Retirement Life

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How tiny homes for older women facing homelessness are saving lives

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Homelessness is becoming a bigger issue each year for older women, and Kim Connolly who is the founder of </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tiny Habitat Homes </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">understands that it is a problem that must be addressed. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Which is why she created a solution to aide ageing women with housing issues in 2017. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australian Bureau of Statistics</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> reports over 6860 ladies aged over 55 were classified as homeless in 2016, which is 5234 more since 2011, Kim told </span><a href="https://www.thesenior.com.au/story/6114985/could-tiny-homes-solve-senior-homelessness/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Senior</span></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">these stats might not be entirely correct. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu7q6QOHF46/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bu7q6QOHF46/" target="_blank">My first Tiny House Build. Love my Tiny!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tinyhabitathomes/" target="_blank"> Kim Connolly</a> (@tinyhabitathomes) on Mar 12, 2019 at 7:50pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the massive jump is a concern, the former high school teacher explained the number did not reveal the full extent of the issue as many women would choose not to ask for help after facing homelessness or becoming homeless. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kim Connolly came up with the idea to offer transportable, affordable and tiny village homes as a method to decrease homelessness after multiple conversations with women her age admitted they were struggling with financial difficulties. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo-uunJAx3S/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo-uunJAx3S/" target="_blank">The Tiny has landed! Safe and sound. Thanks Nifty for sending me this photo of my baby in her new workshop home. #lovemytiny #lovemybuilder</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tinyhabitathomes/" target="_blank"> Kim Connolly</a> (@tinyhabitathomes) on Oct 15, 2018 at 9:13pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Over and over again women kept coming to me and saying, 'I'm going to be homeless, if not in the next few months, in the next few years',” Ms Connolly told </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-29/are-tiny-homes-the-answer-for-older-women-facing-homelessness/11049272"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC News.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I found out all the statistics and research and I didn't have an answer, [but] I love tiny houses and I thought, 'That's it, I'm going to build one'.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Connolly developed such a passion for her housing-solution idea, she set up her village-building business, with a plan to create a community of 15 tiny houses to majorly occupy women. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Currently, Ms Connolly is in the process of setting up a not-for-profit organisation to help make her tiny village concept.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She said: “It's women who are just like me and they're shaking their heads saying, 'I don't know how this happened, I never thought I'd end up in this situation'.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“My idea of the village would be 15 houses — there would be three houses that are rental houses, the other 12 would be owned by the occupants, there'd be two couples and the other 10 houses would be all older women,” Ms Connolly explained.</span></p>

Retirement Life

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Tips for travelling with grandkids

<p>As we get into our senior years it becomes more difficult for us to take holidays on our own. If you want to still enjoy the pleasures of a vacation, the alternative is to take your grandkids with you when you holiday. This may seem a daunting prospect (especially if you have your own children to cater for too), but with the right approach and some smart planning it can be a success. Here's what to consider making it work.</p> <p><strong>Finding the right location and accommodation</strong></p> <p>This choice of holiday venue can make a big difference to the success or failure of a joint vacation. The key factors to making it work are firstly to ensure that accommodation is central to amenities, such as shops, clubs, beaches or places of interest. You don’t want to have to far to travel once you arrive and having everything close by may give you greater independence if you are mobile enough.</p> <p>Generally speaking, it’s best to settle on just one destination, rather than doing a lot of moving around and having to re-pack several times. Check that accommodation has easy access and is suitable for those who have limited mobility issues. It is also very helpful if the accommodation has pleasant surroundings and outlook, so that it is still an appealing place to spend time if you are not able to get out and about as much as your grandkids. Garden areas, pools, cafes and recreation facilities will help in this regard.</p> <p>The type of accommodation needs some forethought too. It’s preferable to have sufficient space to give your grandchildren some privacy and their own area to retreat to, so that everyone is not on top of each other all the time. This is especially true if you have children with you too. A home or apartment that can give you your own living space and bathroom is a good idea. If it is a hotel, then a separate room for them is preferable.</p> <p><strong>Plan and agree on schedules and expenses</strong></p> <p>While there is no need for a rigid schedule, it is important to allocate time for doing things jointly and for doing some things separately. This can help avoid the stress of being together full time and ensures that all parties get proper relaxation and regeneration. Ideally this should be discussed with your grandchildren in advance and perhaps a rough schedule agreed upon so that everyone is on the same page before you go.</p> <p>Make sure also that things like meals, transport and touring activities are discussed in advance so that you are not packing too much in and that there is agreement on how costs are being shared. If you are doing organised tours or attractions, don’t feel it is essential to do everything together – it may cause unnecessary tensions. Meal arrangements can be varied too, so that there is a combination of joint meals and some private time too.</p> <p><strong>Planning your packing</strong></p> <p>Make sure medicines are in good supply and spare prescriptions arranged. If there is any medical equipment that needs to be taken, make sure you investigate the type of power supply and if adapters are required, if you are going to a foreign country. It’s wise to have spare spectacles and hearing aid batteries on hand too. Pack light too, if you are planning on multiple destinations; you will already be carting extra luggage for them, so you don’t want to make this a bigger burden than necessary.</p> <p>Travel insurance needs to cover all persons on the trip to avoid nasty bills if there are any medical emergencies.</p> <p><strong>Test the waters before making a big commitment</strong></p> <p>If it is the first time you have taken a break together, it may be best to start out by trying a shorter break first to see how things pan out and what issues arise. Even a weekend away may be enough to test the waters to see how the dynamics will work. It is possible to achieve a successful holiday together, as long as the right planning and a little common sense are applied.</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/travel/tips-for-traveling-with-parents.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Think Einstein was smart? Here are 8 people with higher IQs

<p><strong>1. Jacob Barnett: IQ 170</strong></p> <p>Jacob Barnett was <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/autistic-boy-genius-iq-higher-einstein-article-1.1340923">diagnosed</a> with moderate to severe autism at two years old, and doctors predicted he’d never learn to tie his own shoes.</p> <p>Needless to say, he’s mastered dressing himself. The American child prodigy finished grades six through twelve in less than a year, then went to college at age ten.</p> <p>He was a published physicist <a href="https://psmag.com/magazine/jacob-barnett-30-under-30">by the time he was 13</a>.</p> <p>Now he’s <a href="https://uwaterloo.ca/physics-astronomy/about/people/j3barnet">working toward his PhD</a> at age 19.</p> <p><strong>2. Judit Polgár: IQ 170</strong></p> <p>The Hungarian chess master is considered the best female chess player of all time.</p> <p>When she was 15 years and 4 months old in 1991, she was the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1992/02/04/news/youngest-grandmaster-ever-is-15-ferocious-and-female.html">youngest player</a> to become an International Grandmaster.</p> <p>She’s <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/smartest-person-in-the-world-2011-12/#bert-byrne-is-alleged-to-have-an-iq-of-170-3">reported</a> to have an IQ of 170.</p> <p><strong>3. Rick Rosner: IQ 192 to 198</strong></p> <p>Rick Rosner has taken <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/interview-with-rick-rosner-2014-11?r=UK&amp;IR=T">more than 30 IQ tests</a>, revealing his IQ is between 192 and 198, depending on how the tests define their scores.</p> <p>Before the allegedly second-smartest man in the world became a TV writer, he worked as a bouncer, stripper, and nude model.</p> <p>He famously <a href="http://www.nydailynews.com/archives/entertainment/lawsuit-millionaire-player-answer-article-1.927553">sued</a> ABC network for a faulty question after losing <em>Who Wants to Be a Millionaire</em> at the $16,000 level, but he lost the case.</p> <p><strong>4. Evangelos Katsioulis: IQ 198</strong></p> <p>With a score of 198, Evangelos Katsioulis, MD, MSc, MA, PhD, has the highest tested IQ in the world, according to the <a href="http://psiq.org/home.html">World Genius Directory</a>.</p> <p>The Greek psychiatrist also <a href="http://www.katsioulis.com/evangelos-katsioulis/">has degrees</a> in philosophy and medical research technology.</p> <p><strong>5. Sho Yano: IQ 200</strong></p> <p>American physician Sho Yano started college at age nine, and earned an MD and PhD <a href="http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/06/young-medical-student-graduate.html">by the time he was 21</a>.</p> <p>He has a black belt in tae kwon do and started composing music when he was four, but he’s put his focus on <a href="https://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Sho_Yano.html">child neurology</a>.</p> <p><strong>6. Nathan Leopold: IQ 200</strong></p> <p>The infamous Nathan Leopold had an IQ of 200 and spoke nine languages by age 18, but he didn’t use his intelligence for the greater good.</p> <p>When he was 19, he and an accomplice were <a href="https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/leopold-and-loeb-gain-national-attention">arrested for murder</a> in 1924 after trying to commit the “perfect crime.”</p> <p>Leopold spent 33 years in jail before being released on parole.</p> <p><strong>7. Marilyn vos Savant: IQ 228</strong></p> <p>When Marilyn von Savant was ten years old, an adult-level Stanford-Binet test revealed she had an <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/4add9230-23d5-11de-996a-00144feabdc0">IQ of 228</a>, which later landed her a Guinness World Record until the company removed the category in 1990 because the numbers are considered inexact.</p> <p>She’s been answering philosophical and mathematical questions for <em>Parade</em> magazine readers in her “Ask Marilyn” <a href="https://parade.com/member/marilynvossavant/">column</a> since 1986</p> <p><strong>8. Ainan Cawley: IQ 263</strong></p> <p>This Irish child genius is <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3721556/The-smartest-40-people-time-revealed-List-includes-geniuses-Einstein-da-Vinci-s-number-one.html">projected</a> to have an IQ of 263.</p> <p>At eight years old, he was already taking third-year chemistry courses at Singapore Polytechnic, and by the time he was nine, he’d memorized the first 518 decimal places of pi.</p> <p>Now 18, he seems to have a knack for entertainment, having written the script and composed music <a href="https://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/irish-child-prodigy-puts-talent-to-use-for-typhoon-charity-254202.html">for a short film called <em>Reflection</em></a> at age 12. </p> <p><em>Written by Marissa LaLiberte. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/think-einstein-was-smart-here-are-8-people-higher-iqs?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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This retirement home for ageing animals will warm your heart

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Located in southern Belgium lies the perfect care home for 150 ageing animals who are living out the rest of their days in peace. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The home which is ran by Valeria Luycx is called Les Petits Vieux meaning The Little Old Ones and is a shelter made to give older animals the best place to spend their final years. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Located in rural Chievres, the animal retreat is home to a number of animals, including Pastis, a pot-bellied pig, a number of elderly dogs, ponies and goats, as reported by the </span><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-45142801"><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fabcnews.au%2Fvideos%2F530188050727430%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The elderly animals were taken to the specialty home due to health problems or their original owners being too old to care for them any longer. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Just some of the gorgeous rescues include a stunning 15-year-old European cat named Azuria, a nine-year-old Carlin dog named Ramses and Yam the nine-year-old Saint Bernard dog who loves a good pat. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The shelter was created in 2000 by Valerie and her husband Serge. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We wanted to recreate family life for the animals,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The older animals are never in cages and are able to explore to their hearts desire, although Valerie says they much prefer to be snuggled on the sofa with her. </span></p>

Retirement Life

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How to keep your memories safe

<p>Before you go on holiday, it’s important to learn about how best to keep your photos safe. There is one main way to ensure that your photos won’t be lost even if you misplace your camera or phone.</p> <p>With the fear of losing our phones/cameras also comes the fear of losing all of the memories we have stored on these devices. But don’t worry, as long as you have internet connection abroad (e.g. wifi or SIM data plan), you should be able to follow the tip below and keep your memories safe.</p> <p>Every cloud has a silver lining. The silver lining of losing your phone is that you have already backed-up your holiday memories in the cloud. The cloud is a term used for a storage place on the internet.</p> <p>First step is to create an account with:</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://onedrive.live.com/about/en-au/" target="_blank">OneDrive</a><span> </span>(5GB free storage)</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dropbox.com/" target="_blank">Dropbox</a><span> </span>(2GB free storage)</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.google.com.au/drive/" target="_blank">Google Drive</a><span> </span>(15GB free storage)</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.box.com/home" target="_blank">Box<span> </span></a>(10GB free storage)</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.amazon.com/clouddrive" target="_blank">Amazon Cloud Drive</a></p> <p>Once you have an account set up, you may then upload your photos/videos up onto this private virtual storage space. After you upload your memories, they exist now in two places, firstly still on your phone or computer, and secondly online. And since they exist online, you can access them from anywhere you have internet connection.</p> <p>A smart thing to do before you leave for your holiday is to backup all of your photos already existing on your phone or camera onto your computer or your cloud storage account (see above for some service options). That way, when you head out for vacation you not only have more space to take more photos on your phone/camera, but also don’t risk losing those older photos due to loss of device. Remember, you can always access any photos you have stored on the cloud as long as you have internet connection.</p> <p><span><strong>Pro Tip</strong>: </span><span>While you are on holiday, periodically take the time to find internet connection and upload your new holiday memories to the cloud. This way, you will be able to keep as many photos backed up as possible and stress a bit less!</span></p> <p>Many of these services offer smartphone applications available for download from your phone’s app store. If you are travelling without a computer, and plan to take photos with your phone camera, it could be wise to set up the cloud storage service application on your phone for easy access to your cloud account. </p> <p> </p>

Retirement Life

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"You can't cheat then?" Queen Elizabeth's hilarious reaction to self-serve checkouts

<p>Queen Elizabeth has popped into a supermarket and learnt how to use self-serve counters to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the British high street chain Sainsbury’s.</p> <p>The Queen went to London’s Covent Garden to visit a pop-up replica of the original Sainsbury’s store, which was founded in 1869 and sold just three items – butter, eggs and milk.</p> <p>She was greeted by Lord John Sainsbury, the great grandson of the supermarket chain’s founder John James Sainsbury, who showed her around and gave her an overview of the supermarket’s history and the popular trends among customers.</p> <p>“Tastes have changed,” she said when she was told how the average basket’s content shifted from porridge and orange during the war years to avocados and ready-made meals today.</p> <p>The 93-year-old monarch was also introduced to modern technology used in stores, such as self-service checkout and mobile phone payments.</p> <p>“And you can’t trick it? You can’t cheat then?” she asked during a demonstration.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxxKPvgHQaO/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxxKPvgHQaO/" target="_blank">Today, The Queen was taken back in time to Sainsbury’s stores from the past to celebrate the British retail chain’s 150th anniversary. The pop-up experience in London’s Covent Garden included a recreation of the very first store, founded by John James and Mary Ann Sainsbury on London’s Drury Lane in May 1869. It sold just butter, milk and eggs. Sainsbury’s 150th anniversary celebrations focus on the colleagues and customers who have helped shape the business over the years. Her Majesty met employees who have been involved in fundraising and volunteering in their local communities, and explored some of the technology which customers use today, including self-service tills. In the first image The Queen views a ration pack as presented by Lord and Lady Sainsbury and learns more about the work which was done with the government to develop the rationing process when goods were in short supply during the Second World War.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/theroyalfamily/" target="_blank"> The Royal Family</a> (@theroyalfamily) on May 22, 2019 at 7:26am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>When manager Damien Corcoran said the self-service counter is particularly popular amongst shoppers, she responded, “I’m sure they do – everybody wants to hurry.”</p> <p>The Queen also met Sainsbury’s employees who dressed up as store clerks from the era of the supermarket’s first store.</p> <p>She concluded the visit by cutting a birthday cake baked by Claire Ptak, who also created Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan’s wedding cake.</p>

Retirement Life

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6 ways to keep your pet healthy

<p>What’s the difference between pets and children? Aside from no university or orthodontics fees, children eventually move out. Eventually.</p> <p>Pets, however, are a lifelong commitment. Yes, they require work and a cast-iron stomach when it comes to refuse collection, but the rewards far outweigh the drawbacks.</p> <p>To make this relationship last as long as possible, there are a few simple strategies to follow.</p> <p><strong>1. Vaccinations</strong></p> <p>Think of these as the equivalent of a prostate check. They come around quicker than you might expect but are necessary. As with so many other areas of medical science, veterinary medicine has advanced exponentially in recent decades and many of the potentially fatal illnesses can now be guarded against.</p> <p>However, these inoculations can’t be downloaded, so ask your vet to send you a reminder when the jabs are due and do the animal you love a favour.</p> <p>While we’re on the topic of medication, stay on top heartworm, flea and tick medications every three months. Look for brands including Comfortis, NexGard and Sentinel.</p> <p>Do your pets and family a favour and make sure they are vaccinated.</p> <p><strong>2. The right food</strong></p> <p>Just as your nutritional needs have changed with age, so too has that of your pet.</p> <p>Food companies with dedicated puppy/kitten, adult and senior ranges are not merely engaging in creative marketing. Science Diet Original Active Longevity, for example, includes glucosamine for healthy joints.</p> <p><strong>3. Exercise</strong></p> <p>Remember how you could chow down on burgers and still maintain a whippet’s silhouette? Now you’re more a Saint Bernard. That’s a slowing a metabolism for you and the pooch or moggy is going through exactly the same thing as the calendar pages tick over.</p> <p>Obesity can pose major health hazards (for both of you) and getting moving is key. If you have a cat, make time for play with toys that will keep them leaping and pouncing.</p> <p>For dogs, walks are mandatory. Twenty minutes a day will do you both the world of good. As will a romp in an off-leash park. The hound will enjoy it too.</p> <p>Make sure your pet gets a good night's sleep - it's far more adorable than being woken up in the early hours</p> <p><strong>4. Bedding</strong></p> <p>Prepare your “back in my day” stories now because there are animal beds on the market that run four figures plus. Clearly, these are not necessary.</p> <p>What is necessary is enough firm support for the spine and joints, a removable cover that can (and must) be washed regularly to get rid of fleas and ticks and a blanket to snuggle into.</p> <p>This last element is especially important with older animals in winter as age affects their body’s ability to regulate temperature.</p> <p><strong>5. Insurance</strong></p> <p>Imagine for a moment that your beloved pet needs a major operation – one costing the same as a second-hand hatchback. Now imagine not being able to afford the fee and having to see the animal in pain. Or worse. The sting of a monthly fee is nothing compared to the alternative.</p> <p>The fact is that at some point, the animal will need substantial medical care and on that day, you will be glad you had pet insurance.</p> <p>As with anything that comes with fine print, pop on those bifocals, read it carefully and ensure you’re across what’s included and what’s not.</p> <p><strong>6. Toys</strong></p> <p>At first glance, this may seem like an extravagance but hear us out. Just like their human counterparts, animals get bored and anxious. Especially if left alone for extended periods. This can result in furniture-chewing, cushion-shredding boredom or clingy neurosis. Neither of which are much fun.</p> <p>A shifting roster of toys will curb both behaviours by focussing attention elsewhere. Especially if they have treats secreted inside them which take some work to retrieve.</p>

Retirement Life

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What your airline pilot won’t tell you

<p><strong>I’ve been struck by lightning twice</strong></p> <p>Most pilots have. Airplanes are built to take it. You hear a big boom and see a big flash and that’s it. You’re not going to fall out of the sky. – Airplane pilot for a regional US carrier</p> <p><strong>You may not be getting the airline you paid for</strong></p> <p>You may go to an airline website and buy a ticket, pull up to its desk at the kerb and get onto an airplane that has a similar name painted on it, but half the time you’re really on a regional airline. The regionals aren’t held to the same safety standards as the majors: their pilots aren’t required to have as much training and experience, and the public doesn’t know that. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>If you’re a nervous flier, book a morning flight</strong></p> <p>The heating of the ground later causes bumpier air, and it’s much more likely to thunderstorm in the afternoon. – Jerry Johnson, LA pilot.</p> <p><strong>The smoothest place to sit is often over or near the wing</strong></p> <p>The bumpiest place to sit is in the back. A plane is like a seesaw. If you’re in the middle, you don’t move as much. – Patrick Smith, airplane pilot and author of Cockpit Confidential.</p> <p><strong>Sit in the back if you’re always cold</strong></p> <p>The general flow of air in any airplane is from front to back. So if you’re really concerned about breathing the freshest possible air or not getting too hot, sit as close to the front as you can. Planes are generally warmest in the back. – Tech pilot at a regional US airline.</p> <p><strong>There’s a reason you can’t use your phone</strong></p> <p>Well, what can happen is 12 people will decide to call someone just before landing, and I can get a false reading on my instruments saying that we are higher than we really are. – Jim Tilmon, retired American Airlines pilot.</p> <p><strong>Listen when I tell you to put your laptop away</strong></p> <p>We don’t make you stow your laptop because we’re worried about electronic interference. It’s about having a projectile on your lap. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to get hit in the head by a MacBook going 200 miles per hour. And we’re not trying to ruin your fun by making you take off your headphones. We just want you to be able to hear us if there’s an emergency. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>Turbulence is not the problem</strong></p> <p>Pilots find it perplexing that so many people are afraid of turbulence. It’s all but impossible for turbulence to cause a crash. We avoid turbulence not because we’re afraid the wing is going to fall off but because it’s annoying. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>It’s updrafts we really worry about</strong></p> <p>A plane flies into a massive updraft, which you can’t see on the radar at night, and it’s like hitting a giant speed bump at 500 miles an hour. It throws everything up in the air and then down very violently. That’s not the same as turbulence, which bounces everyone around for a while. – John Nance, aviation safety analyst and retired airline captain.</p> <p><strong>Being on time is more important than getting everyone there</strong></p> <p> [In the United States], the Department of Transportation has put such an emphasis on on-time performance that we pretty much aren’t allowed to delay a flight anymore, even if there are 20 people on a connecting flight that’s coming in just a little late. – Commercial pilot from North Carolina.</p> <p><strong>We fudge numbers when it comes to flight time</strong></p> <p>No, it’s not your imagination: airlines really have adjusted their flight arrival times so they can have a better record of on-time arrivals. So they might say a flight takes two hours when it really takes an hour and 45 minutes. – AirTran Airways captain, US.</p> <p><strong>We are often low on fuel</strong></p> <p>I’m constantly under pressure to carry less fuel than I’m comfortable with. Airlines are always looking at the bottom line, and you burn fuel carrying fuel. Sometimes if you carry just enough fuel and you hit thunderstorms or delays, then suddenly you’re running out of gas and you have to go to an alternate airport. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>You’ll never hear this phrase</strong></p> <p>You’ll never hear “One of our engines just failed.” What they’ll say instead: “One of our engines is indicating improperly.” (Or more likely, they’ll say nothing, and you’ll never know the difference. Most planes fly fine with one engine down.) You’ll also never hear, “Well, folks, the visibility out there is zero.” Instead they’ll say: “There’s some fog in the area.” – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>There’s no such thing as a water landing</strong></p> <p>It’s called crashing into the ocean. – Airplane pilot, South Carolina, USA.</p> <p><strong>The truth is, we’re exhausted</strong></p> <p>Our work rules allow us to be on duty 16 hours without a break. That’s many more hours than a truck driver. And unlike a truck driver, who can pull over at the next rest stop, we can’t pull over at the next cloud. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>We’re actually jealous of your onboard meal</strong></p> <p>Sometimes the airline won’t give us lunchbreaks or even time to eat. We have to delay flights just so we can get food. – First officer on a US regional carrier.</p> <p><strong>This is why you get sick after flying</strong></p> <p>Most people get sick after travelling not because of what they breathe but because of what they touch. Always assume that the tray table and the button to push the seat back have not been wiped down, though we do wipe down the lavatory. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><strong>This is when to REALLY pay attention</strong></p> <p>It’s one thing if the pilot puts the seat belt sign on for the passengers, but if he tells the flight attendants to sit down, you’d better listen. That means there’s some serious turbulence ahead. – John Greaves airline accident lawyer and former airline captain, Los Angeles.</p> <p><strong>Driving is WAY scarier than flying</strong></p> <p>People always ask, “What’s the scariest thing that’s ever happened to you?” I tell them it was a van ride from the Los Angeles airport to the hotel, and I’m not kidding. – Jack Stephan, US pilot.</p> <p><strong>What pilots like to hear the most</strong></p> <p>Most of the time, how you land is a good indicator of a pilot’s skill. So if you want to say something nice to a pilot as you’re getting off the plane, say “Nice landing.” We do appreciate that. – Joe D’Eon, pilot at a major US airline who produces a podcast at flywithjoe.com.</p> <p><strong>Is travelling with a baby in your lap safe?</strong></p> <p>No. It’s extremely dangerous. If there’s any impact or deceleration, there’s a good chance you’re going to lose hold of your kid, and he becomes a projectile. But the government’s logic is that if we made you buy an expensive seat for your baby, you’d just drive, and you’re more likely to be injured driving than flying. – Patrick Smith. Here are 7 more incredibly dangerous parenting moves even careful parents make by mistake.</p> <p><strong>Keep your seatbelt on</strong></p> <p>Most of you wouldn’t consider going down the highway at 60 miles an hour without your seatbelt fastened. But when we’re hurtling through the air at 500 miles an hour and we turn off the seatbelt sign, half of you take your seatbelts off. But if we hit a little air pocket, your head will be on the ceiling. – Captain at a major US airline.</p> <p><strong>You can recline but be mindful of who’s behind you</strong></p> <p>If you’re going to recline your seat, please check behind you first. You have no idea how many laptops are broken every year by boorish passengers who slam their seat back with total disregard to what’s going on behind them. – John Nance.</p> <p><strong>We don’t wear our hats in the cockpit, by the way</strong></p> <p>On TV and in the comics, you always see these pilots with their hats on, and they have their headsets on over the hat, and that always makes us laugh. – Joe D’Eon</p> <p><strong>There’s a good reason for everything we ask you to do</strong></p> <p>We ask you to put up the window shade so the flight attendants can see outside in an emergency, to assess if one side is better for an evacuation. It also lets light into the cabin if it goes dark and helps passengers get oriented if the plane flips or rolls over. – Patrick Smith</p> <p><strong>We hear some dumb things</strong></p> <p>I am so tired of hearing “Oh my God, you’re a girl pilot.” When you see a black pilot, do you say “Oh my God, you’re a black pilot”? –Pilot for a US regional carrier.</p> <p><strong>Leave flip-flops in your luggage</strong></p> <p>I always tell my kids to travel in sturdy shoes. If you have to evacuate and your flip-flops fall off, there you are standing on the hot tarmac or in the weeds in your bare feet. – Joe D’Eon</p> <p><strong>We do have control of the temperature</strong></p> <p>Cold on the airplane? Tell your flight attendant. We’re in a constant battle with them over the temperature. They’re moving all the time, up and down the aisles, so they are always calling and saying, “Turn up the air.” But most passengers I know are freezing. – Captain at a major US carrier.</p> <p><strong>Here’s the truth about airline jobs:</strong></p> <p>You don’t have as much time off as your neighbours think you have, you don’t make as much money as your relatives think you make, and you don’t have as many girlfriends as your wife thinks you have. Still, I can’t believe they pay me to do this. – Commercial US pilot</p> <p><strong>Don’t ask for directions</strong></p> <p>I may be in uniform, but that doesn’t mean I’m the best person to ask for directions in the airport. We’re in so many airports that we usually have no idea. – Pilot for a regional US carrier.</p> <p><strong>We sleep in the cockpit</strong></p> <p>Do pilots sleep in [the cockpit]? Definitely. Sometimes it’s just a ten-minute catnap, but it happens. – John Greaves.</p> <p><strong>We don’t dress up for cargo flights</strong></p> <p>One time I rode in the jump seat of a 747 freighter, which carries cargo, not passengers. As soon as the doors closed, the first officer went in back and put on a bathrobe and slippers. No kidding. He said, ‘I’ll be damned if I’m going to wear a tie for a bunch of boxes.’ – Tech pilot at a US regional airline.</p> <p><strong>Don’t complain</strong></p> <p>Remember this before you complain about the cost of a ticket: fares today are about the same as they were in the 1980s. – Patrick Smith.</p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Crouch. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/34-things-your-airline-pilot-wont-tell-you">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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Clever uses for ammonia you’ll wish you knew sooner

<p><strong>Powerful cleaning product</strong></p> <p>Ammonia often plays second fiddle to bleach, but it’s one of the most powerful cleaning products in your arsenal. Here are 20 smart ways to use ammonia all around the house.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean your electric oven</strong></p> <p>Here’s a practically effortless way to clean an electric oven: First, turn the oven on, let it warm to 65°C and then turn it off. Place a small oven-safe bowl containing ½-cup ammonia on the top shelf and a large pan of boiling water on the bottom shelf. Close the oven door, and let it sit overnight. The next morning, remove the dish and pan, and let the oven air out a while. Then, wipe it clean using the ammonia and a few drops of dishwashing liquid diluted in a quart of warm water. Even old baked-on grease should wipe right off!</p> <p><strong>WARNING: Do not use this cleaning method with a gas oven unless the pilot lights are out and the main gas lines are shut off. </strong></p> <p>Always take caution using ammonia! Never mix ammonia with bleach or any product containing chlorine. The combination produces toxic fumes that can be deadly. Work in a well-ventilated space and avoid inhaling the vapours. Wear rubber gloves and avoid getting ammonia on your skin or in your eyes. Always store ammonia out of the reach of children.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove soap and grease scum</strong></p> <p>To get rid of those unsightly soap and grease scum build-ups in your porcelain enamel bath and sink, scrub them with a solution of one tablespoon ammonia in 3.7 litres hot water. Rinse thoroughly when done. Find out more about the best ways to clean the most popular room in the house.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean bathroom tiles</strong></p> <p>Make bathroom tiles sparkle again – and kill mildew while you’re at it – by sponging tiled floors, splashbacks and shower enclosures with ¼-cup ammonia in 3.7 litres water.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to repel moths</strong></p> <p>Pesky kitchen moths seem to come out of nowhere! Send them back to wherever they came from by washing your cupboards, drawers, and pantry shelves, with ½-cup ammonia diluted in 1 litre of water. Leave drawers and cabinet doors open to thoroughly air-dry. Head here for the best kitchen and dining room cleaning hacks.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to make crystal sparkle</strong></p> <p>Has the sparkle gone out of your good crystal? Bring back its lost lustre by mixing several drops of ammonia in 2 cups of water and applying with a soft cloth or brush. Rinse it off with clean water, then dry with a soft, dry cloth.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean oven racks</strong></p> <p>Get the cooked-on grime off your oven racks by laying them out on an old towel in a large washtub. You can also use your bathtub, though you might need to clean it afterward. Fill the tub with warm water and add ½-cup ammonia. Let the racks soak for at least 15 minutes, then remove, rinse off, and wipe clean. Check out the ultimate 10 step whole-house cleaning plan here.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to eliminate paint odours</strong></p> <p>Your freshly painted home interior sure looks great, but that paint smell is driving you up the wall! There’s no need to prolong your suffering, though. Absorb the odour by placing small dishes of ammonia in each room that’s been painted. If the smell persists after several days, replenish the dishes. Vinegar or onion slices will also work. Head here for more on how to banish bad smells from your home.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean fireplace doors</strong></p> <p>Think you’ll need a blowtorch to remove that blackened-on soot from your glass fireplace doors? Before you get out the goggles, try mixing 1 tablespoon ammonia, 2 tablespoons vinegar, and 1 litre of warm water in a spray bottle. Spray on some of the solution; let it sit for several seconds, then wipe off with an absorbent cloth. Repeat if necessary – it’s worth the extra effort. FInd out 16 clever house cleaning hacks the professionals use.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean gold and silver jewellery</strong></p> <p>Brighten up your gold and silver trinkets by soaking them for 10 minutes in a solution of ½-cup clear ammonia mixed in 1 cup warm water. Gently wipe clean with a soft cloth and let dry. Note: Do not do this with jewellery containing pearls, because it could dull or damage their delicate surface.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove tarnish from brass or silver</strong></p> <p>How can you put that sunny shine back in your varnished silver or lacquered brass? Gently scrub it with a soft brush dipped in a bit of ammonia. Wipe off any remaining liquid with a soft cloth – or preferably chamois.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to restore white shoes</strong></p> <p>Brighten up your dingy white shoes or tennis sneakers by rubbing them with a cloth dipped in half-strength ammonia – that is, a solution made of half ammonia and half water.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove stains from clothing</strong></p> <p>Ammonia is great for cleaning clothes. Here are some ways you can use it to remove a variety of stains. Be sure to dilute ammonia with at least 50 per cent water before applying it to silk, wool, or spandex.</p> <p>Rub out perspiration, blood, and urine stains on clothing by dabbing the area with a half-strength solution of ammonia and water before laundering.</p> <p>Remove most non-oily stains by making a mixture of equal parts ammonia, water, and dishwashing liquid. Put it in an empty spray bottle, shake well, and apply directly to the stain. Let it set for two or three minutes, and then rinse out.</p> <p>To erase pencil marks from clothing, use a few drops of undiluted ammonia and then rinse. If that doesn’t work, put a little laundry detergent on the stain and rinse again.</p> <p>You can even remove washed-in paint stains from clothes by saturating them several times with a half-ammonia, half-turpentine solution and then tossing them into the wash.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to clean carpets and upholstery</strong></p> <p>Lift out stains from carpeting and upholstery by sponging them with 1 cup clear ammonia in 2 litres warm water. Let dry thoroughly, and repeat if needed. Find out 14 cleaning hacks every cat or dog owner should know.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to brighten up windows</strong></p> <p>Dirty, grimy windows can make any house look dingy. But it’s easy to wipe away the dirt, fingerprints, soot and dust covering your windows. Just wipe them down with a soft cloth dampened with a solution of 1 cup clear ammonia in 3 cups water. Your windows will not only be crystal-clear, but streak-free to boot.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to strip wax from resilient flooring</strong></p> <p>Wax build-up on resilient flooring causes it to yellow in time. Remove old wax layers and freshen up your floor by washing it with a mixture of 1 cup ammonia in 2 litres water. Let the solution sit for three to five minutes, then scrub with a nylon or plastic scouring pad to remove the old wax. Wipe away leftover residue with a clean cloth or sponge, then give the floor a thorough rinsing.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia as plant food</strong></p> <p>Give the alkaline-loving flowering plants and vegetables in your garden – such as clematis, lilac, hydrangea, and cucumbers – an occasional special treat with a shower of ¼-cup ammonia diluted in 3.7 litres water. They’ll especially appreciate the boost in nitrogen. Head here to find other surprising fertilisers for your garden.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to stop mosquito bites from itching</strong></p> <p>If you forget to put on your insect repellent and mosquitoes make a meal of you, stop the itching instantly by applying a drop or two of ammonia directly to the bites. Don’t use ammonia on a bite you’ve already scratched open, though: the itch will be replaced by a nasty sting.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to keep animals out of your bin</strong></p> <p>Few things can be quite as startling as an animal leaping out of your garbage bin just as you’re about to make your weekly rubbish deposit. Keep away strays by spraying the outside and lids of your garbage bins with half-strength ammonia or by spraying the bags inside.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to remove stains from concrete</strong></p> <p>Tired of those annoying discolourations on your concrete work? To get rid of them, scrub with 1 cup ammonia diluted in 3.7 litres water. Hose it down well when you’re done.</p> <p><strong>Use ammonia to fight mildew</strong></p> <p>Ammonia and bleach are equally effective weapons in the battle against mould and mildew. However, each has its own distinct applications and under no conditions should the two ever be combined. Reach for the ammonia for the following chores, but be sure you use it in a well-ventilated area, and don’t forget to wear rubber gloves:</p> <p>Clean the mildew off unfinished wooden patio furniture and picnic tables with a mixture of 1 cup ammonia, ½-cup vinegar, ¼-cup baking soda, and 3.7 litres water. Rinse off thoroughly and use an old terrycloth towel to absorb excess moisture.</p> <p>To remove mildew from painted outdoor surfaces, use the same combination of ingredients.</p> <p>To remove mildew from wicker furniture, wash it down with a solution of 2 tablespoons ammonia in 3.7 litres water. Use an old toothbrush to get into that hard-to-reach twists and turns. Rinse well and let air-dry.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/home-tips/20-clever-uses-ammonia-youll-wish-you-knew-sooner?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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WWII Digger's Great Escape

<p>A khaki felt army cap has sat on a bookshelf in my home in Sydney for nine years.</p> <p>Two metal press-studs secure the brim, and the five-pointed, red communist star graces the front.</p> <p>The crown has the faint odour of human sweat.</p> <p>It is a partizanka, a cap worn by Yugoslav Partisan soldiers in Croatia and western Bosnia during World War II.</p> <p>The partizanka is something of a collector’s piece, as few like it remain.</p> <p>For me, it represents a promise I need to fulfil.</p> <p><strong>Partisan Promise</strong></p> <p>It is impossible to look at the cap and not wonder about its bloody history.</p> <p>It had two rightful owners, Boris Puks*, a Croatian Partisan fighter, and Ernest ‘Ern’ Brough, a World War II veteran from Geelong, Victoria, who gave it to me in 2009.</p> <p>My part in its history is a small footnote compared to the life it once led in the mountains and forests of wartime Yugoslavia.</p> <p>The cap arrived in the post not long after I met Ern, accompanied by a note: “Marc - a gift to me from Puks Boris, 1944, at Cassma, Croatia.”</p> <p>When I phoned Ern to thank him, he made me promise to give it to the Australian War Memorial when he died.</p> <p>This artefact now belongs where Ern had intended.</p> <p>The voices of World War II are fast disappearing and as Ern is still alive, I want him to have the chance to once again share his story.</p> <p>* Boris Puks is called Puks Boris in Ernest Brough’s book, Dangerous Days.</p> <p><strong>A Great Adventure</strong></p> <p>Six weeks after Ern turned 20, on March 28, 1940, he enlisted in the Second Australian Imperial Force.</p> <p>This apprentice butcher from Drouin, in rural Victoria, had very little life experience behind him, but the Army deployed him to Libya to protect the besieged port of Tobruk.</p> <p>He arrived in May 1941.</p> <p>“It was a case of keeping ’em out. Don’t let ’em in, that’s it. Fight for your life,” he said later.</p> <p>Following nearly three months of relentless battle, Ern was wounded by German machine-gun fire during a patrol.</p> <p>He recovered and was then sent to Egypt to fight in the pivotal Battle of El Alamein. Captured by German forces, Ern spent time in a POW camp in Italy before eventually ending up in Stalag XVIII-A/Z, a notorious Nazi POW camp in Austria.</p> <p>After two years, along with fellow Australian Sergeant Arnold ‘Allan’ Berry, and New Zealander Private Eric Baty, he escaped from an Arbeitskommando (prison farm camp) near Graz and spent two months on a desperate flight through first Austria, and then Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia.</p> <p><strong>A Story Revealed</strong></p> <p>Ern offered me Puks’s cap during our first interview in 2009.</p> <p>I had seen a photograph of it in his book and was taken by its historical significance. </p> <p>I knew that he treasured the partizanka cap and had proudly showed it to mates at his local RSL club.</p> <p>Ern appreciated my knowledge of the place where he spent the final months of World War II.</p> <p>“I reckon you can use it more than me, now,” he said.</p> <p>I was reluctant to accept Ern’s cherished cap, but he sent it to me soon afterwards.</p> <p>Now, nine years later, I hoped to return the cap to Ern and see about giving it to the Australian War Memorial.</p> <p>I call the phone number in Geelong that I’d dialled years earlier. After a few rings, a man answers. It’s Ern, who confirms he is very much alive.</p> <p>We arrange for me to interview him two days later. Not long after, Lizzie Campbell, Ern’s carer, calls me to check who I am.</p> <p>Ern has no problem remembering the cap, but he can’t remember giving it to me. These days, Lizzie explains, such memories can elude him.</p> <p>When I call him back as planned, Ern has had time to flick through his book.</p> <p>Details of his time in Tobruk and Croatia are clearer. “How the hell did we ever get through it?” he asks me in a wavering voice.</p> <p>While in Tobruk, fear wasn’t part of Ern’s thinking “A lot of them used to sweat it out,” he recalls. “They had a terrible time. I didn’t care. I was walking around as if I owned the place.”</p> <p>When I press him for more information about the cap and ­Boris Puks, his memory is sketchy. Ern remembers that the cap belonged to Puks, that he was a Croatian Partisan and that Puks gave him the cap as a gesture of thanks.</p> <p>That’s where it stops.</p> <p>“No, I don’t remember,” he tells me.</p> <p>“When you’re young, you learn something and you shove it aside.”</p> <p>More questions about the cap eventually jog his memory.</p> <p>“I used to put a big white turkey feather in it,” he says with a laugh.</p> <p><strong>After the War</strong></p> <p>After the war, Ern returned to country Victoria and resumed work as a butcher.</p> <p>They were difficult times. Shell-shocked and damaged, adjusting to peacetime wasn’t easy.</p> <p>He felt “wild on the inside” and at times resorted to fighting and drinking.</p> <p>“Allan, Eric and I had lived like dogs,” he writes in Dangerous Days.</p> <p>“Every day had been a dangerous day, every shadow a possible predator. We survived on instinct, so it was always going to be difficult to slip back into a civilised world.”</p> <p>Getting the images of war out of his head was hard and Ern believes he suffered from PTSD.</p> <p>He tells me about a time on a train to Melbourne when he attacked a man who had tried to scrounge the last of his tobacco.</p> <p>It took four other men to restrain him. He was also plagued by nightmares and one time woke to find himself trying to throttle his beloved wife, Edna May.</p> <p>Puks wrote to Ern several times and was interested in emigrating to Australia, but Puks was a communist, so the authorities kept an eye on the letters Ern received, placing him under surveillance for six years. ­</p> <p>Anti-communist sentiment was strong at the time.</p> <p>When Ern discovered his movements were being monitored, he was outraged but realised it was safer to end their correspondence.</p> <p><strong>A Promise fulfilled</strong></p> <p>Ever aware of my promise, I call the Australian War Memorial in Canberra to ask about donating the cap to its collection. They are keenly interested in Ern’s story – and the rare artefact – so decide to fly Ern and Lizzie to Canberra and appropriately recognise his donation.</p> <p>On February 6 this year, on a hot, dry Canberra morning, I arrived at the Australian War Memorial ready to hand over the cap to Ern.</p> <p>Frailer than when we last met, he still has that sparkle in his eyes and an easy laugh.</p> <p>In the Commemorative Courtyard before the Pool of Reflection, surrounded by the Roll of Honour commemorating the more than 102,000 Australians who have died in war, Sergeant Ernest James Brough of the 2nd/32nd Infantry Battalion presented the cap to Brendan Nelson, the director of the Australian War Memorial.</p> <p>“People will look at the cap and realise that a Partisan risked his own life and safety to help this Australian escape,” Nelson says.</p> <p>“And at the end he gave his cap to Ern. It will make people ask, ‘Why did he do that?’ Thanks to this simple gesture, the memorial now has an important artefact that tells Ern’s inspirational story of survival and mateship.”</p> <p>Across the courtyard, a group of 18 soldiers are practising a drill. Nelson calls them over and introduces them to Ern, the former POW and Rat of ­Tobruk.</p> <p>Each one eagerly approaches the old man to shake his hand. It is a moving moment. Young soldiers paying respect to a frail, decorated war hero from their own defence history.</p> <p>Ern visited Eric Baty in New Zealand 46 years after their escape. They talked about the time the Partisan attacked his brother and how Ern had stopped Eric from getting involved.</p> <p>“Eric thanked me for saving his life that time,” Ern told me in 2009. “They would have shot him for sure. But I said, ‘No, Eric, it’s me who must thank you for saving my life in the river.’ ”</p> <p>It took Ern more than 60 years to bring himself to write about his war experiences. He comes from a generation who were taught to be stoic but reticent in the face of misfortune.</p> <p>Writer Kim Kelly worked closely with Ern, talking with him every day for a month to research his memoir.</p> <p>She found that he did not want to talk about what happened when he returned to Australia.</p> <p>“The idea of PTSD was not talked about in his day,” she explains.</p> <p>“They used alcohol instead. Today, he is clear-sighted about it and believes returned soldiers need a story debrief about their war experiences, such as writing it down or speaking into a microphone.”</p> <p><strong>Ern's story</strong></p> <p>It helped Ern to be able to tell his war story.</p> <p>“He believed going to war was important and why Australia went to war was important, but Ern is still anti-war,” says Kim.</p> <p>“He thinks war makes no sense.” Ern remains close to her heart - Kim last visited Ern in Geelong last September.</p> <p>Today Ern lives alone. Lizzie visits most days and he keeps active tending oak trees in his garden. Most of his mates from the war have gone.</p> <p>Allan died in 1985, aged 67. Eric died in 1999, aged 80. Edna May, Ern’s wife of more than 60 years, in 2004. She was 81.</p> <p>Ern was so grateful for the treatment she received at Melbourne’s St Vincent’s Hospital that he sold his land and donated $300,000 towards buying an echocardiograph machine.</p> <p>“I keep saying to him that he has to get to 100,” says Lizzie. He is now the last surviving Rat of Tobruk in Geelong.</p> <p>When I handed the cap back to Ern in Canberra, he paused before handing it over to Nelson.</p> <p>I thought Ern was about to say what I was thinking – that it was more than a cap, that it is a symbol of the courageous people who fought against tyranny, a reminder of the debt owed to those who gave their lives to protect our freedoms. But no – to the delight of all present, Ern broke into the Australian Football League anthem, ‘Up There Cazaly’.</p> <p><strong><em>Up there Cazaly</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>In there and fight</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Out there and at ’em</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Show ’em your might</em></strong></p> <p>Later he turned to me and said, “What a wonderful day it is.” Then a joyful expression spread across his face and he let out an uproarious laugh.</p> <p>The khaki partizanka cap that started life in the hands of a young Croatian resistance fighter and was gifted in friendship to an Australian POW escapee is now carefully preserved in the Second World War Galleries of the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.</p> <p><strong>History of the Partisan cap</strong></p> <p>The military side cap, or forage cap, that Boris Puks gave to Ernest Brough in 1944 was part of the Yugoslav Partisan uniform.</p> <p>It was called the triglavka in Slovenian and the partizanka in Croatian.</p> <p>The design was copied from the cap worn by Republican faction soldiers during the Spanish Civil War.</p> <p>A feature of the Yugoslav Partisan cap was the red communist star on the front.</p> <p>The first Yugoslav caps were made in 1941 in Zagreb for the communist People's Liberation Front of Croatia.</p> <p>In occupied Yugoslavia during World War II, this cap's use spread quickly throughout the Partisan resistance.</p> <p>The Slovenian triglavka, adopted in 1942, had a three-pronged ridge along its crown, representing Triglav mountain, Slovenia's highest peak. Puks's cap is a partizanka, so it has a flatter crown and a folded brim at the back.</p> <p>In 1943, the partizanka and the triglavka were replaced by the titovka, or Tito cap, which was named after the Yugoslav communist resistance leader, Josip Broz Tito, and modelled on the Soviet army cap, the pilotka.</p> <p>After the war, the titovka became the official headwear of the Yugoslav People's Army, or JNA.</p> <p><em>Written by Marc McEvoy. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/wwii-diggers-great-escape?items_per_page=All"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Secrets nurses wish they could tell you

<p><strong>We ask the questions you don’t</strong></p> <p>Doctors are clueless about what really happens in the beds, wards, and halls of our hospitals. That's why we went to the experts: nurses</p> <p>“We always question doctors because a lot of the time they are only there for five seconds and we have much more experience with patients.” - Registered nurse with 16 years’ experience</p> <p><strong>This is what I mean when I say to get a second opinion</strong></p> <p> “We’re not going to tell you your doctor is incompetent, but if I say, ‘You have the right to a second opinion,’ that can be code for ‘I don’t like your doctor’ or ‘I don’t trust your doctor.’” – Linda Bell, registered nurse</p> <p><strong>Before you gossip…</strong></p> <p> “Feel free to tell us about your personal life, but know that we’re here for 12 hours with nothing to talk about. So the stuff you tell us will probably get repeated.” – Registered nurse</p> <p><strong>A lot of my patients are incontinent</strong></p> <p> “I’m supposed to just use a wet washcloth to clean them. But if it’s a patient who’s been really nice and appreciative, I’ll go all the way to intensive care to get some of the heated wet wipes, which are a lot more gentle. Somebody who’s constantly yelling at me? I just use the washcloth.” – Registered nurse.</p> <p><strong>Tell us everything because we need to know</strong></p> <p> “If penicillin made your face swell up and your breathing get funny six months ago, it’s likely to do the same again. Please tell me these things. While we’re at it, tell me if you have a food allergy. Some things I can predict, other things, like you’re allergic to nuts, are not immediately obvious.” – Head-nurse.blogspot.com Here's how to get the most out of each and every medical appointment.</p> <p><strong>I always remain calm</strong></p> <p> “I’ve had people blow out arteries in front of me, where I know the patient could bleed to death within minutes. I’ve had people with brains literally coming out of their head. No matter how worried I am, I’ll say calmly, ‘Hmmm, let me give the doctor a call and have him come look at that.’” – A long-time nurse</p> <p><strong>The squeaky wheel won’t always work</strong></p> <p> “If you want me to give you better treatment, be more appreciative. I’m happy to do a bit extra for appreciative patients, such as massage their legs and feet with sorbolene after a shower. But a demanding patient will always wait longer to have their bell answered.” – Registered nurse with 25 years’ experience, RPA, Sydney</p> <p><strong>Yes, you should have come in earlier</strong></p> <p> “I’d never tell a patient that he was stupid for waiting a week for his stroke symptoms to improve before coming to the hospital. Although I’d like to. Especially if his wife then complains that we’re not doing anything for the guy.” – A long-time nurse who blogs at head-nurse.blogspot.com</p> <p><strong>Don’t lie about your pain</strong></p> <p> “If you’re happily texting and laughing with your friends until the second you spot me walking into your room, I’m not going to believe that your pain is a ten out of ten.”  – Nurse, New York  Never tempt fate by lying about what's really bothering you.</p> <p><strong>Listen to our advice, you’ll recover faster</strong></p> <p> “If we tell you Papa must not drive after his stroke, that means Papa must not drive. Not ‘not drive long distances’ or ‘not drive a Toyota’ or ‘not drive to the store.’ It means that Papa now lacks decision-making ability, part of his visual field, and most of the use of one side of his body, and must not drive. Even a big car, even for short distances, even in town.” – Head-nurse.blogspot.com</p> <p><strong>Hospitals are full of drug-resistant germs</strong></p> <p> “Despite nurses’ best efforts, hospitals are still filthy and full of drug-resistant germs. I don’t even bring my shoes into the house when I get home.” – Gina, a nurse who blogs at codeblog.com</p> <p><strong>The sickest patients are the only VIPs in here</strong></p> <p> “If you’re a private patient in a public hospital, don’t complain about not having a private room. The only times you’ll get one is if you’re dying or have a golden staph infection and need to be isolated. If you see a sign with MRSA, it means there’s a risk of multidrug-resistant staph. Either way, you should count your lucky stars you’re in a shared room.” – Nurse, RPA, Sydney</p> <p><strong>I’ll always come into your room with a smile</strong></p> <p> “No matter how many times you use your call light, even if it’s every ten minutes, I will come into your room with a smile. However, if you don’t really need help, I will go back to the nurses’ station and complain, and this may affect how the nurses on the next shift take care of you.” – Cardiac nurse, California.</p> <p><strong>We can tell when you exaggerate the pain</strong></p> <p> “Don’t tell me you need more pain relief – I know you’ve just come back to the ward after having a cigarette.” – Nurse, RPA, Sydney</p> <p><strong>Over-the-counter drugs and herbals count as medications</strong></p> <p> “When your provider asks for a list of the medications you’re taking, make sure you include over-the-counter drugs and herbals. People think that if an herb is ‘all natural’ and ‘organic,’ it’s not a medication. But that’s not true. Herbals can interact with other medications and can cause serious complications.” – Kristin Baird, registered nurse and health-care consultant</p> <p><strong>The sicker you are, the less you complain</strong></p> <p> “I’ll have a dying patient with horrible chest pain who says nothing, because he doesn’t want to bother me. But the guy with the infected toe – he can’t leave me alone.” – Intensive-care nurse, California</p> <p><strong>We can tell when you’re frightened</strong></p> <p> “It’s frustrating to see people neglect themselves, but there’s no point reading them the riot act. One patient had a fungating wound from breast cancer that she’d hidden from her family for 18 months. How she did it I don’t know.” – Community nurse with 20 years’ experience</p> <p><strong>I’ll wait for the doctor to tell you about test results</strong></p> <p> “If you ask me if your biopsy results have come back yet, I may say no even if they have, because the doctor is really the best person to tell you. He can answer all your questions.” – Gina, nurse who blogs at codeblog.com</p> <p><strong>It’s stressful when a physician makes a mistake</strong></p> <p> “It can be intimidating when you see a doctor who is known for being a real ogre make a mistake. Yes, you want to protect your patient, but there’s always a worry: Am I asking for a verbal slap in the face?” – Linda Bell, registered nurse</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Couch and Louise Waterson. This article first appeared <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/70-secrets-nurses-wish-they-could-tell-you?items_per_page=All">in Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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10 health secrets every woman over 50 should know

<p>Learn what you need more of and what to cut out when you hit this important milestone.</p> <p><strong>1. It’s heart disease that women need to worry about</strong></p> <p>Most women fear breast cancer, but heart disease is actually the No.1 killer for women, causing one in three deaths each year. Women’s heart health risks increase after menopause, yet just one in five women believe that heart disease is the greatest threat to health.</p> <p>Red wine may protect you from heart disease, but some people shouldn't drink it at all. Scientists believe the polyphenols found in red grapes' skin are cardioprotective.</p> <p><strong>2. Heart attacks look a whole lot different on TV</strong></p> <p>A man grabs his chest and falls to the floor – everyone has seen this type of heart attack on TV and in the movies, but that’s not always what it looks or feels like in women.</p> <p>For women, the most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort, but they are more likely to experience shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting and back or jaw pain.</p> <p>Like rain freezing into hail or snow, cholesterol can solidify – except that it can do it at 37 degrees in your arteries. A new study reveals that liquid cholesterol can be lethal when it hardens to form sharp crystals.</p> <p><strong>3. Exercising now will slash your risk of dementia</strong></p> <p>Move it or lose it, literally.</p> <p>This is the main message of a study in Neurology that found women who are physically fit at middle age are nearly 90 percent less likely to develop dementia decades later, compared to women who are moderately fit.</p> <p>“These findings are exciting because it’s possible that improving people’s cardiovascular fitness in middle age could delay or even prevent them from developing dementia,” says study author Helena Hörder, PhD, of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.</p> <p>But, she cautions, “this study does not show cause and effect between cardiovascular fitness and dementia, it only shows an association."</p> <p>"More research is needed to see if improved fitness could have a positive effect on the risk of dementia and also to look at when during a lifetime a high fitness level is most important.”</p> <p>Take a look at the 51 everyday habits that reduce your risk of dementia.</p> <p><strong>4. Morning people may be less likely to get breast cancer</strong></p> <p>Are you an early riser? If so, you may be less likely to develop breast cancer.</p> <p>Women who are “morning people” have a lower for risk breast cancer, according to research presented at the US-based 2018 National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference.</p> <p>The study also found that women who sleep more may have higher chances of developing breast cancer. While more research is needed to confirm these results, the findings “are consistent with previous research…[on] exposure to ‘light-at-night’ as risk factors for breast cancer,” says Rebecca Richmond, PhD, a research fellow in the Cancer Research UK Integrative Cancer Epidemiology Programme and the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, United Kingdom, in a news release.</p> <p>Researchers from the UK recently discovered that a novel combination of two existing cancer-treating drugs – Herceptin (generic name: trastuzumab) and Tyverb (generic name: lapatinib) – dramatically reduce the size of tumors caused by a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer.</p> <p><strong>5. You’re not off the hook for mammograms after age 75</strong></p> <p>If you’re still in good health, you should probably still get screened, according to the Harvard Health Letter.</p> <p>Although there has been some back and forth on this issue.</p> <p>The American Cancer Society says: “Women should continue screening mammography as long as their overall health is good and they have a life expectancy of 10 years or longer.”</p> <p>One reason to continue is the comparatively high incidence of breast cancer found in this age group, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).</p> <p>If you wake in the night seeing falling playing cards or a woman floating in mid-air, you might just be having a nightmare – or it could be a sign of something a doctor should check out.</p> <p><strong>6. Adding soy to your diet can strengthen your bones</strong></p> <p>It’s not just calcium and vitamin D that can help shore up your skeleton: Soy-based whole foods such as tofu and soy milk may also do the trick, find researchers out of the University of Missouri-Columbia.</p> <p>Having problems with your bones? Take a look at these 10 tips to stave off osteoporosis.</p> <p><strong>7. Snoring is hard on your heart</strong></p> <p>Yes, your husband’s snoring drives you mad, but your own snoring may be bad for your ticker.</p> <p>Obstructive sleep aponea, which is marked by heavy snoring, gasping and pauses in breathing while asleep, may lead to heart problems in women – and they can turn up earlier than the effects on men’s hearts, according to a new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America.</p> <p>The findings also suggest that sleep apnoea may be vastly underdiagnosed among snorers.</p> <p>Few things are as coveted as good sleep: studies show that it adds years to your life and, over time, increases happiness as much as winning the lottery.</p> <p><strong>8. HRT isn’t all bad</strong></p> <p>Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) fell from grace a few years back: Results from the US Women’s Health Initiative study suggested HRT could increase the risk of strokes and breast and ovarian cancer.</p> <p>However, if HRT is used in low doses for a short period of time, it can dramatically ease some symptoms of menopause, explains Donnica Moore, MD, a Far Hills, New Jersey-based women’s health expert and host of the podcast In the Ladies’ Room with Dr. Donnica.</p> <p>“HRT is not one drug. It is a whole category, including pills, patches, creams, gels, inserts and more,” she says.</p> <p>Her point is that some formulations are may be safer and suitable for easing the complaints of menopause.</p> <p>“Fully half of all women experience vaginal dryness with menopause and this doesn’t get better and it is treatable.”</p> <p>For women who experience it naturally (not as the result of surgery or other causes), menopause has three distinct stages: perimenopause, menopause and postmenopause.</p> <p><strong>9. You may benefit more than most from a low-salt diet</strong></p> <p>Cutting back on sodium may lower blood pressure in women better than it does in men.</p> <p>Women also might benefit most from drugs that directly block aldosterone, a hormone and blood vessel constrictor that is naturally higher in females and is further elevated by a high-salt diet, according to a report in the journal Hypertension.</p> <p>For more info on salt and its hidden harms, check out these 35 things food manufacturer's won't tell you.</p> <p><strong>10. You’re not the only one</strong></p> <p>Millions of women can’t control that “gotta go” feeling (urge incontinence) or leak during exercise or when they sneeze or cough (stress incontinence) and this risk increases after menopause.</p> <p>“It’s common but not normal, and any leaking of urine should be evaluated and treated,” Dr. Moore says.</p> <p><em>Written by</em> <em>Denise Mann, MS . This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/50-health-secrets-every-woman-over-50-should-know?items_per_page=All"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>h</em></a><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>ere’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Your horoscope for May 2019

<p><strong>Gemini May 21 – June 21</strong></p> <p>With speedy Mars in your sign at the start of May, take care when running for the train, bus or taxi and don’t drive too fast if you’re late for an appointment. While you can achieve a lot with your energy dialled up high, you may come across as tense or even aggressive if you’re racing to finish a project or dashing off to meet a friend. Take time out to do what you know calms you down, such as going for a walk or listening to your favourite meditation. Getting to bed early will benefit you. Also, plan a getaway if possible, as you may be feeling worn out. Later in May, you will be supported by your ruler Mercury in having deep and meaningful conversations involving issues to do with joint finances, an inheritance, intimacy or even sex. These positive talks may be life-changing and you will come up with inspired answers to any difficult questions.</p> <p>Best days: May 1, 7-9, 21, 31</p> <p><strong>Cancer June 22 – July 22</strong></p> <p> “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity,” said Roman philosopher Seneca. You come up with a breakthrough in matters to do with offspring, hobbies or affairs of the heart, the ‘lucky’ outcome of you putting in the hard yards behind the scenes.</p> <p>Best days: May 5, 9-11</p> <p><strong>Leo July 23 – August 22</strong></p> <p>You may dazzle your boss or higher-ups and find yourself in the spotlight for your contribution at work or to business affairs in early May. Just remember to devote time and energy to your loved ones as well.</p> <p>Best days: May 5, 11-13</p> <p><strong>Virgo August 22 – September 22</strong></p> <p>Broadening your horizons is a strong urge for you this month. Chat with an acquaintance from faraway, research an overseas trip or perhaps start learning a language. In mid-May, be prepared to make a break from your everyday routine and put your plans into action.</p> <p>Best days: May 5, 13-15</p> <p><strong>Libra September 23 – October 23</strong></p> <p>You attract a love interest or business proposition. But is the chemistry right, and do the numbers add up? A close friend is ready to offer a listening ear if things don’t pan out as you’d hoped. This event has its upside as it makes you look at what you truly value in a good partner.</p> <p>Best days: May 5, 14, 15-1</p> <p><strong>Scorpio October 23 – November 22</strong></p> <p>While it’s easy to see where others should change, it’s harder to transform our behaviour or see where we sabotage ourselves. But a full moon in your own sign, which lights up your self-expression, helps you become clear about what to do.</p> <p>Best days: May 14-15, 17-20</p> <p><strong>Sagittarius November 23 – December 21</strong></p> <p>The evidence is compelling: regular exercise and a healthy diet are essential for our wellbeing. You look into how to spice up your everyday routine and the new moon on May 5 inspires you to put your findings into action.</p> <p>Best days: May 5-6, 17</p> <p><strong>Capricorn December 22 – January 20</strong></p> <p>You’ve been tackling some heavy issues this year so take the time to balance the scales and indulge in the lighter side of life. Plan a romantic dinner with your sweetheart or dedicate a day to doing whatever makes you happy.</p> <p>Best days: May 5-6, 14, 19</p> <p><strong>Aquarius January 20 – February 18</strong></p> <p>You’re feeling the call to makeover your home or living arrangements. Simply painting a wall, recovering a chair or potting a plant could be enough of a transformation to satisfy your mood for change without straining your finances.</p> <p>Best days: May 1, 19, 24-26</p> <p><strong>Pisces February 19 – March 20</strong></p> <p>There is a friendly atmosphere on May 5 that brings you the chance to have a heart-to-heart connection with family or neighbours. You’ll also find a way to improve your daily commute or short trips in your neighbourhood.</p> <p>Best days: May 5, 19, 27-28</p> <p><strong>Aries March 21 – April 19</strong></p> <p>Your attention turns to matters of money, possessions and property with love planet Venus still in your sign and a new moon in your second house. The timing is perfect to reorganise your finances to achieve a goal. However, avoid getting into debt.</p> <p>Best days: May 1, 5, 1</p> <p><strong>Taurus April 20 – May 20</strong></p> <p>Change-making planet Uranus has been influencing your sign for a month and already you may have experienced a positive surprise or a flush of energy. When Venus partners with Uranus later in May, it may spark an event with children or a fun project</p> <p>Best days: May 5, 19</p> <p><em>Written by Janice Jones. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/horoscopes-may-2019?items_per_page=All"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>h</em></a><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>ere’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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5 happy retirement tips you need to follow

<p><strong>1. Control your spending</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is one of the biggest steps to ensure your retirement is stress-free. Controlling your spending during retirement is especially important – what is in your savings may be your only form of income. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unless you’re a millionaire many times over, you need to be able to handle your money – and not necessarily the way you have in the past. Depending on your retirement portfolio, it may be required to scale back on your spending. </span></p> <p><strong>2. Make time for the people who mean the most</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whether it is children, grandkids, siblings, extended family or lifelong friends – make time in retirement for the people you really love and admire. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Spending your golden years with your loved ones for a little bit, even if it isn’t for a long period of time. You will feel better knowing you spent some of your precious retirement years with your precious friends and family instead of spending it in isolation. </span></p> <p><strong>3. Make a bucket list</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What have you always wanted to do? What goals have you wanted to finally achieve? It is important to outline what you want to accomplish in your golden years, as well as your expectations of yourself. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whether it is going for a walk every day, or saving a portion of your retirement fund, or even smiling at a stranger – make sure you make a bucket list for everything you want to do in life so it’s not left until it’s too late. </span></p> <p><strong>4. Consider part-time work</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The rumours are true when they say retirement may be more work than you think, as transitioning from 40 years of full-time work to ‘unemployment’ can be a difficult feat. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To help with the transition and to keep yourself busy, consider part-time work. It may be an excellent possibility, as it can ensure you maintain an active lifestyle, mentally, physically and socially. </span></p> <p><strong>5. Do your travelling early in retirement</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The more distant or exotic your travel plans are, the earlier you should take them in retirement. While a jungle safari or climbing the Himalayas may seem like a great idea in five years’ time, you never know what may come, as health can be a huge factor. You want to ensure you are undergoing your most intense and adventurous travel plans while you’re still relatively young and in your best health. </span></p>

Retirement Life

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5 arthritis myths busted

<p><strong>Arthritis myth 1: you can't exercise</strong></p> <p>If you have arthritis, the right fitness programme could help you get relief from your symptoms by improving strength, balance, flexibility and range of motion. “If you have arthritis, it’s important to stay as active as you can,” says physiotherapist Karen Gordon.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Experts recommend at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise five days a week. Dust off your bike, buy a new bathing suit, start strength training – get moving in the ways that bring you the most happiness.</p> <p><strong>Arthritis myth 2: exercise produces joint pain</strong></p> <p>The more sedentary you are, the more things are going to hurt. Exercise helps by building strength and flexibility and controlling weight, says Gordon. One less kilogram on the scale equals four kilograms less pressure on your knees. Alternate easy days with more challenging days. Gordon suggests swimming or using an exercise bike when pain is more bothersome.</p> <p><strong>TIP</strong>: To help with painful, swollen knees, wear a brace. Stiffness could be a sign you need to start moving to lubricate your joints. Always consult a healthcare professional prior to starting an exercise regimen.</p> <p><strong>Arthritis myth 3: pain is always a bad thing</strong></p> <p>It’s better to regard pain as a signal to pay attention. Over-the-counter pain relievers can help relieve soreness after exercise; taking them beforehand may mask the instructive sensation you need to feel to judge when to stop.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Stop what you’re doing if joint pain increases after five or ten minutes, says Gordon. Burning discomfort in the muscles, however, is a good thing.</p> <p><strong>Arthritis myth 4: exercise puts joints at risk</strong></p> <p>Exercise strengthens joint-supporting muscles. Movement lubricates squeaky joints, strengthens muscles and increases flexibility, which all improve quality of life – and not just for those with arthritis.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Studies show weight-bearing exercise – walking, jogging or lifting weights – produces the healthiest knee cartilage. If sore joints are impeding your workout, you can still head for the pool, where you can jog, squat and do lunges in the water.</p> <p><strong>Arthritis myth 5: follow a restrictive exercise regime</strong></p> <p>Arthritis sufferers can engage safely in a variety of physical activities. Low-impact activities such as swimming, aquatic exercise, cycling and walking are excellent options. But, so too is running – if it doesn’t cause you pain when you do it or for days afterwards. Listen to your joints and make appropriate modifications.</p> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> As a rule, walk, don’t run if you have osteoarthritis, and avoid high-impact, twisting racquet sports.</p> <p><em>Written by Flannery Dean. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/5-arthritis-myths-busted?items_per_page=All"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>h</em></a><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>ere’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Visiting Havana as a 96-year-old

<p>It’s 6am and I’m at Canada’s Montreal international airport with my friend Francine, having just checked in our two suitcases and an upscale foldable walker that my travelling companion refers to as her Rolls-Royce.</p> <p>Francine is wearing an elegant trench coat and, since credit cards aren’t yet accepted at our destination, a moneybelt into which she has slipped a large wad of banknotes. It’s the first time she’s carried so much cash, she says. But isn’t there always a first time for everything?</p> <p>Francine van der Heide is 96 years old. I met her three decades ago in New York, where she had a pied-à-terre near the East River, a few blocks from the apartment of her former colleague, my late aunt Françoise. The two women had been pioneers at the United Nations. My aunt started as a bilingual secretary in 1948, Francine in 1949. In 1951, Francine married Wiebe van der Heide, who had been a member of the resistance in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation before settling in the US after the war. They had three boys. Two years after Wiebe died in 1995, and after nearly half a century of living in the US, Francine returned to her Canadian hometown, Montreal.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7826221/havana-at-96-insert.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/de69b373afdb41e2ac6e6bf439445de4" /></p> <p>It was around this time that we started hanging out together, going to the opera and having long meals in restaurants. And because Francine continued to swim into her 90s, our activities also included sessions at an indoor pool, inevitably followed by a sauna and a margarita (she mixes a wicked cocktail). Today, she has given up the front crawl, but when, during an especially harsh winter, I proposed we spend a week in Havana, she didn’t hesitate: “That would be wonderful.”</p> <p>Francine wants to travel across Old Havana in a bicitaxi, which is a pedal-powered cab. Safety features begin and end with a metal bar, to which we firmly cling. I have some doubts, but with Francine – who is 35 years my senior – gently mocking my apprehension, I decide to embrace the local life.</p> <p>We weave between fruit stands and DVD displays and pass children squabbling over timeless toys, like a hula hoop and a ball. “It makes me happy to see young people having fun like the old days,” says Francine.</p> <p>A big Chevrolet glides by. The cobalt-coloured car is vintage 1950s, and its appearance triggers fond memories. Francine reminisces about summertime in Montreal in 1948, a time when the now hip Plateau Mont-Royal was a working-class district. “Nobody had air conditioners then,” she recalls. “It’s just like that here now, people lingering in the doorways of their homes to escape the heat.”</p> <p>The bicitaxi drops us in front of stands of second-hand books in Plaza de Armas, which was the political centre of the colony when the Spanish ruled from the 16th to 19th centuries. “Do you notice all the blue?” she asks of the balconies adorning the square.</p> <p>Knowing her vision is limited, I’m always amazed when she makes these kinds of observations. Probably reading my thoughts, she adds, “And I cannot believe how clean the city is. There’s no paper littering the ground, no plastic bags caught on tree branches like back home.” I hadn’t noticed, but she was right.</p> <p>For more than 20 years, Francine has suffered from macular degeneration, a disease that causes gradual vision loss. To compensate, she makes a point of researching all outings thoroughly. In preparation for this trip, she perused several travel guides, using a magnifying glass to read small print. With US/Cuba relations thawing, Francine knew she was witnessing a historic moment. [The two nations restored diplomatic relations – which had been severed in 1961 after the Cuban Revolution – on July 20, 2015.]</p> <p>Francine has a fondness for the left, which is one reason why she feels a kinship with Lucía Sardiña. At 76, the employee of the Cuban Ministry of Culture is from the generation that fought alongside Fidel Castro in the 1950s. She is what one would call a keeper of the revolutionary faith.</p> <p>In her chauffeur-driven Lada, Sardiña takes us to visit a cultural centre created by Kcho, one of the island’s most internationally recognised contemporary artists. This modern space, so different from the dusty state museums, is populated by young people toting laptops and smartphones. Most Cubans don’t have access to the internet due to the prohibitive cost and the island’s poor connectivity. Kcho’s workshop, which is open to the public, may be the only place in Havana where Wi-Fi is free – even if it’s a little slow.</p> <p>The previous day, a guided architecture tour of the city had introduced us to a selection of contemporary Cuban buildings at the National Schools of Art, dating from the 1960s. In 30°C heat, under the institution’s acclaimed brick-and-tile cupolas, Francine pondered the island’s cultural legacy. Looking at the student artwork around us, she observed, “It’s stunning, in a country so poor, that all these young people are interested in creating art and are able to make a life.”</p> <p>Francine herself inspires a certain amount of jubilant incredulity when people learn of her age. At the Nécropolis Cristóbal Colón, 56 hectares of ornate mausoleums, graves and statues, the ticket agent exits her booth to greet us and grants Francine free access to the site.</p> <p>When our guide finds out Francine was born near the beginning of the previous century, he not only welcomes her, he kisses her. Then he offers to tell us all about the characters, love stories and tragedies behind the cemetery’s plaster and marble angels.</p> <p>Though her vitality belies her years, Francine is not immune to the physical effects of ageing. In 2013, she was experiencing excruciating back pain, especially when she first awoke.</p> <p>Doctors diagnosed her with lumbar spinal stenosis, a narrowing of the spinal canal that can put pressure on the spinal cord and nerves.</p> <p>Francine suffered. She pleaded for an operation but was deemed too old. Then someone suggested she perform 20 minutes of exercises in bed each morning. Gradually, she recovered. During our stay in Havana, she would lie on the terrazzo floor of her room to do her stretching (her bed is too narrow). “To think that two years ago I didn’t want to live and today I’m walking in Cuba,” she muses.</p> <p>At Nazdarovie, a retro-Soviet restaurant on the Malecón, Francine climbs three flights of stairs in one go. The staff are impressed. “We have people in their 20s who grumble about coming up this far. Can we adopt you as our mascot?”</p> <p>Francine is stimulated by the challenges we encounter during our stay; compliments encourage her.</p> <p>“I wouldn’t like to disappoint you,” she had told me shortly before we arrived in Cuba. Our journey is unconventional and unscripted. Apart from a few organised tours, it’s never clear where we are heading. We learn to be adaptable, which, for my friend, means having to kneel in the shower to wash her hair to avoid slipping on the tiles.</p> <p>One day, we climb into a taxi with a woman behind the wheel. Thinking that the fare is too high, I try to haggle, but our driver won’t budge. Francine defends her. “It’s hard enough for us to make it in a man’s world,” she observes. “Even in New York, few women drive taxis.”</p> <p>Throughout the trip, I’m impressed by Francine’s physical stamina, but it’s her openness that defines our experience. Her ability to relate to others even extends to plant life. Contemplating a pair of palm trees in the courtyard of the Museo de Arte Colonial, she extols their beauty. “They are 150 years old, and see how straight they are!”</p> <p><strong>Travel Tips for Seniors</strong></p> <p><strong>1. Get the right support</strong></p> <p>Most airlines transport wheelchairs or other mobility aids free of charge. Depending on the disability or impairment, special mobility aid assistance can also be provided at the airport, including a wheelchair ride to the aircraft. Attendants will assist with boarding and help you settle in your seat</p> <p><strong>2. Find your speed</strong></p> <p>It’s important to take a break or rest when the need arises – particularly if it is very hot. In Havana, Francine enjoyed refuge in the cool lobby of the Hotel Parque Central. Resting against cushions in what she called “one of the best armchairs” in the city, she spent the afternoon listening to an audiobook.</p> <p><strong>3. Don’t be afraid to ask</strong></p> <p>On board a tourist bus during an architecture tour, Francine couldn’t properly hear our guide, whose voice was drowned out by ambient noise. She kindly requested that he come closer, and he happily obliged.</p> <p><strong>4. Stay in motion</strong></p> <p>According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, even people who engage in moderate amounts of exercise are likely to live longer. Those who, like Francine, are active for at least 150 minutes a week have a 31% lower mortality rate.</p> <p><em>Written by Hélène de Billy.</em> <em>This article first appeared</em> <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/Havana-at-96"><em>in Reader’s Digest.</em></a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Retirement Life

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Meet the 59-year-old man who has the most piercings in the world

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT.</strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rolf Buchholz, 59, has taken piercing to an extreme level – with a total of 453 metal piercings on his body, the German man is the Guinness World Record holder. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the world’s most pierced man, it may seem incomprehensible to many how he could carry out his day to day functions like any other normal person. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Buchholz has 278 metal piercings in his genitalia alone. It doesn’t stop there though as the German man also wears a number of tattoos with pride and even has horn implants on his head.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the 59-year-old insists his life is as normal as anyone else, including his sex life. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s not a problem at all. I have had the piercings already so long, if there was a problem, I would have got rid of them already long ago,” he told </span><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/living/3799724/worlds-most-pierced-man-boasts-of-great-sex-life-despite-having-278-piercings-in-his-penis/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As well as his downstairs area carrying an enormous number of piercings, Mr Buchholz also has 94 in and around his mouth. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs5a2UKH4x2/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs5a2UKH4x2/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Rolf Buchholz (@robuchholz)</a> on Jan 21, 2019 at 4:48am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the 59-year-old confirms he has no complaints in the bedroom, he says it’s a different matter entirely with airport security. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When travelling to the United Arab Emirates for an appearance at a nightclub in Dubai, he claims authorities turned the man away as they were terrified he practiced “black magic.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Those who escorted me back to the aeroplane said that it was because of the way I looked and that it was because I am black magic.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What do you think of Rolf Buchholz 453 metal piercings? Let us know in the comments below. </span></p>

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5 retirement life lessons you didn’t know you needed

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are or five retirement lessons to think about before going into retirement. </span></p> <p><strong>1. Remember maintaining your lifestyle is not a walk in the park</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Frugality coupled with the understanding that your income is not streaming in like it once was is key to maintaining some semblance of the life you used to have. </span></p> <p><strong>2. Transitioning into retirement is not easy</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It may be hard for you to let go of your professional life – after all, you have been working hard and up towards this moment for the better part of your whole life. </span></p> <p><strong>3. You can decide whether you want to be bored or busy</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Often the answer to the question, “what do you want to do with your life during retirement” usually comes easy to many. Perhaps playing golf, relaxing by the beach or spending long summers overseas seems ideal, but unfortunately it is not enough to fill your golden years. </span></p> <p><strong>4. You may lose friends</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your true friends will remain after you retire, but unfortunately the people who may have respected you, listened to you and went out of their way to be friendly with you may stop having time for you after retirement. Unfortunately, it is how life goes, and it will go on.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Being able to save is still essential in retirement</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You may or may not have considered this already, but the fact still remains – retirement is not a free for all when it comes to spending. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unfortunately, bills and expenses still require to be paid even in retirement. Don’t jeopardise your financial future by overspending or going into debt.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What are some of your retirement lessons others may not know about? Let us know in the comments below. </span></p>

Retirement Life

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What Barbie would look like as a 60-year-old

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A dating site for single over 50-year-olds looking to get back in the game has honoured Mattel’s beloved iconic Barbie on her 60</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">th</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> birthday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Charly  Lester from Lumen told </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/dating/barbie-reimagined-as-her-actual-age-on-her-60th-birthday/news-story/ca897d3c91b20dce543cc8761373c214"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">the idea was created in an effort to celebrate and show the appeal of older women. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our Head of Brand Liesa had the idea of showing ageing icons as their real ages, and Barbie was one of the first ones she mentioned,” Lester explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After reconfiguring what the iconic “forever young” doll would look like into her older age, the dating site team said Barbie’s 60</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">th</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> birthday was the perfect way to challenge the way mature aged people are shown in the media. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Lumen’s mission is very much pro-age and anti-ageism and we are repeatedly challenging the way over 50s are shown in the media,” Lester said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">embed</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We felt Barbie’s 60th birthday was a great opportunity to showcase this in a lighthearted way.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our homage to Barbie shows her un-airbrushed, and represented by a real woman at her real age. She is still beautiful and aspirational, but in a very realistic way.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over the years, Barbie has had over 200 jobs, from being an astronaut to a firefighter, a game developer to even the president of the united States – there isn’t much the most recognisable toys in the world can’t do. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The issue, says Lester, is that Barbie has “never been her real age.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Telling </span><a href="https://www.metro.news/barbie-brought-to-life-to-help-over-50s-win-dating-game/1464916/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Metro</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">,</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> they said: “Many women say that in their 50s and 60s they’ve never felt more empowered in their own skin and this should be reflected by influential icons like Barbie.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We encourage the toy industry to consider making their products more pro age… who says that everyone should be in their 20s to be a success?”</span></p>

Retirement Life