at a rapid pace.</span></p> <p><span>Nowadays, what you know is becoming less relevant to remaining employable than ever before – because in the current technologically driven environment, much of what you know will inevitably become outdated soon. Today, your capacity to learn new skills is a critical key to remaining employable.</span></p> <p><span>Formal training is the most straightforward way to acquire the skills you may need for continuing to be employable. <a href="https://www.training.com.au/">College and university courses</a> are available for every type of instruction you could possibly desire. This could be an especially beneficial option for you if you never earned a university degree in the first place.</span></p> <p><span>Some other possible ideas for <a href="https://www.hays.com.au/blog/jane-mcneill/HAYS_1380884">upskilling</a> include participating in webinars, listening to podcasts, attending live events, starting a blog, reading and participating in social media.</span></p> <p><strong><span>How to combat age discrimination</span></strong></p> <p><span><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/age-discrimination-in-the-workplace-and-how-it-affects-you">Age discrimination</a> is a <a href="https://www.smartcompany.com.au/people-human-resources/recruitment-hiring/ageism-employers-illegally-specify-age-limit-job-applications/">sad reality</a> that some older Australians are dealing with – despite the fact that ageism is illegal in Australia. The relevant law is the <a href="https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2017C00341">Age Discrimination Act 2004</a>. According to this legislation, it is unlawful to discriminate against individuals on the basis of their age.</span></p> <p><span><a href="https://www.humanrights.gov.au/our-work/age-discrimination/publications/know-your-rights-age-discrimination-2012">Knowing your rights</a> is one of the most important steps you can take to protect yourself from age discrimination. Australian law specifies that employers must give fair consideration to all applicants for all jobs, apprenticeships and traineeships, regardless of age. Employers may not refuse to hire you or consider you for a job on the basis of your age.</span></p> <p><span>Additionally, you can <a href="https://www.cio.com.au/article/576064/7-ways-mitigate-age-discrimination-your-job-search/">mitigate age discrimination</a> by choosing stylish, up-to-date clothing to wear to work; emphasizing all your relevant work experience; leveraging your professional network; and looking for a senior-friendly company that would be an excellent cultural fit for your skills and expertise.</span></p> <p><span>Of course, these are not the only barriers you may face as you seek to remain employed past retirement age – but these are 3 of the most common obstacles senior citizens must typically overcome as they pursue ongoing employment. If you can successfully overcome these hurdles, there are many <a href="https://www.smartcompany.com.au/partner-content/articles/how-hiring-older-workers-is-good-for-business/">benefits</a> to your continued employment – both for you, and for your employer, who will benefit from your lifetime’s worth of accumulated expertise.</span></p>

Retirement Life

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Signs your house is vulnerable to being robbed

<p><strong>How secure is your home?</strong></p> <p>Here’s how to make sure your home doesn’t become the latest crime statistic. It takes burglars on average five minutes to enter your home, so learn which aspects of your property put you at risk.</p> <p><strong>Your front door</strong></p> <p>This may seem too obvious to be true, but the majority of intruders come in through a door – and many of them are already open. Why? It’s easy access and burglars are all about doing whatever is easiest, says Jacob Paulsen, security expert. One in four homeowners confesses to frequently leaving the front door unlocked and half do it occasionally, according to a Nationwide Insurance survey. And considering that the majority of home burglaries happen in the daytime, between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m., knocking on your front door allows thieves to pose as salesmen or delivery people while covertly checking your doorknob. So, yes, it’s obvious, but we’ll say it again: Lock your door! In addition, replace any hollow-core or sectioned doors with ones made from a solid piece or wood or metal, Paulsen suggests.</p> <p><strong>Your porch</strong></p> <p>People stealing packages off your front porch – aka porch pirates – is one of the fastest rising crime trends. Nearly ⅓ of people have had packages stolen and over half of people say they know someone who has, according to a survey done by Comcast. Thieves have even been known to follow delivery trucks around neighbourhoods, stealing packages almost as soon as they’re dropped off. Having a doorbell camera may deter some would-be pirates but your best defence is not having your packages delivered to your porch, Paulsen says. “Have packages delivered to your office or to a neighbour who is home most of the time,” he advises. “If those aren’t options, consider putting delivery instructions on the order form to leave the package at a side door or in a special box.”</p> <p><strong>Your garbage</strong></p> <p>The good news: Property crimes have been decreasing steadily for the past decade, according to recent data. But that doesn’t mean you can let your guard down. Setting out the box from your new 60-inch HDTV or high-end gaming console on the kerb is basically advertising the fact that those items are in your home. As electronics are the second thing burglars go for (cash is number one), this makes your home a very attractive target, according to the study. So buy a cheap box cutter and invest the 30 seconds it takes to break down large boxes and bundle them together so their labels can’t be seen. Plus, your garbage collector will thank you!</p> <p><strong>Your street</strong></p> <p>Thanks to better lighting and increased traffic, homes in high-visibility places, like on corner lots, are far less likely to be broken into, Paulsen says. There are simply too many potential ways to be seen. But townhomes, houses in the middle of the block, or houses in a cul-de-sac are much better targets. This is especially true if your property backs up to a forest, open lot, or another unguarded area. The trick, he says, is to make your house as difficult as possible to access from all sides. How much? “You don’t have to be Fort Knox, you just have to be less appealing to a thief than your neighbour is,” he adds.</p> <p><strong>Your health</strong></p> <p>As the opioid epidemic rages, thefts of drugs, particularly prescription painkillers, are on the rise. And as heartbreaking as it is to say, both professional thieves and junkies know that people who are elderly or chronically ill often have lots of medication lying around. So if you are in these circumstances, it might be worth taking extra precautions (such as installing a good home security system) to make your house a less attractive target, Paulsen says.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Charlotte Hilton Andersen</span>. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/think-your-sex-life-over-after-40-hardly"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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How do we remain safe drivers through the decades?

<p>While research has shown that older drivers are generally just as safe as drivers of younger ages, there is no doubt that some of us have deterioration in certain functions as we age. For some, this may affect our ability to maintain our driving standards and perhaps there have even been a couple of incidents that have shaken our confidence and stopped us from wanting to get behind the wheel at all.</p> <p>This sudden loss of independence can have a major impact on our ability to get out and about and enjoy life, but it doesn’t need to be that way. Safe driving courses tailored for older aged drivers can make a real difference to maintaining our driving abilities, even if we start to lose some of our physical capacities.</p> <p><strong>Time to self-assess</strong> <br />The trend by road and traffic authorities around the world in recent times is generally to move away from age-based driving tests and making blanket assumptions about older drivers. Instead the focus is on encouraging older drivers to self-assess, so that they are more aware of any drop off in ability and can take remedial action such as driving courses aimed at their specific needs.</p> <p>Issues such as increased reaction times, deterioration in vision, reduced perception about speed and distance, limited ability to turn your head and becoming easily fatigued are all impairments that can creep up on us as we age. The first step, therefore, is to make an honest self-assessment of how you may be affected by such things and get some feedback from family or friends about whether they have noticed a drop off in driving ability.</p> <p><strong>Never too old to learn</strong> <br />If you or those close to you feel that there may be an issue with how your physical condition is affecting your driving then a logical next step is to have an independent assessment by someone who can give an objective opinion and is trained in evaluating the challenges that some older drivers face. Your state motoring association is a good place to seek out such an assessment and driving schools may also be able to help.</p> <p>These organisations also offer safe driving courses or refresher courses that can help you adapt your driving to compensate for any issues you have. Their assessment will also enable them to make recommendations on potential driving situations that you should avoid, such as driving at night or avoiding peak traffic periods.</p> <p><strong>A chance to polish your skills</strong> <br />Most of us obtained our licence in our teens or early twenties and in all the decades of driving since that time we have been under no obligation to take any test or assessment or to formally refresh our skills. Once you consider this it simply makes good common sense to brush up on your skills and get an objective opinion in later life, preferably before any major issues present themselves.</p> <p>While there is certainly no substitute for years of successful driving experience, there could be some bad habits that have gradually become embedded in our driving behaviour.</p> <p>Things like creeping slightly over the speed limit or forgetting to follow the ‘3 second gap’ rule with the car in front can become real issues if our reaction time, vision and ability to focus are deteriorating with age. These are the kinds of things that a senior’s driving course can pinpoint and address in a non-threatening and supportive environment.</p> <p>Apart from correcting bad habits, a refresher course can also help you gain some proactive skills, such as scanning techniques and adjusting your road position and speed to make allowance for reduction in your capacities.</p> <p><strong>Tips for staying on the road</strong> <br />Apart from a formal course, there are other things you can do to help retain your ability to continue driving. Doing things to keep physically fit and mentally alert are essential to support your driving ability. Speak to your health professionals about what physical and mental exercise program you should follow to help keep your strength, flexibility, mobility and alertness.</p> <p>Considering your car choice can also be a major factor. The technology available in modern cars can provide an extra margin of safety and help supplement your driving performance, through features such as automatic emergency braking, reversing cameras, fatigue detection and adaptive cruise control. Perhaps it is time to update that favourite older car with something a bit more modern to help you stay on the road longer.</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/how-do-we-remain-safer-drivers-through-the-decades.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Retirement Life

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Are you tired of feeling invisible?

<p>At a dinner, a friend was sat next to a very important mature-aged man, head of a major religious organisation in this country, whose version of conversation was a monologue about himself.</p> <p>Eventually, my friend, a female executive at a large bank, stopped him in his tracks with: “So now, is there anything you would like to hear about me?”</p> <p>Bang! Shazam! A middle-aged woman had just made herself visible.</p> <p>Becoming invisible at middle age is an enduring frustration for many women, who sometimes feel that they have only just recovered from the unwanted attention they attracted as young women.</p> <p>However, there are some women in my social networks who have this thing all figured out. They make sure they are seen and heard, they have a bit of fun … and get revenge.</p> <p><strong>1. Be annoying</strong></p> <p>Says Odette: “I was waiting in queue at a clothing store to pay. In front of me were several young women. The two young female shop assistants served all of them immediately. When it came my turn, I suddenly became invisible. Both assistants decided to ignore me and have a nice chat.</p> <p>“When they finally decided to serve me, they kept chatting, while the one using the cash register barely glancing my way. So I let her ring up my several items. When she held out her hand for my payment, while still looking at and talking to the other assistant, I walked away.”</p> <p>When the woman called out that she hadn’t paid, Odette replied: "You were rude and dismissive, simply because, according to you I'm old, so you don't deserve my money”.</p> <p>I read about another woman in an electronics store who went around turning off the TVs, one by one, until she was “seen”. Another fun tactic is, if someone can’t be bothered looking at you while serving and taking your money, drop your cash to the side of their hand so they have to bend down and pick it up.</p> <p><strong>2. Use humour</strong></p> <p>Teacher Corinna says she uses humour or finds a point of common interest to engage people and start a conversation.</p> <p>“I think the trick is to always have fun with people. Whether it is for mutual benefit or just for yours,” she messaged me with a wicked winking emoji. “But obviously not to their detriment.”</p> <p>“They never know what you are truly thinking and, when they don't know you, you can put on whatever persona you desire.”</p> <p>Corinna channels her “teacher” voice for an air of “senior authority” and becomes demanding. This reminds me of the time I had to MC an awards night and, when people would not listen, borrowed the childcare workers’ refrain “One, two, three, eyes to me”. Worked a treat, room went silent.</p> <p><strong>3. Dress up</strong></p> <p>There is no doubt that many of us women have noticed we get more attention when we wear lipstick. It is sad, but it appears we have to paint a face on and dress fashionably in order to be taken seriously by many people. Bronia mentions that she gets better service when she wears her “edgier” style of glasses.</p> <p>Performance coach, Louise Mahler, attracts attention by moving (walking, for instance) and then being still — a tactic that draws the eye. Her other suggestions are: “Wear red. Cry. Sing”. This may not work for all of us.</p> <p><strong>4. Vary your volume</strong></p> <p>I tend to lower my voice to project an air of authority, a technique effective for the late Margaret Thatcher. Madeleine has a friend whose mother just started bellowing from the back of the queue. “Maybe it's a South African thing, not sure that would go down well in Australia,” she notes.</p> <p><strong>5. Protest!</strong></p> <p>Nicole, a business owner, was dining with her man in a top Sydney restaurant and found that the waiter continually deferred to her partner in tasting the wine, assuming he would have the steak and giving him the bill. All the while, the waiter made comments about what “the woman” would want. A polite email to the TV star/owner resulted in an abject personal apology by phone, offer of a free meal and an assurance that it would not happen again.</p> <p>“I think it is important to always address both sexist and ageist slights — even though many think them trivial. Always politely, always with a smile,” says Nicole.</p> <p><strong>6. Don’t give them your money</strong></p> <p>Nicole and Sue both were belittled by different car dealers (selling the same brand of car) and, as a result, bought elsewhere.</p> <p>Says Nicole: “Negotiating with the arrogant salesman, I told him I was going to give it some more thought before committing and he replied ‘Why don't you go home and discuss it with your husband and then have him come in and talk to me’.”</p> <p>Given that she was single at the time, perhaps she should have sent her cat in for the test drive.</p> <p>Sue was told she was not allowed to take a test drive because she had taken one a year earlier (and had, therefore, wasted their time). Then, when she responded to the salesman’s phone calls by coming in, she had a hard time finding him.</p> <p>“The young male salesperson was actually hiding from me and sending out a young female salesperson [selling another brand of car] because he didn’t want to waste his time with me. I overheard the conversation between the two of them when she was laughing at him because she was busy and so he would be forced to go out to me.”</p> <p><strong>7. Have fun and seek revenge</strong></p> <p>One of my favourite tales of revenge was the grandmother who was “run over” in the pool by one of those aggressive lap swimmers. She just flopped face down in the water and pretended to be dead, while, out of the corner of her eye, she watched him slink out of the pool to the change rooms.</p> <p><em>Written by Fiona Smith. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/are-you-tired-of-feeling-invisible.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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What ever happened to good manners?

<p>I grew up in a village in the UK and remember well that all adults felt free to comment on my behaviour if I stepped out of line. There were no special school buses - just the regular bus, on which school children paid half-price. It was not uncommon for the driver to stop the bus and walk down the aisle obliging half-price schoolkids to stand for full-price adults, but mostly he didn’t need to. We knew the rules and offered our seats as a matter of routine.</p> <p>The enforcement of expected behaviour shapes and maintains the communities in which we live: If you belong around here then this is right and that’s wrong. This is polite and that’s rude. I suspect that such boundary maintenance is easier to do in small scale societies. Less so in cities.</p> <p>Recently, I heard from one very angry Sydney-sider: “I stood up for a much older women as soon as I saw her getting on the bus and a teenager guy sat down in the seat instead! The older woman had to stand (and so did I). I was livid. The poor woman was almost falling over and no-one cared a jot." That wouldn’t have happened in my village!</p> <p>She followed-up with a text image of a young woman occupying two seats on a full bus (one seat for her and one for her handbag). Headphones on and engrossed in social media, it’s evident that she had no awareness of the needs of others.</p> <p>On the other hand, it can be constraining if everyone is constantly on your case about good behaviour (and we all have something to learn). There’s a point where it becomes downright interference. Yet our Sydney-sider longed for the involvement of others and my village bus driver, Dennis, wouldn’t have let her down. There was no way a teenage boy would nab the only vacant seat on his bus!</p> <p>Rudeness can be relative. It’s been decades since I travelled in Japan, but I still have a vivid memory of a woman on a bus so crowded that she had to stand with one foot on each of the two steps that descended to the exit. Even worse, she was carrying a child on her back who had his leg in plaster. I was horrified that the schoolkids on the bus didn’t jump up to offer her a seat. So I did, but she wouldn’t take it. I still don’t understand why not. Maybe I was rude to offer?</p> <p>When I conducted a straw poll asking friends to provide stories of rudeness, most saw it as a sin of omission rather than commission: “More than rudeness, I notice invisibility as I get older when I am waiting at counters, waiting for service at a cafe or at the butcher. I find you have to be very alert to the serving people and notice where you are in the queue or you'll get overlooked."</p> <p>I know what she means. Medical receptionists are very good at keeping me waiting whilst they’re busy doing something much more important than attend to incoming patients.</p> <p>So, given that ‘rudeness’ various across culture and time, how do we handle it when it happens?</p> <p>Dennis, my UK village bus driver confronted rude behaviour, but I suspect that Australians are more inclined to step-back, like our Sydneysider who just seethed inside. There is an element of self-preservation in this as Lizzie noted: “I try to avoid noticing rudeness or taking it personally, if I encounter it. I assume the person is just a rude person who is indiscriminately rude to everyone - not just me." </p> <p><em>Written by Lyn Martin. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/what-ever-happened-to-good-manners.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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12 ways to rein in varicose vein pain

<p><strong>1. Don’t stand when you can sit.</strong>Standing still in the one position for long periods of time lets blood pool in your lower legs, putting pressure on blood vessels. Whenever possible, take breaks every 15 minutes or so and sit down with your legs raised.</p> <p><strong>2. Eat more berries.</strong>Blackberries, raspberries and strawberries all contain flavonoids, which have been shown to help strengthen blood vessel walls. This is great for preventing varicose veins and haemorrhoids. Get into the habit of having berries as an after-dinner treat or on the top of your morning cereal.</p> <p><strong>3. Put your feet up when sitting. </strong>Raising your legs prevents blood from pooling in the veins. When you’re sitting down watching TV or if you’re lying down for any length of time, keep your feet elevated slightly higher than your heart to reduce the risk of blood pooling in your lower legs.</p> <p><strong>4. Move.</strong>Get up and get moving – it’s the only sure way you’ll strengthen your calf muscles and keep the blood circulating in your legs. Start going for a regular walk after dinner or before breakfast. If you spend much of the day behind a desk, point and flex your feet to boost circulation. If you’re on your feet, get the blood moving several times an hour by rising on your toes, shifting your weight from one foot to the other, bending your legs and walking on the spot.</p> <p><strong>5. Avoid tight clothes.</strong>Believe it or not, those jeans that look great and show off your curves are a bad idea. Never wear tight clothing that can restrict blood circulation at the top of your legs.</p> <p><strong>6. Lose weight.</strong>If you’re carrying any extra kilos, get serious about getting back to a more healthy weight. You’ll not only look better, but you’ll reduce the stress placed on your legs and circulatory system and improve blood flow. An extensive study conducted in Scotland found that being overweight or obese raised your chances of developing varicose veins by as much as 58%. By eating less and getting more aerobic exercise, you’ll lose weight and also reduce your risk of developing leg vein problems.</p> <p><strong>7. Wear flats. </strong>While high heels won’t cause varicose veins, wearing them makes your calf muscles less effective at pumping blood back towards your heart when you walk. Our legs much prefer walking in flat shoes. They tone calf muscles, helping to move blood through the veins.</p> <p><strong>8. Wear stockings.</strong>While not the most attractive option, wearing compression stockings (available from your pharmacy) is an effective way of easing the pain that comes with varicose veins. Compression stockings work by applying pressure to the lower part of your legs, forcing any build-up of blood back towards the heart – by as much as 20%. When Japanese researchers measured the legs of 20 people with varicose veins, they found that all grades of compression stockings reduced swelling, but medium- and strong-grade stockings worked best.</p> <p>Scientists in Hong Kong recently discovered a design flaw in the stocking: as study volunteers moved around, their stockings sometimes squeezed tighter at the thickest part of the calves than the ankles, which could actually promote blood pooling rather than prevent it. The conclusion was that compression stockings are still worth wearing if you’re on your feet all day, but you should also attempt to exercise your calf muscles to help keep blood moving.</p> <p><strong>9. Gotu kola.</strong>Research has found that this herb, which is native to Madagascar, India and Sri Lanka, can ease the pain, swelling and sensation of heaviness and tingling in the legs. It works by strengthening the collagen lining in the walls of veins, which enhances circulation. The recommended dose is between 30-39mg a day.</p> <p><strong>10. Horse chestnut. </strong>The seed extract from this tree is one remedy for varicose vein discomfort that seems to work. When Harvard Medical School researchers reviewed 16 studies of thousands of people with weak valves in their leg veins, they found that those who took the extract had four times less pain than those who were given a placebo. Half saw a decrease in swelling, and 70% had less itching. They also reported improvement in feelings of fatigue and heaviness in their legs. In lab studies, escin, the active ingredient in horse chestnut seeds, was found to strengthen the walls of small blood vessels. UK researchers say this safe botanical may be as effective as compression stockings. The usual daily dose is 300mg (containing 50-75mg of escin per dose).</p> <p><strong>10. Stop straining.</strong>Working too hard to have a bowel movement increases pressure on veins in the lower legs. Scottish researchers report that this kind of pushing nearly doubles the risk of vein problems in men. To make bowel movements as easy and as comfortable as possible, drink plenty of water during the day and increase your fibre intake.</p> <p><strong>11. Enjoy a glass of wine.</strong>Spanish researchers who analysed the health records of 1778 people found that those who enjoyed a glass of wine every day had a 50% lower risk of varicose veins than those who drank less – or more. Other research suggests that flavonoids and saponins in wine can help keep blood vessels flexible and healthy.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/varicose-vein-pain"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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New trials give hope for Parkinson's disease treatment

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There has been a breakthrough in treatments for Parkinson’s disease and could spell a potential saving grace after a successful drug trial in Australia. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The new tests found those with the debilitating disorder improved patients symptoms and aided in stopping the progression of the degenerative disease. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The drug is giving new hope to those battling Parkinson’s and was developed in Victoria at the Royal Melbourne Hospital. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Doctor Andrew Evans told </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/wellbeing/2019/06/11/parkinsons-disease-treatment-trial/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> the new trial showed a lot of promise for the future of broader treatments. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It shows quite a lot of hope,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The phase one trials began 15 years ago and the drug was administered to18 Australian Parkinson’s disease patients in three volumes: Small, medium and large. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The results surprised Dr Evans who expected to see little results however improvements were shown in the patient’s symptoms in addition to them getting “better.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This was more marked in higher-dose groups, who were given 72 milligrams of the drug a day,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was playing it down to patients at the start, saying, ‘This probably won’t make you feel better’. But people were coming back saying, ‘I feel better on this drug’.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Parkinson’s disease, some neurons in the brain are dead, some are ill and others remain functioning relatively well.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The improvements and positive findings were a result of the drug activating neurons in the brain. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What the drug has done is bring back those sick neurons into functioning well,” Evans said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While phase two tests are still underway, researchers are looking to develop more trials focussing on longer periods of time and larger groups of patients.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The challenge in Parkinson’s is that it is a very slowly progressing disease,” Dr Evans said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“… if you’re just slowing the progress of the disease, you do need to study people for longer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But if this drug holds up … maybe we can get (results) in a shorter amount of time.”</span></p>

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50 reasons why you should love being over 50

<p>It might not surprise you, but most studies find that we are happiest between the ages of 50 and 70. For the most part you’ve done worrying about what other people think of you, built more than a little resilience and your career and kids are not demanding the attention they once did.  Now it’s finally time for you.</p> <p>We’re building the list of reason to love being over 50 and we’d love you to help us get it to 50! What are your favourites?</p> <p><strong>Reasons to love being over 50</strong></p> <p>1. You’re old enough to really appreciate your parents.</p> <p>2. You’re happy in your own skin.</p> <p>3. Experiences mean more than things.</p> <p>4. You’ve got more me time now that the kids are off your hands.</p> <p>5. A really fantastic cup of coffee.</p> <p>6. You can finally get to work on that bucket list.</p> <p>7. Spending time with great friends.</p> <p>8. Older and bolder, self confidence tends to grow with age.</p> <p>9. Eating chocolate cake for dinner.  With no ‘example to set’, you can eat whatever you want whenever you want! </p> <p>10. Sleeping in!</p> <p>11. Freckles and knobbly knees – the things we used to obsess about when a teenager seem utterly irrelevant now. </p> <p>12. Having the time to actually read a great book.</p> <p>13. Family - spending precious time with crazy cousins, kooky aunts and much loved parents, children and grandchildren. </p> <p>14. And speaking of them – GRANDCHILDREN !</p> <p>15. After a lifetime of delivering 'what is expected'. No more expections!</p> <p>16. Knowledge gained and amazing memories.</p> <p>17. We can participate in life with the energy and enthusiasm of a child but with the wisdom of experience - just magic!</p> <p>18. Setting your own schedule and time-frames because you are finally your own boss!</p> <p>19. Having the time to travel for more than a month a year (and when it isn't school hoildays).</p> <p>20. Spending time with grandchildren who love you back unconditionally. Being able to read to grandchildren for as long as you want to, without worrying about all the jobs that still need doing.</p> <p>21. Having the time to write about experiences brings a whole new perspective to amazing holidays and relationships.</p> <p>22. Being old enough to know better but then doing it anyway.</p> <p>23. Realising you don't need to worry about what others think. You only need to answer to yourself.</p> <p>24. Seeing all the kids and 'young people' wearing the 'latest fashion' that you wore at the same age as they are now.</p> <p>25. Having a great cup of tea with an old friend and having the time to just enjoy spending time together.<br />26. ?</p> <p><strong>Now help us build our list and tell us your favourite reasons …</strong></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/help-us-find-50-reasons-why-you-should-love-being-over-50.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Is my forgetfulness normal?

<p>We all forget things from time to time. For example, how many of us have walked into a room only to forget why we went there in the first place? Or forgotten the name of a new acquaintance only moments after they’ve introduced themselves? These are common experiences, but if these memory lapses turn persistent or progressive it could be a sign of something else.</p> <p><em>“A person with forgetfulness may lose their car keys, but a person with dementia may lose their car keys and then forget what the car keys are actually used for,”</em> explains Alzheimer’s Australia CEO, Carol Bennett. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and affects 80 per cent of people with dementia. While memory loss is the most common symptom of dementia, other symptoms may include confusion, personality change, apathy and withdrawal or an inability to perform everyday tasks.</p> <p>According to Bennett, dementia will present itself in many different ways and symptoms may vary between individuals. <em>“For some people it won’t be memory loss, rather they may experience visual-spatial differences. For example, someone with dementia may put their glass down under the table or above the table and drop the glass. They may misjudge stairs, because they lose their capacity to judge physical space,”</em> she said.</p> <p><strong>Early signs of alzheimer’s disease</strong><br />Alzheimer’s Australia advise some warning signs include:</p> <p>1. Remembering events, words, names or objects: A person with dementia may progressively forget common words or names and may even forget part or all of an event. In healthy people, there may be the occasional lapse but words are usually on the tip of the tongue and memories are vague, rather than completely forgotten.</p> <p>2. Understanding stories: Dementia causes a decline in the ability to follow story lines in TV shows, films, books or any other storytelling form of entertainment.</p> <p>3. Performing everyday tasks: In someone with dementia, everyday tasks like dressing and cooking can become quite arduous, whereas a healthy person will not have any difficulty unless physically impaired.</p> <p>4. Following directions: Healthy people should be able to follow written and verbal directions without any difficulty. Someone with dementia, on the other hand, is increasingly unable to follow these cues.</p> <p><a href="https://fightdementia.org.au/">Read the full checklist on the Alzheimer’s Australia website.</a></p> <p><strong>Younger onset dementia</strong><br />While dementia is more common in people over 65, sadly there are more than 24,000 Australians in their 30s, 40s, 50s and early 60s affected by the disease.</p> <p><em>“Dementia in the under 65s is often misdiagnosed. There’s a lack of information, even among health professionals,”</em> adds Bennett. One theory is that people with younger onset dementia tend to present with problem solving and behavioural issues, and as a result, these individuals can be mistakenly diagnosed with depression.</p> <p>There are different types of dementia and symptoms are variable. However, if you or a loved one is worried, see a GP or ask for a referral to a neurologist who can complete a series of medical and psychological tests to determine the cause. Your doctor may talk to you about your medical history, perform cognitive, psychiatric and/or neuropsychological testing, or request blood and urine tests to screen for illnesses which could be responsible for dementia-like symptoms.</p> <p>Bennett explains, when it comes to younger onset dementia, early intervention is key.<em> “Early diagnosis makes a huge difference to the outcome. Unfortunately it is a very progressive condition, especially in younger onset where it tends to progressive more quickly. The sooner you can provide support the better. Early intervention keeps people out of hospital and residential aged care,”</em> she adds.</p> <p><strong>Preventing dementia: help at hand</strong><br /><em>“There isn’t a one size fits all, it’s about keeping your mind active,”</em> advises Bennett. In fact, experts say that the changes in the brain that lead to dementia begin up to 15-20 years before symptoms first appear. Lifestyle changes, such as keeping physically active, eating the right foods and challenging the mind, all reduce the risk.</p> <p><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/six-ways-to-keep-your-mind-sharp.aspx">Click here</a> for six fun and simple ways to reduce your risk for dementia and keep your mind sharper for longer. </p> <p>Alzheimer’s Australia has also developed a Brainy App, which can help determine your ‘brain health’ and assist you with completing brainy activities using a score system. Download the free app <a href="http://yourbrainmatters.org.au/a-little-help/brainyapp">here</a>.</p> <p>Ready for something new? Take the Your Brain Matters 21 challenge! Always dreamt of speaking Spanish, learning the violin or finally mastering a soufflé? Keeping your mind active by doing new things is a fun way to establish brain healthy habits visit: <a href="http://yourbrainmatters.org.au/challenge">Your brain matters</a>.</p> <p>You can also call the National Dementia Helpline on 1800 100 500 for support and advice regarding health, financial and counselling services in your area.</p> <p><em>Written by Mahsa Fratantoni. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/is-my-forgetfulness-normal.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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How to cope when you're getting a divorce

<p>Perhaps you were the instigator, after years of thought. Or your partner announced it, out of the blue. Maybe you decided together that things just weren’t working. The fact is, you’re now separated or divorced and there are a huge number of emotional and practical issues to deal with.</p> <p><strong>Are you OK?<br /></strong>Many people compare the end of a significant relationship with grieving for a lost friend or relative. You can experience strong feelings like fear, sadness, resentfulness, anger, confusion and bitterness to name just a few.</p> <p>Be mindful of both your mental health and physical wellbeing. It can be tempting to turn to food, smoking, alcohol, gambling, drugs, or promiscuous behaviour but none of these things bring long-term relief. Only time will help you heal, but with the help of friends or even a counsellor, this is possible.</p> <p><strong>Being practical<br /></strong>Ending a relationship that’s lasted a decade or more involves many practical issues. The first two key ones to address are where you plan to live, and what assets/income you’ll have to live on.</p> <p>According to Amy McGinn, Post Separation Services Manager of Relationships Australia, after separa-tion or divorce, many people need to learn how to handle their own finances for the first time. “It’s best to get independent financial advice; perhaps from a financial advisor. Relationships Australia offers property mediation to help couples split assets, and individual counselling to assist people with things like budgeting which can actually be quite empowering.”</p> <p><strong>Being positive<br /></strong>Whilst separation and divorce can be incredibly painful and challenging, Ms McGinn suggests you’ve got some new opportunities. “It’s the chance to make choices for yourself, rather than choices for a whole family. You can make new friends that don’t need to know your separation story; they just know you,” she says.</p> <p>You can start new hobbies without worrying about what your ex-partner thinks. You can try volunteering or work on your bucket list.</p> <p>If you need help, the following organisations offer information and/or assistance:</p> <p><a href="http://www.relationships.org.au/">relationshipsaustralia.org.au</a><br /><a href="http://www.beyondblue.org.au/">beyondblue.org.au</a><br /><a href="http://www.menslineaus.org.au/">menslineaus.org.au</a></p> <p><em>Written by Gabe McGrath. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/how-to-cope-when-youre-getting-a-divorce.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Who says you can’t be 50 plus and fashionable?

<p>If I had a dollar for every 50 plus woman who complains that fashion doesn’t cater to them, I’d be retired in the Caribbean by now.</p> <p>Women over 50 tend to fall in to two main categories when it comes to fashion: they are either the proverbial ‘mutton dressed up as lamb’ or women who dress much older than their years.</p> <p>The irony is that there is some great fashion out there for women over 50, it’s all about being brave and knowing where to look.</p> <p>58-year-old Sydneysider and empty-nester, Maria Manissian, laments that she cannot seem to find the right style (or size) of clothes to make her feel sexy and confident any more.</p> <p>“I have always really loved fashion, but I am constantly disappointed by the style of clothes and the stores marketed to women my age,” she says.</p> <p>Suzy Black, an Australian Personal Shopper and Stylist who gives wardrobe make-overs recently appeared in an article in The Sydney Morning Herald addressing the issue.</p> <p>Suzy believes the common mistake mature women make is dressing frumpily and not accentuating the right areas.</p> <p>"Women my age are used to being second best. For years they've put their family first so they fade away and let themselves become invisible when this is the time to re-invent yourself. I'm here to help them get their mojo back," she told <a href="http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/fashion/australias-trinny-bringing-style-back-to-the-50-set-20130506-2j32l.html#ixzz32VnjZCYZ">SMH</a>.</p> <p>Suzy advocates shopping in chain stores such as Supre, Country Road and Zara and even sharing your wardrobe with your daughters. You not only look better, but it won’t hurt the hip pocket.</p> <p>Below are some handy tips you should keep in mind if you decide to overhaul that wardrobe:</p> <ul> <li>If you really lack confidence in choosing the right clothes, invest in a personal stylist, it could be worth every penny! (Even chain stores like <a href="http://m.myer.com.au/mobile/latest-news/myer-personal-shopping-service.html">Myer</a> and <a href="http://www.davidjones.com.au/Store-Services/Fashion/Personal-Shopping-Service">DJs</a> offer this service affordably.)</li> <li>Make sure you are wearing the right undergarments: bras need to be properly fitted to uplift and support (avoid sagging breasts) and underwear needs to be seamless; Shapewear like <a href="http://www.spanx.com/">Spanx</a> might be something you also need to invest in to avoid the visible panty line</li> <li>Go to the large chain stores before leaping in and spending a fortune in a boutique specifically marketed to 50-somethings.</li> <li>Avoid the two main pitfalls: dressing either too young or too old for your age. For example, either wearing very short skirts and dresses, overly tight tops and stiletto heels, or wearing loose baggy pants and oversized t-shirts or frumpy long shapeless dresses.</li> <li>Sometimes style needs to win out over comfort.  For example, opt for nice tailored pants rather than elasticised waisted pants.</li> <li>Black can be slimming, very stylish and chic, especially when accessorized with a splash of colour.</li> <li>Use accessories to your full advantage.  For example, a chunky colourful necklace or scarf can do wonders for a plain outfit.</li> <li>Invest in attractive, good quality, yet comfortable shoes. Go for a mid-height heel, black or tan knee-length fashionable boots in winter or cute ballet flats if you can’t wear heels.</li> <li>Dress up, rather than down for a special occasion – too many 50-plus women feel it’s ‘all too much of a bother’. Make the effort and you will feel better about yourself.</li> <li>Jeans are a 50-plus woman’s best friend. Update them regularly, they can be extremely flattering at any age. (Tip: darker jeans are more dressy and slimming)</li> <li>Track pants and Ugg boots in public are never acceptable.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Danielle Cesta. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/who-says-you-can%E2%80%99t-be-50-plus-and-fashionable.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Great things to do solo

<p>Living life to the fullest means experiencing new things and getting out of you comfort zone. If you're flying solo it can be especially hard to motivate yourself to get out and about. However, consider the freedom you have to choose your own adventures. Don’t let fear of uncertainties hold you back, there are plenty of great things to do solo!</p> <p>Here are just a few.</p> <p><strong>Go exploring</strong><br />Don’t be held up by the needs and wants of other people. When you live independently you can explore on a whim. Go for a nature walk, meander the city or visit a museum. Join group walking tours or sign-up for cooking classes and wine tastings. You might meet a new friend with similar interests.</p> <p><strong>Go Travelling</strong><br />If you love the idea of travel but are uncertain about how you would go planning the entire trip by yourself, look into booking with a tour group even for a day trip. This provides you with instant transport to all major attractions, as well as included meals. Ultimately it gives you the ability to relax while your tour guide takes care of all the details.  </p> <p><strong>Go to a show</strong><br />Going to the theatre or a movie by yourself is a great activity. This can be just as fun by yourself, so choose something you want to see, take a taxi and have a night out on the town.</p> <p><strong>Join a community group</strong><br />Look into joining a community group or volunteering. It could be as simple as painting, joining a book club, taking an aerobics class or visiting a local church. There are always like-minded people around, so step out and make some new friends while learning a new activity!</p> <p><strong>Try something new</strong><br />It’s easy to stick to the same old habits, but by trying new activities, foods and meeting new people, you will add colour and fun to your life. While it may seem overwhelming at first glance, why not take the plunge? You’ll find all these activities are great to do alone!</p> <p><em>Written by Jessica Morris. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/great-things-to-do-solo.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Don't let age slow you down

<p>While some may associate retirement or impending retirement with slowing down, others are using the change of pace to do something new.</p> <p>Whether it is going back to university, taking a course at community college or taking on a new career, more and more of the over fifties are upskilling and finding the change rejuvenating.</p> <p><strong>Get busy and start a business</strong> <br />Melbourne based Mary Harnan was 50 when she made the monumental decision to resign from the job she had been doing for 34 years and start her own business, helping people to reorganise their homes. “The first few years were really tough,” she says. “But now I'm so happy. I wish that I had done it years ago.”</p> <p>Now that business is going well Mary plans to tick of another of her life’s ambitions and put pen to paper to write her first book. “It’s something that I have always wanted to do,” she says.</p> <p><strong>A career change</strong><br />Similarly, 51 year old Sydney-sider John Milham changed the direction of his career path from corporate IT Manager to Life Coach. Having lost his wife to cancer, John took some time out to re-evaluate.</p> <p>After deciding to embark on a new career in life caching, John took a course at the Life Coaching College to learn the new skills he needed. It is a step that he is very proud of. “I am really passionate about coaching,” he says. “It is incredibly challenging and very worthwhile.”</p> <p>Not only has John inspired himself, he now has the opportunity to do the same for others.</p> <p><strong>Go back to school</strong> <br />You don’t need to change your career in order to learn a new skill. There are community colleges all over the country offering a variety of fun and engaging learning experiences from languages to gardening. And if upskilling doesn’t appeal then another way to expand your horizons is to volunteer with a charity or not for profit organisation.</p> <p>If like Mary and John you are ready for a change of scene then remember that there is no need to let age slow you down. Why not follow their example and think about taking the plunge?</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/dont-let-age-slow-you-down.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Cop crackdown: Greek restaurants slammed for ripping off tourists

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tourists may be having the last laugh after a number of complaints about restaurants overcharging foreigners insanely high food and drink bills has led the Greek police to be involved. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mykonos has become the destination of dreams over the last decade especially and Greek restaurant and bar owners have used the ignorance of tourists to scam more money than necessary for meals and drinks – including 877 for six pieces of calamari. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Greek finance ministry has plans to conduct more than 50,000 raids in the next few weeks to target restaurants attempting to cheat customers. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A number of tourists have complained about the insane charges made for simple meals, including six pieces of calamari that rounded up to NZD$878.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The squid was apart of a $1400 rip-off bill that came with a NZD$101 grilled chicken dish. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another customer was faced with a hefty bill as well when he was charged more than NZD$229 for two glasses of prosecco at a different restaurant. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reports claim officers have already closed down dozens of businesses who have been caught scamming their customers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mykonos restaurant owners have denied the allegations of scamming tourists – claiming customers are fully aware of prices before they place an order. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, foreigners have spoken out against the “scam culture” on the island.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Me and my wife were dragged for a drink only to pay €230 ($NZD 392) for a €20 ($NZD34) bottle of wine and a couple of sides,” tourist Yannis Psarras, from London, said according to </span><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/travel/9361217/greek-cop-restaurants-tax-evasion-fraud/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“These guys run the ultimate scam.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They invite you in on a non-existent offer — like free sunbeds — they don’t show you the price list. They list prices by 100 grams rather than per portion or per kilogram or something more standard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s really a playbook of scamming tourists.”</span></p>

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Taking your pet on holidays?

<p>Being able to take your beloved pet with you when you go away is a huge advantage. Here’s what you need to know.</p> <p><strong>Why take pets with you on holiday</strong></p> <p>Lucky for Australian animal lovers they will get a much warmer welcome than actor Johnny Depp’s terriers received when they jetted in, then out, of the country in 2015. </p> <p>There are a number of options catering for travellers to stay with their pets with a growing number of pet-friendly destinations around the states. These are often located near the local dog-friendly or park and can direct you to other local amenities you may require including cafes, groomers, vets and the like.</p> <p>And, with the price of boarding starting from about $280 a week for small dogs, $150 for cats and rabbits, and $100 or so for birds, while pet minders start from about $140 a week, you’re likely to come out ahead. Your pet will thank you for it!</p> <p><strong>Getting your pet to the location</strong></p> <p>For obvious reasons, domestic animals are banned from all national parks, nature reserves and state recreation areas so camping or visiting them is not possible with pet. Some forests may allow a leashed dog but check before you go.</p> <p>What about five-star hotels? Even if you’re an A-lister, there are few and far between. <a href="https://www.expedia.com.au/Sydney-Hotels-Pier-One-Sydney-Harbour.h440886.Hotel-Information?rm1=a2&amp;hwrqCacheKey=71214779-ca95-4828-b1e0-bd2045ad3345HWRQ1450055600718&amp;c=8099d2c2-7f15-42d6-b1c1-b994c602618d&amp;">Pier One Sydney Harbour</a> <a href="https://www.pieronesydneyharbour.com.au/2013/04/pet-friendly-guests-at-pier-one-sydney-harbour/">accommodates dogs only</a> and they must be booked on the De Vil Pet Pamper Package. All other pets and animals are still not allowed. Sorry Felix!</p> <p><strong>Pack smart when staying with pets</strong></p> <p>The key is, of course, to be prepared. Planning is everything. Like the Depp debacle revealed, just turning up with animals in tow is not the way to go. There are differences between travelling with cats and dogs.</p> <p>For travelling around Australia for a weekend away or on a dream of a lifetime road trip, a dog may be the perfect companion and will enjoy fresh horizons with as much joy as you do.</p> <p>Cats are not so well suited to road trips but are better able to settle down for a week’s stay in one location such as a holiday apartment or house such as you’d find on <a href="http://www.stayz.com.au/">Stayz</a> or <a href="https://www.airbnb.com.au/">Airbnb</a>.</p> <p>Or, go online and check relevant real-estate websites and such as Elders New Brighton, near Brunswick Heads in northern NSW, which states “No need to leave your pet at home we have pet-friendly homes conveniently located near the dog walking areas to the north and south of our pristine beaches”.</p> <p>Pack their bedding, pooper scooper and bags or kitty litter equipment, toys, first aid kit or medications, food and water bowls. Research expected stops along your journey and book ahead.</p> <p>No pets on furniture seems to be a universal rule (good luck with that one!) but sleeping may be permitted, otherwise a covered spot outside may be provided.</p> <p>Most accommodation does not charge extra for your animal but it’s best to clarify at the time of booking.</p> <p>Online bed and breakfast-style places can be found at Stayz and Airbnb, both of which have pet options and conditions listed.</p> <p>Just search <a href="http://www.stayz.com.au/">Stayz</a> for pet friendly accommodation and both NSW and Victoria come up with well over 2000 options each, Queensland has some 1100, SA and WA about 500 or so, Tassie nearly 200 and NT offers 54 and ACT just 15.</p> <p>However, you cannot filter the Airbnb accommodation options by listings that allow pets on the premises but the option will appear on listing if available – you can always make a special request if it’s not mentioned.</p> <p>Contact real-estate agents in your destination for holiday lets that will approve pet stays. This kind of travel will best suit cats, for example, who are less keen and not so suitable to take on road trips.</p> <p><strong>Getting there</strong></p> <p>Animals except for service dogs are pretty much banned on public transport throughout the country so there are only two ways to go: by air or by car.</p> <p>Sydney-based retiree Pam takes a road trip when she drives with her two dogs to stay with friends on the Gold Coast, stopping at pre-arranged motels along the way. “The boys just love staying at a new place. They get so excited,” she says.</p> <p><strong>Air travel</strong></p> <p>Airlines will not allow animals under the age of 8 weeks to travel, as the risk of severe dehydration is too high. Make sure your pet has plenty to drink before check-in.</p> <p>Do not sedate any pets before travel as they will be more distressed as the medication affects their balance. Carriers usually say that they do not bear the responsibility for pets who become ill during travel.</p> <p>Most carriers require that pets be checked in at least two hours before departure.</p> <p><strong>Checklist: what to take</strong></p> <ul> <li>Copy of microchip info, medical records, pet insurance policy</li> <li>Collar with tag and mobile number</li> <li>Bedding, lead/harness, toys, grooming gear</li> <li>Food and water bowls and supplies</li> <li>Suitable cage/enclosure</li> <li>Kitty trays and litter, poop bags</li> <li>First aid kit, medication, tick and flea control</li> </ul> <p><strong>What to ask when booking</strong></p> <ul> <li>Are there any extra costs to bring my pet to stay?</li> <li>Can my dog/cat stay inside?</li> <li>Is a kennel or a sleeping area provided?</li> <li>Is the property securely fenced?</li> <li>Is my dog required to be on a lead?</li> <li>Are there nearby exercise areas?</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Janice Jones. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/pets/taking-your-pet-on-holidays.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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How tiny homes for older women facing homelessness are saving lives

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Homelessness is becoming a bigger issue each year for older women, and Kim Connolly who is the founder of </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tiny Habitat Homes </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">understands that it is a problem that must be addressed. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Which is why she created a solution to aide ageing women with housing issues in 2017. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australian Bureau of Statistics</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> reports over 6860 ladies aged over 55 were classified as homeless in 2016, which is 5234 more since 2011, Kim told </span><a href="https://www.thesenior.com.au/story/6114985/could-tiny-homes-solve-senior-homelessness/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Senior</span></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">these stats might not be entirely correct. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu7q6QOHF46/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu7q6QOHF46/" target="_blank">My first Tiny House Build. Love my Tiny!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tinyhabitathomes/" target="_blank"> Kim Connolly</a> (@tinyhabitathomes) on Mar 12, 2019 at 7:50pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the massive jump is a concern, the former high school teacher explained the number did not reveal the full extent of the issue as many women would choose not to ask for help after facing homelessness or becoming homeless. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kim Connolly came up with the idea to offer transportable, affordable and tiny village homes as a method to decrease homelessness after multiple conversations with women her age admitted they were struggling with financial difficulties. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo-uunJAx3S/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo-uunJAx3S/" target="_blank">The Tiny has landed! Safe and sound. Thanks Nifty for sending me this photo of my baby in her new workshop home. #lovemytiny #lovemybuilder</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tinyhabitathomes/" target="_blank"> Kim Connolly</a> (@tinyhabitathomes) on Oct 15, 2018 at 9:13pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Over and over again women kept coming to me and saying, 'I'm going to be homeless, if not in the next few months, in the next few years',” Ms Connolly told </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-29/are-tiny-homes-the-answer-for-older-women-facing-homelessness/11049272"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC News.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I found out all the statistics and research and I didn't have an answer, [but] I love tiny houses and I thought, 'That's it, I'm going to build one'.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Connolly developed such a passion for her housing-solution idea, she set up her village-building business, with a plan to create a community of 15 tiny houses to majorly occupy women. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Currently, Ms Connolly is in the process of setting up a not-for-profit organisation to help make her tiny village concept.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She said: “It's women who are just like me and they're shaking their heads saying, 'I don't know how this happened, I never thought I'd end up in this situation'.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“My idea of the village would be 15 houses — there would be three houses that are rental houses, the other 12 would be owned by the occupants, there'd be two couples and the other 10 houses would be all older women,” Ms Connolly explained.</span></p>

Retirement Life

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Tips for travelling with grandkids

<p>As we get into our senior years it becomes more difficult for us to take holidays on our own. If you want to still enjoy the pleasures of a vacation, the alternative is to take your grandkids with you when you holiday. This may seem a daunting prospect (especially if you have your own children to cater for too), but with the right approach and some smart planning it can be a success. Here's what to consider making it work.</p> <p><strong>Finding the right location and accommodation</strong></p> <p>This choice of holiday venue can make a big difference to the success or failure of a joint vacation. The key factors to making it work are firstly to ensure that accommodation is central to amenities, such as shops, clubs, beaches or places of interest. You don’t want to have to far to travel once you arrive and having everything close by may give you greater independence if you are mobile enough.</p> <p>Generally speaking, it’s best to settle on just one destination, rather than doing a lot of moving around and having to re-pack several times. Check that accommodation has easy access and is suitable for those who have limited mobility issues. It is also very helpful if the accommodation has pleasant surroundings and outlook, so that it is still an appealing place to spend time if you are not able to get out and about as much as your grandkids. Garden areas, pools, cafes and recreation facilities will help in this regard.</p> <p>The type of accommodation needs some forethought too. It’s preferable to have sufficient space to give your grandchildren some privacy and their own area to retreat to, so that everyone is not on top of each other all the time. This is especially true if you have children with you too. A home or apartment that can give you your own living space and bathroom is a good idea. If it is a hotel, then a separate room for them is preferable.</p> <p><strong>Plan and agree on schedules and expenses</strong></p> <p>While there is no need for a rigid schedule, it is important to allocate time for doing things jointly and for doing some things separately. This can help avoid the stress of being together full time and ensures that all parties get proper relaxation and regeneration. Ideally this should be discussed with your grandchildren in advance and perhaps a rough schedule agreed upon so that everyone is on the same page before you go.</p> <p>Make sure also that things like meals, transport and touring activities are discussed in advance so that you are not packing too much in and that there is agreement on how costs are being shared. If you are doing organised tours or attractions, don’t feel it is essential to do everything together – it may cause unnecessary tensions. Meal arrangements can be varied too, so that there is a combination of joint meals and some private time too.</p> <p><strong>Planning your packing</strong></p> <p>Make sure medicines are in good supply and spare prescriptions arranged. If there is any medical equipment that needs to be taken, make sure you investigate the type of power supply and if adapters are required, if you are going to a foreign country. It’s wise to have spare spectacles and hearing aid batteries on hand too. Pack light too, if you are planning on multiple destinations; you will already be carting extra luggage for them, so you don’t want to make this a bigger burden than necessary.</p> <p>Travel insurance needs to cover all persons on the trip to avoid nasty bills if there are any medical emergencies.</p> <p><strong>Test the waters before making a big commitment</strong></p> <p>If it is the first time you have taken a break together, it may be best to start out by trying a shorter break first to see how things pan out and what issues arise. Even a weekend away may be enough to test the waters to see how the dynamics will work. It is possible to achieve a successful holiday together, as long as the right planning and a little common sense are applied.</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/tips-for-traveling-with-parents.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Think Einstein was smart? Here are 8 people with higher IQs

<p><strong>1. Jacob Barnett: IQ 170</strong></p> <p>Jacob Barnett was <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/autistic-boy-genius-iq-higher-einstein-article-1.1340923">diagnosed</a> with moderate to severe autism at two years old, and doctors predicted he’d never learn to tie his own shoes.</p> <p>Needless to say, he’s mastered dressing himself. The American child prodigy finished grades six through twelve in less than a year, then went to college at age ten.</p> <p>He was a published physicist <a href="https://psmag.com/magazine/jacob-barnett-30-under-30">by the time he was 13</a>.</p> <p>Now he’s <a href="https://uwaterloo.ca/physics-astronomy/about/people/j3barnet">working toward his PhD</a> at age 19.</p> <p><strong>2. Judit Polgár: IQ 170</strong></p> <p>The Hungarian chess master is considered the best female chess player of all time.</p> <p>When she was 15 years and 4 months old in 1991, she was the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1992/02/04/news/youngest-grandmaster-ever-is-15-ferocious-and-female.html">youngest player</a> to become an International Grandmaster.</p> <p>She’s <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/smartest-person-in-the-world-2011-12/#bert-byrne-is-alleged-to-have-an-iq-of-170-3">reported</a> to have an IQ of 170.</p> <p><strong>3. Rick Rosner: IQ 192 to 198</strong></p> <p>Rick Rosner has taken <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/interview-with-rick-rosner-2014-11?r=UK&amp;IR=T">more than 30 IQ tests</a>, revealing his IQ is between 192 and 198, depending on how the tests define their scores.</p> <p>Before the allegedly second-smartest man in the world became a TV writer, he worked as a bouncer, stripper, and nude model.</p> <p>He famously <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/entertainment/lawsuit-millionaire-player-answer-article-1.927553">sued</a> ABC network for a faulty question after losing <em>Who Wants to Be a Millionaire</em> at the $16,000 level, but he lost the case.</p> <p><strong>4. Evangelos Katsioulis: IQ 198</strong></p> <p>With a score of 198, Evangelos Katsioulis, MD, MSc, MA, PhD, has the highest tested IQ in the world, according to the <a href="http://psiq.org/home.html">World Genius Directory</a>.</p> <p>The Greek psychiatrist also <a href="http://www.katsioulis.com/evangelos-katsioulis/">has degrees</a> in philosophy and medical research technology.</p> <p><strong>5. Sho Yano: IQ 200</strong></p> <p>American physician Sho Yano started college at age nine, and earned an MD and PhD <a href="http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/06/young-medical-student-graduate.html">by the time he was 21</a>.</p> <p>He has a black belt in tae kwon do and started composing music when he was four, but he’s put his focus on <a href="https://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Sho_Yano.html">child neurology</a>.</p> <p><strong>6. Nathan Leopold: IQ 200</strong></p> <p>The infamous Nathan Leopold had an IQ of 200 and spoke nine languages by age 18, but he didn’t use his intelligence for the greater good.</p> <p>When he was 19, he and an accomplice were <a href="https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/leopold-and-loeb-gain-national-attention">arrested for murder</a> in 1924 after trying to commit the “perfect crime.”</p> <p>Leopold spent 33 years in jail before being released on parole.</p> <p><strong>7. Marilyn vos Savant: IQ 228</strong></p> <p>When Marilyn von Savant was ten years old, an adult-level Stanford-Binet test revealed she had an <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/4add9230-23d5-11de-996a-00144feabdc0">IQ of 228</a>, which later landed her a Guinness World Record until the company removed the category in 1990 because the numbers are considered inexact.</p> <p>She’s been answering philosophical and mathematical questions for <em>Parade</em> magazine readers in her “Ask Marilyn” <a href="https://parade.com/member/marilynvossavant/">column</a> since 1986</p> <p><strong>8. Ainan Cawley: IQ 263</strong></p> <p>This Irish child genius is <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3721556/The-smartest-40-people-time-revealed-List-includes-geniuses-Einstein-da-Vinci-s-number-one.html">projected</a> to have an IQ of 263.</p> <p>At eight years old, he was already taking third-year chemistry courses at Singapore Polytechnic, and by the time he was nine, he’d memorized the first 518 decimal places of pi.</p> <p>Now 18, he seems to have a knack for entertainment, having written the script and composed music <a href="https://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/irish-child-prodigy-puts-talent-to-use-for-typhoon-charity-254202.html">for a short film called <em>Reflection</em></a> at age 12. </p> <p><em>Written by Marissa LaLiberte. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/think-einstein-was-smart-here-are-8-people-higher-iqs?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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This retirement home for ageing animals will warm your heart

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Located in southern Belgium lies the perfect care home for 150 ageing animals who are living out the rest of their days in peace. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The home which is ran by Valeria Luycx is called Les Petits Vieux meaning The Little Old Ones and is a shelter made to give older animals the best place to spend their final years. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Located in rural Chievres, the animal retreat is home to a number of animals, including Pastis, a pot-bellied pig, a number of elderly dogs, ponies and goats, as reported by the </span><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-45142801"><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fabcnews.au%2Fvideos%2F530188050727430%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The elderly animals were taken to the specialty home due to health problems or their original owners being too old to care for them any longer. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Just some of the gorgeous rescues include a stunning 15-year-old European cat named Azuria, a nine-year-old Carlin dog named Ramses and Yam the nine-year-old Saint Bernard dog who loves a good pat. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The shelter was created in 2000 by Valerie and her husband Serge. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We wanted to recreate family life for the animals,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The older animals are never in cages and are able to explore to their hearts desire, although Valerie says they much prefer to be snuggled on the sofa with her. </span></p>

Retirement Life