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The best holiday packing tips

<p>Thinking about packing and unpacking can be a real point of stress for all travellers. So, the best way to beat the stress when you land is to pack right. These are among the best packing tips we have grown to love.</p> <p>1. Your carry-on and your checked bag should carry different types of items. To some, this is obvious, but to others, this little tip can mean the difference between a carry-on stuffed with socks and one with items that need quick-access. Your carry-on bag will turn into your day-pack once you arrive at your destination. So, to make the transition easier, include personal items like wallet, passport, pen and paper, hand-sanitiser, maps and city guides, books, camera, headphones, and your mobile phone + charger. You’ll avoid lots of stress while flying by having these types of items readily accessible during flight.</p> <p>2. Roll your clothes. When you are unpacking, you will notice that rolled clothes often come out of the bag with fewer creases. Also, by rolling your clothes, you will often be able to pack more into your suitcase (psst…see tip #5 below).</p> <p>3. Pack your suitcase in sections. Standard rectangular suitcases are easy to mentally divide up into sections. Depending on what is right for you, divide your case into 2, 3, or 4 parts. Each part should only contain similar items. For example, keep all tops in one section, bottoms in another, and under garments + bathing suits in yet another. Or, if you like to pack outfits together, consider packing fair weather outfits in one section, cold weather outfits in another, and shoes + accessories in another. And remember, re-section your bag as you start to accumulate clothes that need washing. Keep those clothes separate to keep things simple.</p> <p>4. Fill your shoes. When packing shoes with any structure (ones that can’t be flattened), ALWAYS take advantage of the space inside your shoes. Pack socks, trinkets &amp; extra breakable souvenirs bought while abroad, or (depending on how smelly your shoes are) clothes and other items.</p> <p>5. Over pack. (Yes, you read that right!) When it comes to a semi-full suitcase or a jam-packed one, what’s really the difference? Most of us use rolly-suitcases anyways, so as long as your bag still meets flight weight requirements, pack the extra pair of shoes, gloves, pants, or sunglasses! Having just want you want with you while you are on holiday can be a relief and a give you an added sense of comfort when exploring!</p> <p><em>Written by Luray Joy. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/packing-for-holiday-tips/">MyDiscoveries.</a></em></p>

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How do you help grandchildren adjust when they’re moving?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When our children move house, we’re often asked to help store their clutter so their home is looking at its best during marketing. However, looking after grandchildren is sometimes added to the list of our desirable contributions when children are moving. And, given that moving home can be particularly stressful for young children and teenagers, there are a few tips to consider – before and after they move.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Routines are understandably disrupted in major ways during moving and sensitive planning can help all family members, but especially young children, to better cope with the impending changes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of the problems is that busy parents, hectic professional lives, and the necessities of an extremely competitive real estate market can mean little thought is given to the effect moving has on young children and teenagers, both of whom respond differently. Certainly no thought is given to the advice grandparents might need when asked to look after children in the middle of the moving process or how to deal with what comes up afterwards.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Firstly, kids need time to get used to the idea of moving, so parents should give them as much advance warning as possible. It is important for other family members such as grandparents provide them with as much additional information as possible about why the family is moving and what they can expect in their new home and suburb.</span></p> <p><strong>Before the move</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are some tips that should help smooth the process of looking after kids when they are in the process of moving suburb, interstate or overseas:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Ask grandchildren to share their feelings with you:</strong> Although you’ll undoubtedly be going through your range of emotions, experts say open discussion is very important so your grandchildren can voice the feelings they’re encountering. Listen to what they have to say and assure them that you understand any concerns. Talk to them about your moving experiences and reassure them about life’s journey, and how change can often opens doors to new and exciting chapters and friends.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Don’t take their reactions personally:</strong> Children can have problems adjusting to a move, or the idea of moving, and can blame a parent or parents for causing it. Don’t fall into the trap of defending a parent’s decision making if this happens. Explain that sometimes big decisions can’t be avoided and reinforce some of the positive outcomes that are possible from a move.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Make them a part of the process.</strong> Ask your children to help very young grandchildren pack some of their favourite items as their house is being packed up. It can help them understand that although the family will be moving to a new home, their belongings will be moving with them. Personalise their boxes with labels and stickers. Perhaps even ask them if they would like some of their belongings to holiday at your house, during the move.
</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Be cautiously optimistic.</strong> It’s important to be positive and optimistic because your grandchildren’s attitude will largely mirror yours and that of their parents. However, don’t insist everything is going to be wonderful. Even if the new house is fantastic, it’s normal for it to take some time to adjust.
</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Help grandchildren to explore the new neighbourhood on the Internet:</strong> If they’ll be moving to a new suburb or town, use Google Street View, Google Earth, maps, tourism information websites, local council websites and Wikipedia pages from your new local council or the Internet to explain where you’ll be living. Explain any differences in weather and geography and talk about any nearby attractions that may be interesting, such as moving closer to the beach or to a park. 
</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Try to keep a routine:</strong> A child’s world is based on routine and it’s important to try and keep some semblance of normalcy throughout the process. We suggest sticking to a set time for dinner every evening, no matter how chaotic things seem to be, and to regular weekend activities the family enjoys.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For younger children and toddlers, it can be useful to speak to your doctor about issues such as a new diet or the start of toilet training. It may be better to put any further new experiences on hold until you’ve settled in to the new home.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With teenagers, the most prevalent concerns revolve around the loss of peer groups, friends and what to expect from a new school. It’s vitally important not to invalidate their feelings but to openly acknowledge their fears and discuss the importance of keeping a sense of proportion and context. Moving house can be exceptionally challenging for teenagers but also an important, strengthening, life experience when handled sensitively.</span></p> <p><strong>After the move</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After your grandchildren have moved, there’s bound to be a settling in period – perhaps for you as well. If they’ve moved some distance away, you may feel just as heartbroken as them. In fact, it can be doubly difficult for grandparents because you may be experiencing considerable anxiety about the loss of regular visits to your children as well as your grandchildren.</span></p> <p><strong>There are a few things you can do to make the separation less arduous:</strong></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re not particularly tech-savvy, or if you’d like to teach your grandchildren the art of snail mail, make a folder with some paper for very young grandchildren to write notes or draw pictures of their new neighbourhood and friends on. Include some addressed, stamped envelopes (taking account of any looming postal increases) and encourage them to snail mail you at any time.</span></li> </ul> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Set up a Skype account or try out Facetime with the kids before they move. It’s a great way of providing a fun and reassuring way of them keeping in touch whenever they like.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Create a photo album or a framed photo collage with all the great times you’ve shared.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Give your grandchildren a special possession for safekeeping and to remember you by.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Provide the recipe for one your grandchildren’s favourite treats or meals.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Finally, it’s important to let children know that they’ll always be in your heart and in your thoughts, that their future holds exciting new adventures that will also include you, and that you have a pact to find ways to stay in contact and strengthen your bond until you see each other again next time.</span></li> </ul> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/property/how-do-you-help-grandchildren-adjust-when-they%E2%80%99re-moving.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

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5 genius packing tips from flight attendants

<p>Taking the time to plan what to pack before you fly can save you time, money and hassle. “How many times do you pack a lot of stuff, but never wear half of it?” asks flight attendant Michele Radon. “Lay it out before you pack it. You may find that you’ll be able to wear a pair of pants with two different tops.”<br /> <br />It’s also OK to wear the same thing twice, adds flight attendant Abagail Valencia. When it comes to handbags and dress shoes, choose just one and wear your bulkiest items such as coats, suit jackets and boots, when you travel. Mix and match your go-to travel outfits. A favourite top, blazer and tailored pants can be mixed and matched for both casual and unexpected dressier occasions. The following useful tips will help make your next trip a breeze.</p> <p><strong>1. Pack “double duty” clothes</strong></p> <p>If you want to travel light, simplify your travel wardrobe to include items that can serve more than one purpose. A comfortable jumper or pashmina wrap, for example, is essential, says Radon. Airlines don’t always give out blankets, so you can use it as a blanket or a ‘pillow’ when on the plane and then wear it.<br /> <br />Pack one pair of jeans and one pair of black pants that can be dressed up or down, suggests Valencia. A couple of T-shirts is all you need for casual wear, and one dressy shirt will suffice when going out at night, she says. If you need dressier attire, add a black dress, scarf and heels, while a smart blazer should work for men.</p> <p><strong>2. Streamline your toiletries bag</strong></p> <p>When travelling light, streamline your getting-ready routine, explains flight attendant Jane Frilicci. If you’re not dedicated to a certain brand, just use the shampoo, conditioner, body wash and body lotion the hotel supplies and use the hotel’s hairdryer. Be careful of taking bulky glass aftershave and perfume which can break or is not allowed in hand luggage on international trips. Consider using up sample size atomisers or refillable sprays, roll or cream perfume instead.<br /> <br />Take the opportunity to use up those sample size products you’ve been storing or fill your favourite product in travel size storage. If you’re going to a remote place or a resort area, prices may be high and you may not be able to buy whatever you need, so taking enough to last the trip makes sense. Frilicci recommends getting a clear travel bag so you can see all of your toiletries when going through security and on your trip.</p> <p><strong>3. Compress and protect</strong></p> <p>Bulky items such as puffy coats for colder destinations that take up a lot of room in your suitcase can be managed by using compression cubes. If you have to travel with bulky items, compression space bags can easily compress your clothes, says Valencia. They save room in your suitcase and protect your items from dirt, moisture, odours and allergens.</p> <p><strong>4. Keep kids occupied and other passengers happy</strong></p> <p>Parents need to be prepared when travelling with kids, says Frilicci. “People get bent out of shape when there is a screaming kid, especially when they’re trying to sleep.”<br /> <br />To keep kids and passengers happy, Frilicci suggests packing a new toy, not an old one. Some parents make gift bags for the passengers seated next to them – including packaged sweets, earplugs and a note that says something like “Hi, I’m Jake, I’m three months old, and I’m not the best traveller so you might hear my loud voice.”</p> <p><strong>5. Keep useful items in your carry-on bag</strong></p> <p>“Keep a separate carry-on bag with all of your essentials that you need to access during the flight – things such as a toothbrush, make-up, passport and a pen,” Frilicci says.</p> <p><em>Written by Kim Fredericks. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/flights/8-genius-packing-tips-flight-attendants"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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6 essential items you need to pack for your river cruise

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You may think river cruises are similar to ocean ones if you have never travelled down the stream before – but they could not be anymore different. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">River cruises are a lot more focussed on frequent stops and minimal lounging onboard – afterall, the spectacular experiences that come with travelling through small towns and beautiful cities are once in a lifetime opportunities. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are a few items to take on your river cruise. </span></p> <p><strong>1. Walking shoes</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You won’t be in your cabins a lot and walking from the start of your cruise vessel to the end will not be the only exercise you can expect while on holiday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are many sights to see, so pack a good pair of shoes that are sturdy, reliable and can go the distance.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Comfortable clothing</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Comfort is an important part of your holiday, so bring a practical wardrobe in which you can explore the great sights by foot, bike or even train. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For evenings aboard your vessel – or even for the small town restaurants – bring smart casual pieces. </span></p> <p><strong>3. Medication</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take all the medication you need – unlike ocean cruises, trusty shops are not located on your vessel and it can be frustrating to have to walk through the gorgeous cities you paid thousands of dollars to be in, just to find some headache tablets or allergy pills. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bring a mini first-aid kit just in case, as well as travel-sized bottles and hand sanitiser. </span></p> <p><strong>4. Adaptor</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Remember, European adaptors differ from our own ones, so bring the cords you require and all your electronics can be charged for another day. </span></p> <p><strong>5. Exercise clothes</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many river cruises have gyms and swimming pools, so pack some exercise gear and swimmers in case they offer classes. </span></p> <p><strong>6. City Guidebooks, phrase books and currency calculator</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For a seamless trip with minimal challenges, bring a city guidebook so you don’t miss out on all the sights to see. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Phrase books can be helpful too if you are in a country where the common tongue is not familiar to you. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A currency calculator can also be extremely helpful if you want to keep a close eye on your spending habits by converting all your money.</span></p>

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The 4 things you will ALWAYS find in a cruise expert's suitcase

<p><strong>1. Highlighter</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Believe it or not, a highlighter on a cruise is not that common to come across – so pack one! Cruises always hand out programs, itineraries and other handy pamphlets and it will be easier to highlight things of interest to you. All the papers you receive really add up, so while this tip may seem silly – it WILL help!</span></p> <p><strong>2. Ziplock bags / plastic bags</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Snacking is a common occurrence. If you’re travelling with children, they may get peckish while on the islands, in the rooms or by the pool so pack a few little snacks in a ziplock bag at the buffet so they never need to leave your sight. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Plastic bags are also a big help for any wet clothes or towels you don’t have the chance to wash or dry out while on your cruise. </span></p> <p><strong>3. Refillable water bottle</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This tip is a must as water bottles cost a lot on the ship! While water itself is free as well as some juices, having a water bottle will be the lifesaver you didn’t know you needed while lying underneath the sun or while on the islands. </span></p> <p><strong>4. Lanyard</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lanyards are very handy when you’re onboard as the whole ship is cashless – you will have to pay for everything with a cruise-given card. So instead of paying $8-10 at the cruise shops, bring your own (it is a lot cheaper if you’re a big group).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What are some of the little things you pack in your suitcase for a cruise? Let us know in  the comments below.</span></p>

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Packing cells will change how you travel in 2019

<p>Packing cells – people either love them or think they are a huge waste of money. We’ve detailed the pros and cons of packing cells so that you can make your own mind up.</p> <p><strong>1. What are they?</strong></p> <p>Packing cells are little cubes or zippered bags of various sizes that act as removable compartments for your suitcase or backpack.</p> <p><strong>2. How do you use them?</strong></p> <p>Packing cells allow you to organise your suitcase. You sort the items you need into individual bags. Put your dirty clothes in one, underpants in another. Put your socks in one, camera gear in another. You get the point. If you’re sharing a suitcase with a travelling companion, you can put your clothes into individual packing cells – that way your clothes won’t get all mixed up.</p> <p><strong>3. What do fans say about them?</strong></p> <p>A Facebook thread on packing cells went viral this week due to the number of people commenting. Comments such as: “Best things ever – saves so much room and keeps things tidy and organised” were common. Here’s a few more comments: “They have really changed our packing. Highly recommend. No more digging through the whole bag trying to find a pair of undies.” – Alicia thoman “We use them all the time now. Each person has their own pack and then you just take it out of the case – so much easier.” – Clare Ditchburn “They are the best, love mine, make so much more room in your suitcase.” – Kathy Stringfellow</p> <p><strong>4. What do the critics say?</strong></p> <p>Critics say that packing bags are a waste of money. Some argue that the bags are just more stuff you don’t need. Why pay the money when it doesn’t really take that long to find something in your bag. Is the 20 seconds really worth the cash?</p> <p><strong>5. Tips for using them</strong></p> <p>Generally, most people we found who have used the packing bags say they love them. So how do you use them effectively?</p> <ul> <li>Use a different colour per traveller</li> <li>Make sure you buy enough of them</li> <li>Get packing bags that have a clear window or mesh to allow you to see what is in the bag. Otherwise you’re going to spend just as much time hunting for the stuff you need.</li> <li>You can make your own packing bags from laundry bags, old airline amenities bags or plastic zip-lock bags.</li> <li>Buy a selection of different sizes</li> <li>Use them for small and necessary items.</li> <li>Use one for medications</li> <li>Keep one for chargers and phones</li> <li>Have a waterproof one for wet clothes</li> <li>Have one for dirty clothes</li> <li>Where do you buy them?</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Alison Godfrey. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/packing-cells-hack/"><em>MyDiscoveries</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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What to pack for a cruise

<p>In the Golden Age of cruising of the 1920s and ‘30s, first-class passengers donned full-length evening gowns and tuxedos as they steamed across the Atlantic.</p> <p>Dress styles changed as cruising became more egalitarian, although five-star lines maintained strict formal dress policies to allow well-heeled passengers to parade their finery.  </p> <p>I clearly remember staring in wonder at the dazzling array of full-length, full-beaded gowns in the boutique on board stylish ship Crystal Symphony in the early 1990s. There was plenty to plunder if one needed a bejewelled outfit for the evening.</p> <p>Dress codes still exist; however, sequins and bowties are more an option than a requirement.</p> <p>I’ll go out on a limb and say that most women love to dress up; I know very few who’d sneer at the chance to put on that cocktail outfit that’s been bought and begging for an outing. Conversely, men favour the phrase: “I’m on holidays – I don’t want to wear a tie.”</p> <p>To appease all-comers, cruise lines still offer traditional ‘formal’ nights (they may have a different name such as ‘cocktail’ or ‘dress to impress’) but also permit passengers to ‘dress down’ as long as they dine in the casual eateries.</p> <p>As a rule of thumb, cruise lines have a resort/casual code for daytime and two different codes for the evening.</p> <p><strong>Onboard</strong></p> <p><strong><u>Day wear</u></strong></p> <p>For summer cruises passengers should pack swimsuits (preferably two), sarong/cover-up, shorts, t-shirts, resort dresses, jeans or light-weight pants, sandals, thongs or ballet flats and gym wear if heading to the fitness centre along with the right footwear. Others should pack flat rubber-soled shoes to avoid slipping on deck.</p> <p>Swimsuits and sarongs are not allowed in restaurants and lounges during the day time, while some cruise lines also prohibit tank tops (sleeveless T-shirts) and baseball caps. The best advice is checking the cruise line website under the Q &amp;A section.   </p> <p>Those taking expedition cruises or venturing to cooler climes should pack hiking pants, waterproof over pants, wind-cheaters, lightweight warm jackets, thermals, beanies and hiking boots.</p> <p><strong><u>Evening wear</u></strong></p> <p>Most cruise lines – be they the affordable mass-market companies or the luxury lines – have two dress codes for the evening.</p> <p>On most nights the code with be “smart casual”, although a cruise line might call it “elegant casual”, as Seabourn Line does.  </p> <p>Women can wear a good dress (something one would wear out to dinner), pantsuit or separates (top and skirt/pants). Men are required to wear a collared shirt and long trousers and sometimes jeans (depending on cruise line), while jackets and ties are optional.</p> <p>The best choices for women are non-crush, no-iron varieties. There are plenty of jersey fabric dresses and outfits available, while a scarf or two, a pashmina, or a light evening jacket never goes astray.</p> <p>The biggest change in the cruise industry has been the relaxing of the “formal” dress code. Ladies can go to town and put on that sparkling evening dress, pantsuit or dressy separates. On most lines men are required to wear a tuxedo or a dark suit with tie or bow tie; P&amp;O Cruises Australia say a tie is optional, while Celebrity Cruises allows men to wear ‘pants or designer jeans’ on their ‘evening chic’ nights. These nights are held once or twice during a seven-night cruise.</p> <p><strong><u>Theme Nights</u></strong></p> <p>Many lines have these, with the most popular being ‘white’ parties and ‘Gatsby’ nights. Cunard ships also have masquerade and Victoriana balls, while P&amp;O has a “Back to School” party.  </p> <p><strong>Shore Excursions</strong></p> <p>Pack the sunscreen, hat, water bottle, lightweight jacket/jumper, rain jacket (or umbrella) into a light day-pack or travel bag and carry local currency for drinks, lunch and tips.</p> <p>The key to stress-free packing is check the cruise line website and choose lightweight, drip-dry outfits than can be mixed and matched and glammed up with a scarf, pashmina and some bling.</p> <p><em>Written by Caroline Gladstone. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.mydiscoveries.com.au/stories/what-to-pack-for-a-cruise/">My Discoveries</a>.</em></p>

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Scary new travel theft trend: Why locking your suitcase with padlocks is pointless

<p>Locking suitcases may not be enough to keep them from being broken into, thanks to an increasingly popular technology.</p> <p>UK consumer group <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.which.co.uk/news/2019/02/master-key-to-luggage-locks-leaked-thieves-can-open-your-suitcase-with-a-3d-printed-key/" target="_blank">Which?</a> found that keys printed on a 3D printer could “potentially open the luggage locks of almost any bag in the world”.</p> <p>Many suitcases have TSA-approved locks, giving officers from the US Transportation Security Administration the ability to access them if needed. These locks, which have seven different varieties, are used by more than 500 different luggage and padlock brands globally.</p> <p>However, in 2014, the TSA's seven master keys were leaked in a <em>Washington Post</em> article, leading them to be replicated around the world and the templates posted on the Internet.</p> <p>The consumer group's investigation found that after four years, bags are still sold with the same TSA locks and the same key templates still work.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7824125/lock1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4fdf36317f0d4294a9adcd6db64df049" /></p> <p>The group found that a set of keys printed using a £200 (AU$369) 3D printer could open suitcases from a variety of brand, including Samsonite, Antler and American Tourister. The templates could also be used to order the keys in stainless steel from an online 3D printing service, which is available to anyone.</p> <p>Travel Sentry, which produces the TSA lock security system across 30 countries, told the group that while the 2014 leak was taken seriously, it did not affect travellers' property security significantly as thieves still prefer using brute force to break into bags.</p> <p>The company also added that the presence of the locks is "still a proven deterrent to theft and tampering".</p> <p>While it is not mandatory in Australia, travellers are still advised to use these TSA-compliant locks when travelling to the US and Canada.</p> <p>The TSA has not commented on the matter.</p> <p>How do you keep your luggage safe? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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The bizarre items you cannot take with you on a plane

<p>There are plenty of items that you can take with you overseas, provided they’re in your checked luggage and not your carry-on.</p> <p>Bottles of alcohol, aerosol cans, corkscrews with blades and sporting equipment are just a few of the things you can transport overseas in your checked luggage. But before you do, keep in mind that each country has their own rules and regulations.</p> <p>For example, the United States doesn’t allow sharp knitting needles.</p> <p>So, what is permitted in carry-on? And what is a complete no-go?</p> <p><strong>Items allowed in your carry-on</strong></p> <p>There are a few items that you can travel with in your carry-on that are restricted in your checked luggage.</p> <p>For example, lithium batteries that are usually found in smartphones, cameras and laptops are considered a fire hazard. So, you would want to keep them in your carry-on bags rather than your suitcase.</p> <p>Other items that you can pack in your carry-on but not your check-in luggage are electric skateboards, cordless curling irons, e-cigarettes and snow globes as long as the liquid inside is less than 100ml.</p> <p><strong>Items that are completely banned</strong></p> <p>When travelling, don’t even think about taking any of these items with you, because chances are, you’ll be stopped before you get the chance to board.</p> <p>CO2 cartridges are definitely not allowed, so if you ride a bike, you’ll need to carry a pump for your tyres instead.</p> <p>Other items that are banned are chlorine, bleach and fertilisers due to the ammonium nitrate that are present in some brands.</p> <p>The most bizarre item of all is probably a coconut, which is also classified as a fire hazard, so don’t try and smuggle it in either your carry-on or your check-in luggage.</p> <p>Did you know what you were allowed to carry and what you weren’t? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Woman writes genius note to noisy neighbour

<p>Dealing with a noisy neighbour is tricky – but this woman from New Jersey in the US took the high road and tried a different approach.</p> <p>Candice Benbow was getting used to the fact that her neighbour loved to play loud music. However, one night when the noise blasted into the wee hours, Benbow finally had enough.</p> <p>While others might call the police or talk to the strata committee, Benbow decided to pick up her baking tools and make a cake at 3.30 in the morning to pass on to her neighbour with the note. </p> <p>“I wanted the best way to tell my neighbor that he tried it with his late night party,” Benbow said.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">I wanted the best way to tell my neighbor that he tried it with his late night party. So I wrote him a letter and baked him a cake. <a href="https://t.co/SxPKAzOHp0">pic.twitter.com/SxPKAzOHp0</a></p> — Candice Marie Benbow (@CandiceBenbow) <a href="https://twitter.com/CandiceBenbow/status/1074010643592814592?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 15, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Accompanying the cake was a whimsical letter, which she also posted on her Twitter page. </p> <p>“When you come home every evening and blast music, I’ve come to expect it,” Benbow said in the letter. She even admitted that the loud music helped her “catch a vibe” and find new songs for her weekly playlists.</p> <p>“But last night… Fam, you tried it,” she wrote. “I don’t know if you were hosting the official afterparty for our building’s holiday social … In the future, as you’re hosting your kickbacks and come throughs, please remember the rest of us.”</p> <p>To her surprise, the gesture worked – and she shared all the updates on Twitter.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">UPDATE: I JUST MET MY NEIGHBOR TOMMY!!!! He’s so freaking cool! He apologized for the noise, promised to invite me to the next party and most importantly...HE SAID MY POUND CAKE WAS AMAZING!!!! <a href="https://t.co/NcU8t0ZfqT">pic.twitter.com/NcU8t0ZfqT</a></p> — Candice Marie Benbow (@CandiceBenbow) <a href="https://twitter.com/CandiceBenbow/status/1075057181798604801?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 18, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The neighbour, Tommy Amaro, turned out to be a music video director, which explains the loud music. </p> <p>“It was just beautiful because if it was another neighbour, they would’ve at least tried to call the cops on me, try to knock me out and this was like, it was cool,” Amaro told<span> </span><a href="https://www.insideedition.com/instead-getting-mad-noisy-neighbor-new-jersey-woman-bakes-him-cake-49470"><em>Inside Edition</em></a>.</p> <p>Benbow also learned that Amaro was having his first Christmas without his daughter, who died in a car accident.</p> <p>“It was a sweet and gentle reminder that we never know what folks are going through and it is always best to lead with kindness,” said Benbow.</p> <p>She confirmed that now she can enjoy being home without the noise. “He has been quiet as a church mouse,” she said.</p> <p>What do you think about this woman's strategy to put an end to her noisy neighbour? How do you deal with noisy neighbours? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

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10 things that are always a waste to pack

<p>All travellers know the hardships of packing the necessities for the trip ahead. And everyone knows how many things you haven’t actually used by the time you get home again – what a waste of precious space in your luggage.</p> <p>Here is a list of 10 things to not bother packing in your suitcase.</p> <p><strong>1. Shampoo and conditioner</strong></p> <p>You can purchase these items at the places you travel. If the locals have easy access to hair products then so will you. Hotels should provide little travel-sized minis which will last a few days. Travelling with liquids can also lead to delays at security check points.</p> <p><strong>2. Shoes</strong></p> <p>Don’t pack more than two pairs of shoes – they take up unnecessary weight and space. Ensure you have a comfortable pair of walking shoes and some shoes that are nice enough to go out in at restaurants and other events.</p> <p><strong>3. Jewellery</strong></p> <p>Don’t bring your favourite expensive jewellery, you are only human and can accidentally leave items behind in hotels or apartments. You could also increase your risk of becoming a target for pickpockets. Try swapping out your diamond earrings for some cheaper substitute studs while you’re away.</p> <p><strong>4. Laptop</strong></p> <p>Don’t bring your laptop. Unless you’re travelling for work, you probably don’t need to bring a computer on your holiday. You could also become a target for thieves while travelling if they notice you have an expensive technological device with you.</p> <p><strong>5. Swimming costume</strong></p> <p>Don’t bring more than two swimming costumes. They are easy to wash and having two on hand always ensures you have a dry one to wear for the next day. Just put the swimmers in the sink filled with cool water and add some mild detergent before rinsing and wringing out to dry.</p> <p><strong>6. Hair dryer </strong></p> <p>Hair dryers are heavy and bulky, so they aren’t the easiest thing to try and squeeze into your suitcase. Hairdryers are usually provided by hotels and although yours may be nicer, they both do the same job in the end.</p> <p><strong>7. Out of season clothing </strong></p> <p>Avoid packing out of season clothing – if you’re going on a summer holiday in Europe, you probably don’t need that heavy winter coat. The excuse for packing these unnecessary items is always “just in case,” but if the situation does arise where there is an uncharacteristic change in weather, you can always buy what you need to face the day.</p> <p><strong>8. Books </strong></p> <p>Turn to paperback books or electronic tablets instead of hardcover novels. The electronic tablets are most helpful as they can contain a whole library of book options without adding the weight of a library in your suitcase. Paperback books are good when you don’t have an electronic tablet, but maybe avoid packing seven books!</p> <p><strong>9. Traveller’s checks </strong></p> <p>Traveller’s checks aren’t used anymore. Although they were once the safeguard of money while on holidays, the traveller’s checks have gone out of style. It’s unlikely you will come across a place that will accept the checks, as these have been replaced by the use of ATMs for cash and the ability to use your debit and credit cards that don’t charge an international transaction fee.</p> <p><strong>10. Double-ups </strong></p> <p>Finally, don’t bring anything your travel partner is also packing. For instance, don’t pack more than one thing that can be shared. You don’t need two tubes of toothpaste, for instance!</p> <p>What are your packing tips? Tell us in the comments below.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p>

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How to pack for your first cruise

<p><strong>Hand luggage</strong><br /> Most cruise lines will take your suitcases at check-in, but it can take a while for these to be delivered to your room. So, it makes sense to pack a small carry bag to take on with you containing your passport, tickets, swimsuit, change of clothes and any other essentials including medication and valuables.</p> <p><strong>Cruise style</strong><br /> Do some research into what you’ll be doing. If it’s mostly on-board entertainment, you’ll need lots of swimwear and casuals, whereas shore trips to galleries and cultural venues will require smarter wear.</p> <p><strong>Dinner style </strong><br /> Most cruise ships have a selection of restaurants, and you’ll probably get a set number of dinners in a formal restaurant, with other meals served in casual or buffet style eateries. Each cruise line has their own dress codes and rules, which should be provided on their website. As a general rule they are:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Casual:</strong> If you’re having lunch or dinner at a buffet-style restaurant, then the dress code is laidback, although swimwear and bare feet are usually not allowed.</li> <li><strong>Semi-formal:</strong> Polo shirts and chinos or smart jeans for men, with women wearing dresses or smart separates.</li> <li><strong>Formal:</strong> Men will be required to wear a dark suit and tie or dinner jacket, with ladies dressing up in cocktail or floor-length dresses. Your tickets should say how many formal nights there are.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Gala nights</strong> <br /> If you are on an upmarket cruise, a gala night or two is usually part of the itinerary. Some men enjoy wearing a tuxedo for these special events, although a lounge suit is usually acceptable, and for women, it’s an excuse to go all out, with evening gowns or glittery cocktail dresses.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/cruising/how-to-pack-for-your-first-cruise">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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5 questions to ask before moving into a granny flat

<p>If managed correctly, a granny flat arrangement can turn into a win-win scenario for all parties. It can also turn sour fast. If you’ve toyed with the idea of entering into this sort of arrangement, it’s important to make sure you’re aware of the implications.</p> <p>Here are five questions to ask before moving into a granny flat.</p> <p><strong>1. Am I really ready to live in a granny flat?</strong></p> <p>While often in these situations you still have plenty of your own personal space, there is going to be a loss of independence to a degree. It’s important to ask yourself if you are really willing to give up this space when moving in with your family.</p> <p><strong>2. Is my family really ready to live with me?</strong></p> <p>It’s not pleasant thing to think about, but the harsh reality is there may be some parties who are not altogether pleased with the situation (even if it seems like they are on the surface). It’s always worth having a frank discussion with all the parties that are affected, and asking them if this is arrangement is indeed willing to go into. </p> <p><strong>3. Is my pension going to be affected?</strong></p> <p>Depending on the arrangement you enter into, moving into a granny flat can affect your pension entitlements. It’s important to check with the Department of Human Services<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.humanservices.gov.au/" target="_blank"></a> and a financial professional about the ramifications of making this move, and ultimately whether or not you’re willing to live with them.</p> <p><strong>4. Have I formalised the agreement?</strong></p> <p>This may seem like adding unnecessary red tape to the arrangement (especially when you’re dealing with family), but formalising the agreement can go some way to avoiding conflicting. Getting the rights and responsibilities of each party down on paper is the best way to manage expectations and ensure no one is given the short end of the stick.</p> <p><strong>5. Do I have a backup plan?</strong></p> <p>If things do go awry you don’t want to be left high and dry. It’s important to have a backup plan up your sleeve just in case the worst does happen, and you can be sure you’re in the best position possible to recoup and ultimately recover.  </p> <p>Have you moved into a granny flat? Or perhaps you know someone who has? What do you think about the arrangement? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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The apartment in Kensington Palace being renovated for Harry and Megan

<p>As Harry and Meghan’s royal wedding draws closer, preparations for their big day are not the only arrangements they’ve had to focus on.</p> <p>Renovations in Apartment 1 in Kensington Palace have been underway since November, prior to their official engagement announcement, in order to have Harry and Meghan’s future family home ready.</p> <p>The 21-room apartment, which is next door to William and Kate, has been undergoing work at a lightning quick rate.</p> <p>Photos show the apartment covered in white tarpaulins with new mortar pointing over the chimney stacks clearly visible.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="497" height="215" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7818127/2_497x215.jpg" alt="2 (75)"/></p> <p>Harry is reportedly very excited to have the renovations finished and move in with Meghan.</p> <p>“He keeps popping round and asking when it will be ready. He seems in a real hurry to move in with Meghan,” a source said. </p> <p>According to reports, Meghan has asked Harry to give up smoking and cut down on alcohol, so they can start a family soon – which meant the pair needed a larger home than their previous two-bedroom cottage.</p> <p>Soon after Harry and Meghan’s engagement, the Queen’s cousin Richard, the Duke of Gloucester, offered to vacate the luxurious Apartment 1 as his three children have grown up.</p> <p>The Gloucesters will downsize into a smaller apartment which will soon be vacated by the Queen’s private secretary, Sir Christopher Geidt.</p> <p>Royal courtiers revealed last year that the couple would immediately be living at Nottingham Cottage in Kensington Palace, but insiders have known for some time that he would be relocating to Apartment 1.</p> <p>When Harry and Meghan move in, they will be neighbours to his brother William, who lives in Apartment 1A with his family.</p> <p>Kate and William also lived at Nottingham Cottage before they had children.</p> <p>Several years ago, a royal spokesman said that Harry had his sights on different accommodation at Kensington Palace but refused to confirm which apartment it was, other than revealing that it was currently occupied.</p> <p>In 2014, Princess Michael suggested in an interview that Apartment 1 would be perfect for Harry to move in to when he got older and wanted to have children.</p> <p>Princess Michael said Wiliam and Kate have a "lovely big apartment, next to the Gloucesters, who I think will leave their enormous apartment because their children have gone.”</p> <p>She added, “They're rattling around this huge space and I think Prince Harry might go there. Then they'd be next door to each other <span>–</span> very good move.”</p> <p>Apartment 1 and Apartment 1A are linked by adjoining doors which will make visits between the royal brothers very convenient.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>Earlier this year, there were suspicions that Harry had chosen Apartment 1 after a line of fir trees were planted to obscure the view of the apartment’s entrance from the public walking through Kensington Palace Gardens.</p> <p>It is believed that Meghan now walks her dogs on the grass behind the trees, which is now obscured from public sight.</p> <p>The Duchess of Cambridge is also known to use the same stretch of grass to walk the family dog Lupo.</p> <p>The couple will also be sharing quarters with Princess Eugenie who lives at Ivy Cottage, a three-bedroom property. </p>

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The trick to removing a stain from any surface

<p>When it comes to household tasks there’s one in particular that makes everyone shudder. I’m referring, of course, to cleaning. No one likes to clean and no matter how often you clean your home it’s never fun.</p> <p>But that doesn’t mean it has to be difficult. The following guide will teach you the best way to tackle stains on any household surface.</p> <p><strong>Carpet stains</strong></p> <p>While some people may opt to hire a carpet cleaner, there are actually very few carpet stains you can’t clean yourself. Add a splash of vinegar to the stain and dampen a cleaning cloth. Gently pat at the stain and rinse the cloth at regular intervals. Repeat this process until the stain lifts.</p> <p>Then sprinkle bi-carb on the damp area and work it into the carpet a little. Once the bi-carb dries, use a vacuum to clean it up.</p> <p>If you like, sprinkle some lemon juice to freshen things up. If you’ve done everything right you’ll be left with clean, fresh smelling carpets.</p> <p><strong>Tile and hardwood flooring</strong></p> <p>Add vinegar to a bucket of water and use it to mop up as much of the stain as possible. Apply more vinegar directly to the stain. Combine with bi-carb and wait a few minutes for a chemical reaction. You will notice some bubbling and frothing.</p> <p>Gently scrub at any marks with a brush until clean. Finally, use clean water to either wipe or mop the area again to finish things off.</p> <p><strong>Bathroom surfaces</strong></p> <p>Bathrooms are tough to clean but this mixture makes mould and mildew a thing of the past. Combine 1½ cups bi-carb soda, one cup of liquid soap, ½ cup of water and ¼ cup of vinegar together in a bucket.</p> <p>Use this to clean shower screens, remove mildew and scrub tile grout. For maximum effect use a coarse sponge or hard bristled brush.</p> <p><strong>Kitchen benchtops</strong></p> <p>Most modern kitchen benchtops will not stain due to the materials they are made from. However, anyone with a kitchen knows they still require constant cleaning in order to stay hygienic.</p> <p>Use a cleaning cloth and vinegar to keep benchtops sanitised. You can use bi-carb anytime if something more abrasive is needed. This could be useful for things like dried cereal or food stains. If the vinegar smell becomes too much, deodorise with lemon juice.</p> <p><strong>Concrete and garage floors</strong></p> <p>The same ingredients can be used to make a powerful degreaser. This will clean any oil or scuff stains from concrete and other robust surfaces. Simply add one cup of vinegar to a few teaspoons of bi-carb, along with a drop or two of liquid soap. Add this to a spray bottle and fill to the top with warm water. Shake to combine the ingredients.</p> <p>Use the spray bottle to apply the mixture to any stubborn stain you wish to remove. For the best results, apply liberally and wait several minutes before scrubbing with a hard bristled brush. If you have one available you might also wish to use a pressure washer.</p> <p><em>Written by Michael Brooke. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.domain.com.au" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Domain.com.au</span></strong></a>.</em></p>

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This $2 packing trick is absolute genius

<p>Two dollars doesn’t go very far these days, but if you’ve got a gold coin handy and are a notoriously messy packer, you can still take advantage of a packing trick that is absolute genius.</p> <p>The trick, which was shared with <a href="http://www.news.com.au/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">News.com.au</span></strong></a> by Sydneysider and professional travel blogger Leanne Melody, will prove to be a real lifesaver to anyone who typically has a hard time getting everything into the one bag.</p> <p>Leanne says, “After this trip, I can’t travel without packing cubes. They’re $2 from <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.mydaiso.com.au/" target="_blank">Daiso</a></strong></span> and they’re the best thing ever to organise your clothes in, and keep everything compact and clutter free.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Packing cubes. ~$26 for a trio. But I found these at Daiso for $1.50 each. Woot! <a href="http://t.co/bQHcwglFhj">pic.twitter.com/bQHcwglFhj</a></p> — Joan Reginaldo (@JoanWIP) <a href="https://twitter.com/JoanWIP/status/516348012616888320?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 28, 2014</a></blockquote> <p>Leanne was also keen to share a list of items she refuses to leave without when she’s jet-setting around the world (it’s a hard life for some). These include:</p> <ul> <li>“A bar of laundry soap for those times you need to hand wash, and it doubles as a makeup brush cleaner.”</li> <li>“A skipping rope for fitness and it doubles as my clothes line when I need to hand wash.”</li> </ul> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 658px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 62.5% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bb_7n8RB8Yc/" target="_blank">Missin' this European summer and the sparkling waters of the Italian Coastline. I could spend hours just frying like an egg on these rocks and then rolling in the water to cool off. Try out the quaint restaurant in Monterosso called Gastronomia San Martino that arguably makes the tastiest handmade pasta you'll have in the region!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by 💥Leanne Melody (@lionmelody) on Nov 27, 2017 at 4:37am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>What do you think of these $2 packing tip? Think you’ll try it?</p> <p><a href="http://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-insurance/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_campaign=travel-insurance&amp;utm_medium=in-article-banner&amp;utm_content=travel-insurance" target="_blank"><img src="http://media.oversixty.com.au/images/banners/Travel-Insurance_Website_GIF_468x602.gif" alt="Over60 Travel Insurance"/></a></p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p>

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The cruise code you need to know

<p>When you pack for your cruise, it can be hard to know what is appropriate attire and what fellow passengers will be wearing.</p> <p>Back in the '60s there were many formal nights where men wore dinner suits and women wore long gowns.</p> <p>However, dress codes on cruises have become much less formal and some lines don’t even require ties and jackets.</p> <p>Follow these tips to help you pack before you depart on your cruise holiday.</p> <p><strong>1. Theme nights</strong></p> <p>On P&amp;O Cruises Australia, formal nights have been replaced with theme parties. President Sture Myrmell told <em>Escape</em>, “There is the Gatsby Party, with all the glamour of the roaring twenties, the Bianco White Party and the Back to School Party. Costumes are not a must, but they are encouraged.”</p> <p><strong>2. Smart casual</strong></p> <p>Some cruise lines recommend smart casual attire for dining. If your line has this same approach, there is no jacket or tie requirement. Steve Odell, the senior vice president of Norwegian Cruise Line, said, “At NCL, we recommend the same dress code as any sunshine resort, both during the day and in the evenings."</p> <p><strong>3. Different occasions</strong></p> <p>At Royal Caribbean Cruises, the recommended dress for breakfast, lunch and dinner is casual. In the main dining room and in the specialty restaurants, passengers can choose to dress casual or smart casual. There are generally two formal nights on Royal Caribbean Cruises where the dress is black-tie and cocktail dresses. On the Celebrity Solstice, passengers get the chance to wear glamorous clothes during the evening Chic nights. If you do forget your formal attire, black-tie and formal gowns are available for hire on the ship.</p> <p><strong>4. Black-tie</strong></p> <p>Holland America Line keeps the tradition of formal nights and has an elegant black-tie dinner at least once on the Maasdam and Noordam.</p> <p><strong>5. Formal</strong></p> <p>On Princess Cruises Australia, there are two formal nights where passengers are asked to wear dinner jacks or dark suits and long gowns or cocktail dresses. For other nights, passengers are expected to dress as they would for a fine restaurant ashore.</p> <p>What are your tips for packing before a cruise? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Inside Princess Diana’s Kensington Palace apartment

<p>Photographs of Princess Diana’s Kensington Place apartments 8 and 9 have been released, giving an intimate look into her private life.</p> <p>The images were taken days after her death by her former butler Paul Burrell, who worked for her from 1987.</p> <p>The photos reveal the religious statues, porcelain figurines, plush toys and photographs that Diana filled her private sanctuary with.</p> <p>These photos are believed to be among the only pictures in existence of Apartments 8 and 9 in the palace.</p> <p>Other photographs in the collection captured Diana’s bedroom, dressing room and drawing room as it was left before she was killed in Paris in August 1997.</p> <p>Paul Burrell told the Sunday Mirror, “When the Princess died, I felt it was appropriate to record where she had lived, spent much of her married life and brought up the Princes.”</p> <p>“These interiors were chosen by the Princess. This was the place she called home. Shortly after she died, her memory was erased from Kensington Palace.”</p> <p>As the anniversary of 20 years since Diana’s death approaches, the photos reveal the trinkets that reminded her of her family and passions.</p> <p>The two apartments were combined to create a home for the newly-married Prince and Princess of Wales in 1981. The apartments were furnished with floral wallpaper, pastel colours and filled with photos of William and Harry.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="500" height="320" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/40769/dianaroom9_500x320.jpg" alt="Dianaroom9"/></p> <p>One photograph shows Diana’s sitting room, where she and her two sons would watch TV together. In her sitting room, she also had a big toy seal, a miniature Christ The Redeemer statue on her desk and a miniature ballet dance figurine on her bookshelf.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>In her bedroom, Diana had a couch dedicated to her stuffed animals including a checked frog she made as a little girl.</p> <p>The photo of Diana’s drawing room, shows the grand piano she loved to play. During a royal tour in Australia, she stunned spectators by playing Rachmaninov.</p> <p>After Diana’s death in 1997, mourners flocked to the gates of Kensington Palace leaving flowers, cards, candles and balloons in tribute to the “People’s Princess”.</p> <p>Her apartments were stripped to the bare and were left empty for years until they underwent a two-year renovation.</p> <p>Kensington Place is now occupied by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry, with nearby Ivy Cottage home to Princess Eugenie.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see a glimpse into Princess Diana’s private sanctuary.</p>

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