Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Nutrient supplements do no good, may do harm

<div class="copy">The only vitamins that help are the ones you get from food, a new study suggests.</div> <div class="copy"> <p>Researchers at Tufts University in the US find that vitamin and mineral supplements are at best a waste of money, and at worst are correlated with increased mortality rates.</p> </div> <div class="copy"> <p>The study, led by nutrition specialist Fang Fang Zhang and <a href="https://dx.doi.org/10.7326/M18-2478">published</a> in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, finds that adequate intakes of vitamin K and magnesium are associated with lower all-cause mortality rates, but the findings hold true only for intake from food sources, not from vitamin supplements.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">On the other hand, excess calcium intake, including from supplements, was linked to a higher rate of cancer mortality. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Vitamin D supplement intake for individuals with no vitamin D deficiency was linked to higher all-cause mortality rates. </span></p> <p>“As potential benefits and harms of supplement use continue to be studied, some studies have found associations between excess nutrient intake and adverse outcomes, including increased risk of certain cancers,” Zhang says.</p> <p>“It is important to understand the role that the nutrient and its source might play in health outcomes, particularly if the effect might not be beneficial.”</p> <p>The study is based on data from 27,725 adults who had answered a range of health and nutrition questions and completed at least one 24-hour food log for the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2006 and 2011.</p> <p>More than half of the participants had used at least one dietary supplement within the previous 30 days, with over 38% using a multivitamin or mineral product.</p> <p>Supplement users were more likely than the rest of the population to get nutrients through their food.</p> <p>They were also disproportionately older, wealthier, whiter, more educated, physically active, and female.</p> <p>They were less likely to smoke, drink heavily, or be obese.</p> <p>In other words, they were people with the resources and inclination to take care of their bodies.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">“Our results support the idea that, while supplement use contributes to an increased level of total nutrient intake, there are beneficial associations with nutrients from foods that aren’t seen with supplements,” said Zhang. </span></p> <p>“This study also confirms the importance of identifying the nutrient source when evaluating mortality outcomes.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrient-supplements-do-no-good-may-do-harm/" target="_blank">cosmosmagazine.com</a> and was written by Samantha Page.</em></p> </div>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

The rise of the Grandfluencer

<p dir="ltr">While previously platforms like Instagram and TikTok were thought to be almost exclusively for young people, there’s a new wave of older influencers, or “<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-09-13/social-media-s-70-up-grandfluencers-debunking-aging-myths/100443904" target="_blank">Grandfluencers</a>”, who are proving that isn’t the case, and doing it in style.</p> <p dir="ltr">Joan MacDonald, who goes by<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/trainwithjoan/" target="_blank">@trainwithjoan</a>, is a 75-year-old who started posting about her fitness journey on Instagram in 2017, and has amassed a staggering 1.4 million followers in the four years since. Most recently, she launched an app with her daughter, a fitness coach, that features meal plans and fitness routines for a variety of fitness levels.</p> <p dir="ltr">Speaking to the ABC, Ms MacDonald said she was initially surprised that people would be interested in what she had to say, but that her daughter soon cleared things up for her: “She said it's what you're representing, that people can do what they think they've not been able to do, or were told that they couldn't do."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CTo-a_mrLJT/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CTo-a_mrLJT/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Joan MacDonald (@trainwithjoan)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Over on TikTok, a group of four gay men who go by<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tiktok.com/@oldgays?lang=en" target="_blank">@oldgays</a><span> </span>post multiple times a week to their 2.4 million followers, primarily about their attempts to understand contemporary popular culture and contemporary gay culture, with hilarious results.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CTsTbYQgBGf/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CTsTbYQgBGf/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Old Gays (@theoldgays)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">One mum explained the appeal of these older influencers to the ABC. Grace Maier, who has two young children, said of one of her favourite Grandfluencers, @brunchwithbabs, “She's got all of these life hacks and tips that remind me of things my grandma shared with me before she passed.</p> <p dir="ltr">"She also doesn't take herself too seriously and just seems like the kind of person who would welcome you into her home.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Babs, a 72-year-old grandmother who lives in Connecticut, shares delicious recipes and life hacks with nearly half a million followers, who come for the food but stay for the maternal wisdom.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CTplhCwlwrL/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CTplhCwlwrL/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Babs (@brunchwithbabs)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">According to a 2019 survey by AARP, a US group which advocates for those over the age of 50, while most people aged 50 and over use technology to stay connected to friends and family, less than half use social media daily.</p> <p dir="ltr">The second-youngest member of Old Gays, 68-year-old Jessay Martin, said that social media had “changed his life”, allowing him to put himself out there and be much more social. “I was just sort of floating by, not being social, not putting myself out there in the gay community. And boy, has the Old Gays changed that."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: @trainwithjoan/Instagram, @theoldgays/Instagram</em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Inside the world’s first midlife wisdom school

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When retirement age hits, a whole new set of challenges are presented. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">From health insurance, funeral plans, superannuation and everything in between, the transition into retirement can be trickier than originally thought.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In order to help with this uncertain time, the world’s first </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">midlife wisdom school, known as <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.modernelderacademy.com" target="_blank">Modern Elder Academy</a> (MEA) has been founded by CEO Chip Conley.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MEA offers courses, both on-line and in person that help people to navigate midlife transitions, find purpose and reframe their mindset on ageing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MEA attracts people of all ages and stages, from midlife and beyond to help and reframe how individuals think about retirement. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Writer Ang Galloway, who is part of the MEA team, said the program helped them restructure their thinking. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I want more from the second half of life than the societal script I inherited. I knew I wasn’t in the market for sensible, beige or elasticised anything and yet the image of ageing that society reflected back at me was at total odds with how I felt. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“MEA helped me to reframe midlife from a crisis to a calling.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Founder Chip Conley said he was inspired to create MEA after writing his book titled </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wisdom@Work: The Making of Modern Elder. </span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There’s a whole culture out there telling us that getting older means becoming less relevant. But MEA deems that wisdom and experience have never been more important in the workplace…or in the world.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He said, “At MEA we believe in making ageing aspirational. It’s about creating a life that is as deep and meaningful as it is long.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MEA runs a series of online courses, including “Navigating Midlife Transitions”, “The Big Reset” and “Flourish in Midlife and Beyond”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The courses have been a huge success online, with people from all over the globe saying how MEA’s message helped them redefine what retirement means for them.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Shutterstock</span></em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

How a financially-savvy 29-year-old plans to retire at age 35

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michelle Ives, a 29-year-old mother of one, believes she has discovered the secret to an early and stress-free retirement. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Central Coast native is planning to retire from running her own copywriting business when she turns 35 in just six short years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">By then, her family will have an impressive investment portfolio worth over $2million. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She plans to leave her job and live off between $70,000 and $100,000 a year from the money her family will make in investing. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When Michelle started her first job at age 14, she said the idea of working into her 70s made her feel “very trapped”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But when she turned 21 and started working full time as a journalist, she got serious about following a strict financial plan. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Everyone followed this linear path to retirement where they work, work, work and do the nine-to-five or just have a job and then they get to 60 to 65 and retire and then potentially have a few golden years to make use of the nest egg that they have built, and that’s if they even have one,” she told </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/superannuation/how-29yearold-michelle-ives-plans-to-retire-at-35/news-story/39a07c283824f7b95d58365a54056922" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But it never made sense to me … and I didn’t feel like it was the only path to financial freedom. I was excited to work but why should I have to do that every day until I’m in my sixties or seventies and not even able bodied enough to enjoy it?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michelle follows a financial movement called FIRE (financial independence and retiring early), which began in the US.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The saving-savvy mum said the movement is primarily about saving the majority of your income and living off what’s left over. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We save around 70 to 80 per cent of our income, as the theory behind FIRE is you need to either take existing income and need to peel it back as much as you possibly can and create disposable income and start saving and investing that.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Or create additional income streams, so get a raise or get a better job or have a side hustle or side business,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It brings forward the retirement age by decades than people can otherwise realistically do. For some people it’s 40 and for some people, 30 is increasingly becoming the age they can retire.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Michelle documents her early retirement plans on her blog and directs many people to financial resources to share her dream of an early retirement. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Shutterstock/Facebook: That Girl on Fire</span></em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

5 fool-proof ways to achieve a spectacular garden

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When it comes to maintaining your garden, not everyone is a self-proclaimed green thumb.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A lot of different environmental and financial factors can alter the progress and growth of a healthy outdoor space. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But with these five tips, anyone can become an expert gardener in a few simple steps to have your garden thriving!</span></p> <p><strong>Plan your garden</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The key to a successful garden is planning and structuring before you even start.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You should know what type of soil you’re dealing with before you head to your local nursery to find plants that will work best. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You will also need to make sure you choose the right plants that will thrive in your garden outside, as well as what will work best in inside spaces. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So get planning, and talk to the professionals at your local nursery for fool-proof advice. </span></p> <p><strong>Buy plants that are difficult to kill</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are extensive ranges of low maintenance plants that are notoriously difficult to kill. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Renowned horticulturalist Mike Wells says there are many plants that are happy soaking in the sun without being regularly watered. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“People need to remember to check on their gardens and their indoor plants. Most indoor plants can last a week without watering but they need a quality potting mix,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mike says one of his go-to and easy-to-please plants is succulents, for both indoors and outdoors, as they don’t need daily watering and can be very inexpensive.</span></p> <p><strong>‘Set and forget’ plants</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some gardeners are turning to growing their own fresh produce, as they require a lot less maintenance. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These ‘set and forget’ plants are a great long-term investment, and do not need constant monitoring in larger garden beds</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Having fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs straight from your own backyard is a huge win financially, as well as for your kitchen!</span></p> <p><strong>Supercharging your plants</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In order to maintain a healthy, weed-free garden, mulching is a must. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mike Wells says that adding mulch to ornamental gardens can be a lifesaver by extending the longevity of all plants. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Cypress pine wood chips are best to 50 to 75mm deep. For a vegetable garden, these would be too coarse, so a chopped lucerne or fine sugar cane mulch to no deeper than 50mm is recommended,” says Mike.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“For the gardeners who don’t want to fertilise often, choose a controlled release plus organics product which should only need light incorporation every six months.”</span></p> <p><strong>Self-watering plants</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For the tech-savvy gardener, self-watering systems can be a lifesaver. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">No more having to schedule watering your plants, and worrying if they are getting enough </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">water, as smart systems take the hassle out for you. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They reduce the amount of water you need for the garden. Just set up the automatic timer and away you go.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are multiple options when deciding on an indoor or outdoor plant watering system. Some are so high tech you can operate them using a mobile phone.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These systems, combined with carefully planning and maintaining your garden, are destined to have your garden blooming all year round.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Shutterstock</span></em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

10 long riddles to give your brain a workout

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Who doesn’t love a good riddle? Whether you prefer easy riddles, hard riddles, or short riddles, there’s just something about trying to solve these brain busters that keeps us coming back for more. Come on, is there anything better than finally solving a mind-bender we’ve been stuck on for a while?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You may consider yourself a master of riddles, but remember – you haven’t seen our list of long riddles yet. Buckle up – these riddles will get your gears turning!</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Can you solve these long riddles?</span></p> <p><strong>The farmer's river crossing</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A farmer went to a market and bought a wolf, a goat, and a cabbage. On his way home, the farmer came to the bank of a river and rented a boat. But crossing the river by boat, the farmer could carry only himself and a single one of his purchases: the wolf, the goat, or the cabbage. If left unattended together, the wolf would eat the goat, or the goat would eat the cabbage. The farmer’s challenge was to carry himself and his purchases to the far bank of the river, leaving each purchase intact. How did he do it?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: The farmer takes seven trips over – here are his steps:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take the goat over</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Return</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take the wolf or cabbage over</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Return with the goat</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take the cabbage or wolf over</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Return</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take goat over</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Note: The riddle doesn’t forbid the farmer from bringing a purchase back, which makes the steps above possible.</span></p> <p><strong>The suspicious hotel visit</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A woman is sitting in her hotel room and hears a knock at the door. She opens the door to see a man whom she’s never met before. He says, “I’m sorry, I have made a mistake, I thought this was my room.” He then goes down the corridor and into the elevator. The woman goes back into her room and calls security. What made the woman so suspicious of the man?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: If he really thought it was his hotel room, he would have tried to open the door – not knock on it first.</span></p> <p><strong>Man and a brick</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A man is found unconscious in front of a store at two in the morning. His head is bleeding and there’s a brick laying next to him. When the police arrive, they carry the man to jail. Why did they arrest him?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: The man was trying to rob the store. He threw a brick at the store’s bullet-proof window and it bounced back and hit him.</span></p> <p><strong>My three sons</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A father told his three sons he would die soon and he needed to decide which one of them to give his property to. He said, “Go to the market and buy something that is large enough to fill my bedroom, but small enough to fit in your pocket. From this, I will decide which of you is the wisest and worthy enough to inherit my land.” They all went to the market, and each came back with a different item. The father told his sons to come into his bedroom one at a time and try to fill up his bedroom with their item. The first son came in and put some pieces of cloth he bought and laid them across the room, but it barely covered the floor. The second son came in and laid some hay on the floor, but there was only enough to cover half the floor. The third son came in and showed his father what he bought. He wound up getting the property. What did the third son show his father?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: A box of matches. Whenever he lit a match, it filled the room with light.</span></p> <p><strong>The big family</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There’s a girl who has a large family. She has an equal amount of brothers and sisters, but each brother only has half as many brothers and sisters. What’s the correct amount of brothers and sisters?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: Four sisters and three brothers.</span></p> <p><strong>Door to paradise</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You stand in front of two doors. A guard stands next to each door. You know the following things: one path leads to paradise, the other leads to death. You cannot distinguish between the two doors. You also know that one of the two guards always tells the truth and the other always lies. You have permission to ask one guard one question to discover which door leads to paradise. What one question would you ask to guarantee you enter the door to paradise?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: Ask, “Which door would the other guard say leads to paradise?”</span></p> <p><strong>The basket full of hats</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is a basket full of hats. Three are white and two are black. Three men, Tom, Tim and Jim, each take a hat out of the basket and put it on their heads without seeing the hat they selected or the hats the other men selected. The men arrange themselves so Tom can see Tim and Jim’s hats, Tim can see Jim’s hat, and Jim can’t see anyone’s hat. Tom is asked what colour his hat is and he says he doesn’t know. Tim is asked the same question, and he also doesn’t know. Finally, Jim is asked the question, and he does know. What colour is his hat?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: The hat is white. If Tom doesn’t know his hat colour then the other two men’s hats cannot be both black otherwise he would know his hat is white. When Tim doesn’t know his hat colour either, that means Jim’s hat could not be black otherwise Tim would have to know his hat was white based on Tom’s answer.</span></p> <p><strong>What word am I?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Consider this about a word: The first two letters signify a male, the first three letters signify a female, the first four letters signify a great, while the entire world signifies a great woman. What is the word?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: Heroine.</span></p> <p><strong>The lake house</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sally lives in a place where six months of the year is mild summer and the temperature drops significantly the other six months. She owns a lake where there is a small island. She wants to build a house on the island and needs to get materials there. She doesn’t have a boat, plane, or anything to transport them to the island. How does Sally solve this problem?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: She waits to take the materials over during the colder months because the lake will freeze over, so she can walk over it.</span></p> <p><strong>The old horror house</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You walk into an old horror house. It has no power or plumbing. Once inside, you see three doors. Each door has a number on it. Behind each door is a way for you to die. Behind door number one, you die by getting eaten by a lion. Behind door number two, you die by getting murdered. Behind door number three, you die by electric chair. You can’t turn back, so you have to go through a door. Which door do you go through?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Answer: Door number three – the house has no power, which means it doesn’t have electricity. Therefore, the electric chair won’t work.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Getty Images</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">This article first appeared on <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/long-riddles-to-give-your-brain-a-workout" target="_blank" title="Long riddles to give your brain a workout">Reader's Digest</a>.</span></em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Vintage-loving couple shun modern day life for 1940s style

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A British couple have shunned the bells and whistles of modern life to embrace a more old-fashioned lifestyle. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ruth Shelley, 28, and Robert Oestmann, 27, from the West Midlands share a love of all things vintage and have redecorated their home to match. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Not only do they wear old-fashioned clothing, listen to wartime music on their gramophone, and refuse to own a TV, but they even own a vintage car.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 396.6386554621849px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843042/vintage-1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9594583e62334e3a8e6396a9aea530ac" /></p> <p><em>Image credit: Instagram @vintage.robb</em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Robert is a keen home cook, and often experiments with recipes that date back to the 1700s when not making a living selling whiskey.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ruth, a research historian, has praised their unique vintage lifestyle for having a beneficial impact on their relationship.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She said, “</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Robert and I dress like this all of the time as we are in love with the style. Robert mainly wears a suit and flat cap whereas I may wear clothing from 1930s to 1940s.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The couple is intrigued with history and have been known to turn heads on the street with their distinctive style. </span></p> <p><img style="width: 400.5145797598628px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843043/vintage-2.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7270e81a6f8241299b45f917d23d95c2" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Instagram @ladyadepha</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ruth said, “This style isn't something you could wear if you are shy as we do get stared at a lot. We don't mind at all and it's often positive feedback.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Robert said a lot of his inspiration comes from watching old films and reading old books with his grandparents as a child. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ruth said, “In our spare time, we read, talk or Robert cooks and I help. We have a few original cookbooks which are interesting from a historical point of view.”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 426.497277676951px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843044/vintage-4.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d67759f81c024909bd052a62c212051a" /><br /><br /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Instagram @ladyadepha</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of Robert’s favourite dishes is Depression Era Meat Loaf from 1938, whereas Ruth likes to make Welsh cakes on a griddle. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The couple both claim that their lifestyle has had a positive impact on their lives and forces them to live in the present.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ruth said, “For us, this lifestyle works best and is beneficial for our relationships. It works for us as we are present in the moment as opposed to glued to Netflix or on our phones.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Instagram @ladyadepha @vintage.robb</span></em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Huge travel no-no: Woman tries to claim six resort sunbeds before 7am

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A TikTok user has angered</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">holidaymakers after dumping water bottles and towels on six vacant sunbeds at a resort in Hawaii to ‘reserve’ them before 7am. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The clip was shared by an American mother </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">impersonating people who shamelessly scatter their belongings across rows of sunbeds before walking away to return later.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video, which has racked up over two million views, was captioned, “We all know that one person at the resort.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the video, she walks around the poolside resort area and vigorously throws her personal belongings across the lounges, as the time stamp reads 6:55am</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video sparked a slew of angry online comments, with many people branding the poor etiquette as the ultimate holiday sin. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One person said, “I would be moving her stuff,” while another joked, “Ahh the vacation Karen.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One commenter said they would “move their stuff” if they didn't turn up after an hour, while another remarked, “I go on vacation to get away from people like this.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite the comment section being flooded with angry remarks, some people admitted they have been guilty of the same actions while on their holidays. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One person commented, “Nothing wrong with reserving a few chairs. I've done this. Early bird gets the worm - that's what you get for sleeping until 10!”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another wrote, “I think this is ok and I'm ok with other people doing it. They worked for it by waking early.”</span></p> <p><em>Image credits: TikTok</em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Family offers $1million reward for missing heiress

<p>The family searching for the missing heiress Juanita Nielsen has offered up a $1 million reward for anyone who may have information on her disappearance.</p> <p>Juanita, who was 38 when she was seen for the last time, owned the alternative newspaper NOW which, over 46 years ago, she used to rally against developers who were wanting to build on protected heritage buildings in Potts Point.</p> <p>She also used her magazine to promote the Builders Labourers Federation’s controversial green bans during the 70s.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841997/juanita-nielsen.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9b4f59dabe384bef9b19ee7fa5c99b52" /></p> <p>Juanita was last ever seen at the nightclub Carousel Cabaret in Kings cross on the early morning of July 4, 1975.</p> <p>The club was run by a man who allegedly had close ties to notorious underworld crime boss Abe Saffron.</p> <p>While Juanita’s family, nor investigators can confirm why she mysteriously disappeared all those years ago, her living relatives are desperate to find answers.</p> <p>It is widely believed she was kidnapped and murdered due to her anti-development and anti-corruption campaigns which she broadcasted loudly.</p> <p>A coronial inquiry in 1983 found Ms Nielson, who was also an heiress to the Mark Foy's retail empire, had likely died.</p> <p>However, what perhaps is the most shocking and mystifying part of this case, is that despite its extraordinary publicity – a body, nor more information has ever been uncovered.</p> <p>Her family say they are desperate to give Juanita a proper burial with her cousin Francis Foy appealing for any information about her suspected murder.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841996/juanita-nielsen-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8ce11450707b4a428abaf232d833c59e" /></p> <p>"Juanita was very much loved by her family and very much missed," Mr Foy said on Monday.</p> <p>"Her disappearance and the unknown of what happened to her caused incredible pain for her family."</p> <p>Homicide Squad Commander Detective Superintendent Danny Doherty said in a statement that it was unlikely they would be able to collect any further forensic evidence or witness statements, but that hope is not lost.</p> <p>"In turn, it has also become difficult for police to target known persons of interest or associates due to their passing," he said in a statement.</p> <p>"However, it is our hope that someone in the community may have information about Juanita's disappearance, or the location of her remains."</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

How to lead a truly happy life

<p><strong>Survey says that having a family and watching them grow leads to a truly happy life</strong></p> <p>As we age, we reminisce on our lives, looking back at what truly made us happy, and what, if anything, would we change. <span><a href="https://www.country-cousins.co.uk/">Country Cousins,</a></span> leading providers of live-in care to those living with Dementia, wanted to know more about what makes people happy, what they credit to an enriched life and what age was their favourite. So, they asked 1,000 UK adults aged between 50-75, and the results are not what we expected.</p> <p><strong>Men prefer their twenties, yet women preferred their thirties</strong></p> <p>The survey found that 27% of men preferred their twenties and only 22% of men favoured their thirties.</p> <p>On the other hand, women seemed to much prefer their thirties as 25% said they were the best years of their life, typically a time when they’re settled and have a young family, and only 21% of women favoured their twenties.</p> <p><strong>Are the teenage years really the worst in our lives?</strong></p> <p>92% of respondents say being a teenager, a time when you’re carefree and have no major obligations, were some of the <em>least enjoyable</em> years of their lives?</p> <p>Perhaps it’s because 2% of people of the 1,000 respondents said watching their family grow around them helped them to live an enriched life, and 17% said having a family leads to a truly happy life.</p> <p>Along with that, 36% of those over the age of 60 credit watching their family grow and mature around them to be the most rewarding thing about getting older.</p> <p><strong>What can we take from this?</strong></p> <p>So, it seems that to live a truly happy, enriched life, we should aspire to have a family and enjoy watching them grow, learn, and maybe one day have a family of their own.</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Retired couples, have your say

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As we approach retirement, we face a new and often drastic change in our lives. From cutting down on work to downsizing, this new stage of life can signal the start of a healthy and enjoyable period of your life or one that offers no direction.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To combat this, we are encouraged to save for retirement, pursue hobbies and learn new skills, and stay in touch with friends, loved ones, and our wider community. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But there is one aspect of life that many of us look past that can have a significant effect on our retirement years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The answer: our romantic partners.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Two-thirds of Australian retirees are in relationships where they live with a significant other, but the impact of our significant others on us (and vice versa) is less well understood.</span></p> <p><strong>Researchers investigate the impact of our personal relationships</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ayeesha Abbasi, a PhD candidate at the Australian National University (ANU) College of Business and Economics is looking to improve our understanding of retirement and how our experiences are shaped by our personal relationships. Specifically, she is investigating the influence of partners on each other as they transition into and experience retirement.</span></p> <p><strong>Have your say</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To do this, cohabiting couples who have retired completely, semi-retired, or otherwise left the workforce are invited to participate in a survey. Hearing from both partners will help to better understand the influence partners have on each other. Both partners can complete the Couples in Retirement Survey and answer questions regarding how you feel about retirement, relationships, health, social support, and more.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To participate, and contribute to important research, take the time to head </span><a href="https://anu.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1F9q3qpbOlxPYgJ"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

War medal reunited with family almost 100 years later

<p>A war medal lost on a Melbourne beach in Australia, almost more than 100 years ago, has finally been returned to the family of a World War I digger.</p> <p>Just in time for ANZAC Day, Private R.S.G. Smith’s lost WWI British Victory Medal lost on Chelsea Beach in 1925 has been returned – over 61 years since his death.</p> <p>The medal was found in 1980, about 10km away at Beaumaris Beach.</p> <p>Although there were attempts for the medal to be returned to its rightful owner, it was not until it was passed on to Lilydale police Sergeant Vaughan Artherton that the mystery was solved.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840880/gold-medal.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7753df1a9bab45f18cd4609ea3fc4678" /></p> <p>It was revealed that the man who found the medal 40 years ago was married at the time but later passed away.</p> <p>His wife later remarried and came into contact with Sergeant Atherton at their local Upwey Belgrave RSL Club.</p> <p>Sergeant Atherton found Private Smith’s details by combing through the National Archives of Australia, and it was there where he found Robert Stanley Gordon Smith who was born in Fitzroy in 1891.</p> <p>Mr Smith was enlisted at Broadmeadows on the August 7, 1915 and formed a part of the 13th Reinforcements, 5th Battalion of the Australian Imperial Force.</p> <p>He later would go on to serve in France where he was wounded in action twice.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840879/gold-medal-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6bbbe9673e5e4ec693c7c62ccfb80faa" /></p> <p>The veteran would return to Australia after the war, and it was there he met and married Ada Grace Nicholl.</p> <p>He is memorialised at the Coburg cemetery in the north of Melbourne.</p> <p>Sergeant Atherton found information in his service record a statutory declaration where he requested to replace a “bade” that he had lost at Chelsea beach back in 1925.</p> <p>Private Smith’s nephew Alan Norster admitted he was overjoyed when Sergeant Atherton located him to return the war medal.</p> <p>“I am delighted to have been given the opportunity to have this medal put on display at Upwey- Belgrave RSL museum,” he said.</p> <p> <img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840878/gold-medal-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/bb4b6b1c057846f2a29f1f1e499cfe16" /> </p> <p>“I am sure Private Smith’s medal will be treasured by all present and future RSL members”.</p> <p>“I am glad that I have been successful on this occasion in reuniting the medal with the recipient’s relatives”.</p> <p>The successful reunion comes just in time for Anzac Day on Sunday to commemorate the 106th anniversary of the 1915 Gallipoli landing.</p> <p><em>Images: Channel 9</em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

13 people who faked their own deaths

<p>Aimee Semple McPherson<br />On May 18, 1926, Canadian-born evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson disappeared while swimming at a Los Angeles beach. As rescue teams searched for her, one team member died, and a grief-struck follower of the charismatic religious leader drowned herself in despair. Five weeks passed, and McPherson turned up in Mexico, claiming to have gone off the grid in the course of fleeing would-be kidnappers. The kidnapping story seemed shady and was investigated as a possible fraud. However, it remained unresolved until McPherson’s actual death in 1944.</p> <p>Aleister Crowley<br />In September, 1930, Crowley, a self-proclaimed prophet and founder of the religion Thelema, jumped off a cliff near Lisbon, Portugal. Or so he made it seem. Three weeks later, he turned up alive and well in Berlin. Turns out, it was all an elaborate hoax that he’d planned with an acquaintance, the poet Fernando Pessoa. His motives remain unclear, but it’s possible he did it to get away from a woman with whom he’d been travelling and with whom he’d grown bored. Is it any wonder Crowley’s been called “the wickedest man in the world”?</p> <p>Juan Pujol Garcia<br />When World War II ended in Europe, British spy Juan Pujol Garcia, with the help of his MI5 handlers, faked his own death by malaria in order to keep a surreptitious eye on Germany. His wife never believed it and wasn’t surprised when he turned up four decades later, having been outed by an investigative reporter, Nigel West. Garcia was nicknamed “Agent Garbo” (because of his esteemed acting skills) and is one of Europe’s most celebrated spies.</p> <p>Reverend Philip St John Ross<br />When the Reverend Philip St John Wilson Ross, an English vicar, drowned during a seaside holiday in August 1955, his wife and congregation mourned his tragic death… until two years later, when he was spotted in Switzerland with another woman, Kathleen Ryall. He had faked his death and was living with Miss Ryall under the assumed names Mr and Mrs Davies.</p> <p>Lord Lucan<br />Richard John Bingham, the 7th Earl of Lucan, was a relative by marriage to Diana, Princess of Wales. Lord Lucan, as he was commonly known, disappeared in November 1974 following the murder of his children’s nanny and the assault of his wife, who immediately identified the attacker as Lucan. His abandoned car was eventually recovered with an empty bottle of prescription pills inside, making it seem as if Lucan had killed himself. But it’s been widely rumoured that Lucan faked his death, with the assistance of his wealthy and connected friends.</p> <p>John Stonehouse<br />British politician and member of Parliament, John Stonehouse, drowned in Florida in 1974 – conveniently, it seemed, since he was heavily in debt. Two months later, he was discovered in Australia where he was living under an assumed name. At first, it was suspected he was Lord Lucan because Lucan had disappeared earlier that year. In 1976, Stonehouse was convicted of fraud and related offenses and served three years before being released on parole.</p> <p>Takashi Mori<br />In 1995, Takashi Mori, a 47-year old Japanese man living in the Philippines, faked his death with the help of his 21-year-old son, so that his family could collect on his life insurance policy, which was worth at least five million US dollars. They then hurried off to Japan to live on their ill-gotten gains. Nine months after his ‘death,’ Mori was discovered to be living in Manila. He was arrested for insurance fraud, along with his son and wife who were deported from Japan.</p> <p>Patrick McDermott<br />Patrick McDermott was the boyfriend of actress and singer Olivia Newton-John. On a fishing trip to Mexico in June 2005, McDermott disappeared. Although he’s never been seen again, the circumstances of his disappearance have led to speculation that McDermott faked his death to avoid substantial debts, including child support payments to his ex-wife (not Newton-John).</p> <p>John Darwin<br />Pictured here with his wife, Anne, John Darwin apparently drowned while canoeing in the North Sea in 2002. In reality, the Darwins were looking for a life insurance pay-out. In 2007, Darwin turned up in a London police station, pretending to have amnesia. Unfortunately for him, someone found a photo of the couple in Panama, where they were looking to buy property. The Darwins were sentenced to six years in prison for fraud and related charges. Anne ended up divorcing John and wrote a book about her experiences called Out of My Depth.</p> <p>Samuel Israel<br />Former hedge fund manager Samuel Israel had been convicted of running a Ponzi scheme and was to report to prison on June 9, 2008. Instead, Israel abandoned his car alongside the Bear Mountain Bridge in upstate New York, the words “suicide is painless” written in the dust on the hood. Given the circumstances, the authorities didn’t believe for a second that Israel had killed himself. He hadn’t. Instead, he was hiding out with his girlfriend in an RV parked off a nearby interstate. He turned himself in after a month; Israel is still very much alive and in prison.</p> <p>Aimee Semple McPherson<br />On May 18, 1926, Canadian-born evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson disappeared while swimming at a Los Angeles beach. As rescue teams searched for her, one team member died, and a grief-struck follower of the charismatic religious leader drowned herself in despair. Five weeks passed, and McPherson turned up in Mexico, claiming to have gone off the grid in the course of fleeing would-be kidnappers. The kidnapping story seemed shady and was investigated as a possible fraud. However, it remained unresolved until McPherson’s actual death in 1944.</p> <p>Aleister Crowley<br />In September, 1930, Crowley, a self-proclaimed prophet and founder of the religion Thelema, jumped off a cliff near Lisbon, Portugal. Or so he made it seem. Three weeks later, he turned up alive and well in Berlin. Turns out, it was all an elaborate hoax that he’d planned with an acquaintance, the poet Fernando Pessoa. His motives remain unclear, but it’s possible he did it to get away from a woman with whom he’d been travelling and with whom he’d grown bored. Is it any wonder Crowley’s been called “the wickedest man in the world”?</p> <p>Juan Pujol Garcia<br />When World War II ended in Europe, British spy Juan Pujol Garcia, with the help of his MI5 handlers, faked his own death by malaria in order to keep a surreptitious eye on Germany. His wife never believed it and wasn’t surprised when he turned up four decades later, having been outed by an investigative reporter, Nigel West. Garcia was nicknamed “Agent Garbo” (because of his esteemed acting skills) and is one of Europe’s most celebrated spies.</p> <p>Reverend Philip St John Ross<br />When the Reverend Philip St John Wilson Ross, an English vicar, drowned during a seaside holiday in August 1955, his wife and congregation mourned his tragic death… until two years later, when he was spotted in Switzerland with another woman, Kathleen Ryall. He had faked his death and was living with Miss Ryall under the assumed names Mr and Mrs Davies.</p> <p>Lord Lucan<br />Richard John Bingham, the 7th Earl of Lucan, was a relative by marriage to Diana, Princess of Wales. Lord Lucan, as he was commonly known, disappeared in November 1974 following the murder of his children’s nanny and the assault of his wife, who immediately identified the attacker as Lucan. His abandoned car was eventually recovered with an empty bottle of prescription pills inside, making it seem as if Lucan had killed himself. But it’s been widely rumoured that Lucan faked his death, with the assistance of his wealthy and connected friends.</p> <p>John Stonehouse<br />British politician and member of Parliament, John Stonehouse, drowned in Florida in 1974 – conveniently, it seemed, since he was heavily in debt. Two months later, he was discovered in Australia where he was living under an assumed name. At first, it was suspected he was Lord Lucan because Lucan had disappeared earlier that year. In 1976, Stonehouse was convicted of fraud and related offenses and served three years before being released on parole.</p> <p>Takashi Mori<br />In 1995, Takashi Mori, a 47-year old Japanese man living in the Philippines, faked his death with the help of his 21-year-old son, so that his family could collect on his life insurance policy, which was worth at least five million US dollars. They then hurried off to Japan to live on their ill-gotten gains. Nine months after his ‘death,’ Mori was discovered to be living in Manila. He was arrested for insurance fraud, along with his son and wife who were deported from Japan.</p> <p>Patrick McDermott<br />Patrick McDermott was the boyfriend of actress and singer Olivia Newton-John. On a fishing trip to Mexico in June 2005, McDermott disappeared. Although he’s never been seen again, the circumstances of his disappearance have led to speculation that McDermott faked his death to avoid substantial debts, including child support payments to his ex-wife (not Newton-John).</p> <p>John Darwin<br />Pictured here with his wife, Anne, John Darwin apparently drowned while canoeing in the North Sea in 2002. In reality, the Darwins were looking for a life insurance pay-out. In 2007, Darwin turned up in a London police station, pretending to have amnesia. Unfortunately for him, someone found a photo of the couple in Panama, where they were looking to buy property. The Darwins were sentenced to six years in prison for fraud and related charges. Anne ended up divorcing John and wrote a book about her experiences called Out of My Depth.</p> <p>Samuel Israel<br />Former hedge fund manager Samuel Israel had been convicted of running a Ponzi scheme and was to report to prison on June 9, 2008. Instead, Israel abandoned his car alongside the Bear Mountain Bridge in upstate New York, the words “suicide is painless” written in the dust on the hood. Given the circumstances, the authorities didn’t believe for a second that Israel had killed himself. He hadn’t. Instead, he was hiding out with his girlfriend in an RV parked off a nearby interstate. He turned himself in after a month; Israel is still very much alive and in prison.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Lauren Cahn. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/13-people-who-faked-their-own-deaths?pages=1"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Radio station apologises for mistakenly declaring death of Queen Elizabeth

<p>A French radio station has deeply apologised for posting an obituary stating that Queen Elizabeth II had died.</p> <p>RFI stressed out royal fans with the news, stating that she had passed away at 94.</p> <p>The obituary had been prepared in draft form so it's ready in the event of the Queen's death, which is a common practice in the media.</p> <p>Other stars who had passed away included Clint Eastwood, 90, Sophia Loren, 86 and Brigitte Bardot, 86.</p> <p>The obituaries were quickly pulled down.</p> <p>It read: "A technical problem has resulted in the publication of numerous obituaries on our French site.</p> <p>"We are working to rectify this serious bug, and we apologise to all concerned as well as those who follow us and put their trust in us."</p> <p>Jessica Phelan, a journalist for Italian news site <em>The Local Italy</em> took a screenshot of the fake obituaries before they were taken down.</p> <p>She shared a photo of the obituaries on Twitter along with the caption: "Solidarity with former colleagues @RFI, which just accidentally published stacks of draft obits for people who are very much not dead—inc Queen Elizabeth, Raul Castro, Brigitte Bardot &amp; more—complete with dates they were last updated &amp; alternative leads if they die of Covid-19."</p> <p>Luckily for royal fans, the Queen is alive and well whilst navigating the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>She's currently in lockdown with Prince Philip at Windsor Castle with essential staff after the UK goes into lockdown for a second time.</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Queen expected to step down and pass on duties to Prince Charles

<p>The Queen is expected to step down and pass on all her duties to Prince Charles in 2021, a royal expert has extraordinarily claimed.</p> <p>Robert Jobson spoke on True Royalty TV‘s<span> </span><em>The Royal Beat<span> </span></em>where she expressed she believes the Queen will retire from royal life in 2021.</p> <p>The biographer said: “I still firmly believe when the Queen becomes 95, that she will step down”</p> <p><em>Newsweek‘s</em> royal reporter Jack Royston disagreed however, saying: “I think she won’t want to.</p> <p>“But realistically she will get to a point where she has handed over everything to Charles and then how do you look your son in the eye and tell him he is not going to be King?”</p> <p>Mr Jobson has previously told the Daily Mail: “I understand the Queen has given the matter considerable thought and believes that, if she is still alive at 95, she will seriously consider passing the reign to Charles.</p> <p>“Her Majesty is mindful of her age and wants to make sure when the time comes, the transition of the Crown is seamless.”</p> <p>Mr Jobson made another grand claim about Princess Diana, saying Princess Diana was “more powerful than the Queen” before her 1995 <em>Panorama</em> interview.</p> <p>He said: “That period between (Charles and Diana‘s) separation announcement, (Diana) actually was on the ascendancy of getting everything she wanted.</p> <p>“But she did this (Panorama) and I think she thought she was more powerful than the Queen. The Queen thought enough was enough and the shutters came down.”</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Body fat deep below the surface is a toxic risk especially for your heart

<p>Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s easy to forget one of the largest health challenges we face remains the global obesity epidemic. <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/obesity-and-overweight">World Health Organisation data</a> shows obesity has nearly tripled in less than 50 years, with about <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/obesity-and-overweight">40% of adults worldwide</a> now overweight or obese. High body fat increases the risk of chronic diseases, including heart problems, diabetes and cancer.</p> <p>However, it’s not simply the total amount of body fat that can increase the risk of disease. The type and location of fat is also important. We’ve known for some time that subcutaneous fat — the fat just below the skin — <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0171933513000459">increases inflammation</a> in the body. But in recent years, researchers have realised an even more serious risk is the unseen deep body fat that accumulates around vital organs.</p> <p><strong>Fat around organs can be ‘toxic’</strong></p> <p>Fat is not all bad — in fact, some fat does a lot of good. It helps protect vulnerable organs and tissues, and provides a convenient energy supply. If you’re out in the cold, it’s essential fuel for body warming through shivering.</p> <p>But excess fat can increase blood pressure and potentially lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke. Many clinicians use <a href="https://theconversation.com/body-mass-and-evolution-why-the-body-mass-index-is-a-limited-measure-of-public-health-79671">body mass index (BMI)</a> to measure a healthy weight range. It’s calculated as body weight divided by the square of height, and it factors in a healthy amount of fat.</p> <p>But BMI can’t provide information about the shape and size of potentially dangerous internal fat deposits, known as “visceral fat”. Over recent years it’s become apparent visceral fat can lead to disease, and good fat can turn into toxic fat when there is too much.</p> <p>Various organs seem to accumulate visceral fat. This can be a problem because it can create and release damaging molecules and hormones into the blood. These are transported in the bloodstream, potentially causing health complications in distant parts of the body.</p> <p>For example, toxic fat can release proteins that blunt the body’s sensitivity to insulin. Blood glucose levels then rise, potentially <a href="https://www.diabetes.co.uk/body/visceral-fat.html">causing diabetes in the long term</a>. Visceral fat can also stimulate uncontrolled cell growth and replication, <a href="https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/obesity/obesity-fact-sheet">potentially triggering some forms of cancer</a>. A fatty liver is associated with metabolic diseases, and excess kidney fat interferes with the body’s fluid balance.</p> <p><strong>The heart is especially vulnerable</strong></p> <p>Visceral fat can also directly affect the organ around which it’s wrapped. Our <a href="https://www.onlinejacc.org/content/76/10/1197?download=true">new research</a>, published in September in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found visceral fat around the heart produces biochemical molecules that can make the heart beat erratically. These molecules potentially cause a serious heart condition called <a href="https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/conditions/atrial-fibrillation">atrial fibrillation</a>, by disrupting the heart’s electrical activity.</p> <p>Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common types of heart rhythm disturbance, and <a href="https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/advance-article/doi/10.1093/eurheartj/ehaa612/5899003">one in three people</a> over 55 will develop the condition. It occurs when the regular signal to drive each heartbeat originating in the top portion of the heart, the atria, is disrupted. It can cause an irregular and chaotic heartbeat, disrupting the heart’s coordinated pumping action. This can mean not enough fresh blood is circulated to allow regular daily activity.</p> <p>For some people, living with episodes of atrial fibrillation is a daily challenge – coping with bouts of dizziness, the distressing awareness of a “racing heart”, and chest palpitations. Other people may be unaware they have the condition and the first sign could be tragic, such as a stroke due to a blood clot travelling to the brain. This can lead to <a href="https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/conditions/heart-failure">heart failure</a>.</p> <p>An advertisement from the Western Australian health department warning viewers about toxic fat. Only in recent years have researchers discovered the dangers of hidden fat around organs.</p> <p>We worked with clinical cardiologists at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and found fat around the heart secretes molecules which change how nearby cells “talk” to each other, slowing cell-to-cell communication. Because the transfer of electrical signals in the heart muscle are delayed, the heartbeat is potentially destabilised.</p> <p>Although a high BMI increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, it’s the fat burden on the heart, and not BMI itself, that’s most important in electrical and structural disruption.</p> <p>This suggests toxic substances released from the surrounding fat can directly harm the nearby organ, without travelling via the blood.</p> <p>For heart patients, these findings mean the surgical removal of cardiac fat could be an effective treatment to consider. Also, it potentially paves the way for the future development of drugs that can suppress the release of damaging molecules from hidden fat.</p> <p>Nevertheless, these findings underscore the danger of an “obese heart”, particularly amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Research is emerging that obesity is a major risk factor for <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/obesity-and-covid-19.html">serious complications while infected with the virus</a>, and the fat load on the heart may be implicated.</p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/lea-m-d-delbridge-1155735">Lea M D Delbridge</a>, University of Melbourne and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/james-bell-1156890">James Bell</a>, La Trobe University. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/body-fat-deep-below-the-surface-is-a-toxic-risk-especially-for-your-heart-146307">The Conversation</a>.</em></p> <p> </p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

10 old-time remedies that actually work

<p>These remedies have been known about for hundreds of years and you might have heard about some of these incredible tips from your grandmother! </p> <p>See the ten best remedies that actually work. </p> <p><strong>1. Old-time home remedies</strong></p> <p>Researchers have produced hundreds of studies in the past five years about the effectiveness of home remedies, but not all the old-time solutions really help. That’s why this list focuses on treatments with evidence to back them up. Remember that even natural cures can interact with medications. If you take pills regularly or have a chronic health condition, check with your doctor before trying these.</p> <p><strong>2. Buttermilk for age spots</strong></p> <p>You can skip the expensive skin creams. This rich by-product of butter contains lactic acid and ascorbic acid. One study showed that this combination lightened age spots more effectively than lactic acid alone. Apply to the spots with a cotton ball, then rinse with water after 20 minutes.</p> <p><strong>3. Comfrey for back pain</strong></p> <p>This medicinal plant has been used for centuries to treat joint and muscle pain. A study of 215 patients found that applying concentrated comfrey cream to the lower and upper back reduced muscle pain. You can buy it in health food stores and online.</p> <p><strong>4. Aloe for burns</strong></p> <p>“Aloe is a very soothing remedy for burns,” says dermatologist, Dr Purvisha Patel. One study demonstrated it was more effective than other treatments for second-degree burns. Make sure you use pure aloe, not a scented version. If you own an aloe plant, simply cut open a leaf and apply the liquid directly to the affected area. For serious burns, you should still see a doctor.</p> <p><strong>5. Ground flaxseed for constipation</strong></p> <p>“It’s almost as if nature tailor-made ground flaxseed to relieve constipation,” says gastroenterologist Dr Will Bulsiewicz. “It is a great source of both insoluble and soluble fibre, which add bulk to the stool and promote the growth of good bacteria.” Ground flaxseed is an excellent source of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to help soften stool and relieve constipation. Aim for two to three tablespoons a day as part of a fibre-rich diet.</p> <p><strong>6. Thyme tea for coughs</strong></p> <p>Thyme is a natural expectorant that relaxes the respiratory tract and loosens mucus. Studies have found that using thyme in combination with primrose or ivy relieves the frequency and duration of coughs. To make thyme tea, place two tablespoons of fresh thyme (or one tablespoon dried) in a cup of hot water. Allow it to steep, then drain out the herb. Add honey to taste.</p> <p><strong>7. Blackberry tea for diarrhoea</strong></p> <p>Blackberries are rich in tannins, substances that can tighten mucous membranes in the intestinal tract. They have long been used as a treatment for diarrhoea. Make blackberry tea by boiling one or two tablespoons of fresh or frozen blackberries or dried blackberry leaves in one and a half cups of water for 10 minutes, then strain. Drink several cups a day. You can also buy blackberry tea, but make sure that it contains blackberry leaves and not just flavouring.</p> <p><strong>8. Lavender oil for foot odour</strong></p> <p>Lavender essential oil not only smells good but also has antibacterial properties that help kill germs. Before bed, rub a few drops of oil onto your feet and massage it in. Pull on a pair of socks to protect your sheets.</p> <p>9. Globe artichoke extract for GORD and heartburn</p> <p>Compounds in artichoke leaves called caffeoylquinic acids stimulate the release of bile from the gallbladder, which helps relieve nausea, gas, bloating, and other symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and heartburn. Since the leaves are mostly inedible, look for artichoke extract capsules in health food stores or online.</p> <p><strong>10. Cherries for gout</strong></p> <p>People who ate about 20 cherries every day were less likely to experience flare-ups of gout, according to a study of 633 patients with the condition. Cherries contain compounds that help neutralise uric acid.</p> <p><em>Written by Jen McCaffery and Tina Donvito. This <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/20-old-time-home-remedies-that-actually-work" target="_blank">article</a> first appeared in Reader’s Digest. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> <p>​</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

87-year-old woman berates William and Kate in hilarious exchange

<p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge could not hold back their tears of laughter after an aged care resident berated the pair for their “bingo calling” skills during a visit to Cardiff.</p> <p>Prince William and Kate Middleton both visited Shire Hall Care Home in Wales three months after conducting a virtual bingo session for the staff and residents.</p> <p>Joan Drew-Smith, 87, did not forget the pair’s appearance via live stream either and claimed they both did a "b-----y s-----y job" at it.</p> <p>The spirited elderly woman was certainly open and vocal about the couple’s lack of bingo calling skills during their session in May, claiming it "wasn't as good as it should have been," to the press.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837210/prince-william-kate-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9a045a92f35745f7878e577352846078" /></p> <p>Upon reuniting with Drew-Smith, the Duke asked if she remembered him.</p> <p>"'Hello Joan, do you remember we did the bingo with you? You said we weren't very good!" Prince William said.</p> <p>Drew-Smith replied with a simple "yes", adding "You did a b------y s-----y job".</p> <p>Though initially taken aback by Drew-Smith's blunt feedback, however they both into a fit of laughter moments later.</p> <p>Drew-Smith continued her comedy routine, by asking Kate Middleton if she was the prince’s "assistant."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CDhXPtBHS03/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CDhXPtBHS03/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">#special#photos#uk#london#british#royalfamily#queen#queenelizabeth#princephillip#princecharles#princessdiana#princessanne#princeandrew#princeedward#thecrown#monarchy#cambridge#princewilliam#katemiddleton#dukeofcambridge#duchessofcambridge#cute#princegeorge#princesscharlotte#princelouis#flower#flowerstagram#beautiful#art#royal#flowerstagram</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/uk.monarchy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> uk.monarchy</a> (@uk.monarchy) on Aug 5, 2020 at 1:37pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Laughing in response, the Duchess replied: "I have been for a long time."</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visited the quaint Welsh town to see for themselves the brand-new beach huts installed as part of the Vale of Glamorgan Council's £6 million (10.9 million AUD) regeneration project in the community.</p> <p>The pair also met with aged care residents, and thankfully enough met a much more welcoming resident.</p> <p>Margaret Stocks, 95, told the pair: "I did enjoy it,", claiming she "hadn't played," bingo before, despite being the victor of the virtual game.</p> <p>"Neither had we!" the Duchess responded, admitting that's why the pair were "so bad" at calling the numbers.</p> <p>"It was a new experience for us," William added.</p> <p>The Prince shared his admiration for Drew-Smith's candid nature, and only had praise for her when speaking to a staff member: "I love Joan, she's brilliant. If only everyone was as honest as her."</p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Over-60s make the leap to virtual “Feisty Feet” dance classes

<p><span><a href="https://nzdc.org.nz/education/feisty-feet">Feisty Feet</a></span> is an over 60s seniors dance class created and facilitated by The New Zealand Dance Company (NZDC), which brings together the wisdom keepers of our communities to express and enjoy themselves through dance.</p> <p>Feisty Feet classes, certified by the <a href="https://www.livestronger.org.nz/">Live Stronger for Longer</a> intiative, are held weekly at two Auckland locations in Takapuna and Point Chevalier, but can now also be accessed from anywhere across New Zealand through a weekly Virtual Class.</p> <p>NZDC tutor <a href="https://nzdc.org.nz/our-team/kerry-ann-stanton">Kerry-Ann Stanton</a>, who manages the class in  Pt. Chevalier, has been teaching and developing Feisty Feet from its inception in 2016. Kerry-Ann says, “I enjoy bringing the joys of movement to people in their older age. Dance has been shown to have a positive influence on people, such as a reduced risk of dementia, reduced stress and depression, providing increased energy and serotonin. These classes are fun, inclusive of all cultures and are a great way to make new friends.”</p> <p>Like most activities in 2020, Feisty Feet was affected by COVID-19, but in a positive way. The disappointment regular class-goers expressed about missing their weekly class during lockdown inspired NZDC to move Feisty Feet online. The Company wanted to stay connected with its seniors dance community from the safety of their homes as a means of combatting loneliness during the isolation period and supporting physical and mental wellbeing.</p> <p><span><a href="https://nzdc.org.nz/our-team/carlene-newall-de-jesus">Carlene Newall de Jesus</a></span>, a community dance advocate, specialist, and lecturer at the University of Auckland is also a core facilitator for Feisty Feet, developing and teaching NZDC’s Takapuna class. She reflects,“The transition to virtual classes was surprisingly smooth. After initially worrying that being together across our screens would be too removed and distanced, it became clear that even in this digital space, physical exploration and connection was still possible. As the virtual classes developed I began to appreciate homes spaces as dancing places and found ways to allow individual contribution even in the digital space.”</p> <p>Survey feedback from class participants also showcased that the benefits of a Feisty Feet class were not lost when moving to an online class.</p> <p>One participant shares, “Although I've never attended a dance class before, learning flowing movements and practising coordination, balance and memory and enjoying the friendly faces of other participants and the encouragement of the tutors got me moving and made me feel content in myself.”</p> <p>Another participant enjoyed the “extra physical movement, using whole body and the associated wellbeing and inspiration and pleasure of communication and meeting new dancers as well as learning new IT skills.”</p> <p>An additional participant reflected how it was “easy to access, no embarassment as on [your] own and no time lost in transportation”</p> <p>Carlene encapsulates the intention of Feisty Feet classes and the desire at NZDC to continue to offer the online class alongside in-person classes: “I believe dance offers a unique combination of exercise, creativity, cognition and socialisation that can be beneficial for older bodies, brains and general wellbeing. The digital platform allows older adults who may not have access to appropriate dance classes in their region, or who are unable to travel to classes, a chance to dance, move and express. Aotearoa is made up of more than just large cities and I am excited to see what sense of community can develop across older New Zealanders from diverse towns and regions.”</p> <p>More Information: <span><a href="https://nzdc.org.nz/education/feisty-feet">nzdc.org.nz/education/feisty-feet</a></span></p> <p><strong>VIRTUAL</strong></p> <p><strong>WHERE</strong>: Online through Zoom</p> <p><strong>WHEN</strong>: Every Friday 9-10am</p> <p><strong>TUTOR</strong>: Carlene Newall de Jesus</p> <p><strong>COST</strong>: $10 per session. Register ahead of class here: <span><a href="https://bit.ly/virtualfeistyfeet">https://bit.ly/virtualfeistyfeet</a></span></p> <p><strong>TAKAPUNA</strong></p> <p><strong>WHERE:</strong> St Peters Anglican Church, 11 Killarney Street, Takapuna</p> <p><strong>WHEN:</strong> Every Wednesday 10-11am until 16 December 2020</p> <p><strong>TUTOR:</strong> Carlene Newall de Jesus</p> <p><strong>COST:</strong> $10 per session or $90 for 10 sessions. Pay in person before class with cash.</p> <p><strong>POINT CHEVALIER</strong></p> <p><strong>WHERE</strong>: Subud Hall, 19 Formby Rd, Pt Chevalier</p> <p><strong>WHEN</strong>: Every Wednesday 11am-noon until 16 December 2020</p> <p><strong>TUTOR</strong>: Kerry-Anny Stanton</p> <p><strong>COST</strong>: $10 per session or $90 for 10 sessions. Pay in person before class with cash.</p> <p>Photos by Caroline Bindon and Ashley David.</p> <p> </p>

Retirement Life

Placeholder Content Image

Alzheimer’s breakthrough discovery

<p>Australian researchers are optimistic as they believe they have discovered a treatment that could revise the impacts of memory loss in people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>The Macquarie University Dementia Research Centre study builds on previous research that found an enzyme in the brain could modify a protein so it prevents the development of Alzheimer’s symptoms.</p> <p>The latest research went further by finding the gene responsible for the enzyme that could help restore or improve memory in mice suffering from advanced Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>The study also suggests the gene therapy, which involves genetic material being introduced to cells to help replace abnormal genes, may also be helpful for those who are in their 40s and 50s and suffer from dementia.</p> <p>Researchers have discovered gene therapy is safe when given in high doses and for a long period of time.</p> <p>Dr Arne Ittner, one of the leaders of the study, says a better understanding is required of what happens to the molecules in the brain during dementia.</p> <p>"Our work delivers a very powerful piece in this puzzle," he said in a statement.</p> <p>His brother and co-research leader, Professor Lars Ittner, said he was ecstatic to see a decade worth of research transition into clinical development that could benefit those living with dementia.</p> <p>"This provides hope as there is a lot of therapy out there focused on prevention but not much for those already affected by the disease," he said.</p> <p>The two researchers said the possible success of this new therapy could be within reach in five to 10 years.</p>

Retirement Life