Food & Wine

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Is purple your favourite colour? This wine is for you

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whether you prefer your wine to be red, yellow or pink, you’ve never seen wine in this shade before.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An Australian winery has created a purple wine, made from a blend of Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc with an infusion of botanicals.</span></p> <p><a href="https://purplereign.com.au/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Purple Reign Wine</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the vineyard behind this unique wine, says they have “harnessed nature’s rarest colour and most powerful visible wave-length to create a popular style of wine embellished with mystery and nobility.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CH7Jf2ij2Ck/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CH7Jf2ij2Ck/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The World’s First Purple Wine! (@purplereignwine)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The winery goes on to say the drop “is infused with natural, organic, plant-based botanicals to minimise the use of sulphites.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The move away from using sulphites in wine stems from a theory that avoiding synthetic additives like sulphites could lessen a hangover.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to this theory, natural wines that replace synthetic additives with botanicals have less acetaldehyde, a chemical that your body breaks down after drinking alcohol.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A </span><a href="https://www.saveur.com/story/drink/truth-about-natural-wine-and-hangovers/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">2013 study</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> by the University of Rome found lower amounts of acetaldehyde in blood meant the liver had less work to do and could process alcohol faster.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Co-developer Ross Stewart told </span><a href="https://www.perthnow.com.au/travel/food-wine/worlds-first-purple-wine-purple-reign-developed-in-wa-and-it-might-lessen-your-hangover-ng-b881858722z"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Perth Now</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that one customer claimed the wine didn’t trigger his asthma like other drops.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’ve had many similar stories from customers over the last two years,” Mr Ross said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We believe using antioxidant rich compounds in winemaking could also translate to a clearer, less foggy head after drinking, compared to other wines.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Ross added, “We’ve also found that when our wines are stored correctly after opening, they stay fresh for longer than other wines, all by using natural means.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As for the flavour profile, Purple Reign says the “lush style wine exhibits a hint of grass and a touch of minerals with a perfect balance of natural acidity and freshness complemented by a crisp dry finish.”</span></p> <p><strong>Image credit: Purple Reign Wine / Instagram</strong></p>

Food & Wine

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Unbelievable deal: ALDI shopper scores lamb roast for under $1

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An ALDI customer has shared how she bought a lamb roast for just 83c and the unexpected reason why.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Posting the story on the </span><a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/1034012533313136"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ALDI Mums</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Facebook page, Monique said she was excited to pick up the dinner favourite at her local ALDI.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The half leg of lamb was still four weeks out from its ‘best before’ date, so it wasn’t reduced because it was close to expiring.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Upon closer inspection, the ALDI label shows that it had been incorrectly weighted at 68g.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Seasoned ALDI shoppers estimate that a similar leg would weigh anywhere from 1.5kg to 2kg, with the error pricing it at well under 100g.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was so excited about my bargain find today I knew you mums would appreciate it!” Monique wrote on the page.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I paid a whole 83c for this lamb roast today as it was marked and weighed wrong!”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Monique said she even checked if the price was right with the checkout worker.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was like so this is marked 83c, does that mean I get it for 83c? He went and spoke to his manager and they were like ‘Yeah we can’t charge you any more for it’.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since it even scanned at 83c, Monique said, “I was like, ‘Yes! Get in my basket!’”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Fellow shoppers were amazed by her good luck.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Lucky you, enjoy! Just about need a bank loan to buy any cuts of lamb these days!” one said.</span></p>

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This is what happens if you accidentally eat mould

<p><strong>Will eating mould make you sick?</strong></p> <p>You’re enjoying your breakfast when you notice that your banana muffin seems to have grown a patch of fuzzy green dots. You have already taken a bite or two. Now, you wonder, what happens if you eat mould?</p> <p>First, don’t panic. Most healthy people can accidentally eat some mould here and there and feel totally fine. A lot depends on the type of food (after all, some foods, like gorgonzola, and other blue cheeses are made with mould cultures) and on your underlying health status, like your immune system. Here’s a brief explanation of mouldy foods you can eat – and which ones to avoid.</p> <p><strong>What are moulds?</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Moulds are microscopic fungi that can grow on wood, paper, carpet, food and building materials, such as insulation. All moulds need water or moisture to grow. Wherever there is moisture and oxygen, mould can grow.</p> <p>There are many species of fungi, with some estimates suggesting 300,000 or more, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). This is why the mould that pops up on your breakfast muffin may look different than the furry layer that grows on your luncheon meats, explains gastroenterologist Elena Ivanina. Unlike bacteria, moulds grow in structures that contain many cells, and you don’t need a microscope to see them. In general, moulds consist of root threads that run deep into food, a stalk that rises above the food, and spores at the end of the stalks. Spores give mould its variety of colours and also help transport it from item to item.</p> <p>“If you pick up a dandelion and blow on it, the seeds disperse in the air, and that’s how mould spores travel from place to place, contaminate products and cause spoilage,” says Robert Gravani, professor and director of the National Good Agricultural Practices Program.</p> <p>“Moulds are nature’s decomposers. If you have a piece of fruit with mould, eventually that fruit will be decomposed,” says Gravani. “Moulds are very efficient in what they do.” In fact, some can be very beneficial. The life-saving antibiotic penicillin is made from Penicillium mould, Dr Ivanina notes.</p> <p>Mould thrives in warm, humid environments, but that doesn’t mean it can’t also form and grow in your refrigerator. Moulds are pretty smart, too, and tolerate preservatives such as salt and sugar better than most other food invaders. “They are pretty hearty critters,” Gravani says.</p> <p><strong>Allergic reactions to mould</strong></p> <p>Some people are allergic to mould, says Dr Ivanina. This is usually mould in the environment as opposed to food, but for these people, exposure to mould can cause vomiting, diarrhoea or headaches. If your doctor suspects a mould allergy is to blame, you will likely be referred for testing, she says.</p> <p>Hidden patches of mould can lurk in all different areas of your home and may make you sick.</p> <p>“If you have an underlying health condition that affects your immune system, exposure to mould can be dangerous,” Dr Ivanina says. “You may have a much worse reaction to eating mould than someone else because you don’t have a healthy immune system to fight that reaction.”</p> <p><strong>Some moulds produce poisonous substances</strong></p> <p>A few moulds produce mycotoxins, or poisonous substances that can make you very sick. For example, moulds produced by the <em>Aspergillus</em> species can cause aflatoxicosis, a life-threatening form of acute poisoning with the potential to cause liver damage.</p> <p>This type of mould tends to lurk in cereals: oil seeds such as soybean, peanut, sunflower, and cotton seeds; spices; and tree nuts. These mycotoxins have been linked to cancer in animals and can cause liver cancer in humans. “Some are highly toxic, which can get you really sick or cause cancer,” says Gravani.</p> <p><strong>How to handle mouldy foods</strong></p> <p>When it comes to food, it can be tempting to cut away mould and eat it anyway, given the high price tags of certain products, but it’s usually not worth it, Gravani says.</p> <p>Besides the risk of illness, mouldy food doesn’t taste great, he says. Most moulds on soft foods will taste like soil or dust. If it looks like mould, it likely is mould, so don’t smell it, as according to the USDA, sniffing it can cause respiratory issues.</p> <p>When in doubt, throw it out, Dr Ivanina says. This is a good motto for mouldy foods, but there are some more specific guidelines to keep in mind too.</p> <p><strong>Cheese</strong></p> <p>There are different rules for cheese depending on its texture.</p> <p><strong>Hard cheese</strong></p> <p><span>Hard cheeses (not to be mistaken with those that have mould as part of the process) can be consumed if you cut off at least 2cm around and below the mould. Make sure to keep the knife away from the mould to avoid spreading it. Still, Gravani adds, “If the hard cheese is heavily encrusted with mould, I would probably discard it.”</span></p> <p><strong>Soft cheese</strong></p> <p>If you see mould on soft cheese such as cottage, cream cheese or all types of crumbled, shredded and sliced cheeses, throw it out. These may be contaminated below the surface and can also have bacteria growing along with the mould.</p> <p>Some cheeses are made with mould including Roquefort, blue, Gorgonzola, Stilton, Brie, and Camembert. If they contain moulds that are not a part of the manufacturing process, these cheeses can be dangerous.</p> <p><strong>Fruit and vegetables</strong></p> <p><span>Like cheese, there are different rules for fruits and vegetables based on the texture.</span></p> <p><strong>Soft produce</strong></p> <p>Discard soft fruit and veggies like cucumbers, peaches and tomatoes if you spy any mould. Many of these may also be contaminated under the surface, says Dr Ivanina.</p> <p>What you see isn’t all that you get with moulds. “Root” threads from the mould tend to run deep, especially in foods that show heavy mould growth.</p> <p><strong>Firm produce</strong></p> <p><span>You can keep these if you cut out all the mould. This is due to the low moisture content as seen with firm fruit and veggies like cabbage, capsicums and carrots. With these types of foods, mould can’t penetrate them easily.</span></p> <p><strong>Meat</strong></p> <p><span>The rule of thumb for mouldy luncheon meat, bacon and hot dogs is to discard as they may be contaminated under the surface and also harbour bacteria, Dr Ivanina says.</span></p> <p><strong>Hard salami and dry-cured country hams</strong></p> <p><span>You can keep these meats if you scrub off all of the surface mould. The USDA points out that it is normal for these shelf-stable products to grow surface mould.</span></p> <p><strong>Cooked casseroles and leftover meat</strong></p> <p><span>Get rid of these if you see mould as there is a good chance it runs deep and it may travel with bacteria. It’s also a smart idea to use or get rid of leftovers within three or four days.</span></p> <p><strong>In the fridge</strong></p> <p><strong>Cooked grains and pasta</strong></p> <p><span>Like other leftovers, if you see mould on cooked grains or pasta, toss it. There is likely mould under the surface too and there’s also a risk of bacteria.</span></p> <p><strong>Yoghurt and sour cream</strong></p> <p><span>If you see mould, get rid of yogurt and sour cream immediately. Mould is likely growing beneath the surface too, and there’s a good chance that the mould is travelling with bacteria.</span></p> <p><strong>Jam</strong></p> <p><span>These should be thrown away if you see any mould. These foods could be producing a mycotoxin if they develop mould, which is why microbiologists warn never to scoop out the mould and use the remains.</span></p> <p><strong>In the pantry</strong></p> <p><strong>Bread and baked goods</strong></p> <p><span>Get rid of mouldy bread and baked goods, says Dr Ivanina. “Mould can spread really fast on soft things like bread and muffins.”</span></p> <p><strong>Peanut butter, legumes and nuts</strong></p> <p><span>Discard these because foods processed without preservatives are at high risk for mould.</span></p> <p><strong>How to avoid eating mould</strong></p> <p>Preventing mould from forming can go a long way towards preserving your food supply and eliminating waste. This starts by storing fruits and vegetables in individual containers or plastic bags in your crisper.</p> <p>Keep food covered when serving to prevent exposure to mould spores in the air, and cover foods you want to stay moist with a lid or bees’ wax wrap to keep mould away.</p> <p>Don’t forget to always empty open cans of perishable foods into clean containers and refrigerate them right away. And never leave any perishables out of the refrigerator for more than two hours.</p> <p>Clean out your refrigerator and often, Gravani says. Also, as a rule of thumb: Toss out the food as soon as you spot mould or it will travel and invade the rest of your food.</p> <p><em><span>Written by Denise Mann, MS</span><span>. This article first appeared in </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/kitchen-tips/this-is-what-happens-if-you-accidentally-eat-mould" target="_blank"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a><span>.</span><span> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank"><span>here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p>

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10 cooking tricks that are only taught in culinary schools

<p><strong>How to get the perfect steak</strong></p> <p><span>If you’re one of the many people who takes a piece of meat out of the refrigerator or freezer and throws it directly on the barbecue, it’s time to learn the error of your ways. For the best-tasting steak, you’re much better off taking it out of the cold and letting it sit for an hour or two before bringing the heat. If you start cooking the steak when it’s already at room temperature, it will cook much more evenly. Yes, it’ll take longer, but the difference is worth it!</span></p> <p><strong>How to get delicious juicy meat</strong></p> <p><span>How are restaurant chefs able to get their chicken and pork chops to have that perfect delicious amount of juiciness? The answer is (fairly) simple: they brine it. Nope, brining’s not just for turkeys! Soaking the meat in cold salt water infuses it with rich flavour and a juicy texture even before you cook it. Brining also helps keep your chicken or pork from drying out and provides a safeguard against overcooking.</span></p> <p><strong>Don't be scared of salt</strong></p> <p>C<span>ulinary students learn pretty quickly not to be stingy with the salt. “For the first several months of school, I kept getting docked for serving under-seasoned food,” Culinary Institute of America graduate Jesse Szewczyk told BuzzFeed. If your food tastes bland, there’s a good chance it just needs more salt. If you’re hesitant to ramp up your salt addition, use this trick to avoid over-salting: garnish your creation with salt continuously as you cook, rather than salting it heavily at the beginning and/or the end. Sprinkle the salt from up high so that it will be evenly distributed throughout your dish.</span></p> <p><strong>Sugar makes a great seasoning</strong></p> <p><span>It’s not just for baked goods anymore. If you add a pinch (or three) of sugar to a recipe that uses tomatoes, you’ll notice a delicious difference. The sugar counteracts the natural sour taste of the tomatoes to create a rich, pleasant flavour. Szewczyk even noticed that adding a bit of sugar to a dish he was making with slightly out-of-season tomatoes made it “taste like it was made with perfectly ripe ones.”</span></p> <p><strong>How to produce a perfectly-shaped burger patty</strong></p> <p><span>This super-simple tip will help you step up your hamburger game – and it takes less than ten seconds. First, toss the patty down hard on your cutting board to force out the air bubbles. Then, press an indent into the center of the patty. These two simple actions prevent the patty from puffing up in the middle and create a nice, even burger. They also keep the burger from bubbling while you cook it.</span></p> <p><strong>How to prepare a clear broth</strong></p> <p><span>The trick to making the clearest – and tastiest – chicken broth involves lots of chicken and lots of patience. Take your chicken meat – and bones, if you’re using them – and cook them in a small amount of water (just enough to cover them) for at least three hours. Cook on a low heat, and make sure to skim off any suds that float to the top. This will make the stock clearer and tastier. Don’t add your vegetables right away, wait to add them after about an hour and a half to two hours. For the clearest broth possible, strain the liquid through cheesecloth.</span></p> <p><strong>A little olive oil goes a long way</strong></p> <p><span>What do pasta dishes, pizzas, fish dishes and meat dishes all have in common? Well, aside from being super delicious, they can all be enhanced with a dollop of olive oil. Many professional chefs, including culinary instructor Sydney Willcox, top off nearly all of their dishes with a sprinkling of this liquid gold. Make sure you’re using a good quality extra virgin olive oil, which will add a flavourful kick and “make for a silky finish,” Willcox promised StyleCaster.</span></p> <p><strong>How to cook a perfectly crusted fish</strong></p> <p><span>One word: heat. You can’t produce a perfectly seared piece of fish without a piping hot pan. “If you are looking for a sear, you need to bring on high levels of heat,” says Willcox. Willcox also warns against overcrowding the pan while searing; that could seriously diminish the heat and prevent your fish from developing that succulent brown crust. Keeping the pan nice and hot also prevents bits of the fish from sticking to the pan when you flip it over; when cold, the proteins in the fish are more likely to adhere to the metal.</span></p> <p><strong>The only reason to use non-stick pans</strong></p> <p><span>They sound good in theory, but non-stick pans really aren’t going to produce the best dishes. If you’re cooking anything that you want to develop some kind of crust – think meat or fish – avoid using your non-stick pan. “It’s a different kind of heat, with non-stick pans,” chef Amanda Cohen told BuzzFeed. “It’s not quite as hot, it doesn’t get things as crispy since it’s really protecting things from the heat underneath.” The non-stick coating acts as a barrier between the heat and your food, which can prevent it from developing that rich, crispy texture. Don’t toss your non-stick pan altogether, though – it’s still great for eggs, pancakes and French toast.</span></p> <p><strong>How to cook the tastiest pasta</strong></p> <p><span>Want restaurant-quality, flavourful pasta no matter what sauce you’re tossing it in? Before your pasta is fully cooked, transfer it into the sauce for the last few minutes of cooking. Doing this will help the pasta absorb the flavour and help the sauce cling to them better. If the sauce comes out too thick, add a little bit of the leftover pasta water until it reaches the texture you want.</span></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Meghan Jones</span>. This article first appeared in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/kitchen-tips/10-cooking-tricks-that-are-only-taught-in-culinary-schools" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. Find more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="https://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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This new pasta is whacky but sustainable

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The way we make our pasta is being challenged, with researchers developing a style inspired by flat-packed furniture.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) have developed a flat kind of pasta that becomes a more conventional shape as it cooks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This approach could make pasta production more sustainable, with potential savings on packaging, transportation and energy costs, while tasting like the food we all know and love.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">By taking advantage of the expanding and softening that occurs when pasta is boiled, the scientists were able to create flat pasta that turns into rigatoni-like tubes, fusilli-like spirals, and long noodles.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ye Tao, one of the researchers involved in the project, tested the flat-pack pasta on a hiking trip and found it didn’t break en route and could be cooked on a portable stove while camping.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The morphed pasta mimicked the mouthfeel, taste and appearance of traditional pasta,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since traditional pasta can be difficult to package and take up a lot of space, the researchers hope their pasta can become a more sustainable option.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We were inspired by flat-packed furniture and how it saved space, made storage easier and reduced the carbon footprint associated with transportation,” said Lining Yao, director of the Morphing Matter Lab at CMU’s School of Computer Science.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We decided to look at how the morphing matter technology we were developing in the lab could create flat-packed pasta that offered similar sustainability outcomes.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The researchers also applied their pasta-making technique, published in the journal </span><a href="https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/7/19/eabf4098"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Science Advances</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, to swelling silicon sheets and believe it could be useful in the world of robotics and biomedicine.</span></p>

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Woolworths accused of “disgusting” Anzac biscuit scandal

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Woolworths has rejected claims it renamed Anzac biscuits after social media outrage caused by a recent recipe in one of its catalogues.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Posts appearing on Facebook and Twitter suggested the supermarket giant had succumbed to “cancel culture” by removing the word Anzac from its biscuit recipes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the lead-up to Anzac Day, Woolworths featured a recipe for Golden Oat Biscuits in one of its catalogues.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Noticing the striking similarity between the oat biscuits and the traditional Anzac biscuits, one person claimed, “Woolworths in their woke wisdom has changed the name of Anzac biscuits calling them golden oats because it may insult some people.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another shopper claimed the name change was “disgusting and a slap in the face for our Anzacs”, vowing to never shop at the supermarket again.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Clarification came when a spokesperson told Yahoo News Australia the biscuits were not called Anzac Day biscuits out of respect for the strict guidelines set by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The Department of Veterans’ Affairs has strict regulations around the word Anzac and how it can be used on products or in marketing,” they said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We didn’t have the relevant approvals to use the term for this particular recipe placement in the catalogue and wanted to ensure we respected the regulations.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 500px; height:335.4166666666667px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7840941/woolworths-biscuits.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3499d58e56df4033b6242382ddd4640c" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Companies considering using the word Anzac in their products need to be approved by the department first, which Woolworths did not pursue in this instance.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo News Australia understands the Golden Oat Biscuits recipe has featured in previous catalogues.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The spokesperson reiterated Anzac biscuits were still available to purchase and had been approved for sale, with proceeds helping raise funds for veterans and their families.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo News Australia also reached out to the Department of Veterans’ Affairs to clarify on what the approved recipe is and whether Woolworths recipe would have been approved if an application had been submitted.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Comparing a 2014 recipe published by the department against the Woolworths recipe, both recipes feature the same ingredients but they use varying measures.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the guidelines, “The use of the word ‘Anzac’ in the commercial production and sale of Anzac biscuits is usually approved, however the biscuits must not substantially deviate from the generally accepted recipe and shape, and must be referred to as ‘Anzac Biscuits’”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The biscuits must avoid any additions such as chocolate chips and must not be called cookies.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <p><strong>Image credit: Woolworths</strong></p>

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ALDI releases insanely affordable family dinner option

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’ve ever been drawn to the convenience of a meal kit - where everything is included and you just have to cook it - this is the news for you.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">ALDI, known for their exclusive and own-brand food products that have attracted so many loyal fans, has launched its first series of DIY cooking kits.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So what sets these apart from the dozens of other meal kits? For one thing, you can pick them up during your weekly shop and avoid the online ordering and commitment that comes with subscription-based kits. The second, and most important thing, is the low price, at just $3.99 a kit.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though they aren’t as comprehensive as kits such as Hello Fresh, they are still worth it. Unlike the standard sauce with noodles or rice kits already available in supermarkets, these ones include all the veggies you’ll need, already prepped. The one thing you’ll need to pick up yourself are the necessary proteins and carbohydrates.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though the kits require you to purchase your noodles and chicken as well, they still feed a family of four for about $14, or $3.50 per person. Plus, you can easily substitute items for ones you prefer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Each kit comes with a QR code that takes you to demonstrations that will walk you through each recipe, saving you from having to worry or plan dinner when you’re out of energy or time.</span></p>

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This Is the Scientific Secret Behind the Perfect Cup of Coffee

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">All coffee is not created equal. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Coffee quality will change from city to city, roast to roast, and brewing method to brewing method. Purists might tell you to eschew the milk and sugar, but ultimately it’s your bean water and you can do with it what you wish. But when it comes down to the process before the additives, is there a science behind nailing the perfect brew? Yes, </span><a href="https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/science-behind-brewing-great-cup-coffee-180965049/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">according to the Smithsonian</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are a few factors that need to be closely monitored in order to achieve the ideal caffeinated cup. Christopher H. Hendon, a materials chemist, breaks down the nitty gritty scientific details.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The variables of temperature, water chemistry, particle size distribution, ratio of water to coffee, time and, perhaps most importantly, the quality of the green coffee all play crucial roles in producing a tasty cup,” he writes, “It’s how we control these variables that allows for that cup to be reproducible.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A trait that plays a key role in making your coffee experience enjoyable is the concentration of coffee constituents, naturally occurring chemicals found in the grounds. The ideal coffee constituent concentration of 1.2-1.5 percent can be achieved through certain brewing methods, specifically “pour-over, Turkish, Arabic, Aeropress, French press, siphon or batch brew.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Water also plays a key role in the whole process and knowing the composition of your tap water makes a difference.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ideal acidity is right in the middle, a good way to glean what a good cup should taste like is to brew a batch with Evian, which has “one of the highest bicarbonate concentrations in bottled waters.” The ground of your coffee also matters, but Hendon details that there are arguments to be made for both coarse (less chance of small particles with negative flavours impacting the taste), and fine (better chance of richer, bolder taste), so it’s best to experiment to find out what you like best.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And finally, freshness is incredibly key. The longer your beans sit on the shelf, the more “volatiles”, gaseous organic molecules that affect flavour, escape. The coffee you buy at a cafe will generally be relatively freshly roasted, and almost never more than four weeks removed from its roast date. So as a rule of thumb, buy fresh and use quickly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The full article really dives into some of the tough physics and chemistry involved in the process, </span><a href="https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/science-behind-brewing-great-cup-coffee-180965049/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">read on here</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. A lot of it comes down to taste, but the three non-negotiable factors that are easily monitored and altered are freshness, water acidity and brewing method.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Sam Benson Smith. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/kitchen-tips/scientific-secret-behind-perfect-cup-coffee">Reader’s Digest</a>. Find more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="https://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</span></em></p>

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5 things you should never cook in an air fryer

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can air fry almost anything. And why wouldn’t you want to? There’s a reason these appliances have seemingly taken over everyone’s kitchens. Air fryers can imitate the results of deep-frying with some intense hot air and only a fraction of the oil. With this healthier alternative, crispy foods don’t have to be reserved for nights out and special occasions. But, there are foods that just shouldn’t be seen near an air fryer. Before cooking with your air fryer, see which foods won’t work – even though they may be tempting to throw in there.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Battered foods</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unless the food is pre-fried and frozen, you’ll want to avoid placing wet batter in the air fryer. Aside from the obvious mess it will create, wet batter won’t set the way it does when it’s submerged in oil, meaning the food won’t have that crunchy shell. If you’d like to add a little crispiness to your food, coat in flour, egg, and breadcrumbs.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Fresh greens</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Leafy greens, like spinach, will cook unevenly and are very likely to burn due to the air fryer’s high-speed air. When choosing vegetables to cook in the air fryer, make sure they hold some weight, like broccoli or zucchini. Kale chips may also be successful if coated in enough oil to weigh them down. Ultimately, experts say that frozen veggies are the way to go when it comes to air fryers because they retain more moisture from the ice.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Whole roasts</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The apparent issue with whole roasts is whether or not it will even fit properly into an air fryer basket, but even if it does fit, it’s best to just stick to the regular oven. The roast will not cook evenly, with the part closest to the heat source likely to burn by the time the part furthest away is safe to eat. The problem comes down to overcrowding. Since the hot air needs room to appropriately circulate, the most successful method would be to cook the roast in smaller pieces. If cooking a chicken, make sure the skin is facing up as air fryers heat from the top.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To really make the most of your appliance, discover </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/11-mistakes-everyone-makes-with-their-air-fryer"><span style="font-weight: 400;">11 mistakes everyone makes with their air fryer</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Cheese</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Who wouldn’t love to instantly make some fried cheese to snack on? Since the air fryer isn’t truly ‘frying’ the food, placing cheese in it without some sort of coating will just melt the cheese into a puddle and create a mess you don’t want to clean up.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Raw grains</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Grains such as rice and pasta can crisp nicely in an air fryer, but they have to be cooked on the stovetop first. Air fryers are intended to dry cooked food, so trying to cook something that needs to be immersed in water to cook properly won’t work. Even with an insert that allows you to place water inside the air fryer, the fan will never get hot enough to boil the water and successfully cook your grains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now discover how to </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/unforgettable-waste-reducing-cooking-tips"><span style="font-weight: 400;">reduce your kitchen waste</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Emma Taubenfeld. This article first appeared in </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/kitchen-tips/5-things-you-should-never-cook-in-an-air-fryer"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Find more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a href="https://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></em></p>

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5 food safety tips for proper food handling

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In light of recent food poisoning cases around the world – a salmonella outbreak in the US in June that sickened over 100 people was linked to contaminated pre-cut melons and several people in Australia died because of contaminated rockmelons in February – it is more important than ever to get up to speed about the right way to handle food.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Closer to home, Malaysian and Singaporean netizens were shocked by a video that circulated on social media in June this year of staff at a Bangsar, KL, eatery </span><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3maABRgv8G4"><span style="font-weight: 400;">washing plates in a dirty puddle</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Contamination can occur at several junctures, such as during the production of the food, the processing of raw materials, and even during the transport and display of the food.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When a food product finally makes it to the kitchen, it is also in danger of cross contamination, which is the transfer of bacteria or viruses through the use of contaminated items such as knives or chopping boards.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Be vigilant and adopt these 5 food safety tips to minimise the risk of food poisoning.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Picking up refrigerated and frozen items last</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the supermarket, pick up your refrigerated and frozen items last, just before you make your way to the checkout counter.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Choose chilled items that have been properly packed without any tear in the packaging.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are looking to shed some dollars from your grocery bill, try these </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/Spend-Less-On-Groceries-With-These-19-Tricks-Savvy-Shoppers-Use"><span style="font-weight: 400;">supermarket shopping hacks</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Buy raw meats that have been properly displayed</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Never buy chilled or frozen items that have been displayed at room temperature.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you do most of your grocery shopping at the wet market*, this is particularly important. Take note of how the raw seafood and meats are being displayed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Are they in a chiller? Is there sufficient ice packed around the items to ensure they’re stored at a safe temperature?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once you get your meat home, you still have to cook it, however. Try this version of a classic stroganoff that </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/beef-and-mushroom-stroganoff"><span style="font-weight: 400;">stretches a modest portion of meat</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">* For those in Australia and New Zealand, the wet market is an Asian grocery store that sells fresh meat and produce.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Bringing the food home safely</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Our hot and humid weather can provide extra challenges when it comes to keeping our food safe.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If your journey home will take longer than 30 minutes, keep your chilled and frozen items in an insulated bag and make use of the free ice that is provided by some supermarkets to keep the items well chilled.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Store the items in the fridge as quickly as possible.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Storing raw foods properly</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Raw foods should be kept separate from cooked foods while in the fridge.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Different types of raw foods (e.g., meat, eggs, vegetables) should also be kept separately from each other to avoid cross contamination.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re not planning to cook the meat in the next three to five days, it’s best to freeze it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Get the most out of your beef buy with these delicious and easy </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/beef-skewers-ginger-dipping-sauce"><span style="font-weight: 400;">beef skewers with ginger dipping sauce</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Avoid buying pre-cut fruits</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re concerned about the cases of contaminated pre-cut fruit, you may want to buy a whole fruit and cut it up yourself at home.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wash the fruit properly by rubbing it with your hands under running water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re cutting it up, use a separate chopping board than the one you use for raw meat.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a race to eat all of your fruit purchases before they all spoil? </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/kitchen-tips/how-to-preserve-fruit"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Try bottling it as a preserve!</span></a></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/food-home-garden/5-food-safety-tips-proper-food-handling"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Find more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a href="https://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></em></p>

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Peach, mozzarella, basil and prosciutto salad

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Preparation time: 10 mins  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cooking time: 15 mins</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Serves 4</span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">4 peaches, halved, stones removed, cut into wedges</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Olive oil cooking spray</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">100g shaved prosciutto slices, torn into pieces</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">½ cup small basil leaves</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">250g tub buffalo mozzarella, drained, thickly slice</span></li> </ul> <ol> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Heat a chargrill pan over high heat. Spray peaches with olive oil and chargrill, in batches for 1-2 minutes each side or until slightly charred and softened (see note). </span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Place peach slices onto a serving platter. Top with prosciutto, basil leaves and cheese. Drizzle with balsamic glaze and serve.  </span></li> </ol> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Note: If your peaches are sticking to the chargrill pan, simply line the base of the pan with non-stick baking paper first. This will still result in lovely chargrill marks. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span></p> <p>Recipe credit: <a href="/facebook.com/AustraliaSummerStonefruit"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australian Summer Stonefruit</span></a></p>

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“What a monster”: Mum shocks the internet with bizarre habit

<p><span>A woman has stirred the Internet into a frenzy over her mother’s bizarre ice cream habit</span><br /><br /><span>“My mom always eats the chocolate and puts it back in the freezer like that,” the woman captioned an image.</span><br /><br /><span>The picture shows a magnum ice cream with the chocolate shell eaten off and the vanilla ice cream still on the stick.</span><br /><br /><span>Ice cream addicts took to the comments to call out the mother’s crazy habit.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839886/ice-cream-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/942489c867434e8683f84f0f98eb17ea" /><br /><br /><span>“She’s a monster,” one person joked, with another adding: “I refuse to believe this is real”.</span><br /><br /><span>“Run away and disown her,” a person said, while another called the move “gross”.</span><br /><br /><span>The woman cleared up any confusion saying her mum only carries out the weird habit about once a month and "leaves the vanilla part for my dad to eat".</span><br /><br /><span>“Does she know she can buy chocolate that isn't attached to ice cream and eat that,” a person commented.</span><br /><br /><span>“Also - if it’s the weird sort of chocolate that comes on ice cream bars that she is into specifically, and not just chocolate in general, you can buy that at the gr</span></p>

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The clever egg yolk hack you will need to try for yourself

<p>A man's egg separating hack has gone viral.</p> <p>Cracking the shell and going back and forth to separate the whites from the yolk are a thing of the past as a TikTok video reveals an ingredient that will make your life a lot easier.</p> <p>Callum Gray demonstrated how a clove of garlic can help even the most amateur chef complete the complex task in seconds.</p> <p>In the video, Gray rubs his fingers on the garlic and then in one swift motion pinches the yolk and pulls it apart from the whites of the egg.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839724/hero-28.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a8819917553a4c9abdc800daca0397a3" /></p> <p>He then dumps the yolk into the mug, and the egg whites are left perfectly separated.</p> <p>Gray's video has racked up more than 1.7 million likes and 17,000 comments from stunned viewers hoping to try out the technique for themselves.</p> <p>Many marveled at Gray's cooking method, one commenting, "TikTok really teaches me more than school."</p> <p>Another speculated, "I think it's [because] garlic residue is sticky."</p> <p>One user was confused as to how Gray discovered the hack, questioning, "How does one figure this out?"</p> <p>Another person offered their own piece of advice to the TikTok chef.</p> <p>"If you want your hands to stop smelling of garlic rub them on stainless steel under cold water."</p>

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The nifty kettle cleaning hack you need to try

<p>When did you last clean your kettle?</p> <p>Most people haven't cleaned their kettle since they purchased it, and scrubbing at it endlessly to get rid of the stubborn limescale isn't anyone's ideal way to spend their weekend.</p> <p>But unfortunately, if you want to avoid flakes in your cup of tea, it needs to be done.</p> <p>Thankfully, one woman has shared a simple and natural way of effectively cleaning your kettle, with zero scrubbing required.</p> <p>Plus, an added bonus is the hack uses fruit you'll likely already have at home, avoiding harsh cleaning chemicals.</p> <p>The woman, who shared the nifty hack on TikTok, uses slices of lemon as a natural cleaner and deodoriser.</p> <p>“This is the natural, no-scrub way to rid kettle limescale,” she captioned the demonstration clip on the video-sharing platform.</p> <p>In the video, she simply fills the kettle with water and adds a sliced lemon.</p> <p>Once the lemon has been added, the user who goes by the name Mama_Mila_ says to boil the kettle twice and keep the hot water in the kettle for 30 minutes before draining.</p> <p>She then suggests rinsing out the kettle with water before admiring your limescale-free appliance.</p> <p>After she shared the simple trick, TikTok users flocked to the comments, obsessed with the efficacy of the no-scrub method.</p> <p>“I just did this to my kettle. Amazing result. Thank you,” one impressed fan wrote.</p> <p>“This really works, thanks,” another added.</p>

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Bean dad sparks internet fury

<p>One of the biggest debates of 2021 so far has sent social media site Twitter into a furious divide – and it all started over a humble can of beans.</p> <p>Earlier this week US man John Roderick was met with fierce backlash after he took to Twitter share his own parenting story that involved making his nine-year-old daughter starve for six hours until she was able to open a can of beans.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.34556574923545px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839375/bean-dad-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/980b37e0a02a4dcfac2916ab7a7a0abb" /></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.34556574923545px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839374/bean-dad-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8683226e648c47f98bdd1cc5cc06f112" /></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.38718173836696px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839373/bean-dad-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ba7680d19f194a7982b6e88af2fd5ce1" /></p> <p>The man has since deleted his Twitter account, but screenshots last forever.</p> <p>In a series of tweets, he recounted how horrified he was to discover his young child did not know how to use a can opener.</p> <p>He instructed her to “study the parts” and “study the cans” which left her struggling with the can for six hours in order to open the can.</p> <p>Hours later, Mr Roderick says his daughter had been left defeated.</p> <p>What was meant to be a hilarious parenting anecdote, a number of people did not see it that way.</p> <p>Nicknaming him “Bean Dad”, the father has been slammed for not helping his daughter, and insisting she starve instead of assisting her.</p> <p>The debate became even more heated when a series of racist and anti-Semitic tweets penned by Mr Roderick resurfaced.</p> <p>He promptly issued an apology for his “poorly told” parenting story.</p> <p>“I framed the story with me as the asshole dad because that’s my comedic persona and my fans and friends know it’s ‘a bit’,” he said in a statement.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">still waiting on my dad’s response but my mom’s response is killing me. “he is mean.” <a href="https://t.co/JKqhRpwwhY">pic.twitter.com/JKqhRpwwhY</a></p> — austin carter 🥨 (@_amcarter) <a href="https://twitter.com/_amcarter/status/1346134461457592327?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 4, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>“I was ignorant, insensitive to the message that my ‘pedant dad’ comedic persona was indistinguishable from how abusive dads act, talk and think.”</p> <p>In standard Twitter fashion, a number of users took the odd story and turned the parenting lesson into a parenting test.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://t.co/XZ0VnMSFyW">pic.twitter.com/XZ0VnMSFyW</a></p> — Arianna Haut (@AriannaHaut) <a href="https://twitter.com/AriannaHaut/status/1346180249231347712?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 4, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>Writer Caroline Moss shared a screenshot of a text conversation between her and her dad where she wrote: “If I was eight and didn’t know how to open a can with a can opener, how would you suggest I learn.</p> <p>“Take a can, an opener, start the opening, let you finish. Give you another can let you start yourself. Help if necessary,” Caroline’s dad replied.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">This was a sweet answer but also weird bc we never went out to restaurants when I was 9 cuz we didn’t have money. For reference also I am 35 now, Dad is 68. <a href="https://t.co/caaCh99t3y">pic.twitter.com/caaCh99t3y</a></p> — Leslie (@Leslie_D) <a href="https://twitter.com/Leslie_D/status/1346213277253201922?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 4, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>Soon others were sharing their responses from their dads, which had a number of hilarious responses.</p>

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Man’s avocado deodorant stick sends internet into chaos

<p><span>One man has invented an avocado deodorant stick as a way to make the “fastest avocado toast ever”.</span><br /><br /><span>Posting to the TikTok page Unnecessary Inventions, the man behind the account introduced his insta invention, "avocado on a stick".</span><br /><br /><span>At the crux of it, it appears to just be an empty deodorant stick filled with smashed avocado.</span><br /><br /><span>"I invented the easiest way to make avocado toast," he says as the clip begins.</span><br /><br /><span>“Meet the avocado on a stick."</span><br /><br /><span>The tutorial went on to demonstrate how the avocado stick functions much the same as a stick of roll-on deodorant.</span><br /><br /><span>"This handy little container features fresh, mashed avocado. And you can twist this little knob to reveal a little more avocado," he says.</span><br /><br /><span>"Then you just grab a piece of toast and spread on your avocado. The fastest avocado toast ever."</span><br /><br /><span>The video has since been viewed over 4.6 million times.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839271/avocado.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ea9f3fdaf7fa442d941ee5361f68bbd9" /><br /><br /><span>"Im so repulsed [sic]" one person wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>Another added: "That really does not look edible.”</span><br /><br /><span>"This makes me uncomfortable," a third chimed in.</span><br /><br /><span>Not all the comments were bad however, with some choosing to admire his “creative take”.</span><br /><br /><span>“The point is you tried,” one person commented.</span><br /><br /><span>Another user added: “I appreciate the effort indeed.”</span></p>

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ALDI shopper causes $180k in damages after smashing alcohol

<p>Footage of a woman going rampant and causing severe damage to an ALDI store by smashing bottles of alcohol has caused great concern among customers. </p> <p>The video was recorded at a supermarket in Stevenage, UK, on Wednesday (local time) afternoon.</p> <p>Footage shows the woman wearing a hoodie and a backpack removing bottles of alcohol off the shelves with her arms.</p> <p>She then slips in the mess she created and falls to the ground.</p> <p>“Oh god, she’s not right,” a man is heard saying off-camera.</p> <p>The woman quickly gets back up and starts her tirade of breaking more bottles.</p> <p>The man off camera notices the woman has cut her hand and it’s covered in blood, while another person reveals the police won’t arrive for a while.</p> <p>“I’ve never seen anything like this,” someone is heard saying.</p> <p>A man who was waiting in the check-out line asked the woman to “calm down” and the woman threw a bottle of booze at his leg.</p> <p>The store manager estimated the damages to cost approximately $AUD180,270 when taking into account the loss of stock and revenue due to being forced to close the store to clean.</p> <p>According to The Comment, police officers arrived at the scene at around 2.30 pm and arrested the woman, who was taken to hospital and treated for her injuries.</p> <p>Image credit: <a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/entertainment/viral-weird/woman-smashes-500-bottles-of-alcohol-in-five-minutes-during-bizarre-aldi-rampage-c-1662545" target="_blank">7NEWS</a></p>

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