Food & Wine

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Festive smoked fish paella

<p>One of the reasons the so-called Mediterranean diet is considered healthy is that it features many dishes like this one from Spain, based on rice cooked in olive oil with lots of vegetables and a modest amount of protein foods. The spicy chorizo here adds an authentic Spanish flavour.</p> <div id="ingredients"><strong>Ingredients</strong> <ul> <li>1 litre vegetable or fish stock</li> <li>large pinch of saffron threads</li> <li>50g thin chorizo sausage</li> <li>400g undyed smoked haddock fillet, skinned</li> <li>2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>1 large onion, finely chopped</li> <li>2 large cloves garlic, crushed, or 1 tablespoon bottled chopped garlic in oil, drained</li> <li>250 g green beans, cut into bite-sized pieces</li> <li>1 1/4 cups (275g) paella or other shortgrain rice</li> <li>1 cup (155g) frozen peas</li> <li>salt and pepper</li> <li>finely chopped fresh parsley to garnish</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <div> <ol> <li>Bring the stock to the boil in a pan over a high heat. Add the saffron threads, reduce the heat and leave to simmer gently while preparing the other ingredients.</li> <li>Remove the thick skin from the chorizo sausage and thinly slice the sausage. Cut the haddock into large chunks.</li> <li>Heat the oil in a 30 cm round, shallow flameproof casserole, paella pan or frying pan. Add the chorizo, onion, garlic and green beans and fry for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.</li> <li>Add the rice and stir until all the grains are coated with oil. Add the saffron-flavoured stock and stir. Season with salt and pepper to taste.</li> <li>Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for 3 minutes.</li> <li>Gently stir in the haddock pieces and peas. Simmer for 20 minutes or until all the liquid has been absorbed and the rice is tender.</li> <li>Stir halfway through cooking, taking care not to break up the haddock too much. Sprinkle with chopped parsley and serve.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/smoked-fish-paella"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Food & Wine

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Hot and spicy stir-fried duck

<p>Lightly dusted with Chinese five-spice, this tasty duck breast is stir-fried with a little honey, pear and fresh Asian greens to make a modern Asian lunch or dinner. It can be served as part of a shared meal with your favourite noodles or steamed rice on the side.</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 4<br /><strong>Preparation:</strong> 15 minutes<br /><strong>Cooking:</strong> 10 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>400 g (14 oz) skinless, boneless duck breasts, trimmed of fat</li> <li>2 teaspoons Chinese five-spice</li> <li>2 tablespoons sunflower oil</li> <li>4 small onions, thinly sliced</li> <li>4 small celery stalks, thinly sliced, plus a few leaves, to garnish</li> <li>1 firm pear, peeled, cored and diced</li> <li>1½ cups (230 g) sliced canned water chestnuts</li> <li>1 tablespoon honey</li> <li>¼ cup (60 ml) rice vinegar or sherry vinegar</li> <li>1 tablespoon salt-reduced soy sauce</li> <li>2⅔ cups (200 g) shredded bok choy</li> <li>1½ cups (135 g) bean sprouts, trimmed</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <ol> <li>Cut the duck breasts into thin strips and sprinkle over the five-spice to coat.</li> <li>Set aside.</li> <li>Heat the sunflower oil in a wok or heavy-based frying pan over high heat and swirl to coat the base and side.</li> <li>Add the duck pieces and stir-fry for 2 minutes, then add the onions and celery and stir-fry for 3 minutes, or until softened.</li> <li>Add the pear and water chestnuts and stir well to combine.</li> <li>Add the honey, vinegar and soy sauce to the wok and heat through.</li> <li>When the liquid is bubbling, reduce the heat to low and simmer for a further 2 minutes.</li> <li>Increase the heat to high, then add the bok choy and bean sprouts, and stir-fry for 1 minute, or until the bok choy has just wilted.</li> <li>Divide the duck and vegetables among serving plates and serve immediately, garnished with celery leaves.</li> </ol> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/spicy-stir-fried-duck">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><span>here’s our best subscription offer</span>.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Food & Wine

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Delicious Japanese beef with soba noodles

<p>Invite your friends over for a casual night in and cook this Japanese one–dish meal. Delicious, healthy and impressive looking.</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 4<br /><strong>Preparation:</strong> 10 minutes<br /><strong>Cooking:</strong> 15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>½ cup (125 ml) salt–reduced dark soy sauce</li> <li>2 cloves garlic, crushed</li> <li>1 tablespoon cornflour (cornstarch)</li> <li>1 teaspoon wasabi paste</li> <li>500 g (1 lb) lean sirloin steak, trimmed and thinly sliced</li> <li>300 g (10 oz) soba (Japanese buckwheat noodles)</li> <li>2 tablespoons sunflower oil</li> <li>1 large red capsicum (bell pepper), halved, seeded and thinly sliced</li> <li>5 spring onions (scallions), sliced</li> <li>1½ cups (125 g) sliced shiitake mushrooms</li> <li>3 cups (750 ml) dashi stock, made with dashi powder</li> <li>1 sheet nori, cut into thin strips</li> <li>½ cup (15 g) chopped fresh coriander (cilantro) leaves</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Put ¼ cup (60 ml) of the soy sauce in a bowl with the garlic, cornflour and wasabi paste and mix well to combine.</li> <li>Add the steak and stir until well coated.</li> <li>Set aside.</li> <li>Cook the noodles in a saucepan of boiling water for about 6 minutes, or until al dente.</li> <li>Drain well and set aside.</li> <li>Heat 1 tablespoon of the sunflower oil in a large wok or large non–stick frying pan over high heat.</li> <li>Add the capsicum, spring onions and mushrooms and stir–fry for 4 minutes, or until the vegetables have softened.</li> <li>Remove to a plate.</li> <li>Heat the remaining oil in the wok, add the steak and stir–fry for about 4 minutes, or until just tender.</li> <li>Remove to a plate.</li> <li>Put the stock and remaining soy sauce into the wok, add the noodles, vegetables, nori and coriander.</li> <li>Toss well, then return the steak to the wok and toss again.</li> <li>Divide the noodles, vegetables and beef among serving bowls and spoon over some of the cooking liquid.</li> <li>Serve immediately.</li> </ol> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/japanese-beef-with-soba-noodles">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Food & Wine

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Mouth-watering sesame sausages with vegetables

<p>Be tempted with this delicious dish that is quick and easy to prepare.</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 4<br /><strong>Preparation:</strong> 10 minutes<br /><strong>Cooking:</strong> 25 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 large red capsicums (bell peppers), halved and seeded</li> <li>2 large yellow capsicums (bell peppers), halved and seeded</li> <li>4 thick pork sausages</li> <li>2 tablespoons tomato sauce (ketchup)</li> <li>2 tablespoons hoisin sauce</li> <li>3 tablespoons sesame seeds</li> <li>3 heads bok choy, chopped</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the grill (broiler) to medium.</li> <li>Cook the capsicums and sausages for about 20–25 minutes, turning occasionally until the sausages are cooked through and the capsicums is tender and lightly charred.</li> <li>Cut the capsicums into wide strips, set aside and keep warm.</li> <li>Combine the tomato sauce and hoisin sauce in a large shallow bowl.</li> <li>Add the sausages and roll to coat.</li> <li>Cover the grill rack with foil and continue grilling the sausages for 1 minute, or until the glaze is bubbling.</li> <li>Turn the sausages and sprinkle with the sesame seeds, then cook for a further 1 minute, or until the seeds are golden.</li> <li>Thickly slice the sausages on the diagonal and combine with the capsicums and bok choy, tossing together to combine.</li> <li>Divide among serving bowls and serve immediately.</li> </ol> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/sesame-sausages-with-vegetables">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Food & Wine

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Healthy chicken salad with tahini dressing

<p>The ingredients for this salad are presented individually on a platter rather than being mixed together, with a simple tahini–based dressing so everyone can help themselves. Careful and neat slicing of the vegetables will improve the overall presentation of this dish.</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 4<br /><strong>Preparation:</strong> 25 minutes<br /><strong>Cooking:</strong> 15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>300 g (10 oz) skinless, boneless chicken breast fillets</li> <li>1 tablespoon mirin or sake</li> <li>10 cm (4 inch) piece telegraph (long)cucumber</li> <li>2 carrots</li> <li>1 red capsicum (bell pepper), seeded</li> <li>2 baby cos lettuces, leaves separated</li> <li>½ cup (10 g) fresh basil leaves, chopped</li> <li>½ cup (6 g) fresh mint leaves, chopped</li> <li>8 spring onions (scallions), halved lengthwise</li> <li>1¼ cups (115 g) sliced button mushrooms</li> <li>2 tablespoons tahini</li> <li>1 clove garlic, crushed</li> <li>1 tablespoon salt–reduced soy sauce</li> <li>2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice, or to taste</li> <li>chilli powder, to garnish (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <ol> <li>Place the chicken breast fillets on a heatproof plate in a steamer over a saucepan of boiling water.</li> <li>Sprinkle with the mirin or sake and season with salt and black pepper.</li> <li>Cover and steam for 10–12 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through.</li> <li>Set aside to cool.</li> <li>To make the tahini dressing, mix together all of the ingredients, except the chilli powder, in a bowl.</li> <li>Drain the cooking juices from the chicken and add enough water to measure ⅓ cup (80 ml).</li> <li>Add to the dressing, mixing well to combine.</li> <li>Add a little more lemon juice, if needed.</li> <li>Pour into a serving bowl and sprinkle with chilli powder, if using.</li> <li>To make the salad, cut the cucumber, carrots and red capsicum into fine strips of similar length, about 5 cm (2 inches) each.</li> <li>Arrange the lettuce leaves at one end of a large platter.</li> <li>Scatter with the chopped basil and mint.</li> <li>Cut the chicken into strips and place on the lettuce.</li> <li>Arrange all of the other salad ingredients on the platter.</li> <li>Serve with the dressing on the side for guests to help themselves.</li> </ol> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/chicken-salad-with-tahini-dressing">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Food & Wine

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Scrumptious peach, coconut and hazelnut loaf

<p>This easy and delicious peach, coconut and hazelnut loaf is the perfect addition to your afternoon tea. Whether you choose to accompany the homemade dessert with a cup of tea or a glass of fresh juice, this unique and fresh recipe is sure to be a hit.</p> <p>Try it out for yourself below.</p> <p><strong>Preparation time:</strong> 15 min</p> <p><strong>Cooking time:</strong> 50 min</p> <p><strong>Makes:</strong> 1 loaf</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>125g butter, softened</li> <li>2/3 cup caster sugar</li> <li>1 tsp vanilla extract</li> <li>2 eggs, at room temperature</li> <li>1 cup sour cream</li> <li>2 yellow peaches, stone removed, finely diced</li> <li>1 ½ cup self-raising flour</li> <li>½ cup plain flour</li> <li>½ cup desiccated coconut</li> <li>1/3 cup roasted hazelnuts, finely chopped</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease a 6-cup capacity (20cm x 10cm x 7cm deep base measurement) loaf pan and line with baking paper, 5cm above line of pan. Using an electric mixer, beat butter, sugar and vanilla until pale and creamy. Add egg, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition.</li> <li>Using a large metal spoon, gently fold in sour cream, peaches and coconut. Sift flours over batter and gently fold until combined.</li> <li>Spoon batter into prepared loaf pan. Smooth top and sprinkle with chopped nuts, pressing gently into batter. Bake for 1 hour or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Stand for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe and image courtesy of <span><a href="https://www.facebook.com/AustraliaSummerStonefruit">Australian Summer Stonefruit</a></span>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Spice it up: Indian curried yellow split pea and coconut soup

<p>Korma curry powders are milder than many other Indian spice mixes, so this is a great way to introduce aromatic food to your family. Add less if your loved ones are still getting used to spiciness.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 tablespoons olive oil</li> <li>2 brown onions, finely diced</li> <li>3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced</li> <li>1 leek, white part only, washed, thinly sliced</li> <li>1 carrot, diced</li> <li>1–3 tablespoons korma curry powder</li> <li>660 g yellow split peas, rinsed</li> <li>2 litres good-quality vegetable stock</li> <li>300 ml coconut milk</li> <li>45 g baby spinach leaves</li> <li>juice of 2 limes, or to taste</li> <li>1 long red chilli, thinly sliced diagonally </li> <li>Greek-style yoghurt and coriander (cilantro) leaves, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Heat the olive oil in the insert pan of a slow cooker or a frying pan over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, leek and carrot and sauté for five to seven minutes, or until tender. Add the curry powder and stir for 30 seconds, or until aromatic.</li> <li>Return the insert pan, if using, to the slow cooker, or transfer the vegetable mixture to the slow cooker. Add the split peas and stock. Cover and cook on high for three and a half hours, or until the split peas are very tender.</li> <li>Stir the coconut milk through. Purée the mixture to a rough consistency, using a stick blender, food processor or blender, leaving some of the soup un-puréed if desired. (You may need to add a little extra coconut milk to reach your desired consistency.) Stir in the spinach and lime juice, to taste. Season with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.</li> <li>Ladle into bowls and serve topped with chilli, yoghurt and coriander.</li> </ol> <p><em>Images and recipes from Slow Cooker Vegetarian by Katy Holder, Murdoch Books. Photography by Alan Benson.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/indian-curried-yellow-split-pea-and-coconut-soup.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></span>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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13 foods you should never eat past the expiration date

<div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Not every date you see on your food is an expiration date. Here are four common dates you may see in the grocery store and what they really mean, according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.businessinsider.com/grocery-store-eggs-milk-cheese-sell-by-expiration-date-2016-1" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">Business Insider</a></em>:</p> <p><strong>Sell-by date:</strong> How long the store has to display the product<br /><strong>Use-by date:</strong> When manufacturer thinks the product will be at its peak quality<br /><strong>Best before date:</strong> The best date for flavour and quality<br /><strong>Closed by date or coded dates:</strong> The packing number that the manufacturer uses</p> <p>None of these are expiration dates nor do they indicate whether food is safe to eat or not. In fact, the FDA allows manufacturers to sell almost any food past these dates, with baby formula being the exception. What’s more, manufacturers aren’t required to put any of these dates on their food; the decision is totally up to them.</p> <p>That being said, looks and smells can sometimes be deceiving (taking a whiff of the milk carton is not an exact science), which is why those expiration dates stamped on the packaging can guide you in the right direction and help prevent illness. From creamy cheeses to sandwich staples, it’s best to toss these foods once they’re past their given expiration date unless you want to roll the dice on an extra sick day.<br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>1. Egg substitutes</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>A full carton of eggs has a little more leeway than their boxed substitutes, but both should be consumed in a timely manner. If you’re debating whether to finish off that two-week-old carton of whites—don’t. “It’s very safe to keep eggs in the refrigerator for three to five weeks if they’re raw and in the shell. For egg substitute products, you have about three to five days on average once they’re open. If they’re unopened you have about 10 days,” says Jessica Crandall, a registered dietitian, certified diabetes educator, and national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.<br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>2. Soft cheeses</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Harder cheeses like cheddar or gouda have a longer shelf life because it’s more difficult for bacteria and mold to permeate them. Once opened, hard cheeses may last up to six months in the refrigerator, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. However, softer cheeses like ricotta, cream cheese, or goat cheese, are more susceptible to mold and bacteria and should be tossed at the first sign of spoiling or once the expiration date has passed, whichever comes first. As a general rule of thumb, softer cheeses last about one week in the refrigerator after opening.<br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>3. Jarred condiments</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>It may seem like spreads and sauces last forever, but just because they’re in a glass jar tucked away in the cool refrigerator doesn’t mean they’re untouchable by bacteria. “Once you’ve opened the lid, that safety seal is broken, and you should be using that condiment in a timely fashion,” says Crandall. “In addition, as we make sandwiches for example, we dip our knife into the spread container and wipe it onto the sandwich and then dip it back into the container. By doing this you’re putting some of that bacteria back into the container.” Jarred condiments tend to have more exposure to bacteria and therefore could lead to foodborne illness if not trashed at the appropriate time. If you notice any water floating on top, discoloration, or weird smells – just toss it. <br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>4. Potato salad</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Similar to jarred spreads like mayo and mustard, potato or egg salads are more susceptible to bacteria growth because they have more instances of exposure. Taking a few scoops at a time from the container introduces more bacteria and increases risk of contamination leading to foodborne illness. Salads like these are often pushed to the back of the fridge and forgotten about, giving time for that bacteria to grow and for that food to spoil. “Our food system is very safe, but sometimes when things fall out of temperature or if there is bacteria introduced, we have to be extra cautious with those things,” says Crandall.<br /><br /></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>5. Cold-pressed juice</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Green juices may be filling up your Instagram feeds daily, but they should not find a permanent home in your refrigerator. Cold-pressed or raw juices are incredibly popular among the health-conscious because they’re nutrient-dense, but it’s important to consume them very soon after buying. Unlike typical processed juices which undergo pasteurization to kill off harmful bacteria and increase shelf life, these raw juices are not pasteurized, making them much more prone to bacteria contamination. Only buy from your local juice bar what you plan to drink in the next 48-72 hours if you want to avoid getting sick.<br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>6. Fresh meat</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>With fresh meat you’re usually dealing with a “sell by” date, which tells the store the last day it can keep that product out for sale. What does this mean for you? You either need to eat it or freeze it when you get home. “The ‘sell by’ is telling the store when it should be the last day to have it on their shelf. They may even be discounting the food to try to get rid of it if it’s the last day they can have it on their shelves,” says Crandall. A lot of fresh raw meat is also contaminated with <em>Salmonella</em>, <em>E. coli</em>, or other bacteria. With that in mind, it’s very important to cook the meat at the proper temperatures as a greater defence against bacteria.<br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>7. Ground meat</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>The<span> </span>US FDA <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/ResourcesForYou/HealthEducators/ucm109315.pdf" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">says</a> that ground meat should be eaten or frozen within two days of purchase. This applies to beef, pork, turkey, lamb, and any other type of ground meat. Because it’s ground, the bacteria that were originally present on the surface can be mixed throughout the meat, increasing your risk of contracting food poisoning or another illness. Nuking your food isn't always a good idea either.<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/kitchen-tips/10-foods-you-shouldnt-reheat-microwave" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title=""></a></p> <p> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>8. Deli meat</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Take your ticket, but don’t load up too much at the deli counter. Those ham and turkey slices will only last about three to five days, so it’s important to only buy what you’ll realistically eat during that period. Pre-packaged deli meats sold in air-tight packaging will last a little longer than the fresh-sliced varieties if they’re unopened, but as soon as you crack the seal you’re working with the same three- to five-day consumption window for safe eating. Deli meat in particular is susceptible to a certain kind of bacteria called <em>Listeria</em>, which can multiply in cold environments like your refrigerator, so just because it’s cold doesn’t mean it’s completely protected. If the deli meat is a little slimy or giving off a funky smell, then that’s a good sign it needs to go.<br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>9. Fish</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Fish are no less prone to bacteria than meat and should be consumed in one or two days after purchase. Otherwise, Whole Foods <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/about-our-products/food-safety/handling-seafood-safely" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">advises</a> tightly wrapping it in moisture-proof freezer paper or foil and put in the freezer. <br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>10. Fresh berries</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Whether you get them from the store or a farmer’s market, berries have a short lifespan. Raspberries and strawberries are only good for about three days after purchase, while blueberries can last a few days longer in the fridge. Pro tip: Freeze any berries you know you won’t eat in that time frame. After that, they turn mushy and become susceptible to a bacteria called cyclospora cayetanensis, which can cause diarrhoea, bloating, vomiting, and other food poisoning symptoms. On the flip side, there are some foods you might be throwing away that you could be putting to good use.<br /><br /></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>11. Leafy greens</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Yes, even those packaged ones that are pre-washed. <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.prevention.com/eatclean/foods-to-never-eat-past-expiration-date/slide/7" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title=""><em>Prevention.com</em></a> reports that these leafy greens still have the potential to carry bacteria like E. coli because they’re touched by so many hands. For your safety, wash all types of greens before eating and never consume them after any date posted on the bag. Why would you want a soggy salad anyway?<br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>12. Sprouts</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Sprouts are grown in warm climates, which makes them ideal breeding ground for bacteria right off the bat. Eat them past their ideal date (about two days after purchase) and your risk of getting sick increases. If you’re pregnant or already sick, avoid them altogether. Another time to avoid sprouts is in a buffet.<br /> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-title field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"><strong>13. Shellfish</strong></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Like other seafood, raw shellfish can only last a day or two in the fridge before their bacteria can cause foodborne illnesses. Clams and scallops should be eaten no more than 24 hours after they are bought. Oysters eaten past their expiration date may contain vibrio vulnificus, bacteria that can cause blood poisoning. If you notice a strange odour from any seafood, throw it out immediately.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p><em>Written by <span>Tiffany Gagnon</span>. This article first appeared in </em><span><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/13-foods-you-should-never-ever-eat-past-expiration-date">Reader’s Digest</a></em></span><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><span><em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></span></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The perfect pound cake

<p>Pound cake is a simple recipe, and it is loved by many for its ability to be dressed up or down, for any event, in any setting. It’s a delicious snack, a sweet start to the morning or a little teaser before dinner. Although pound cake seems easy to wrap your head around – it’s even better with a few slight adjustments to get the creamiest, buttery and smooth tasting home-baked cake.</p> <p>This recipe is one by Rose Levy Beranbaum in her cookbook <span><em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Cake-Bible-Rose-Beranbaum-1988-09-20/dp/B01K3NO8LU">The Cake Bible.</a></em></span></p> <p>The chef’s recipe is a lot like the traditional method, however, uses milk, lots of extra butter and a little amount of baking powder. In result, a fluffy, buttery and creamy pound cake should be the turn out.</p> <p>“This cake not only has a silky-smooth dissolving texture similar to the famous Sara Lee pound cake but also the incomparable moist, butter flavour of a home-baked cake. It’s excellent keeping qualities make it ideal for slicing ahead and bringing on picnics,” she wrote.</p> <p>See the recipe below:</p> <p>Servings: 8</p> <p>Prep time: 15 minutes</p> <p>Cook time: 50 minutes</p> <p>Total Time: 1 hour 5 mnutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <p>3 tblsps milk (skim, low fat, or whole)</p> <p>3 large eggs</p> <p>1-1/2 tsp vanilla extract</p> <p>1-1/3 cups cake flour, spooned into measuring cup and levelled with a straight edge</p> <p>3/4 cup sugar</p> <p>3/4 tsp baking powder</p> <p>1/4 tsp salt</p> <p>13 tblsps unsalted butter, softened (no need to cut it in pieces)</p> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>1, Preheat oven to 180 degrees Celsius and lightly grease an 8x4-inch loaf pan with butter or non-stick cooking spray.</p> <p>2. Dust the pan with flour and shake off excess.</p> <p>3. In a medium-sized bowl, whisk milk, eggs, vanilla until combined.</p> <p>4. With a hand mixer (alternatively you can use electric mixer with a paddled attachment), place flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a bowl before mixing on low speed until blended.</p> <p>5. Add butter and only half of the egg mixture and mix on low speed until all the dry ingredients have moistened.</p> <p>6. Increase the mixture to medium speed (high speed if using hand mixer) and beat for one minute. Scrape down sides of the bowl and add in the remaining egg mixture, in two separate additions, until completely combined.</p> <p>7. Do not over-mix the combination, ensure the batter has a slightly curdled or grainy appearance.</p> <p>8. Scrape batter into prepared pan and smooth top with spatula. Bake for 50-55 minutes or until cake is golden brown.</p> <p>9. Allow cake to cool for 10 minutes on rack.</p> <p>10. Wrap the cooled cake in plastic wrap or sealable plastic bag</p> <p><strong>Notes </strong></p> <p>The wrapped pound cake will stay edible for one week when refrigerated. Alternatively, the cake can be frozen for two months.</p>

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Simple grilled halloumi and kale salad with tahini yoghurt dressing

<p>Try this simple kale and halloumi salad topped with a delightful yoghurt dressing, so it's still packed with flavour.</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>2</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p><strong>For the kale salad</strong></p> <p>100g kale leaves</p> <p>½ teaspoon sea salt</p> <p>30g blanched almonds</p> <p>1 avocado, peeled, de-stoned and cut into chunks</p> <p>4 spring onions, thinly sliced</p> <p>100g radishes, thinly sliced</p> <p>1 pomegranate, seeds</p> <p>2 teaspoons sesame seeds</p> <p>2 teaspoons black sesame seeds</p> <p><strong>For the halloumi</strong></p> <p>1 teaspoon turmeric</p> <p>1 teaspoon hot smoked paprika</p> <p>3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil</p> <p>200g halloumi, cut into 1cm-thick slices</p> <p><strong>For the tahini yoghurt dressing</strong></p> <p>25ml tahini</p> <p>100ml Greek yoghurt</p> <p>½ a lemon, juice and zest for garnish</p> <p>Sea salt</p> <p><strong>To serve</strong></p> <p>2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil</p> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Prep the kale by removing stalks and thick stems, and cut or tear into bite-size pieces. Put the leaves into a large mixing bowl and add the salt, crushing it between your fingers.</p> <p>2. With both hands, massage the leaves with the salt for a minute or two; it will suddenly feel much softer in your hands.</p> <p>3. Add all the other ingredients, mix together and set to one side.</p> <p>4. Turn your grill to its hottest setting. Put the turmeric, paprika and oil into a little bowl and mix. Add the halloumi and coat in the spices and oil.</p> <p>5. Place the halloumi on a baking sheet and pop under the hot grill. Allow to cook for 3 to 4 minutes, then turn over and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes. Turn off the grill but leave the baking sheet under it to keep warm.</p> <p>6. For the dressing, put all the ingredients into a bowl and mix with a whisk.</p> <p>7. To serve, divide the salad between two bowls, add some dressing and top with warm halloumi and an extra drizzle of oil.</p> <p><em>This is an edited extract from <a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/pioppi-diet-dr-aseem-malhotra/prod9781405932639.html" target="_blank">The Pioppi Diet by Dr Aseem Halhotra &amp; Donal O'Neill</a>, Penguin Books, RRP $24.99. </em><em>Republished with permission from <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/grilled-halloumi-and-kale-salad-with-tahini-yoghurt-dressing.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Tasty finger food: Crumbed chicken ribs

<p>Entertain with ease thanks to this tasty finger food.</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>35 mins</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>4 mins</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>4-6</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <p>24 chicken ribs</p> <p><strong>Rub (Dry spice mix)</strong></p> <p>1 tablespoon fresh cracked black pepper</p> <p>1 tablespoon kosher salt</p> <p>1 tablespoon rosemary powder</p> <p>1 teaspoon garlic powder</p> <p>1 teaspoon onion powder</p> <p>1 teaspoon celery powder</p> <p><strong>Crumbs</strong></p> <p>500 g panko breadcrumbs</p> <p>4 eggs</p> <p>50 ml buttermilk</p> <p>2 cups plain flour</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Apply liberal coating of rub to each chicken rib and chill ribs in fridge for 30 minutes.</p> <p>2. Place eggs and buttermilk in a bowl and panko breadcrumbs in a second bowl.</p> <p>3. Dip the coated ribs into the egg and buttermilk mixture and then coat well with breadcrumbs.</p> <p>4. Pre-heat deep fryer to 180°C and deep fry chicken ribs in small batches (depending on the size of the fryer) for 3–4 minutes per batch ensuring a golden colored crumb coating.</p> <p>5. Place cooked ribs on paper towel to drain excess oil.</p> <p><strong>Tips:</strong></p> <p>Use this cooking method with any flavor combination in the rub to suit your preference. These are such good eating on their own but add a range of dipping sauces on the side depending on your crowd - try a Japanese mayo and hot sauce combination.</p> <p><em>This is an edited extract from Ribs: With Low and Slow BBQ Guide by Adam Roberts, New Holland Publishers, RRP $45, available from all good bookstores or <a rel="noopener" href="http://au.newhollandpublishers.com/" target="_blank">online</a>.</em></p>

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Redbelly citrus poke bowl

<p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>15 mins</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>10 mins</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>6</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <p>1½ cups (300g) sushi or jasmine rice</p> <p>⅓ cup (80ml) Japanese rice vinegar</p> <p>1 tablespoon sugar</p> <p>4 green onions (shallots), thinly sliced</p> <p>Salt flakes</p> <p>½ red cabbage, finely shredded</p> <p>600g cooked, shelled prawns</p> <p>2 avocadoes cut in half, skin removed and sliced thinly</p> <p>5 redbelly citrus (also known as blood oranges)</p> <p>2 cucumbers, shaved lengthwise into ribbons</p> <p>2 carrots, peeled, shaved lengthwise into ribbons</p> <p>½ bunch coriander, roughly chopped<span> </span></p> <p>1 Nori sheet, cut into little strips or seaweed flakes</p> <p>2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted</p> <p><strong>Dressing</strong></p> <p>1 tsp (5ml) toasted sesame oil</p> <p>⅓ cup (80ml) blood orange juice</p> <p>1 tbsp (20ml) gluten-free tamari or soy sauce</p> <p>1 clove garlic, peeled and grated</p> <p>2 teaspoons fresh ginger grated</p> <p>1 chili, deseeded and finely shredded</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Cook rice according to packet instructions. Mix vinegar, sugar, green onions and a pinch of salt. Stir half through the cooked rice and toss the other half in a separate bowl with the cabbage.</p> <p>2. Combine dressing ingredients in a bowl, add prawns and leave to marinate for 5 minutes.</p> <p>3. Cut 3 redbelly in half, to cut the remaining 2 into segments: cut a small slice off the ends of each remaining redbelly. Stand up on one end, and carefully, following the contour of the redbelly, cut down to remove the peel and the pith. Holding the fruit in one hand, cut down one side of the membrane on one segment, almost to the core.</p> <p>Cut down along the inside of the opposite membrane, to cut out a wedge with no pith or membrane attached. Repeat until you have cut out all segments. Squeeze juice out of the remaining core into the dressing, then discard the core.</p> <p>4. Divide the rice between 6 bowls. Drizzle with dressing from the prawns. Place prawns, cabbage mixture, avocado, Redbelly, cucumber and carrot on top. Sprinkle with coriander, seaweed and sesame seeds with extra bowls of each. Serve immediately.</p> <p><strong>Tips:</strong></p> <p>This recipe is gluten-free. Brown rice or quinoa could also be used in place of the white rice. For a paleo version, replace the rice with blanched zucchini “pasta” or ribbons.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lyndey-milan-redbelly-citrus-poke-bowl.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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The choc chip cookies you need to try

<p>Have you ever craved a lighter, fluffier, more aesthetically pleasing version of chocolate chip cookies for a snack? Nigel Slater, an English food writer, journalist, broadcaster and chef, says these gorgeous looking treats will get you through those meals where you crave a sweet dessert afterwards.</p> <p>“The best moment to eat these soft cookies is when they are still warm, when the butterscotch notes of the brown sugar is still evident and the chocolate chips haven’t quite set,” he wrote in <em>The Guardian</em>. Have a peak below and see if you would like to try these out for yourselves.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7823982/gettyimages-958512822.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1c55f900fcf74f2e9cf09712a3c09dde" /></p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>125g butter</li> <li>75g light muscovado sugar</li> <li>75g caster sugar</li> <li>1 egg</li> <li>250g plain flour</li> <li>½ tsp bicarbonate of soda</li> <li>20g crystallised rose petals</li> <li>200g marzipan</li> <li>150g dark chocolate</li> <li>Vanilla extract</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method </strong></p> <p>1. Set oven to 200 degrees celsius.</p> <p>2. Cream butter and sugars together until the texture is light and the colour resembles a light brown.</p> <p>3. Break egg into bowl and mix the yolk and egg white together with a fork, then combine with butter and sugar mixture.</p> <p>4. Mix flour and bicarbonate soda and fold into creamed butter and sugar mix.</p> <p>5. Finely chop rose petals. Cut marzipan into small bits and pieces then add to mixture.</p> <p>6. Cut chocolate into small pieces then fold cookie dough with vanilla extract (your desired amount).</p> <p>7. Roll mixture into small balls and set on baking paper.</p> <p>8. Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until pale and risen.</p> <p>9. Allow 5 minutes to cool.</p> <p>10. Makes 18 cookies.</p> <p>Will you try this classy take on chocolate chip cookies? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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The perfect pavlova for summer

<p>Dutch Chef Rob Kabboord has reinvented a new way to snack on the Australian-New Zealand dessert favourite loved by so many down-under.</p> <p>And luckily, the guide to this perfect pav is as easy as pie.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>4 egg whites (5 if you are using small eggs)</li> <li>250g pure icing sugar or fine caster sugar, sifted</li> <li>1/2 tsp white vinegar</li> <li>1 tbsp cornflour, sifted</li> <li>Preheat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>Place baking paper on a baking tray with melted butter or vegetable spray on the tray. You need the paper to stay in place while spooning the pavlova.</p> <p>1. With an electric mixer, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form.</p> <p>2. Add sugar all at once and beat the mixture for a minute or so ONCE soft peaks appear, on full speed.</p> <p>3. Do not stop the machine to add sugar as the process needs to catch as much air as possible in the egg whites. The texture should change almost immediately and form glossy, meringue-style peaks that are soft and loose.</p> <p>4. Mix on high until the texture thickens and the sugar is complete dissolved – a ribbon stage must be reached (when a spoonful of the mixture is poured back into the bowl and the surface looks like a ribbon).</p> <p>5. Slow the machine, add the vinegar and let the beaters make three rotations, then remove the bowl from the mixer.</p> <p>6. Sprinkle the cornflour over the mixture and with the help of a clean spatula, gently fold in the cornflour. Do not exceed any more than six folds.</p> <p>7. Spoon the mix on the prepared tray and mould it into the shape you want.</p> <p>8. Kabboord prefers to leave it pretty heaped. Don’t play around with the meringue too much – timeliness is key here.</p> <p>9. Place the tray in the middle of the oven and immediately turn the temperature down to 120 degrees Celsius.</p> <p>10. Don't use the fan.</p> <p>11. Cook for 80-90 minutes but don't let the pavlova colour. You may see a little sugar syrup seep out of the bottom, but the crust should be firm.</p> <p>12. Cool to room temperature and decorate using quark, goat's curd or mascarpone and your favourite toppings, such as summer fruit.</p> <p><strong>Notes and Tips</strong></p> <ul> <li>A whisking bowl that is clean is mandatory for a successful meringue – use a little vinegar to lightly wash the mixing bowl.</li> <li>Timeliness is key when making a perfect pav – when you start mixing your dessert, you should not stop for any reason.</li> <li>The eggs should be as fresh as possible.</li> <li>There must be no yolk in the desserts egg white.</li> <li>Egg whites must be at room temperature.</li> </ul> <p>Would you try this delicious pavlova at home? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p> </p>

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Family favourite: Vegetarian chilli beans

<p>Mexican food is often a favourite with the whole family. If your kids are fussy about spice, leave out the chilli powder initially, then add it little by little each time you cook the dish to increase their tolerance.  </p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>4 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>4</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p>½ red onion, chopped (use remainder for salsa)<br />1 red capsicum (pepper), seeds and membranes discarded, chopped<br />400g tin chopped tomatoes<br />1 tablespoon tomato paste (concentrated purée)<br />2 x 400g tins red kidney beans, drained and rinsed<br />3 teaspoons ground coriander<br />2 teaspoons ground cumin<br />½ teaspoon chilli powder<br />2 garlic cloves, crushed<br />2 dried bay leaves<br />125 ml good-quality vegetable stock<br />85g sour cream<br />2 tablespoons coriander (cilantro) leaves, coarsely chopped (optional)<br />flour tortillas or steamed rice, to serve (optional)</p> <p><strong>Avocado salsa</strong><br />1 avocado, peeled and diced<br />2 tablespoons lemon juice<br />1 roma (plum) tomato, seeded and diced<br />½ red onion, thinly sliced<br />1–2 tablespoons olive oil</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Place the onion, capsicum, tomatoes, tomato paste and beans in the slow cooker. Add the ground coriander, cumin, chilli powder, garlic and bay leaves. Pour in the stock and stir to combine well. Cover and cook on low for 4 hours.</p> <p>2. Put all the avocado salsa ingredients in a bowl and gently stir to combine. Season to taste with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cover and refrigerate until required.</p> <p>3. Spoon the chilli beans into bowls. Top with a dollop of the sour cream and scatter over the coriander, if using. Serve with the avocado salsa and tortillas or steamed rice, if desired.</p> <p><em>Images and recipes from <a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/slow-cooker-vegetarian-katy-holder/prod9781760523589.html?source=pla&amp;gclid=CjwKCAjw3cPYBRB7EiwAsrc-uXW5TMKVsCrkFFQLKgIeqNuUjXagEPhzCuczSMiLwLeWraYFJ3006xoCOBMQAvD_BwE" target="_blank">Slow Cooker Vegetarian</a> by Katy Holder, Murdoch Books, RRP $29.99 Photography by Alan Benson</em></p>

Food & Wine

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The most deliciously soft chocolate chip banana bread

<p>Have you ever wanted to combine two sweet flavours to get the ultimate dessert snack you won’t want to put down? This decadent chocolate chip banana bread by <em><a href="https://asassyspoon.com/chocolate-chip-banana-bread/">A Sassy Spoon</a></em> is all the best combinations made into one perfect meal.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong> </p> <ul> <li>1 stick unsalted butter, room temperature (1/2 cup)</li> <li>1 cup brown sugar, packed</li> <li>1 large egg</li> <li>3-4 <em>very</em> ripe bananas, mashed (frozen bananas are extra sweet)</li> <li>1 teaspoon vanilla</li> <li>2 cups all-purpose flour</li> <li>1 teaspoon baking powder</li> <li>1/2 teaspoon baking soda</li> <li>1/4 teaspoon salt</li> <li>1 cup dark chocolate chips</li> </ul> <p><strong>Instructions </strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 180 degrees Celsius</li> <li>Line a 9x5 loaf pan with parchment paper, making sure the parchment is hanging over the sides of the loaf pan. This will help you easily remove the loaf after baking. Spray with non-stick spray and set aside.</li> <li>In a large bowl, cream butter and sugar together for about 2 minutes until smooth. Whisk in the egg then add the mashed bananas and vanilla. Mix, scraping down the sides of the bowl, until well combined.</li> <li>Add the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Mix until well combined. Fold in the chocolate chips.</li> <li>Pour the mixture into the loaf pan. Bake for 55-65 minutes until a knife inserted in the centre of the loaf comes out clean. Let cool for at least 30 minutes before serving. Enjoy!</li> </ol> <p>This recipe makes 1 loaf and approximately 12 slices.</p> <p>Will you try this deliciously moist chocolate chip banana bread? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Food & Wine