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Healthier sweet potato and spelt carbonara

<p><em><span>Recipe by Magdalena Roze for Australian Sweet Potatoes</span></em></p> <p><span>I</span>’<span>ve made this recipe for one serve because it</span>’<span>s the perfect meal to make for one when you have leftover sweet potato mash or puree. To cook for more people, simply double, triple etc the quantities. It</span>’<span>s also easily adapted for vegetarians by simply omitting the bacon. In this healthier version of carbonara, I</span>’<span>m using delicious sweet potato as a substitute for cream, and wholesome spelt pasta.</span></p> <p><em><span>Serves 1</span></em></p> <p><strong><span>Ingredients:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span>100 grams spelt spaghetti</span></li> <li><span>1 tablespoon olive oil</span></li> <li><span>1 garlic clove, crushed</span></li> <li><span>30 grams bacon or pancetta, diced</span></li> <li><span>150 grams sweet potato, pureed</span></li> <li><span>30 grams parmesan cheese, grated</span></li> <li><span>1 whole free range egg, beaten</span></li> <li><span>Salt and pepper to season</span></li> </ul> <p><strong><span>Method:</span></strong></p> <ol> <li><span>Cook the spelt pasta according to the packet instructions, usually around 10 minutes, and reserve 2 tablespoons of the cooking water for your carbonara sauce.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="2"> <li><span>In the meantime, place the olive oil in a frying pan on medium heat, add the garlic and bacon/pancetta, and cook for about 5 minutes or until it</span>’<span>s crisp and golden, then set aside.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="3"> <li><span>Put the sweet potato, parmesan, egg and half the pancetta/bacon in a bowl. When the pasta is ready, remove it from the water with tongs and place it into the bowl along with a couple of tablespoons of the cooking water. Using the tongs or a couple of forks, toss the pasta with all the ingredients until it</span>’<span>s well coated and all ingredients are well combined. The hot pasta will lightly cook the egg.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="4"> <li><span>Top with remaining bacon/pancetta, extra parmesan and a generous amount of sea salt and freshly cracked pepper.</span></li> </ol> <ol start="5"> <li><span>Enjoy!</span></li> </ol>

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Sweet potato crusted shepherd’s pie

<p>Take out your casserole and try this recipe for the weekend.</p> <p><em>Serves 4 </em></p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <ul> <li>1kg sweet potato, peeled, diced</li> <li>150g butter</li> <li>Salt and black pepper</li> <li>3 tbsp olive oil</li> <li>1 onion, finely sliced</li> <li>1 carrot, finely diced</li> <li>1 stick celery, finely diced</li> <li>2 clove garlic, finely chopped</li> <li>500g lamb mince</li> <li>2 tbsp tomato paste</li> <li>2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce</li> <li>½ cup red wine, optional</li> <li>1 cup chicken stock</li> <li>1 x 400g tin tomato</li> <li>1 cup frozen peas</li> <li>½ cup grated cheddar cheese</li> <li>Green leaf salad, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Steam or boil the sweet potato until cooked and soft then drain, mash and mix with the butter, salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.</li> <li>Heat a medium saucepan over a high heat, add the olive oil, onion, carrot, celery, garlic and lamb.</li> <li>Season with a little salt and cook over a medium to high heat to colour the lamb and cook the vegetables, stirring to break up with a spoon as it is cooking. Add the tomato paste and continue to cook for another minute then add the Worcestershire sauce, red wine, chicken stock and tinned tomato and cook over a low heat, stirring occasionally, for approx. 30 minutes.</li> <li>Preheat the oven to 190C. Adjust the seasoning of the lamb ragu then spoon the lamb mix into a baking dish, stir through the peas and top evenly with the mash sweet potato. Cover with the cheddar then bake for 15 -20 minutes before serving with a green salad if preferred.</li> </ol>

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Frozen food contamination fears as Beijing market outbreak grows

<p><span>The coronavirus outbreak which traced to a food market in the Chinese city of Beijing continues to grow as authorities spark fears of frozen food contamination.</span></p> <p><span>The outbreak, first detected at the Xinfadi wholesale market last week, has infected at least 158 people in China’s biggest resurgence since the initial outbreak was brought under control in March.</span></p> <p><span>The city reported 21 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday, down from 31 on Wednesday.</span></p> <p><span>City officials are now attempting to trace all possible cases as quickly as they can, with testing and prevention measures being taken.</span></p> <p><span>Fresh meat and seafood in other parts of the country are also being inspected for precautionary reasons.</span></p> <p><span>In the neighbouring Tianjin Municipality, there has been a first local case in months.</span></p> <p><span>The new case was a hotel worker who handled frozen seafood, according to the local health commission.</span></p> <p><span>The infected 22-year-old man had been working in the kitchen of the Conrad Tianjin Hotel since May 30 – washing dishes and occasionally cleaning frozen seafood.</span></p> <p><span>The man had not left Tianjin in the 14 days prior and had not been in contact with a confirmed case.</span></p> <p><span>The case is currently being investigated, as concerns grow of widespread contamination.</span></p> <p><span>One expert told the </span><em>Global Times</em><span> that the man was more likely to have been infected by frozen food, or the ice around it, as, if contaminated, it could survive for weeks.</span></p> <p><span>“The frozen seafood touched by the Tianjin patient could be of the same batch with those shipped to Beijing Xinfadi,” Wuhan University virologist Yang Zhanqiu said.</span></p> <p><span>Yang urged residents not to eat raw food and exercise caution when eating processed frozen food.</span></p> <p><span>The first reported cases of the global pandemic emerged from a Wuhan wildlife wet market in December 2019.</span></p>

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Butter chicken and sweet potato

<p>Looking for something wholesome and fulfilling for dinner? Try out this comforting butter chicken and sweet potato dish as a winter’s warmer.</p> <p><em>Serves 4</em></p> <p><em>Prep time: 15 mins + 1-hour marinating (optional)</em></p> <p><em>Cooking time: 40 mins</em></p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 tbs tandoori curry paste</li> <li>¼ cup Greek yoghurt</li> <li>700g small chicken thigh fillets, trimmed                      </li> <li>1 tbs ghee or vegetable oil</li> <li>1 brown onion, finely chopped</li> <li>1 long green chilli, seeds removed, finely chopped</li> <li>800g sweet potato, peeled, halved lengthways, cut into 3cm pieces</li> <li>420g jar butter chicken sauce</li> <li>400g can finely chopped tomatoes                   </li> <li>150ml thickened cream</li> <li>Warm naan, to serve</li> <li>cucumber raita &amp; coriander sprigs (optional), to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Combine curry paste and yoghurt in a bowl. Cut chicken in half crossways (if chicken is large cut into thirds). Stir into tandoori mixture. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour only if you have time.</li> <li>Preheat oven 230°C fan forced. Remove chicken from marinade. Place on a greased tray. Roast 10 minutes in hot oven.</li> <li>Meanwhile, heat ghee or oil in a deep-frying pan or wok. Add onion and chilli. Cook stirring 4 minutes until soft. Add sweet potato, cook 5 minutes. Add butter chicken sauce and tomatoes. Bring to the boil. Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes until sweet potato just tender. Stir in cream. Add the chicken. Simmer for 10 minutes until chicken cooked through.</li> <li>Serve with warm naan, raita and coriander.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Tip:</strong> Ghee is clarified butter, its available in the Indian section of the supermarket. Once opened, store in the fridge. It’s great for cooking curries, pancakes, pikelets and cooking over high heat as it won’t burn like regular butter.</p>

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Miguel’s mushroom sweet potato gnocchi

<p>When it comes to cooking, celebrity chef Miguel Maestre has a surprising favourite ingredient – mushrooms.</p> <p>“Mushrooms are a brilliant and versatile ingredient that make meal times tastier and healthier,” the restaurateur and TV presenter said.</p> <p>Here’s one of Miguel’s mushroom recipes.</p> <p><strong>Recipe by: </strong>Miguel Maestre for Australian Mushrooms</p> <p><em>Serves 2-3</em></p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 medium sweet potatoes</li> <li>2 cups all purpose flour</li> <li>2 teaspoons salt flakes</li> <li>flour for dusting</li> <li>250g Swiss brown and button mushrooms, chopped in quarters</li> <li>10 sage leaves</li> <li>2 tbsp toasted pinenuts (optional)</li> <li>1/2 lemon</li> <li>50g butter</li> <li>Grated Parmesan</li> </ul> <p> <strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius. Poke a few holes in the sweet potatoes with a fork, and then bake them for at least 1 hour on a bed of rock salt in the oven until they are tender and the skin starts to look wrinkly.</li> <li>While the potato is still warm, peel the skin away from the flesh and set aside to cool slightly.</li> <li>If you have a potato ricer, put the sweet potatoes through this. Otherwise you can use a fine sieve and push the potato through with a ladle or wooden spoon.</li> <li>Place the flour on a board, or your kitchen bench. Make a well in the centre and add the riced / sieved sweet potatoes to the well.  Season with salt and pepper.</li> <li>Using your hands, work the sweet potato into the flour until it’s fully combined. You don’t want the dough to be sticky so keep adding flour gradually until you get a nice dry dough. This could take quite a bit of extra flour.</li> <li>Once fully combined, roll the dough into a ball and cut it into 4 even pieces. Roll each piece into a long sausage, each about a finger in thickness.</li> <li>Cut the rolls of dough into 2cm little pillows of gnocchi, and gently toss each piece into some flour on your work bench to ensure that it’s dry. At this point you could also use a gnocchi board or fork to press grooves into each piece of gnocchi to make it more professional looking but this is optional and tastes just as good without!</li> <li>To cook the gnocchi, bring a large pot of water to the boil and add the salt. Blanch the sweet potato gnocchi in salted boiling water until they all float. Then drain, reserving a little of the cooking water.</li> <li>In a large frying pan, over a high heat, add a splash of olive oil and a teaspoon of butter, add the quartered mushrooms and cook for a few minutes until golden. Spoon out the mushrooms into a bowl.</li> <li>Using the same frying pan, add the cooked gnocchi and sear until crispy. Add the remaining butter, pine nuts, sage leaves and mushrooms you just set aside. Cook until the butter starts to burn.</li> <li>Then add lemon juice and Parmesan and serve.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Tip: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Putting the potatoes through a sieve or potato ricer is a vital step to making gnocchi, as this breaks down the starch.</li> <li>If you make gnocchi often, a potato ricer is a fairly inexpensive kitchen tool that is handy to have.</li> </ul>

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MasterChef judge Andy Allen shares secret to “restaurant quality” scrambled eggs

<p>MasterChef Australia judge Andy Allen has shared his cooking tricks to make the perfect “restaurant-quality” scrambled eggs in just 10 seconds.</p> <p>The co-owner of Three Blue Ducks said that how he makes scrambled eggs for breakfast is one of the most common questions he gets asked.</p> <p>You only need three simple ingredients, which are eggs, salt and oil.</p> <p>“We call them ‘the 10 second eggs’,” Andy said in a 'how-to' MasterChef video.</p> <p>To make one serve of fluffy scrambled eggs, he whisked two eggs in a bowl and seasoned them with a pinch of salt after the eggs have a “smooth” consistency.</p> <p>“Here's the trick, we want a nice hot pan,” Andy explained.</p> <p>“I'm using grape seed oil, which has got a high smoke point. You can also use rice bran or vegetable oil,” Andy said.</p> <p>“We want to stay away from olive oil for this [dish] because we put the eggs in just before our oil starts to smoke.”</p> <p>Andy then poured the mixture into the pan over high heat, and as the curds started to form, he expertly used a silicone spatula to move the eggs around.</p> <p>“Have your spatula ready because this only takes 10 seconds,” he said.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836330/egg-hack-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3f69df1d451e4e90a99cfc2bc0082abc" /></p> <div class="body_text "> <p>“Eggs in to a nice hot pan... you can see that they're just starting to cook around the outside, and in one kind of big smooth motion, we're just moving the eggs.”</p> <p>After 10 seconds, Andy said you should see the eggs are “just set”.</p> <p>“We take them out [of the pan],” he said.</p> <p>“There it is, 10 second eggs, no excuses. All you'll need is a hot pan, two eggs and 10 seconds, everyone can do that,” he added.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Ten</em></p> </div>

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Mum's time-saving school lunch hack branded as lazy

<p>A mum has left parents divided after revealing her lunchbox hack to save time making her children’s school sandwiches.</p> <p>Taking to Facebook, she shared that she makes 40 sandwiches at once and freezes them before taking them out when needed.</p> <p>She asked for advice on the best way to freeze them, saying preparing two weeks worth of sandwiches at once saved her time in the long run.</p> <p>She wrote: "The kids take them out in the morning and put them in their sandwich boxes and the sandwich bag goes back into the freezer ready to be used again (to stay environmentally friendly and cost-effective)."</p> <p>The lunch is made up of ham, cream cheese, plum jam and Vegemite to “keep it simple”.</p> <p>Although many parents praised her for the hack and said they’re planning to try it out themselves, others branded it “lazy” and said the sandwiches would be “tasteless” by the time they came out of the freezer.</p> <p>One commented: "I wouldn't want to eat a frozen sandwich so wouldn't make one for my kids. It takes a minute to make a sandwich."</p> <p>Another wrote: "My mum used to make frozen peanut butter sandwiches when I was a kid so I will admit now those sandwiches were binned every day at school."</p> <p>But others defended her method, arguing that as long as the sandwiches were thawed out for a few hours before they were eaten, they wouldn't taste any different.</p> <p>They also added that the tactic clearly works for the mum and the negative remarks were “uncalled for”.</p>

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Tropical papaya refrigerator cake

<p>End your mealtime with a bang and serve up this juicy dessert. The tropical fruit flavours blend well with the dairy to create a dessert to remember.</p> <p><em>Serves 12</em></p> <p><em>Prep Time: 25 minutes</em></p> <p><em>Refrigerator Time: 8 hours</em></p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>250 g cream cheese (one block)</li> <li>300 ml pure cream</li> <li>1/4 cup sweetened condensed milk</li> <li>1 tsp lemon juice</li> <li>1/2 tsp vanilla paste or extract</li> <li>1 1/2 packets Nice biscuits</li> <li>300 g papaya, thinly sliced</li> <li>1 x 440 g can crushed pineapple in juice, drained</li> </ul> <p>To garnish</p> <ul> <li>Extra sliced papaya</li> <li>1/4 cup flaked coconut, toasted</li> <li>1/4 cup sliced almonds, toasted</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>With a hand-held mixer beat the cream cheese until smooth. Slowly add cream, beating to incorporate well as you pour, then continue to beat for one to two minutes until it thickens and holds soft peaks.</li> <li>Add the condensed milk, vanilla and lemon juice to the cream and beat until the mixture begins to re-thicken and the beaters leave trails in the surface. Spoon 1/2 cup of the cream into a separate dish, cover and place in the fridge for toping the cake when it’s ready to serve.</li> <li>Line a 1.5 litre loaf tin with cling-wrap to cover the base and over-hang on all four sides. Spread 1/2 cup of the remaining cream in the bottom of the prepared tin and arrange a layer of biscuits on top, cutting a few into smaller pieces to fill any gaps. Dollop over a quarter of the cream (about 1/2 cup again) and spread to cover the biscuits. Top cream with a third of the papaya slices and a third of the drained pineapple.</li> <li>Repeat with biscuits, cream and fruit for two more layers, then finish with a final layer of biscuits and the remaining cream.</li> <li>Cover the surface of the cake with the over-hanging cling-wrap. Press gently to compress and refrigerate eight hours or overnight – giving the biscuits plenty of time to soften.</li> <li>When ready to serve, peel the cling-wrap off the top of the cake and invert onto a serving platter. Remove all cling-wrap and discard. Spread the top and sides of the cake with the reserved cream. Decorate with the coconut, almonds and extra papaya. Keep cake refrigerated until ready to slice and serve.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Tips:</strong></p> <ul> <li>To toast coconut and almonds, spread over a tray and bake for 5 - 6 minutes in an oven preheated to 180°C, or toss in a hot pan until just golden.</li> <li>As long as the cream is thick enough to stay on the biscuits without running quickly off the edges it will do the job perfectly, however if you feel it’s too thin at the end of Step 2 you can refrigerate it for an hour and beat again.</li> <li>To cut biscuits into smaller pieces use a serrated knife in a sawing motion so they don’t shatter or crumble.</li> </ul>

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Woman shares genius cereal storage hack

<p>A new kitchen hack has taken over social media by storm, with people praising the food storage trick as “brilliant”.</p> <p>Cereals are commonly stored in a plastic container or simply left in the packaging box. However, a UK woman has revealed the way to properly store cereal boxes to minimise the risk of going stale.</p> <p>In a Facebook post, Becky Holden-McGhee wrote: “It’s only taken me 40 years, but I now know the correct way to close a cereal box.</p> <p>“Genius. It takes seconds, no more dried up cereal and ugly torn boxes to greet me every morning.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbecky.holden.923%2Fposts%2F10163890423985508&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=552&amp;height=706&amp;appId" width="552" height="706" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Holden-McGhee told <em>Metro.co.uk</em> she adopted the trick from an American woman on her online feed. ”I was like, ‘that looks amazing but I don’t think I’m going to be able to do that’,” she said.</p> <p>“Because you see these hacks don’t you, but in reality they’re not that easy to do.”</p> <p>Her post has received hundreds of comments and been shared more than 110,000 times.</p> <p>“I can’t keep up with every single comment now because it’s gone a little bit crazy, but everyone has just been like ‘wow’ and ‘who knew?’” she told the outlet.</p> <p>“Loads and loads of people have shared pictures of their own cereal boxes, which is so cute.”</p> <p>The trick to sealing a cereal box is to fold the two small flaps on the sides and one of the long sides inside. Pinch the two sides of the box so that the sides fold in to close like a milk carton. From then, the remaining long side can be folded into the box.</p> <p><em>Image: Becky Holden McGhee/Facebook </em></p>

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The Queen’s drop scone recipe revealed

<p>We may not afford to live like the Queen – but even amid the pandemic, we can afford to cook like her Majesty.</p> <p>Queen Elizabeth II revealed her personal recipe for drop scones, also known as ‘scotch pancakes’, in a letter which is available in the <a href="https://catalog.archives.gov/id/5721363">National Archives</a>.</p> <p>The monarch prepared the recipe for US President Dwight Eisenhower and his wife Mamie during their stay at Balmoral Castle in 1959. It appeared that the couple was so taken with the delicacy that the Queen, then 34 years old, decided to share the recipe with them.</p> <p>“Dear Mr President,” she wrote in the letter. “Seeing a picture of you in today’s newspaper, standing in front of a barbecue grilling quail, reminded me that I had never sent you the recipe of the drop scones which I promised you at Balmoral. I hope you will find them successful.”</p> <p>In addition to listing the ingredients, the Queen also included a few tips. “Though the quantities are for 16 people, when there are fewer, I generally put in less flour and milk, but use the other ingredients as stated,” one read.</p> <p>She added, "I have also tried using golden syrup or treacle instead of only sugar and that can be very good, too. I think the mixture needs a great deal of beating while making, and shouldn’t stand about too long before cooking.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836048/recipe.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5e45e4bffd4448519943a4cc3f3c9942" /></p> <p>The recipe is as below:</p> <p><strong>The Queen’s Drop Scones</strong></p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 teacups flour</li> <li>4 tablespoons caster sugar</li> <li>2 teacups milk</li> <li>2 whole eggs</li> <li>2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda</li> <li>3 teaspoons cream of tartar</li> <li>2 tablespoons melted butter</li> </ul> <p>Beat eggs, sugar and about half the milk together, add flour, and mix well together adding remainder of milk as required, also bi-carbonate and cream of tartar, fold in the melted butter.</p> <p>The Queen’s recipe ends there, but it is understood that the batter can be poured onto a heated frying or griddle pan and flipped when it starts bubbling on top. Once each side is slightly browned, the scones can be served.</p>

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The controversial cooking question on everyone’s lips

<p>As garlic is a common staple in many dishes around the world, there’s been a controversial question on everyone’s lips who use the spice in their dish.</p> <p>How much minced garlic equals one clove?</p> <p>Although the question might sound simple, the answer is anything but.</p> <p>It depends on how finely minced the garlic is as well as whether the chop is standardised and how big the clove of garlic is.</p> <p>This question has confused many as it depends on the chef’s personal preference. One person says that clove is a “useless measurement”.</p> <p>"clove" [is] a useless measurement. Look at the variation on this page—anywhere from 1/4 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon—that's a variation of 1200%. I use the conversion of 1 clove equals 1 teaspoon. I believe Cook's Illustrated does the same,” he said to<span> </span>Hotline<span> </span>in a<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://food52.com/hotline/13423-how-much-minced-garlic-equals-one-clove" target="_blank">thread</a>.</p> <p>However, others have disagreed. The answer that was “voted the best” in the thread says that minced garlic is a waste of time.</p> <p>“Sorry, I would toss the "packaged" garlic that has chemical preservatives in it in favor of spending the 20 seconds it takes to chop or mince fresh real garlic cloves,” they wrote.</p> <p>Others agreed with the best voted answer, saying “you will never get the flavour of fresh garlic from a jar so there is no equivalent”.</p> <p>One person commented explaining that they were from New Zealand and therefore preferred using pre-minced garlic as fresh garlic is quite expensive and they use it a lot in their cooking.</p> <p>One final commenter just praised anyone who was getting into the kitchen and trying to use garlic, as well as giving an answer to the question.</p> <p>"Yes, fresh garlic is best. Applause to anyone that is trying to be a better home chef, no matter what kind of garlic you are using."</p>

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MasterChef contestant kicked out after serving dead bird to the judges

<p>Spanish MasterChef fans have been left in shock after one of their contestants served an unplucked and uncooked partridge to the less than impressed judges.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Así ha sido la expulsión de Saray en el cuarto programa de <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MasterChef?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#MasterChef</a> 8 <a href="https://t.co/5KB3O2GWnE">https://t.co/5KB3O2GWnE</a> <a href="https://t.co/PYvzC9D0oq">pic.twitter.com/PYvzC9D0oq</a></p> — MasterChef (@MasterChef_es) <a href="https://twitter.com/MasterChef_es/status/1257449800540336130?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 4, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>27-year-old social worker Saray was reportedly unhappy with having to pluck and cook the bird for that week’s elimination challenge and defiantly decided to serve the bird as is.</p> <p>She was already upset with previous harsh critiques she’d received from the judges and plated up the uncooked partridge with cherry tomatoes and dressing.</p> <p>The clip has since been watched more than 1.8 million times on Twitter and shows Saray calmly delivering the uncooked bird to the judges.</p> <p>Fans of the show were disgusted and thrilled by the drama and the incident spread quickly on Twitter.</p> <p>A viewer tweeted: “MasterChef Spain is more exciting than the British version!</p> <p>“Contestant serves up an uncooked, unplucked partridge because she's p***ed off that her effort in the previous round was rubbished by the judges.”</p> <p>Another Spanish national sarcastically said: "This is the society that we are creating children-adults, crying, conceited, badly educated ....... Let's continue like this."</p>

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Papaya lime bars

<p>In the mood for baking? These tangy, juicy bars will be a perfect snack for the whole family.</p> <p><em>Serves 12</em></p> <p>Prep time: 10 minutes</p> <p>Cook time: 30 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p>For the crust</p> <ul> <li>100 g butter, melted</li> <li>1 cup flour (130 g)</li> <li>1/2 cup icing sugar mixture (60 g)</li> <li>1/4 tsp baking powder</li> <li>zest from 1 lime – approx. 1 tsp</li> <li>pinch sea salt</li> </ul> <p>For the filling</p> <ul> <li>1/2 cup mashed papaya (125 g)</li> <li>1⁄3 cup lime juice (80 ml)</li> <li>2 eggs</li> <li>1/4 cup caster sugar (60 g)</li> <li>2 Tbsp cornflour (20 g)</li> <li>zest from 1 lime – approx. 1 tsp</li> <li>1⁄4 tsp sea salt</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 180°C. Lightly coat a 20cm x 20cm pan with cooking spray, then line the base and two sides with a single strip of baking paper.</li> <li>In a medium bowl combine the dry ingredients for the crust (flour through salt) and mix well. Add melted butter and stir to create a soft dough. Turn dough into the prepared pan and press evenly across the base.</li> <li>Par-bake the crust for 12 mins until just golden. While it’s baking, make the filling.</li> <li>Add papaya and lime juice to a blender jug and puree until smooth. Add remaining filling ingredients (eggs through salt) and pulse to combine.</li> <li>Remove pan from the oven, pour filling over the hot crust and return to the oven. Bake for an additional 18 - 20 mins, until bars are puffed and firm to the touch in the centre.</li> <li>Allow papaya bars to cool in the pan for at least 30 minutes before running a knife around the edge of the slice and using the paper to lift it out onto a rack. Cool completely, then cut into bars to serve.</li> </ol>

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MasterChef winner Adam Liaw shares spaghetti bolognese recipe with bizarre ingredient

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Former MasterChef winner Adam Liaw has been keeping his fans occupied during the coronavirus pandemic by running online cooking lessons.</p> <p>However, his latest dish has raised eyebrows for a surprising ingredient and it’s one that is well loved by most Australians.</p> <p>Liaw, 41, shared his spaghetti Bolognese recipe to Instagram and revealed that he adds Vegemite into the mix.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_a_prtlgQE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_a_prtlgQE/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Over the next 3 weeks I’m running a weekly 15-minute online cooking class for @Vegemite over Zoom. Tune in at 5pm AEST this Tuesday April 28 for the first one, showing you how to make your spaghetti bolognese the Aussiest spag bol ever with a Vegemite toast pangrattato. Follow @Vegemite for details. The Zoom link is in my profile and the sessions are limited to the first 300 participants who join, so make sure you’re on time! Swipe for the ingredients. #tasteslikeaustralia #Vegemite #sp</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/adamliaw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Adam Liaw</a> (@adamliaw) on Apr 25, 2020 at 4:10pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>He posted a photo of the “most Aussie spag bol ever with a Vegemite toast pangrattato”.</p> <p>The cooking term pangrattato refers to breadcrumbs and Liaw used Vegemite toast to make his crumbs, which are sprinkled over the pasta and sauce to serve.</p> <p>He has also recently advised home cooks to substitute missing ingredients instead of buying more so they don’t have to return to the supermarket.</p> <p>“If you don't have sugar, use honey. If you run out of soy sauce, use a bit of salt. No lemon juice? Try vinegar instead,” he said in a piece for <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.goodfood.com.au/recipes/news/adam-liaws-six-step-process-to-help-plan-your-meals-waste-less-food-and-cook-more-20200325-h1muvn" target="_blank">The Good Food</a>. </p> <p>Liaw advised budding chefs to waste less as well as clean out space in their pantries. </p> <p>“If you have some odds and ends of vegetables, chop them up and throw them into that quarantine bolognese. Turn bones and offcuts into stock,” he said.</p> <p>“Before anything goes in the bin, think to yourself "how can I use this?"</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Toddler accidentally orders $40 worth of onions online

<p>A one-year-old girl has bought onions off Deliveroo by accident whilst playing on her father’s phone.</p> <p>Jamie, a dad from the United Kingdom, took to Twitter on Tuesday to share a screenshot of the online order his daughter placed on delivery app Deliveroo after he let the toddler play with his phone.</p> <p>The order was placed for “large mild brown onions” at Morrisons supermarket. While the onions cost just £1.50, there were other fees added to the order, including small order fee (£13.50), delivery fee (£4.50), and service fee (£0.49).</p> <p>The total came down to £19.99 (about NZ$41).</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Let my one year-old daughter play with my phone and she ordered one onion on Deliveroo. <a href="https://t.co/28qVw0qYNP">pic.twitter.com/28qVw0qYNP</a></p> — Jamie (@Jamsoir) <a href="https://twitter.com/Jamsoir/status/1252251787249278976?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 20, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>“£20 for an onion,” Jamie wrote.</p> <p>However, he later learned that “it was a pack of three so great value actually”.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Happy with her onions. <a href="https://t.co/OYHTPLZ91I">pic.twitter.com/OYHTPLZ91I</a></p> — Jamie (@Jamsoir) <a href="https://twitter.com/Jamsoir/status/1252263133651120128?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 20, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>The original post went viral, with more than 30,000 retweets and 194,800 likes at the time of writing.</p> <p>Deliveroo offered to recompense the order. “We’d love to send you the rest of the ingredients for a meal and some deliveroo credit,” the company said in response to the tweet.</p>

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The psychology of comfort food - why we look to carbs for solace

<p>Amid the global spread of COVID-19 we are witnessing an increased focus on gathering food and supplies.</p> <p>We’ve seen images of supermarket shelves emptied of basics such as toilet paper, pasta, and tinned foods. Messages to reassure people there would be continued supply of provisions has done little to ease public anxiety.</p> <p><a href="https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200304-coronavirus-covid-19-update-why-people-are-stockpiling">Panic buying and stockpiling</a> are likely responses to heightened anxiety, fear and uncertainty about the future. COVID-19 poses an imminent threat.</p> <p>Being able to exert some control over the situation by gathering goods to store for lockdown is one way individuals seek to manage anxiety and fear, and feel protected. But why do we seek out certain foods, and should we give in to cravings?</p> <p><strong>Retreating into our pantries</strong></p> <p>On the one hand, newly stocked and plentiful pantries, fridges and freezers reassure us that food is readily available and puts supplies within easy reach. At the same time, feelings such as loneliness, anxiety, depression, and stress may increase as we retreat and become housebound. So, we may be more vulnerable to what is referred to as “emotional eating” during this challenging time.</p> <p>Reaching out for food to comfort oneself is an attempt to manage or alleviate negative emotions. A person’s tendency to emotionally eat can be measured using questionnaires such as the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019566631200013X">Emotional Eating Scale</a>, which asks about eating in response to anxiety, depression and anger.</p> <p>From an early age, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3907771/#B65">infants learn to associate feeding with being soothed</a> and social interaction. In everyday life, food is often used to enhance mood or “treat” ourselves. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30595479">Eating tasty food releases dopamine</a> in our brains, which is strongly associated with desire and wanting for food.</p> <p>Eating sweet and fatty foods <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16546294">may improve mood temporarily</a> by making us feel happier and more energetic while also satisfying our hunger. However, if comfort eating becomes a habit, it often comes with health costs, such as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30894189">weight gain</a>.</p> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195666318300874">Mantau and colleagues in 2018</a> found emotional eating is most likely to occur in response to stress and in individuals who are trying restrict their food intake (“restrained eaters”). These factors were more important in explaining people’s food choices than biological factors such as hunger.</p> <p>Other studies have also shown that trying to suppress food urges can be futile and have the opposite effect to the desired outcome. For example, dieters have been found to <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195666312000219">experience strong cravings</a> for the very foods they were trying to restrict.</p> <p><strong>Doing it tough</strong></p> <p>Employment insecurity, financial difficulty and hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic are affecting the lives of many people. <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/985DE9F19CEA4165BE1E85A022BEFDFB/S0007125000253737a.pdf/inequality_an_underacknowledged_source_of_mental_illness_and_distress.pdf">Past</a> <a href="https://jech.bmj.com/content/71/4/324">research</a> has shown that poverty is associated with psychological distress, including higher rates of depression and lower mental well-being. Again, people’s ways of coping with this distress could have further ramifications for their health.</p> <p>Research <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/oby.22402">shows</a> those in lower socioeconomic circumstances were more distressed, and more likely to turn to emotional eating as a way of coping. This emotional eating was, in turn, associated with increased body weight.</p> <p>This suggests it is not distress or biological make-up but people’s ways of coping (using food) that may be critical in explaining why some people gain weight in response to stressful life events. <a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.psych.031809.130711">People with a history of socioeconomic disadvantage </a> may also find it harder to cope with emotional distress, perhaps due to factors such as lower social support. As a result, they may be more vulnerable to using food as a way of coping.</p> <p><strong>Toasty crusty goodness</strong></p> <p>Baking has become a strong theme on social media. The #BakeCorona hashtag has <a href="https://www.sbs.com.au/food/article/2020/03/23/hashtag-connecting-home-bakers-isolation">taken off</a> and <a href="https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/quarantinebaking/">#QuarantineBaking</a> has over 65,000 posts.</p> <p>Research suggests there are likely benefits from engaging in cooking. The <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29121776">psychosocial benefits of baking</a> have been shown to include boosts in socialisation, self-esteem, quality of life, and mood. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29955728">Cooking with children</a> may also promote healthy diets.</p> <p>By providing and sharing food with other people, baking may <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3907771/#B65">strengthen social relationships and make us feel closer to our loved ones</a>. This may explain why it has become so popular in these times.</p> <p><strong>Coping with lockdown</strong></p> <p>During this time of social isolation, it’s tempting to reach for food, but a healthy balance remains important.</p> <p>Creating a “new routine” or “new normal” which includes a variety of activities – exercise, baking, music, reading, online activities, working or studying, relaxing, keeping in touch with friends and family - may help maintain a sense of well-being, and assist in managing meal times and food intake.</p> <p><a href="https://www.mindful.org/mindfulness-how-to-do-it/">Mindfulness meditation practice</a> may be useful in managing emotional eating and weight. Research has shown that Mindfulness Based Interventions (MBIs) are effective in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24854804">managing emotional eating</a>, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29076610">reducing weight and improving obesity-related eating behaviours</a>.</p> <p>Weight management initiatives should encompass psychological factors such as mood and distress. Teaching people to develop positive coping strategies in these challenging times (problem solving, positive help seeking, relaxation techniques) may be particularly effective.</p> <p><em>Written by Joanne Dickson and Charlotte Hardman. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-psychology-of-comfort-food-why-we-look-to-carbs-for-solace-135432">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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George Calombaris breaks his silence on the latest season of MasterChef

<p>Former<span> </span>MasterChef<span> </span>judge George Calombaris caught his folllowers by surprise when he tweeted praises for the new MasterChef series for 2020. Calombaris was a former judge on the show alongside Matt Preston and Gary Mehigan for ten years when Channel Ten announced a new lineup for 2020.</p> <p>Fans of the show were shocked, but the new lineup of Andy Allen, Melissa Leong and Jock Zonfrillo seems to be going well with fans and Calombaris himself.</p> <p>George shared a photo of the all-star contestants from this year's season and wrote, "OMG. Massive result last night on MC12 launch night. Congrats to @channel10au @endemolshineau, all the awesome crew, the contestants and the new judges. Well done! GC xxxx."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-8V3q8FV-t/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-8V3q8FV-t/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">OMG. Massive result last night on MC12 launch night. Congrats to @channel10au @endemolshineau, all the awesome crew, the contestants and the new judges. Well done! GC xxxx 🧿👏🏻</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/gcalombaris/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> George Calombaris</a> (@gcalombaris) on Apr 13, 2020 at 6:28pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Hayden Quinn, who appeared in season three of<span> </span>MasterChef<span> </span>originally, wrote, "What a night mate! Haha I needed a hug! Thanks for all the support."</p> <p>Khanh Omg from season 10 added, "Love you to pieces."</p> <p>Celebrity chef Curtis Stone also commented, "George [you're] an absolute gentleman."</p> <p>The latest season of<span> </span>MasterChef<span> </span>has returning contestants and is titled<span> </span>MasterChef Australia: Back to Win, which seems to be winning new audiences.</p> <p>"I'm thoroughly enjoying the new judges on #MasterChefAU. They fell into their roles so effortlessly. It's as though they've always been there. Kind, supportive, engaging, practical, knowledgeable, funny — the perfect fit," a fan wrote on Twitter.</p> <p>It is believed that the previous judges left the show after failing to secure pay rises from Channel Ten.<span> </span></p>

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Perfect isolation recipe: Jamie Oliver’s two-ingredient pasta

<p>In these strange and unpredictable times, the one thing you can always rely on is a good Jamie Oliver recipe.</p> <p>The beloved British chef knows how to make delicious, wholesome food, that’s usually achievable at home.</p> <p>His new series,<span> </span><em>Keep Cooking And Carry On</em>, is serving up his best recipes with a self-isolation twist.</p> <p>“Let’s celebrate freezer faves, big up the store cupboard and get creative with whatever we have on hand,” he says.</p> <p>Not only should you tune in to his show for the great recipes using isolation pantry items, but you also have something to do during your time at home.</p> <p>Here’s a recipe for you to try that only includes two ingredients – one of which is water.</p> <p>“My easy homemade pasta recipe is great for emergencies. You don’t need a pasta machine, just a rolling pin.”</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 large handfuls of plain flour, plus extra for dusting</li> </ul> <p>This recipe is so simple, it doesn't even require proper measurements.</p> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Put the flour in a bowl, then gradually mix in just enough water to bring it together into a ball of dough (if it's sticky, add a little extra flour).</li> <li>Knead for just a couple of minutes, or until smooth and shiny.</li> <li>On a flour-dusted surface, use a rolling pin to roll out the pasta to about 2mm thick.</li> <li>Dust it well with flour, then loosely roll it up. Use a sharp knife to slice it ½cm thick, then toss it with your hands to separate the strands.</li> <li>Cook in boiling salted water for 2 minutes, then drain and toss with your chosen sauce.</li> </ul>

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