Retirement Life

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"Prisoner in his own home": Veteran's battle for freedom

<p>An Aussie veteran is battling for his freedom after being stuck in his apartment for over a year. </p> <p>Eric Bouvier, a 92-year-old veteran, wants nothing more than to sit outside in the sun without having to rely on others. </p> <p>Despite being in a wheelchair, Eric is capable of getting himself around. </p> <p>The only problem is, he lives on the third floor of an apartment block in the eastern Sydney suburb of Maroubra, which doesn't have lift access. </p> <p>After serving in World War II, the Department of Veteran Affairs stepped in and purchased him a chairlift, saying they would also pay for the installation in his home unit block.</p> <p>But well over a year after its approval, it still sits in a box waiting to be installed.</p> <p>"He is a prisoner in his own home," Jason, Eric's carer, told <a href="https://9now.nine.com.au/a-current-affair/sydney-war-veterans-battle-with-body-corporate-over-chairlift-installation-inaction/dd3d3f4f-c54b-4859-bbab-ff578e48d977" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>A Current Affair</em></a>.</p> <p>"Eric and I have asked the body corporate to put the chairlift in, but discussions are still going on and meanwhile Eric is stuck inside."</p> <p>"I've been trapped inside my home now for nearly 18 months," Eric said.</p> <p>The problem is the building's 1960s internal hand-railing is not to standard and needs to be replaced at the body corporate's expense before the chairlift can be installed.</p> <p>The building's body corporate have been getting quotes and debating the price of the renovations for well over 12 months. </p> <p>"It's my home and I have no rights," said Bouvier, who has now engaged a lawyer to battle the body corporate and get freedom.</p> <p>"It's everyone's legal right to access their home and if a hand railing needs to be installed, it should be done immediately," Amanda Farmer, Bouvier's Strata property lawyer said.</p> <p>Eric is continuing to wait patiently inside his home until the day his chairlift gets installed.</p> <p>"I may have lost my freedom for now, but at least I can still smile," he said.</p> <p><em>Image credits: A Current Affair</em></p>

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Readers respond: What responsibilities did you have at home when you were young?

<p>We asked our readers what responsibilities they had at home when they were young and the responses were nothing short of surprising. </p> <p>From looking after younger siblings to having dinner ready because both parents were at work, here are just some of your awesome responses.</p> <p>Bernadette Heckford - Everything as my mother had seven kids. Being the eldest girl you helped her do chores. Taught me how to care for my home.</p> <p>Denise McGoldrick - We lived on a farm so when we got home from school we had to feed the pigs, ducks and chooks, cut up wood for the combustion stove, usually just splinters until we were old enough to do the big stuff. Only when our chores were finished we were allowed to watch TV for an hour, then bath, dinner, washing dishes and bed at 7.30pm. Also had to keep our rooms tidy and make our beds before leaving for school and have our uniforms and shoes ready the night before. Our Dad was an Army man, so was big on preparation. Still got my clothes ready the night before, so I am not running late.</p> <p>Peggy Czajka Bowser - Both parents worked so I had to prepare and get dinner ready for mum to cook, look after my little brother, do my own washing from the age of 12 and sometimes wash the whole family’s washing on weekends as well. Shopping, ironing, cleaning the floors, cut grass, general everyday cleaning of my room and put up with three painful lazy brothers as well. </p> <p>Diane Jack - Collect the eggs, bring in the wood my brother had chopped, set the table and do my homework.</p> <p>Gill Holman - Youngest of five and we all had chores. My dad even taught my brothers to sew on buttons and darn socks which he had learned to do in the RAF. We all learnt skills for life.</p> <p>Charlie Hedges - Keeping my room clean, helping to clean all common rooms, laundry, ironing, setting the table for meals, clearing and washing dishes, tending to my younger sibs, lawn mowing and raking leaves in the fall, anything else my parents asked. Our "payment" for family chores was a roof over our heads, food, basic wardrobe. If we wanted more we needed to find gainful employment outside of home.</p> <p>Kaye Whitbread - Helping Mum in the house. I was the only girl. Brothers did nothing.</p> <p>Judy Bagatella - I was responsible for all my five brothers and sisters. Washing up, taking them to the park ect. My parents had to both work. I didn't mind at all. When I was 19 though I moved away.</p> <p>Georgina Johnson - Keeping our room tidy and clean, helping prepare meals, ironing, chopping wood, and anything else that mum needed help with around the place. Also mowing the lawns with a hand mower. </p> <p>Petra Harris - To begin with, mum and dad had a servo open from 6am for five to six days a week so after school I usually went home (I was around 12) and started the evening meal prep. Other times I learnt to pump petrol and to get pocket money to go to the pictures. I ran a carpark for patrons of the footy club across the road. Then the parents bought a coffee lounge so when not at school I worked there before and after school and Saturday mornings, no pay/pocket money. Then I decided I would like a job and earn real money and the oldies were not impressed. I didn't resent my parents because they taught me good work ethic.</p> <p>If you would like to share a memory of your own click <a href="https://www.facebook.com/oversixtyNZ/posts/pfbid0ESVN4M8nQNRhJ78LpoZp1Ree5DSV7cK7VmmXiW81duBkymnwqPSmUDLSg2FRG7cjl" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p>Image: Shutterstock</p>

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Readers respond: What advice did your grandparents give to you that you remember best?

<p dir="ltr">We asked our readers to think back to a time their grandparents gave them some of the best advice they still remember today. </p> <p dir="ltr">From looking for the good in everyone, tucking in your singlet, and never trusting your fart.</p> <p dir="ltr">Here are some of your answers.</p> <p dir="ltr">Peter Laing - My Gran had a saying: The wise old owl sat in the oak. The more he listened the less he spoke. The less he spoke the more he heard. We should all be like that wise old bird.</p> <p dir="ltr">Gail Keeb - My dad's mum always said "Spend less than you make!".</p> <p dir="ltr">Elsie Miller - If a job is worth doing, it is worth doing well.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kerri Anderson - My grandmother gave me two important pieces of advice on aging - never walk past a toilet and never trust a fart!</p> <p dir="ltr">Laraine Fields - My Nana told me that there was some good in everyone and to look for that.</p> <p dir="ltr">Janice Grove - If you cannot say anything nice, say nothing.</p> <p dir="ltr">Susan Buckett - Always wear clean underwear when you go out, in case you have an accident.</p> <p dir="ltr">Tracey Burns Kitchingham - Some things are better left unsaid…My grandmother was a very wise woman.</p> <p dir="ltr">Pam Leonard - Always leave a place better than the way you found it. No good being so heavenly good that you’re no earthly use.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kylie Jane McCauley - Always keep a little cash aside for a rainy day. You never know when a storm might blow in.</p> <p dir="ltr">Peter Hulthen - Respect your elders. Help the less fortunate.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sue Casey - Life is too long to be unhappy.</p> <p dir="ltr">To leave a memory of your own, or to check out more of the inspiring responses head <a href="https://www.facebook.com/oversixtyNZ/posts/pfbid02RxCVd13bBb1N59vYUcgQohgxie6u4uazXNTgvFmRWpKSa6z7ZLKc5peUwaQATUb6l" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Readers respond: What is the best thing about growing older?

<p dir="ltr">We asked our readers to tell us the best thing about growing up and your responses were surprising. </p> <p dir="ltr">From simply being alive and healthy to see another day, to spending more time with the family and great grandchildren, here are just a few of your amazing responses.</p> <p dir="ltr">Barbara Damp - Not being worried about what other people think of you!</p> <p dir="ltr">Jennifer Waldron - Just waking up each day and knowing you are alive! Then enjoying that day.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bernadette Foley - Freedom to do what you want, freedom to spend quality time with family and friends and finally freedom to be happy with your life because of the choices you have made!!</p> <p dir="ltr">Jean Kavanagh - Experience, also at my nursing home, all meals provided, no dishes, feet up, even bed making, although I do my own washing, I also do mine.</p> <p dir="ltr">Susan Graham - Retrospectively every age is an adventurous journey that you just get better at navigating.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sherrill Fletcher Brock - Freedom to do as you choose.</p> <p dir="ltr">Narain Lodha - Old age is for relaxation, rest and retrospection.</p> <p dir="ltr">Thomas Gadsden - Maybe just being realistic, about the future!</p> <p dir="ltr">Johanna Shakes - Doing whatever you want and having the knowledge to do it!!!!</p> <p dir="ltr">Vanessa Maloy - Wearing sleeveless tops and dresses and not caring if my bat wings wobble or not wearing make up if I don't feel like it.</p> <p dir="ltr">To leave a memory of your own, or to check out more of the inspiring responses head <a href="https://www.facebook.com/oversixtyNZ/posts/pfbid0PYJDNFjSyh4WygmqQ6kL4AFzhNdt3NeCgxHstZmMcgjyQqZUAdXeoi7HBhdSRFtml" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Readers Respond: What would you like your children and grandchildren to remember about you?

<p dir="ltr">We asked our readers to tell us what they want their children and grandchildren to remember most about them. </p> <p dir="ltr">From the unconditional love to the fun you had together as you grew up, here are some of your loveliest responses:</p> <p dir="ltr">Karen TeNyenhuis Rafael - That I loved them unconditionally, equally and always wished the best for them. </p> <p dir="ltr">Jan Hitch - That they were ALL my world, and I loved them, with all my heart.</p> <p dir="ltr">Caroline West - That I love them and always want the best for them.</p> <p dir="ltr">Janine Mason - All the wonderful times we have had together, and that I love them to the moon and back.</p> <p dir="ltr">Geraldine Robertson -I want them to know that I love them twice. Once for themselves and once for their connection to my children. That is mighty love.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kathleen Sheehan - That we had a world of fun and how our faces lit up when we saw each other.</p> <p dir="ltr">Chaz Gartrell - I want them to remember a strong, free minded, hard working woman who was there for them.</p> <p dir="ltr">Glenn Wilcox - That I’ll love them till the end, they fill a place in my heart that will always be full!</p> <p dir="ltr">Di Armstrong - I’m not perfect and whatever my mistakes were they were mine and I have always tried to do better. Also I love them, I may not be with them for all their lives but I will love them for the rest of mine.</p> <p dir="ltr">Zarka Pesa - That they brought so much joy into my life and that I not only loved them but was "in love " with them. Also that I wished they could be safe and protected throughout their life and to have a good life.</p> <p dir="ltr">To leave a memory of your own, or to check out more of the amazing responses head <a href="https://www.facebook.com/oversixtys/posts/3340803866149876" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Reader’s Respond: What’s different about growing up today from when you were growing up?

<p dir="ltr">We asked you to take a trip down memory and reminisce about what has changed since growing up. </p> <p dir="ltr">From walking to school alone to not having social media, neighbours being like family to the point of not having to lock your front door – here are just some of the amazing and touching memories you shared. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Faye Birtwistle</strong> - Safety. We were able to walk to school safely. Doors were never locked, you were able to sleep out on the veranda, neighbours were like family, we were taught respect for parents teachers police and adults.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>John Barbuto</strong> - We were very lucky there was no unsocial media, we actually spoke to each other. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Yvonne Vishnich</strong> - We had boundaries and rules to abide by, if we didn't conform there was a punishment, grounded or not allowed something that was wanted. Manners had to be used and no answering back.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Marje Brugel </strong>- We weren't reliant on technology and the need to constantly communicate. We wrote letters by hand and we relied on our own ability rather than a calculator. If our parents said "No", we knew they meant it and stress-related illness was rarely heard of.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Jenni Champion</strong> - We were safe playing outside, no mobile phones, no TV, radios and used our imagination.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Christine Rennie</strong> - Family values. Spending time together and grandparents were a special part of the family unit...sadly not anymore.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Carolyn Zillman</strong> - So much stress in children’s lives today. We just lived our lives really not knowing what was going on around us. We enjoyed being kids knowing our parents were looking after us. The pressure on children today is tremendous and everything is so expensive to be involved in.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Joy Flint</strong> - We had so much freedom after school and enjoyed playing without TV or internet always obeyed parents and teachers. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Samantha Elliott</strong> - I didn't get a phone until I was 11, we spent most days outside, played with our cousins and went swimming once a week.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Sharon Hemus</strong> - We had freedom to be kids.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Patricia Phillips-Johnson</strong> - Fewer choices, you ate at meals no matter what it was…no snacks, no screens, you wore what was on the chair…generally hand me downs.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Sue Smith</strong> - We spent more time outside playing seeing friends.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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The best ways to adjust to life in retirement

<p dir="ltr">Retirement is what some of us have dreamt of for many years…or are still dreaming of. </p> <p dir="ltr">You finally have enough spare time to do whatever you want, you can go try out that cooking class or painting class you’ve always wanted to give a go…basically you have a lot of opportunities.</p> <p dir="ltr">But often with retirement, we lose our sense of identity and these psychological effects can take a toll on one trying to embrace their new lifestyle. </p> <p dir="ltr">Whether you were a chef, teacher, accountant, journalist - that’s in the past. </p> <p dir="ltr">When retired, there are a lot of emotions and unusual feelings one experiences. </p> <p dir="ltr">Below are five of the feelings you could experience while retired and how to adjust to them.</p> <ol> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Expect to go through stages of emotions</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">That feeling of being on a never ending holiday became a bit of a novelty when retired. </p> <p dir="ltr">You begin to feel lost, bored, anxious and unsure of how to process this. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, one must embrace these emotions and find a way to deal with them either through walking, reading a book, meditating, yoga. </p> <ol start="2"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Structure your day</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">There is no more Monday to Friday 9-5 work now that you’re retired and this can throw off your whole routine out the window.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s important to begin your new routine and stick to it. </p> <ol start="3"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Set small goals</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">Just like at work when you had goals to work toward, retirement doesn’t have to be any different.</p> <p dir="ltr">Have a goal of reading a certain amount of books by the end of the month, meeting new friends, or joining a sports club. </p> <ol start="4"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Grow your friendship group</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">That lovely person at the cafe you see every morning and want to talk to…why not finally speak to them and maybe you can have coffee together. </p> <p dir="ltr">Growing your friendship circle brings joy to one’s life and could be the beginning of even more friendships. </p> <ol start="5"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Get a casual job</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">No one really said you have to stop working while retired. Why not find yourself a casual job that will keep you busy here and there while making a bit of extra money on the side.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Aged care residents given 10 weeks to find a new home

<p dir="ltr">Older Australians living in aged care have been forced out of their homes, after it was decided that the only facility in their small town would be shut down.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em><a href="https://9now.nine.com.au/a-current-affair/elderly-aussie-residents-face-being-forced-out-of-nsw-aged-care-facility/78205e17-fc8a-4372-bb23-09aa081f538c" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A Current Affair</a></em> reported that the owners of Anglian Care, the only facility in the northern NSW town of Bulahdelah, gave families of residents ten weeks to find their loved ones a new place to live.</p> <p dir="ltr">The decision has angered the community, with local resident Rod telling the program that losing “40 staff” and “40 local jobs in a small community” will be devastating.</p> <p dir="ltr">Norma Hughes, a resident of the Cedar Wharf Lodge, told <em>A Current Affair</em> that she never imagined she would be asked to leave on the eve of her 90th birthday.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I was going to finish my days here but that’s not happening anymore,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Her son Neil and daughter-in-law Lyn were also angered by the situation.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The staff found out that day, I think I was the only one there that wasn’t in tears, they were all crying going ‘damn, what’s going on?’” Neil said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It was pretty sad for them; for everybody in a sense.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Bob, another resident, passed away at the age of 99 shortly after his family was interviewed by <em>A Current Affair</em>. </p> <p dir="ltr">His son-in-law, Kevin Carter, said the stress of being evicted was a heavy weight for him in his final days.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Ninety-nine is a lot of age and how do you accommodate meeting the new nurse and staff? It’s quite frightening,” Mr Carter said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bulahdelah’s nursing home has been in operation since 1991, and the decision to close its doors came after the church reviewed its 11 aged care homes and found it wasn’t viable to continue operating.</p> <p dir="ltr">The church said in a statement this was because the Federal Government wasn’t offering any long-term funding for small regional services like the one in Bulahdelah.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though the closest facility is half an hour away, many residents will be forced to travel an hour away to Taree, meaning their loved ones will have to embark on two-hour round trips to visit them.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rod told<em> A Current Affair</em> that a solution could arise through a “stay of execution”, but that he didn’t have his hopes up that Anglican Care and the bishop would change their minds.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Potentially it could be saved … but they’re not flexible, they’ve made their decision and they won’t listen,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Now it seems the only hope for elderly Austraions in towns like Bulahdelah could come after the looming federal election, if the next leaders decide to funnel money into these areas.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-d61e29f4-7fff-18c9-8fed-bbeab0d53b76"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: A Current Affair</em></p>

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Reader’s Respond: What is something younger generations will never understand?

<p dir="ltr">We asked you to take a trip down memory lane and share something younger generations will never understand and your responses did not disappoint. </p> <p dir="ltr">From black-and-white TVs to getting up to change the channel, having your milk delivered to your front door and even good old-fashioned typewriters, here are just some of the memories you shared.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Dawn Dominick</strong> - The sense of safety that we had growing up.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Jeanne-Marie Thomas</strong> - When you are 81...you live in a world soooo different from the world you grew up in! The list is immense.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Keith Wilson</strong> - Having to stand up to change the channel</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Joan Gebetsberger </strong>- Milkman, Bread delivered not sliced, listening to the radio for the serials no TV. Playing in the street, hunting tadpoles enjoying the outdoors</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Anne Mckeon</strong> - Being thankful for what we had.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Margaret Inglis</strong> - Typewriters. And carbon paper to place between 2 pieces of paper to make a copy. And put it in an envelope to forward it to someone.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Tolla Edda Anderson</strong> - Not being able to use the phone and computer at the same time.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Maureen Lyons Martinsky</strong> - Dialling a rotary phone.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Geoff Scrimes</strong> - No internet. Maybe black and white TV too. Of course no cell phones!!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Rosy Bloom</strong> - Stockings, suspenders, belts and corsets!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Marguerite Gainsford Stanford</strong> - actual money (cash) instead of paying everything on cards.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Steve Smith</strong> - milk bottles delivered to your front door.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Reader’s Respond: What do you miss most about the 90s?

<p dir="ltr">We asked our readers what they miss most about the 90s, and some of the responses took us down memory lane while others were just downright heartbreaking. </p> <p dir="ltr">From being younger, to the simplicity of life, to spending time with the kids, here are just a few of your 90s memories.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Dawn Larson</strong> - My kids were still young enough to talk to me every day and most days, I got a hug.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Yahwandi K Kunda</strong> - The Music. The simplicity, good manners, courtesy and the togetherness.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Kate Young</strong> - Everything. My family, mum and dad, youth.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Colleen Coad</strong> - Being 30 years younger!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Alison Foster</strong> - My kids being young and wanting to do family things. The simple life and freedom.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>John Peters</strong> - An internet free life.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Martin Hession</strong> - Collingwood premiership in 1990- that kept me happy for the rest of the 90s.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Wayne Kelly Friesen</strong> - Common sense, there doesn’t seem to be any anymore.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Kathryn Potter</strong> - My younger years but most of all my Parents! My Dad died in 95 and Mum 10 days before my 50th in 2000! RIP to both of you but please give me my youth back! I truly loved the 50s, 60s, 70s and the 90s!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Greg Thiesfield</strong> - Life.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Lori Interrante Langer </strong>- Prices.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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How to retire early

<p dir="ltr">Although there’s no official “retirement age” in Australia, it’s only possible to withdraw your super after you’ve reached your ‘preservation age’ (55 to 60), depending on when you were born.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, most people consider retirement age to be around the 65 mark – and indeed many people think that that’s when we have to retire.</p> <p dir="ltr">But what if you can retire earlier than when you reach 65 years of age?</p> <p dir="ltr">A dream? Maybe. But dreams are there to become a reality – especially if it’s something that you truly desire.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you want to retire early, you will need a lot of discipline to earn, save, and invest as much as you possibly can.</p> <p dir="ltr">You will also need to ensure you have another means of income if you’re not eligible to access your super.</p> <p dir="ltr">Below is a list of what you need to achieve in order to retire early.</p> <ol> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Define what early retirement means to you</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">It could be not working at all or reducing hours to slowly start spending more time with the family or doing things you love. </p> <p dir="ltr">Whatever it is, you have to define it clearly so you know the goal.</p> <ol start="2"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Understand your living costs</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">Currently, living costs are soaring so it can be difficult to understand your expenses perfectly.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, if you can map out what you spend money on or what you don’t need anymore as clearly as possible, it can help you in the future.</p> <ol start="3"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Calculate your total retirement savings goal</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">Following up from the last step, you will need to figure out how much money you will be actually spending on these expenses.</p> <p dir="ltr">You will need to remember that if you’re retiring earlier then you need your money from savings or super to last longer.</p> <ol start="4"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Make a financial plan</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">Putting everything together in a financial plan is often the best way to figure out if you can retire early.</p> <ol start="5"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Grow your super</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">Even if you can’t access your super just yet, did you know you could still make contributions to it?</p> <p dir="ltr">So if you’ve decided to continue working fewer hours, you could contribute more of your income into your super.</p> <ol start="6"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Stick to the plan</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">As mentioned above, it takes a lot of discipline to retire early and it’s important to stick to your plans. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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See a sneak peek of Ash Barty’s new “forever” home

<p dir="ltr">Newly-retired tennis champ Ash Barty has shared a look at her future home, which is currently being built in Ipswich, west of Brisbane.</p> <p dir="ltr">The native Queenslander grew up in Ipswich, southwest of Brisbane, and is now building her dream home in the residential community at Brookwater, just a 20-minute drive from her home turf.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-bc1bc730-7fff-39e3-a6c0-a08d3d9bc04f"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">The 25-year-old appeared in a video released by Brookwater Residential, outlining the journey behind designing the house she will be sharing with her fiancé, Gary Kissick.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/03/barty-house2.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>A rendered image of what Ash Barty’s new home could look like. Image: realestate.com.au</em></p> <p dir="ltr">“You can hear the birds in the morning. You can see the sun rise. It’s just all those little things that make a home a home,” Barty says in the clip.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I love how low-key the lifestyle is here at Brookwater. That’s where I see myself forever.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She also shared how she worked with one of the in-house architects to prioritise the outside space and get the kitchen just right.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-8d75863b-7fff-b921-fca0-8f4fa66449da"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“I love spending time in the kitchen, so I wanted my kitchen to be just how I imagined it,” she says in the video.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/03/barty-house0.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Ash Barty revealed how her future home will look in a video with Brookwater Residential. Image: realestate.com.au</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Brookwater is on track to become a million-dollar suburb soon, with a median house price of $960,000.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Brookwater has become a major draw card for aspirational families and empty nesters,” Brookwater Residential senior sales executive Irena Marasea told <em><a href="https://www.realestate.com.au/news/inside-the-stunning-home-where-ash-barty-will-spend-retirement/?rsf=syn:news:nca:news:spa:strap" target="_blank" rel="noopener">realestate.com.au</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The scarcity of land is also a big issue in the Brisbane market as there isn’t a lot of </p> <p dir="ltr">opportunities for people to purchase premium land so close to the CBD and have the confidence to build their architecturally designed forever home, so we definitely fill that gap.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The community also houses the Brookwater Golf Course, designed by Greg Norman and reportedly the spot where Barty first met Kissick.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-6de27938-7fff-266d-bed2-b47363501a99"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Since their dream home is still under construction, Barty is reportedly living in a rental next door, per <em><a href="https://www.ntnews.com.au/sport/tennis/retired-tennis-star-ash-bartys-lucrative-tennis-career-saw-her-pocket-more-than-30-million/news-story/ba8ac1c0ff66e3bed1fb60de28d2cf87" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NT News</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/03/barty-house1.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>A rendered image of what Ash Barty’s new home could look like. Image: realestate.com.au</em></p> <p dir="ltr">The clip also includes rendered images of the final look, showing several open-plan living areas, light timber flooring, high ceilings, and a spacious deck with views of the golf course.</p> <p dir="ltr">Her appearance in the video comes just days after the tennis legend <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/ash-barty-announces-retirement" target="_blank" rel="noopener">announced her retirement</a> in an emotional Instagram video.</p> <p dir="ltr">Making the clip with her close friend and former doubles partner Casey Dellacqua, Barty said she was “so ready” to hang up her racket after achieving her lifelong dream of winning Wimbledon last year.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-f256d5b8-7fff-9f34-797e-5c74d457f643"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: @ashbarty (Instagram) / realestate.com.au</em></p>

Retirement Life

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The reality of retiring

<p dir="ltr">A lot of people think that retirement is just having all the time in the world to do whatever you want.</p> <p dir="ltr">But what some don’t understand is that the realities of retirement can trigger stress, anxiety and depression. </p> <p dir="ltr">What can trigger these feelings can stem from what your life was like before you decided to retire. </p> <p dir="ltr">Below is a list of common challenges that <a href="https://www.helpguide.org/articles/aging-issues/adjusting-to-retirement.htm" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Help Guide</a> identified that are experienced by people during retirement.</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Struggling to “switch off” from work mode and relax, especially in the early weeks or months of retirement.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Feeling anxious at having more time on your hands, but less money to spend.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Finding it difficult to fill the extra hours you now have with meaningful activity.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Losing your identity. If you’re no longer a doctor, teacher, designer, sales person, electrician, or driver, for example, who are you?</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Feeling isolated without the social interaction of being around your coworkers.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Experiencing a decline in how useful, important, or self-confident you feel.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Adjusting your routine or maintaining your independence now you’re at home with your spouse during the day.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Some retirees even feel guilty about receiving money from a pension without directly working for it.</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">If you feel as though any of these relate to you and your retirement (or pre-retirement!) situation, we’ve put together a handy list of OverSixty articles to help you overcome these issues and a whole host of others.</p> <ol> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/how-to-make-the-most-of-your-super-as-you-retire-or-semi-retire" target="_blank" rel="noopener">How to make the most of your super as you retire or semi-retire</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/five-quick-ideas-for-staying-active-in-retirement" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Five quick ideas for staying active in retirement</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/how-much-do-australians-need-to-retire" target="_blank" rel="noopener">How much do Australians need to retire?</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/5-tips-to-make-transitioning-into-retirement-easier" target="_blank" rel="noopener">5 tips to make transitioning into retirement easier</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/ten-key-steps-to-help-you-make-your-retirement-the-best-years-of-your-life" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Ten key steps to help you make your retirement the best years of your life</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/why-retirement-living-is-the-perfect-way-to-upsize-your-lifestyle" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Why retirement living is the perfect way to upsize your lifestyle</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/how-one-day-off-work-led-to-a-dream-retirement" target="_blank" rel="noopener">How one day off work led to a dream retirement</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/the-only-way-is-up" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The only way is up!</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/want-to-see-a-therapist-but-don-t-know-where-to-start-here-s-how-to-get-a-mental-health-plan" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Want to see a therapist but don’t know where to start? Here’s how to get a mental health plan</a></p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"> <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/retirement-life/why-it-s-important-to-try-new-things-in-later-life" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Why it's important to try new things in later life</a></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Retirement Life

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How to make the most of your super as you retire or semi-retire

<p dir="ltr">The transition from working life to retirement or semi-retirement is different for each individual.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you decide to keep working, it is important that you know you can access some of your super while you’re still working, once you have reached “preservation age” – the age at which you can access your super.</p> <p dir="ltr">With a transition to retirement stream (TTRS) strategy, you can begin receiving an income from your super once you reach your preservation age, even if you haven’t permanently retired.</p> <p dir="ltr">The benefits of TTRS include your income payments being generally tax free, if you’re 60 or over.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another benefit is being able to continue to grow your super if you’re still working, and using your TTRS payments to top up your take-home pay, so you can work less or save more.</p> <p dir="ltr">There are, however, some rules if you do want to transition into a retirement stream, which your super business can assist you with.</p> <p dir="ltr">The rules include:</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">You generally can’t make lump sum withdrawals.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">You must receive between 2% and 10% of your TRIS balance each year.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Drawing from your super now could mean you have a lower balance when you fully retire.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">While you’re under 60 years of age, your TRIS payments will be subject to tax – any taxable component will be taxed at your marginal tax rate less a 15% offset. From 60, you don’t pay any tax on income payments from your super.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Earnings in your TRIS receive the same concessional tax treatment as your super – earnings are taxed at up to 15%.</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Retirement Life

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Five quick ideas for staying active in retirement

<p dir="ltr">Retirement is possibly the only time when you have the opportunity to do whatever it is you want. </p> <p dir="ltr">But for those of you who are stuck for ideas to stay active and motivated, here are some exciting ideas that can easily be done alone or with other like-minded retirees. </p> <ol> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Travel </strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">The kids have grown and moved out and you can finally visit that place you’ve always wanted to but couldn’t. </p> <p dir="ltr">Definitely an enriching experience to learn about different cultures, foods, and how things work across the world.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you’re unable to travel, even just planning a trip for when you eventually can is fun. </p> <ol start="2"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Volunteer</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">You’ve done your fair share of 40-hour weeks (or even more!), but if you miss having something to do for others, then volunteering is definitely for you. </p> <p dir="ltr">The best way to volunteer is to find an organisation you’re passionate about and see whether you have the skills to help them out. Alternatively, go in the other direction and choose a cause or activity you’re not even remotely familiar with – which transforms the entire exercise into a learning opportunity as well!</p> <ol start="3"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Sport</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">This is possibly one of the best ways to meet new people, but also sport will keep you fit and healthy, which is definitely what you want during retirement. </p> <p dir="ltr">If sport isn’t for you then consider heading down to your local park and becoming a spectator! </p> <ol start="4"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Go back to school</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">If there’s something you’ve always wanted to study, now is the chance to go ahead without any distractions.</p> <p dir="ltr">Not only will you be learning interesting information, it will also keep your mind sharp. </p> <ol start="5"> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>Find a new hobby</strong></p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">With all the time in the world it could be fun to join a painting or pottery class.</p> <p dir="ltr">Other hobbies you may want to get immersed in include cooking classes, book clubs, or even growing your own vegetable garden. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Retirement Life

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New list of top places in the world to retire

<p dir="ltr">Imagine this…you’re on a beach somewhere, laying there in the sun and sipping on a delicious fruity drink without a single care in the world. </p> <p dir="ltr">Fun fact is that you actually don’t have to imagine it because it could all be a reality when you retire. </p> <p dir="ltr">Whether you’ve already retired or retirement is just around the corner, check out the top 10 places you should be according to <a href="https://internationalliving.com/the-best-places-to-retire/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">International Living’s 2022 Global Retirement Index</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>10.  Uruguay</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">This stunning spanish-speaking nation has a population of 3.5 million people and boasts warm summers and mild winters. </p> <p dir="ltr">You can have your choice of living on a ranch, on farms, in the city or on the beach right along the coast. </p> <p dir="ltr">What's more is that healthcare is cheap, delicious foods are on offer, and there are plenty of activities, parades, hobbies and pastimes to immerse yourself in. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>9. Spain</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Known for its relaxed lifestyle, Spain also has beautiful beaches to enjoy in the summer and snow-covered mountains to explore in the winter. </p> <p dir="ltr">Get stuck in to the Mediterranean diet that can help decrease the risk of heart disease, depression, and dementia, which is what you want while retired. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>8. Malta</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Malta isn’t exactly the cheapest retirement destination but has tourists arriving during all months of the calendar thanks to its year-round sunshine. </p> <p dir="ltr">You can speak English and take advantage of the excellent healthcare system on offer as well as joining locals with outdoor activities. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>7. France</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Pardon? Did someone say France? Yes, France is definitely a retirement destination with its big cities, rural hideaways, mountains and sun-soaked beaches. </p> <p dir="ltr">It boasts fair housing costs in line with its exciting rich culture and laid-back way of life. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>6. Ecuador</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">If you’re looking for something a bit more modern, then Ecuador is the place for you. </p> <p dir="ltr">Mingling with locals is encouraged and a monthly lifestyle could cost between just $1,500 - $1,825. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>5. Colombia</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Visa applications to Colombia are quite straightforward, and who wouldn’t want to live here, especially thanks to the cheap living costs.</p> <p dir="ltr">Locals speak English and if you ever need an explanation of the stunning surrounds, they are more than happy to help. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>4. Portugal</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">It’s a bit daunting moving to a country where you don’t know the language, but English is taught at all schools.</p> <p dir="ltr">The government also offers free Portuguese lessons around the country.</p> <p dir="ltr">What’s more is that the country has cheap living costs, excellent healthcare, low crime rates, and friendly people. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>3. Mexico</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">In Mexico you have your choice of beach resorts, the city, remote, or desert hideaways to retire. </p> <p dir="ltr">Another affordable place to live, Mexico requires about $2,000 monthly for housing, transport and food. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>2. Costa Rica</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">From beaches to lush jungle regions, covering multiple climate zones, you can take your pick any time of the year depending on where you want to stay in Costa Rica. </p> <p dir="ltr">Lots of friendly locals and an active outdoor culture brings a lot of retirees to this stunning country. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>1. Panama </strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Panama residents enjoy warm tropical climates which are eased by cool breezes from the Pacific Ocean on one coast and the Caribbean Sea on the other side. </p> <p dir="ltr">The safe living environment, world-class healthcare, friendly people, stunning beaches, secret mountain retreats and city living… Panama has it all.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Shutterstock</em></p>

Retirement Life

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‘Where would we live otherwise?’: the rise of house-sitting among seniors

<p>The severe lack of <a href="https://www.facs.nsw.gov.au/providers/housing/affordable/about/chapters/what-is-affordable-housing" target="_blank" rel="noopener">affordable housing</a> is hurting Australians right across the community – from young renters, to families seeking to buy and older people needing a stable home.</p> <p>The number of Australians over 55 who are homeless jumped by 28% between the <a href="https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/people/housing/census-population-and-housing-estimating-homelessness/latest-release" target="_blank" rel="noopener">2011 and 2016 censuses</a>.</p> <p>An increasing lack of affordable housing is forcing some older people to take <a href="https://theconversation.com/generation-share-why-more-older-australians-are-living-in-share-houses-107183" target="_blank" rel="noopener">unconventional approaches</a> to finding a home. One of these is <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-31/house-sitting-on-the-rise-for-older-people-in-financial-stress/11461726" target="_blank" rel="noopener">house-sitting</a>.</p> <p>My new research published in <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00049182.2021.1999612?journalCode=cage20" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Australian Geographer</a>, looks at how this works – and how it doesn’t – for this often-vulnerable group.</p> <h2>What is house-sitting?</h2> <p>In exchange for free accommodation, house-sitters take care of the house (and garden and pets), while the owner is away. House-sitting episodes can be as short as one day to more than three years.</p> <p>House-sitters use different methods to find a potential house-sitting property. Most rely on house-sitting websites and specific Facebook groups. Some people also find house-sitting opportunities through referrals and repeat bookings.</p> <h2>Our study</h2> <p>In the first <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00049182.2021.1999612?journalCode=cage20" target="_blank" rel="noopener">analysis</a> of its kind, a colleague and I interviewed 20 Australians between 53 and 78, who had been house-sitting for more than a year.</p> <p>Half our interviewees had permanent housing (either rental or owned) and were mainly casual house-sitters. The remaining were house-sitting full-time and had no permanent address.</p> <p>We asked people about their experiences as older house-sitters and the impact of this type of housing on their well-being.</p> <h2>A temporary relief from rental stress</h2> <p>Almost half of the house-sitters we interviewed reported financial issues, such as unemployment, unstable or low-paid jobs and unaffordable housing as the main reason for starting house-sitting. Relationship breakdown that left people without a secure housing was the second most common reason.</p> <p>They told us house-sitting provided temporary relief from the high and unrelenting costs of paying rent. As one interviewee noted:</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">It [house-sitting] is pretty essential, where would we live otherwise? So, we did rent for a little while, but money is an issue, because I am not earning enough yet to be paying rent […] [It] just happens to be a really good solution to the situation that we happen to be in.</span></p> <p>In turn, this freed up funds to spend on other things, such as their health and social life.</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">My husband gets his pension this year. So, [if we house-sit] it means that we will actually have an income, which means in theory we might actually save some money.</span></p> <p>Less common reasons for starting house-sitting included free accommodation for travelling and spending time with animals.</p> <h2>‘Gorgeous pets’</h2> <p>Apart from saving money, interviewees described multiple benefits of house-sitting. The majority referred to the opportunity to travel and experience different places. </p> <p>Participants also appreciated the opportunity to live in pleasant houses and meet new people. They liked the freedom, variety and “getting rid of unnecessary stuff”.</p> <p>As one interviewee noted:</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">we were able to live in some beautiful homes and with gorgeous pets.</span></p> <h2>But not feeling secure</h2> <p>However, house-sitting, was not seen as a long-term option. Interviewees were concerned about the lack of security and increasing health needs as they aged.</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">Well, for short stays and holidays this [house-sitting] is viable, but for long-term you need to have plan B and C. As you see when COVID struck, it affected many people and some are staying in their cars even.</span></p> <p>Most sitters also found the temporary, short-term nature of house-sitting made it difficult to engage in the local community and develop a sense of belonging.</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">You might make temporary friends, but then you move on and leave the community.</span></p> <p>Constant moving around also makes it hard to acquire local knowledge, which is particularly important in unforeseen circumstances, such as natural disasters. As one interviewee explained:</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">It was quite scary in the bushfire […] when suddenly you need to know […] where to go, where’s the evacuation centre […] If I was at home in my own place, I might be talking to friends or neighbours and making decisions together but […] the loneliness becomes obvious when something like that happens.</span></p> <h2>Lack of transparency</h2> <p>A further issue is the power imbalance. House-sitters have few, if any rights - home owners have ultimate control over their properties. House-sitters referred to a range of challenges because of the lack of clear agreement between parties.</p> <p>These included disputes over the cost of housing repairs and disagreement on the property status when departing, such as how clean the house and how tidy garden should be.</p> <p>Unexpected changes or cancellation of the house-sitting schedules by owners also contributed to feelings of insecurity and distress among older house-sitters.</p> <h2>Making house-sitting more stable</h2> <p>House-sitting may not yet be a widespread practice, but it is <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-31/house-sitting-on-the-rise-for-older-people-in-financial-stress/11461726" target="_blank" rel="noopener">growing</a>. As it gains more prominence, we need transparent policies to specify the rights and entitlements of owners and sitters and address the inherent power imbalance.</p> <p>We also need to investigate ways of making house-sitting a more secure proposition for people in the longer-term.</p> <p>And to prioritise informed discussions about secure housing options for people as they age.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-3e464ab3-7fff-e5db-a868-d8bc1b832136">This article originally appeared on The Conversation.</span></p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Retirement Life

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How much do you need to retire?

<p dir="ltr">It’s those lifelong questions you ask yourself every now and then - can I retire now and can I do so comfortably? </p> <p dir="ltr">You feel like you’ve worked enough 40-hour weeks and have enough bank to finally retire.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, that may not necessarily be the case, with Super Consumers Australia (SCA) now saying that it’s only easy to retire if you’re a homeowner. </p> <p dir="ltr">(Did you hear that? That was the sound of almost all Millennials crying.)</p> <p dir="ltr">Xavier O’Halloran, the director of SCA, and his team looked into the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) to find out just how one can “kickstart their retirement planning”. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Our goal is to develop trustworthy retirement targets that give people a solid ‘rule of thumb’ on what they’ll need to save to maintain their standard of living in retirement,” he told <a href="https://www.brokernews.com.au/news/breaking-news/how-much-do-australians-need-to-retire-279722.aspx" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Australian Broker</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">The research found that an annual retirement income of $259,000 would be needed for a single homeowner aged 67. This is based on a fortnightly spend of $1,423. </p> <p dir="ltr">But if you’re a couple owning a home at the same age, you will need $369,000 annually if you’re spending $2,115 in a fortnight. </p> <p dir="ltr">If you’re feeling a bit more successful and want to retire a decade earlier, single homeowners would need $313,000 yearly if their fortnightly spend is $1,654.</p> <p dir="ltr">Couple homeowners require $409,000 annually if spending $2,385 fortnightly. </p> <p dir="ltr">On the other hand, for those not so lucky to own a home, the research found that there is an increase of financial hardship and income poverty. </p> <p dir="ltr">This comes as older Australians are continuing to work later in life to keep up with the increase in cost of living. </p> <p dir="ltr">It is predicted more than 50 million people aged 50 and over will still be working by 2031. </p> <p dir="ltr">“People chasing inappropriate targets can end up with a much lower standard of living if they over save or don’t spend down as much as they can afford in retirement,” Xavier said. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

Retirement Life

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Readers respond: What was your "I'm getting old" moment?

<p>We asked our readers when they knew they were getting old, and the responses were overwhelming. </p> <p>From harsh reality checks and physical changes, to independence and seniors discounts, here is when you knew ageing was catching up with you. </p> <p><strong>Christine Grzonek</strong> - When I was lying in bed looking at my arms and I can see the skin on my arms changing hence wrinkles! Weird moment knowing it was coming.</p> <p><strong>Sheila Vincent</strong> - I’ve always been independent about getting my outside chores done.. but after getting the ladder ready to clean out the gutters, I had to realise, my knees were NOT going to hold up and allow me to climb that ladder… and I had to call my son to get the job done.</p> <p><strong>Linda Charlton</strong> - When I hit 60 and my doctor said, "Congratulations, if you lived in Bali you’d probably be dead now."</p> <p><strong>Judith Coneliano</strong> - When I started to groan every time I stood up like my mum.</p> <p><strong>Sarah Hilton</strong> - When my granddaughter asked me "What's it like to get old Nan?"</p> <p>My answer was "It's a privilege, if I hadn't got old, I would have had to die younger, and would never have had this special time with you."</p> <p><strong>Roxanne Page</strong> - When my doctors were all younger than me!</p> <p><strong>Aileen Barrat Zanelli</strong> - My little Granddaughter asked me, "Nanna, did you used to write with a feather?" Cracked me up and I have never forgotten it.</p> <p><strong>Maryann Cullen</strong> - When swimming in the surf with our boogie boards and a young man came up to us. He shook my husbands hand and said gee it’s great to see old people out having fun. </p> <p>We couldn’t be offended as he was so lovely, we had to laugh though because we were only in our early sixties then.</p> <p><strong>Maureen Mcguinness</strong> - When some teenage boys behind us out walking said, "Be careful of these oldies in front of us."</p> <p><strong>Sarah Robinson</strong> - When I realised I have superpowers - I now have the ability to sneeze, pee and fart all at once.</p> <p><strong>Lys Tildesley</strong> - At a Coldplay concert (standing) with my daughter a few years back - the lovely Chris Martin made the audience squat down and we were to leap up at the chorus crescendo - I had to be helped up by the kind young guy standing behind me.</p> <p><strong>Julia Metcalfe</strong> - When my hands started looking like my grandmother’s.</p> <p><strong>Kathy Cannon</strong> - When I ask cashiers, "Would you like to see my Seniors card?" and they say, "No it’s fine."</p> <p><strong>Rick Pybus</strong> - When the Barber asked if I want my eyebrows trimmed.</p> <p><strong>Lori Lee</strong> - When I get senior discounts without asking for one.</p> <p><strong>Linda Champion</strong> - My grandson said, “Grandma you’re old, you were born in the 1900s.”</p> <p><strong>Estelle Rieck</strong> - When my youngest granddaughter looked at me and gently held my face and with a lot of concern and in her sweet little voice said “Oh grandma your face is cracking.“</p> <p><strong>Pat Doherty</strong> - "When my granddaughter asked me if I could iron my neck to get the wrinkles out!"</p> <p><strong>Georgina Johnson</strong> - When I had a fall and got taken to hospital instead of jumping straight up.</p> <p><strong>Noelene John Humphries</strong> - When I went to my Dr for the flu shot, he said, “How old are you?“ After I told him he said, “Oh, you can have the one for old people.” I liked him once, not so sure now.</p> <p><strong>Jeanne Cook</strong> - When someone offered their seat on a train. I turned around to move aside for whoever the woman was standing for and realised it was me.</p> <p><strong>Sue Nichols</strong> - When doing something online and I have to keep scrolling for the year of my birth.</p> <p><strong>Susan Germon</strong> - The mirror, so I confiscated them all now because I am as young as I feel.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Retirement Life

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Readers respond: As you get older, what's something that becomes increasingly annoying?

<p>We asked our readers what is one thing that gets increasingly annoying with age, and the response was overwhelming.</p><p>From bad manners and respect issues, to general ailments and the state of the world, here's what grinds your gears as you age. </p><p><strong>Barbara Carroll</strong> - Having lunch with friends when families with small children let them run around and others sit smiling while the children scream.</p><p>What makes them think we want to listen to them? Just take them home until they can behave.</p><p><strong>Aileen May</strong> - People who, when I tell them I am hard of hearing and ask them please to speak slowly and clearly, get annoyed and gabble more quickly, but very loudly. Grrrr.</p><p><strong>Glenda Crowley</strong> - That l am constantly tired so easily when l once had heaps of get up and go.</p><p><strong>Sue Jaynes</strong> - Knocking down our beautiful original bungalows and replacing them with 2 or more soulless, common-looking boxes (houses), with no room for their cars or yards for their kids. </p><p><strong>Jodie Barras</strong> - My lack of energy. I could tackle the world, but get very tired now.</p><p><strong>Lucy Dix</strong> - People who know you are deaf but speak behind your back and then get annoyed because you ask them to repeat themselves!</p><p><strong>Josephine Johnston</strong> - Self serve checkouts!! Hate them!</p><p><strong>Kath Hughes</strong> - Affected and inauthentic speaking voices on TV and radio. It seems that if somebody is unfortunate enough to have poor diction, phoney accent and an unpleasant timbre to their voice, they’ve got a gig as a commentator or reporter.</p><p><strong>Jennie Rennie</strong> - The only thing I can think of that annoys me as I get older is people complaining when they have so many wonderful advantages in their life that younger people don't.</p><p>Also people who prefer to complain rather than comment on positive things and show gratitude and compassion for others.</p><p><strong>Vicki Mundy</strong> - Celebrates who think they are experts on everything.They should stick to entertainment.</p><p><strong>Jan Burt</strong> - People who only do text messages, what happened to a human voice on the end of the line?</p><p><strong>Julia Metcalfe</strong> - Having to take off my glasses off and on hundred times a day.</p><p><strong>Christine Bache</strong> - Being addressed by my christian name, by people on the phone who have never met me. Especially if they're trying to sell something.</p><p><strong>David Birkett</strong> - People in general. </p><p><strong>Matthew Welsh</strong> - To me the most annoying thing is missing conversations,I know I'm half deaf, frustrating for all.</p><p><strong>Lesley Jemesen</strong> - Bad grammar! I can understand the odd slip up when speaking but not when it is written.</p><p><strong>Jack Robertson</strong> - Walking into the shed too get something &amp; when I get there, not remembering what it was.</p><p><strong>Garda Cummins Ne Kroes</strong> - Not being able to speak directly to people in business any more. Press 1 for this 2 for this etc then put your password and user number in then being put on on hold for ever.</p><p><strong>Jan Bradley</strong> - Everything being online, not all older people either don’t have a computer or if they do are not up with the technology.</p><p><strong>Lee Blanchard</strong> - Grumpy old people who can't see the fun side of things.</p><p><strong>Les Eather</strong> - When the neighbours play music loud and it’s lousy music I can’t dance to.</p><p><strong>Jennifer Pearen</strong> - When I forget to put another bottle of wine in the fridge to chill for 5pm.</p><p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Retirement Life