Food & Wine

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Fetta and couscous salad

<p>Apart from being an excellent source of starchy carbohydrate, couscous is a great background for other ingredients. In this lunch salad, both raw and lightly steamed vegetables are added to the couscous together with toasted almonds, fresh mint and creamy fetta.</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 4<br /><strong>Preparation:</strong> 30 minutes<br /><strong>Cooking:</strong> About 5 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1¼ cups (230g) couscous</li> <li>300ml hot vegetable stock</li> <li>170g slim asparagus spears, halved</li> <li>2 zucchinis, cut into thin sticks</li> <li>1 red capsicum, seeded and cut into thin strips</li> <li>⅓ cup (30g) toasted flaked almonds</li> <li>Handful of fresh mint leaves, finely chopped</li> <li>170g fetta</li> <li>Chilli dressing</li> <li>3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>Grated zest of 1 lemon</li> <li>1 tablespoon lemon juice</li> <li>1 clove garlic, finely chopped</li> <li>½ teaspoon dried red chilli flakes</li> <li>Salt and pepper</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <ol> <li>Put the couscous into a large bowl and pour over the hot stock.</li> <li>Set aside to soak for 15-20 minutes, or until all the liquid has been absorbed.</li> <li>Meanwhile, steam the asparagus for 3 minutes.</li> <li>Add the zucchini and continue steaming for 2 minutes, or until the vegetables are just tender but still retain some crunch.</li> <li>Tip the vegetables into a colander and refresh under cold running water.</li> <li>Drain well.</li> <li>To make the dressing, combine the oil, lemon zest and juice, garlic, chilli flakes, and salt and pepper to taste in a screw-top jar.</li> <li>Shake well to blend and emulsify the mixture.</li> <li>Fluff up the couscous with a fork, then fold in the capsicum strips, almonds, mint, and asparagus and zucchini.</li> <li>Pour over the dressing and stir gently together.</li> <li>Crumble the fetta over the top and serve.</li> </ol> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/fetta-and-couscous-salad"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><span>best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Little custard pot

<p>These creamy baked custards, delicately flavoured with vanilla and accompanied by a fresh cherry compote, are easy to make and sure to be popular with all ages. Take care not to overcook the custards – they should be just set when you take them out of the oven.</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 6<br /><strong>Preparation:</strong> 15 minutes<br /><strong>Cooking:</strong> About 1 hour</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>600ml low-fat milk</li> <li>½ vanilla pod, split</li> <li>2 eggs</li> <li>2 egg yolks</li> <li>2 tablespoons caster sugar</li> <li>½ teaspoon cornflour</li> <li>Cherry compote</li> <li>2 tablespoons raw sugar</li> <li>500g fresh cherries, stoned</li> <li>2 teaspoons arrowroot</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <ol> <li>Place the milk and vanilla pod in a saucepan and heat until almost boiling.</li> <li>Remove from the heat, cover and set aside to infuse for 15 minutes.</li> <li>Preheat the oven to 160°C.</li> <li>Put the whole eggs, egg yolks, caster sugar and cornflour into a bowl and lightly whisk together.</li> <li>Bring the milk back to boiling point, then remove the vanilla pod and pour the hot milk over the egg mixture, whisking all the time.</li> <li>Strain the mixture into a jug, then divide among 6 lightly buttered ½ cup (125ml) ramekin dishes.</li> <li>Set the ramekins in a roasting tin and pour enough hot water into the tin to come halfway up the sides of the ramekins.</li> <li>Bake for 30-35 minutes, or until lightly set – the custards should still be slightly wobbly, as they will continue cooking for a few minutes after being removed from the oven.</li> <li>Lift them out of the tin of hot water and place on a wire rack to cool.</li> <li>Once cold, chill until ready to serve.</li> <li>For the cherry compote, put the raw sugar and 90ml water in a saucepan and heat gently until the sugar has dissolved.</li> <li>Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and add the cherries.</li> <li>Cover and simmer gently for 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until tender.</li> <li>Lift out the cherries with a draining spoon and put them into a serving bowl.</li> <li>Mix the arrowroot with 1 tablespoon cold water.</li> <li>Stir into the cherry juices in the saucepan and simmer for 1 minute, stirring, until thickened and clear.</li> <li>Allow to cool for a few minutes, then pour over the cherries.</li> <li>Spoon a little of the cherry compote over the top of each custard pot and serve the rest of the compote in a bowl.</li> </ol> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/little-custard-pot"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><span>best subscription offer</span>.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Double chocolate creams

<p><strong>Serves:</strong> 6<br /><strong>Preparation:</strong> 15 minutes, plus chilling<br /><strong>Cooking:</strong> Nil</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>200g dark chocolate (70 per cent cocoa) </li> <li>1¾ cups ready-made custard, at room temperature </li> <li>1 tablespoon brandy or other liqueur </li> <li>½ cup whipping cream </li> <li>30g white chocolate, finely grated </li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <ol> <li>Chill 6 drinking glasses. Melt the dark chocolate in a heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of gently simmering water. Stir until melted and smooth, about 3 minutes. </li> <li>Pour in about one-third of the custard and stir lightly. The chocolate will begin to thicken and become glossy. Don’t overmix – a couple of large scooping stirs are enough. Pour in the remaining custard and stir to combine with the chocolate. Stir in the brandy. The mixture will thicken as the chocolate cools. Spoon into the chilled glasses and place in the freezer to chill for 20 minutes, or until set. </li> <li>Whip the cream until it holds its shape. Stir in white chocolate. Spoon into the glasses and serve immediately. </li> </ol> <p><strong>TIP:</strong> Dark chocolate with 70 per cent cocoa content gives a deep, rich flavour.</p> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/double-chocolate-creams"><span>Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><span>best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Pecan waffles with maple and blackberry sauce

<p><strong>Serves:</strong> 4 (Makes 4-8 waffles depending on the size of the iron)<br /><strong>Preparation:</strong> 20 minutes<br /><strong>Cooking:</strong> Approx. 15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>¾ cup (110g) plain flour</li> <li>½ teaspoon ground cinnamon</li> <li>1 teaspoon baking powder</li> <li>1 tablespoon caster sugar</li> <li>1 large egg, separated</li> <li>200ml low-fat milk</li> <li>1 tablespoon (20g) butter, melted</li> <li>1½ tablespoons finely chopped pecans</li> <li>Maple and blackberry sauce</li> <li>1 large, ripe dessert pear</li> <li>4 tablespoons maple syrup</li> <li>½ cup (50g) pecans</li> <li>100g blackberries</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation</strong></p> <ol> <li>First make the maple and blackberry sauce.</li> <li>Cut the pear lengthwise into quarters and cut out the core, then cut the pear into fine dice.</li> <li>Put into a small heavy saucepan and add the maple syrup.</li> <li>Warm gently, then remove the pan from the heat.</li> <li>Stir in the pecans and blackberries.</li> <li>Set aside while making the waffles.</li> <li>Heat and lightly grease the waffle iron or maker according to the manufacturer's instructions.</li> <li>Meanwhile, make the waffle batter.</li> <li>Sift the flour, cinnamon, baking powder and sugar into a medium-sized mixing bowl.</li> <li>Make a well in the centre and add the egg yolk and milk to the well.</li> <li>Gently whisk the egg yolk and milk together, then gradually whisk in the flour to make a thick, smooth batter.</li> <li>Whisk in the melted butter, then stir in the finely chopped pecans.</li> <li>Whisk the eggwhite in a separate bowl until stiff.</li> <li>Pile it on top of the batter and, using a large metal spoon, fold it in gently.</li> <li>Spoon a small ladleful (3-4 tablespoons) of batter into the centre of the hot waffle iron or maker, then close the lid tightly.</li> <li>If using a waffle iron on top of the hob, cook for about 30 seconds, then turn the waffle iron over and cook for a further 30 seconds.</li> <li>Open the waffle iron: the waffle should be golden brown on both sides and should come away easily from the iron. (If using an electric waffle maker, follow the manufacturer's instructions – usually allow 2-3 minutes for each waffle.)</li> <li>Lift the cooked waffle from the iron using a round-bladed knife and keep warm while cooking the rest of the waffles.</li> <li>Just before all the waffles are ready, gently warm the fruit sauce, then pour into a sauceboat or serving bowl.</li> <li>Serve with the warm waffles.</li> </ol> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/fruity-vegetable-muffins">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><span>best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Fruity vegetable muffins

<p>Not only do grated vegetables and dried fruit add food value and flavour to these muffins, but they also make them deliciously moist. Unlike many muffins, these are not too sweet, so they are as good in a packed lunch or as a snack, as they are for breakfast or a teatime treat.</p> <p><strong>Makes:</strong> 12 muffins</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>125g self-raising flour</li> <li>125g self-raising wholemeal flour</li> <li>2 teaspoons ground cinnamon</li> <li>¾ cup (170g) caster sugar</li> <li>½ cup (60g) dried mixed fruit or raisins</li> <li>¾ cup (115g) finely grated carrot</li> <li>1 cup (135g) finely grated zucchini</li> <li>½ cup (125ml) sunflower oil</li> <li>3 eggs</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method: </strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 180°C.</li> <li>Grease a 12-cup deep muffin tin or line the cups with paper muffin cases; the cups should be about 3-3.5cm deep.</li> <li>Sift both types of flour, the cinnamon and sugar into a mixing bowl, adding any bran left in the sieve.</li> <li>Stir in the dried mixed fruit or raisins and make a well in the middle.</li> <li>In another bowl, beat the carrot, zucchini, oil and eggs together.</li> <li>Pour this mixture into the well in the dry ingredients and stir until almost blended, but with a small amount of dry flour still visible in places.</li> <li>Divide the mixture among the cups, filling them about two-thirds full.</li> <li>Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the muffins are well risen, peaked in the centre and springy to the touch.</li> <li>Transfer the muffins to a wire rack to cool.</li> <li>Serve the muffins warm or at room temperature.</li> <li>They are best eaten on the day they are made, but they can be stored in an airtight container for up to 2 days.</li> <li>Alternatively, freeze them for up to 3 months.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><strong><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/fruity-vegetable-muffins">Reader’s Digest</a></strong></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our best subscription <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>offer</strong></span></a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Banana and mango shake

<p>A thick banana-flavoured milkshake with a tropical touch, this will certainly appeal to children and adults alike. Ideal at breakfast time as it is filling, nourishing and quick, it can also be enjoyed as a delectable dessert after lunch or dinner.</p> <p><strong>Serves</strong>: 2</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>½ ripe mango</li> <li>1 small ripe banana, sliced</li> <li>½ cup (125ml) low-fat milk</li> <li>½ cup (125ml) orange juice</li> <li>2 teaspoons lime juice</li> <li>1 teaspoon caster sugar</li> <li>2 heaped tablespoons vanilla frozen yogurt</li> <li>Sprigs of fresh lemon balm to serve (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method: </strong></p> <ol> <li>Peel the skin from the mango and cut the flesh away from the stone.</li> <li>Chop the flesh roughly.</li> <li>Put into a blender with the banana.</li> <li>Add the milk, orange juice, lime juice, sugar and frozen yogurt and blend on maximum speed for about 30 seconds, or until well combined and frothy.</li> <li>Pour into glasses and serve immediately, decorated with sprigs of lemon balm, if you like.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/banana-and-mango-shake">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our best subscription <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>offer</strong></span></a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Stuffed baked potatoes

<p>A steaming-hot baked potato makes perfect comfort food and doesn't need lashings of butter and cheese to be delicious. This tasty vegetarian filling combines marinated mushrooms and zucchini for a healthy filling. Other fillings are limited only by your imagination.</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 4</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <ul> <li>4 baking potatoes, about 300g each</li> <li>2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>200g small open-cup mushrooms, about 5cm in diameter</li> <li>1 large zucchini, about 170g, sliced</li> <li>1 teaspoon red wine vinegar</li> <li>1 teaspoon dijon mustard</li> <li>Salt and pepper</li> <li>⅓ cup (10g) chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley</li> </ul> <p><strong>Preparation:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 200°C.</li> <li>Push a metal skewer through each potato or push the potatoes onto a potato roasting rack. (Pushing a metal skewer into the potatoes helps to conduct heat through to their centres so that they cook more quickly.</li> <li>Place the potatoes directly on the shelf in the oven and bake for 1½ hours or until tender.</li> <li>Make the zucchini and mushroom filling when you first put the potatoes in the oven so that it has time to marinate.</li> <li>Alternatively, it can be made just before the potatoes are cooked and served hot.</li> <li>Heat a large ridged chargrill or frying pan.</li> <li>Drizzle half the oil over the pan and cook the mushrooms and zucchini slices for 10-15 minutes or until they are well-browned in places and softened and have released their juices.</li> <li>Transfer the vegetables to a bowl with all their juices and add the remaining oil, the vinegar and mustard.</li> <li>Season to taste, mix well and leave to marinate until the potatoes are cooked.</li> <li>Split open the baked potatoes, then press gently to part the halves, keeping them joined at the base.</li> <li>Stir the parsley into the marinated vegetables, then pile them into the potatoes.</li> <li>Serve immediately.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><strong><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/stuffed-baked-potatoes">Reader’s Digest</a></strong></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our best subscription <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>offer</strong></span></a>.</em></p>

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Sticky prune and ginger teabread

<p>The texture of this irresistible teabread is a mixture of crumbly ginger-spiced cake and a sticky, sweet prune purée that is rippled through it. The teabread keeps well – in fact, it improves after being stored for a day or two – and is a good choice for an energy-giving lunch box sweet.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Ingredients:</strong></span></p> <ul> <li>1 cup (220g) pitted prunes, coarsely chopped</li> <li>100ml strong Earl Grey tea, cooled</li> <li>115g unsalted butter</li> <li>⅓ cup (80g) soft brown sugar</li> <li>¼ cup (90g) golden syrup</li> <li>2 cups (30 g) self-raising flour</li> <li>½ teaspoon baking powder</li> <li>½ teaspoon ground cinnamon</li> <li>1 egg, beaten</li> <li>90ml low-fat milk</li> <li>⅓ cup (75g) glacé ginger, chopped</li> </ul> <p><strong><u>Method:</u></strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 160°C.</li> <li>Use baking paper to line a large loaf tin measuring 23 × 13 × 6cm.</li> <li>Place the prunes and tea in a small saucepan and bring to the boil.</li> <li>Reduce the heat, cover the pan and simmer gently for about 10 minutes, or until almost all of the liquid has been absorbed.</li> <li>Tip the prunes into a food processor or blender and process to a fairly smooth purée. Set aside. Place the butter, sugar and golden syrup in a saucepan and heat gently until just melted and smooth. Remove from the heat.</li> <li>Sift the flour, baking powder and cinnamon into a large bowl and make a well in the centre. Add the warm syrup mixture, the egg and milk, and beat well to mix thoroughly.</li> <li>Reserve about 1 tablespoon of the chopped ginger and stir the rest into the cake mixture.</li> <li>Spoon about one-third of the cake mixture into the prepared tin and spread over the bottom.</li> <li>Top with about half the prune purée, spreading it into an even layer. Add another third of the cake mixture and spread out evenly, then spread the remaining prune purée over that.</li> <li>Finally, spoon the remaining batter on top and smooth it out. Sprinkle the reserved chopped ginger over the surface of the cake.</li> <li>Bake for 1-1¼ hours, or until well risen, golden brown and firm to the touch.</li> <li>Cool in the tin for about 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and leave to cool completely.</li> <li>Wrap in foil and store for at least 24 hours before slicing. The teabread will keep for up to a week.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/sticky-prune-and-ginger-teabread">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our best subscription <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Goat's cheese toasts

<p>Indulge your guests with these tasty morsels, made by topping toasted slices of crusty baguette with slices of roma tomato and tangy goat's cheese, sprinkled with pine nuts and fresh herbs. Choose your favourite type of goat's cheese: delicate or strong in flavour, soft or firm in texture.</p> <p><strong>Makes:</strong> 16 toasts</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <ul> <li>1 baguette, about 280g, cut into 2.5cm slices</li> <li>4 tablespoons passata</li> <li>2 tablespoons sun-dried tomato paste</li> <li>4 roma tomatoes, about 250g in total</li> <li>150g goat's cheese</li> <li>1½ tablespoons extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>1 tablespoon pine nuts,</li> <li>Few sprigs of fresh thyme or oregano, plus extra to garnish</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method: </strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the grill to moderate.</li> <li>Place the baguette slices on a rack in the grill pan and lightly toast on both sides.</li> <li>Mix together the passata and tomato paste and spread a little on top of each toast, covering the surface completely.</li> <li>Slice the tomatoes lengthwise, discarding a slim slice from the curved edges, to give 4 flat slices from each tomato.</li> <li>Lay a slice of tomato on top of each toast.</li> <li>Place 1 small slice of firm goat's cheese or about 1 teaspoon of soft goat's cheese on top of each tomato slice, and drizzle over a little oil.</li> <li>Scatter on a few pine nuts and thyme or oregano leaves.</li> <li>Grill for 4-5 minutes, or until the cheese is beginning to melt and the pine nuts are golden.</li> <li>Serve the toasts hot, garnished with sprigs of thyme or oregano.</li> </ol> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/goats-cheese-toasts">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The $1.50 Kmart hack that will change your life in the kitchen

<p>One of New Zealand’s all-time favourite brunch foods is the popular poached egg.</p> <p>If you find it hard to recreate the perfect poached egg in your own kitchen, one savvy mother has revealed a clever hack.</p> <p>The thrifty mum revealed that she has mastered the tricky technique of the poached egg by using $1.50 backing moulds from Kmart.</p> <p>Sharing her trick on social media, she wrote: “Don't know if anyone has already hacked this but wanted to share anyway.”</p> <p>The mum shared two photos accompany her secret trick, the first showing a pot of water with two eggs in silicone muffin cases floating inside.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 375.14792899408286px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7821687/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6d88a58d31d84b3bb765c505efd0cbf8" /></p> <p>The second photo revealed the end result of the surprising technique, showing two perfectly poached eggs sitting on two slices of toast with bacon and wilted spinach.</p> <p>“I totally suck at mastering the poached egg…so I gave this a go – it worked a dream!”</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 375.14792899408286px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7821688/2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a9346ce14f37491aae050d997da12ae0" /></p> <p>“I put a tiny bit of cooking spray in the cup and just let some water boil over into it,” she said.</p> <p>The silicone cups are available from Kmart in packs of six for $1.50.</p> <p>The woman received a flood of praise for sharing her little-known secret.</p> <p>One user wrote: “I need to do this! Last time I tried poached eggs, they dissolved – I literally lost the eggs! Can't wait to try this.”</p> <p>Another said: “I'm the poached egg maker in my house, but they never look this round or perfectly awesome – thanks for sharing!”</p> <p>One user admitted their relief that they weren’t the only person who struggled to make poached eggs.</p> <p>“So it isn't just me – I am honestly so glad to hear this,” she said.</p> <p>Some users also shared other tricks to perfecting poached eggs, such as adding a dash of vinegar and stirring continuously to prevent the eggs disintegrating.</p> <p>What is one of your favourite kitchen hacks? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Duchess Meghan reveals her “life changing” banana bread recipe

<p>It is a widely known tradition to never rock up to a country home empty handed, and the Duchess of Sussex took that literally when she arrived at Dubbo on Wednesday with homemade banana bread, baked by the royal herself.</p> <p>Meghan, 37, prepared the delicious loaf in the kitchen of the Admiralty House, the place the Duke and Duchess are temporarily calling home in Sydney.</p> <p>She brought it with her as she visited Mountain View Farm where her and husband Prince Harry discussed the plight of farmers and the affect the drought has had on the residents in the region.</p> <p>The bread, which was a combination of chocolate chips and a hint of ginger, proved to be a huge success, as those who were lucky enough to try it praised it endlessly.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpC-NGKFLiV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpC-NGKFLiV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">The Duchess Of Sussex Baked A Loaf Of Banana Bread For The Picnic They Attended In Dubbo #DubboAustralia #Picnic #DuchessOfSussex #MeghansBananaBread #MeghanMarkle #RoyalBaby #Delicious #Ginger #ChocolateChips #BananaBread</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/the_kensington_royals/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> The Kensington Royals</a> (@the_kensington_royals) on Oct 17, 2018 at 12:45pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>And it wasn’t the first time Meghan had dipped her hands into baking the bread.</p> <p>In her now-defunct lifestyle blog, <em>The Tig</em>, she shared the recipe for the “Life Changing Bread".</p> <p>The blogpost claims that the bread, although delicious, is also healthy as it’s a low-carb gluten and grain-free loaf.</p> <p>The recipe was passed down from the Duchess’s friend and stylist Talia Brown.</p> <p>An aide had a few words to share about the royal, saying: “She loves baking and just decided to take something along with her on the spur of the moment.”</p> <p>Benita Woodley, who is the daughter of Scott and Elaine, the farmers who are responsible for Mountain View Property where the Duke and Duchess shared a meal, said the bread was delicious.</p> <p>“It was such a nice and thoughtful thing for her to do. We are really touched.”</p> <p>After the news of Meghan’s banana bread hit social media, users began praising the Duchess, with some asking: “Is there anything this woman can’t do?”</p> <p>Marilyn Hulslander from Over60's cookbook, <em>The Way Mum Made It</em>, has been making this special banana bread for the last 40 years, and it's as close to the Duchess's as you're going to get.</p> <p>So, from the Duchess’s kitchen to yours, try the recipe yourself:</p> <p><em>Banana Bread just like Duchess Meghan's:</em></p> <p><strong><span>Serves:</span></strong> 8–10</p> <p><strong><span>Ingredients:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li>125 g unsalted butter, chopped</li> <li>1 cup caster sugar</li> <li>1 teaspoon vanilla extract</li> <li>2 large eggs</li> <li>¾ cup mashed ripe bananas (about 2)</li> <li>1¼ cups self-raising flour</li> <li>¾ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda</li> <li>1 teaspoon salt</li> </ul> <p><strong><span>Method:</span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 180°C. Lightly grease and flour a loaf tin.</li> <li>Using an electric mixer, beat the butter and sugar thoroughly, adding the vanilla while mixing.</li> <li>Add the eggs, one at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition. Add the banana and beat on low speed.</li> <li>In a separate bowl, combine the flour, bicarbonate of soda and salt and add to the banana mixture. Continue mixing on low speed until combined, then mix on medium speed for 2 minutes.</li> <li>Pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45 minutes. Leave to cool in the tin for 5 minutes, then cut around the sides and turn out onto a wire rack to cool.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Note:</strong><span> </span>This basic recipe can be enhanced by adding ½ cup of chopped walnuts, shaken with a little bit of flour, and stirred into the mixture after you’ve finished beating. You can also add a teaspoon of ground ginger if you like.</p> <p><span>Will you be trying out this delicious banana bread recipe? Let us know in the comments below.</span></p>

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Princess Eugenie’s stunning wedding cake revealed

<p>This week, Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank will tie the knot in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle on October 12.</p> <p>As the palace continues to release information about the nuptials as the day draws closer, details about the couple’s wedding cake have been revealed.</p> <p>Eugenie and Jack have hired London-based cake designer Sophie Cabot to make their wedding cake.</p> <p>Just like Prince Harry and Meghan’s wedding cake, Eugenie and Jack’s will draw inspiration from the time of the year of their nuptials.</p> <p>For their May ceremony, Harry and Meghan chose a lemon elderflower cake that featured “the bright flavours of spring” and was decorated with fresh flowers.</p> <p>Eugenie’s red velvet and chocolate cake will feature rich autumn colours and include detailed sugar work such as ivy.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjE4e7sgJIw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjE4e7sgJIw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Sophie Cabot cake designer 💫 (@sophiecabot)</a> on May 22, 2018 at 3:25am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The couple found out about Cabot through her involvement with Eugenie’s father, The Duke of York’s Pitch@Palace programme, after supplying specially decorated bespoke biscuits.</p> <p>A statement from Buckingham Palace said: “The couple are delighted that Miss Cabot can be involved in the celebrations for their special day.</p> <p>“Originally a costume designer, Sophie’s artistic skills and flair come through in her creations, with a particular love for making sugar-flowers and using her hand-painting skills to create unique cakes.”</p> <p>Discussing her important role in the big day, Cabot said: "I am incredibly excited to be given this wonderful opportunity to create such a special and unique cake. It has been lovely working with Princess Eugenie and Jack and I really hope they enjoy the cake on the day.”</p> <p>It has also been revealed that the Eugenie and Jack will be married by the Dean of Windsor, the Rt Revd David Conner.</p> <p>Internationally renowned singer Andrea Bocelli is set to perform two songs during the wedding ceremony.</p> <p>Musicians from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) will also perform during the ceremony. </p>

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Hazelnut & Prune Scones

<p>It wasn't intentional that this recipe would result in something more reminiscent of scones than cakes, but they are incredibly delicious, so I decided to roll with the recipe, regardless of it being a bit unconventional. </p> <p>The brown butter takes a little while to make but smells incredible and adds a delicious nuttiness. Use plain flour if you prefer and serve warm with an extra slather of good butter.</p> <p><strong>Makes:</strong> 24 mini scones </p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <ul> <li>150g butter</li> <li>1 cup pitted prunes</li> <li>60g buckwheat flour</li> <li>60g quinoa flour </li> <li>150g ground almonds</li> <li>1 tsp baking powder</li> <li>1 tsp baking soda</li> <li>Pinch of sea salt</li> <li>2 large free range eggs</li> <li>¼ cup milk of your choice</li> <li>½ cup hazelnuts, roughly chopped</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method: </strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 180C on fan bake. Grease 24 holes of a mini cupcake tray very well.</li> <li>First, make the brown butter. In a saucepan, melt the butter gently over a low heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk, until the milk solids sink to the bottom and it starts to turn golden brown – this should take about 20 minutes. Set aside to cool.</li> <li>Next, puree the pitted prunes in a food processor and set aside.</li> <li>In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the flours, ground almonds, baking powder, soda and sea salt, and gradually add in the brown butter, eggs and milk. Mix until just combined. Finally, fold through the pureed prunes. </li> <li>Divide the batter between the 24 holes until they are about two-thirds full. Sprinkle each with the chopped hazelnuts. </li> <li>Bake for about 20 minutes or until the baby cakes are golden, springy to the touch and a skewer inserted in their centres comes out clean.</li> </ol> <p><em>Written by Jordan Rondel. Republished with permission of <span><strong><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/food-wine/recipes/97914384/recipe-jordan-rondels-glutenfree-hazelnut--prune-scones">Stuff.co.nz.</a></strong></span> </em></p>

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Fruity Bircher muesli

<p>The original recipe for this nutritious breakfast cereal was developed over a century ago by Dr Bircher-Benner at his clinic in Zurich. The technique of soaking the cereal, here using milk, makes it easier to digest, and also easier to eat.</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Serves:</span></strong> 4<br /> <strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Preparation:</span></strong> 10 minutes, plus overnight soaking</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Ingredients</span></strong></p> <ul> <li>1¼ cups (125g) rolled (porridge) oats</li> <li>1 cup (125g) sultanas</li> <li>1 cup (250ml) low-fat milk</li> <li>1 apple</li> <li>2 teaspoons lemon juice</li> <li>¼ cup (35g) hazelnuts, roughly chopped</li> <li>1½ tablespoons pepitas (pumpkin seeds)</li> <li>1 tablespoon sesame seeds</li> <li>100g strawberries chopped</li> <li>⅓ cup (90g) low-fat natural yogurt</li> <li>1 tablespoon honey</li> </ul> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Preparation</span></strong></p> <ul> <li>Place the oats and sultanas in a large bowl and add the milk.</li> <li>Stir to mix evenly, then cover with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator.</li> <li>Leave to soak overnight.</li> <li>The next day, just before eating, grate the apple, discarding the core.</li> <li>Toss the apple with the lemon juice to prevent browning.</li> <li>Stir the hazelnuts, pepitas and sesame seeds into the oat mixture, then stir in the grated apple and strawberries.</li> <li>To serve, divide the muesli among 4 cereal bowls, and top each with a spoonful of yoghurt and honey.</li> </ul> <p><em>This recipe first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/fruity-bircher-muesli">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img src="/media/7820640/1.png" style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;"/></p>

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Rice pudding with apricots

<p>Rich in flavour and wonderfully creamy in texture, this satisfying rice pudding is a modern version of a popular old favourite. It's flavoured with tangy orange zest and sultanas and paired with a cinnamon-spiced fresh apricot compote.</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Serves:</span></strong> 4<br /><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Preparation:</span></strong> 15 minutes<br /><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Cooking:</span></strong> Approx. 1½ hours</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Ingredients</span></strong></p> <ul> <li>850ml full-cream milk</li> <li>¼ cup (55g) caster sugar</li> <li>Finely grated zest of 1 orange</li> <li>½ cup (110g) short-grain rice</li> <li>½ cup (60g) sultanas</li> <li>Ground cinnamon to sprinkle</li> <li>Apricot compote</li> <li>300g fresh ripe apricots halved and stoned</li> <li>Juice of 1 orange</li> <li>1 cinnamon stick</li> </ul> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Method</span></strong></p> <ul> <li>Preheat the oven to 160°C.</li> <li>Pour the milk into a saucepan and add the sugar and orange zest.</li> <li>Heat gently, stirring, until the sugar dissolves and the milk is almost boiling.</li> <li>Put the rice and sultanas in a shallow 1.5 litre ovenproof dish.</li> <li>Pour over the milk mixture and stir.</li> <li>Bake the pudding for 30 minutes, then stir well.</li> <li>Leave to bake for a further 45 minutes, or until the rice is tender and the pudding is creamy.</li> <li>Meanwhile, to make the compote, combine the apricots, orange juice and cinnamon stick in a heavy-based saucepan.</li> <li>Cover and cook over a low heat for 10 minutes.</li> <li>Remove the lid and cook for a further 5 minutes, or until the juice is reduced.</li> <li>Remove the cinnamon stick from the compote.</li> <li>Sprinkle the top of the rice pudding with a little cinnamon, then serve hot, with the apricot compote.</li> </ul> <p><br /><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/rice-pudding-with-apricots">Readers Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img src="/media/7820640/1.png" style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;"/></p>

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Raspberry cranachan

<p>This traditional Scottish dessert is quick and easy to put together, and the nutritious combination of cream, fromage frais, oats and fresh fruit makes a superb sweet course for a special occasion meal. The whisky not only adds a taste of Scotland but gives a fantastic kick to the flavour.</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Serves:</span></strong> 4</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Preparation</span></strong>: 15 minutes, plus 15 minutes cooling<br /><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Cooking:</span></strong> About 5 minutes</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Ingredients:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li>¾ cup (75g) medium oatmeal</li> <li>150ml whipping cream</li> <li>⅔ cup (160g) fromage frais or Greek-style yoghurt</li> <li>2 tablespoons honey</li> <li>2 tablespoons whisky</li> <li>400g raspberries</li> <li>400g raspberries</li> </ul> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Method:</span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the grill to high.</li> <li>Line the rack of the grill pan with foil and spread the oats over the foil.</li> <li>Toast under the grill for about 3 minutes, stirring once or twice, until the oats are golden.</li> <li>Set aside to cool for about 15 minutes.</li> <li>Roughly chop the oats or transfer to a food processor and blitz until roughly chopped.</li> <li>Put the cream and fromage frais or yoghurt in a bowl and whip together until thick.</li> <li>Stir in the honey and whisky, then fold in half of the toasted oats.</li> <li>Reserve a few raspberries for the decoration.</li> <li>Layer the remaining raspberries with the cream mixture in 4 glass serving dishes, starting with raspberries and ending with a layer of the cream mixture.</li> <li>Decorate each dessert with a sprinkling of the remaining toasted oats and the reserved raspberries.</li> <li>Serve immediately (or keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 hour before serving).</li> </ol> <p><br /><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/raspberry-cranachan">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img src="/media/7820640/1.png" style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;"/></p>

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Chocolate caramel slice

<p>The chocolate caramel slice is a variation on one I have made for years, with an extra hit of chocolate in the caramel, and using my quick and easy method of combining caramel and regular sweetened condensed milks.</p> <p>This slice is so wickedly addictive, to avoid gluttonous temptation it's best to pop leftovers in containers for guests to take with them – or pop them in portioned amounts in the freezer.</p> <p><strong>Makes: </strong>40</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p><strong>·        </strong> 250g butter plus 25g, softened<br />·         ¾ cup caster sugar<br />·         2 teaspoons vanilla extract<br />·         2 ½ cups plain flour<br />·         1 teaspoon baking powder<br />·         ⅓ cup dark Dutch cocoa powder plus 1 tablespoon extra<br />·         1 tin sweetened condensed milk<br />·         1 tin condensed milk caramel<br />·         1 tablespoon golden syrup<br />·         125g 50 per cent dark chocolate, roughly chopped </p> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 180 degrees Celsius. Line the base and sides of a 28 x 21cm slice tin with baking paper.</li> <li>Put 250g butter, sugar and vanilla extract in a food processor (or mixer) and whiz until pale and soft. Add flour, baking powder and ⅓ cup of cocoa, and pulse again to combine. Tip ¾ of the mix into the prepared baking tin and press in, then smooth firmly with the back of a tablespoon. Pop in the fridge while you prepare the rest.</li> <li>Mix the condensed milks, 25g butter and golden syrup in a microwave-proof bowl and microwave on high for one minute. Add the extra tablespoon of cocoa powder and whisk until loosened. Microwave on high for a further minute and whisk until smooth.</li> <li>Pour the caramel mix over the base and sprinkle over the chopped chocolate. Top with the remaining base mixture, giving it a good squish as you crumble so it forms big clumps. Bake for 30-35 minutes until richly golden and cooked through. Cool in the tin, remove and slice into squares and store in an airtight container.</li> </ol> <p><em>Written by Sarah Tuck. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz</span></strong></a>.</em></p>

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Gluten-free Bumblebees

<p>Almost any dried fruit or nut works in these delicious gluten-free sweet treats, making them a great standby. Adding chocolate to the base takes them to the next level.</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Makes:</span></strong> 24</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Ingredients:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li>¾ cup dried apricots</li> <li>½ cup glacé cherries</li> <li>¼ cup crystallised ginger</li> <li>½ cup raisins</li> <li>½ cup walnuts</li> <li>½ cup natural almonds</li> <li>1¼ cups desiccated coconut</li> <li>395g tin sweetened condensed milk</li> <li>1 cup coconut thread for coating</li> </ul> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Method: </span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Heat oven to 175°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper.</li> <li>Chop the fruit and nuts quite finely and evenly in size. Place in a mixing bowl with desiccated coconut, add condensed milk and stir until well mixed.</li> <li>Place coconut thread in a shallow dish and, using wet hands, form heaped tablespoons of mixture into balls. Roll in the coconut thread and place on prepared tray.</li> <li>Bake 15-20 minutes until golden.</li> <li>Leave on tray for several minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.</li> <li>If desired, dip the bases of the Bumblebees in a little melted dark chocolate.</li> <li>Stored in an airtight container, these will keep for a week.</li> </ol> <p><em>Written by Bernadette Hogg. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz. </span></strong></a></em></p>

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Fish and chips shop owner’s hilarious responses to negative online reviews

<p>Most of the time, a negative review can be a real downer for business owners – but one fish and chips shop owner decided to use his quick wit to respond to the unsatisfied customers in the most hilarious fashion.</p> <p>The Bunker fish and chip shop in the English seaside village of Seahouses is known by many as the best chip shop in the entire village.</p> <p>But while business is booming, co-owner Rod White tends to receive the odd negative comment here and there via TripAdvisor and Google, and always determined, Mr White has fired back with his own responses.</p> <p>His witty comments have garnered popularity, with Mr White now having fans of his own – and some, visiting the chip shop to meet the man for themselves.</p> <p><img width="496" height="165" src="/media/7820202/eb009eeeb2a9ea8e573469a065617fa4_496x165.jpg" alt="Eb 009eeeb 2a 9ea 8e 573469a 065617fa4"/></p> <p><img width="498" height="245" src="/media/7820203/931e43bbf77bce64732f4d6d9681d798_498x245.jpg" alt="931e 43bbf 77bce 64732f 4d 6d 9681d 798"/></p> <p>One review complained about the lack of gluten-free options, and that the fish was covered in grease, to which Mr White responded: “Your comments are duly noted sir and from now on we shall be frying our fish and chips in daffodil extract.</p> <p>“Once cooked, the fish will spend 5 minutes in a tumble drier, while at the same time, staff member X will be blow drying the chips, with one of those Dyson hair dryers, you know the one that doesn’t even look like a hair dryer? until there is no sign of grease whatsoever.</p> <p>“Then, and only then, will the plate of Atlantic cod and Northumbrian chipped potatoes be presented to our customers.”</p> <p>One customer complained about the price for chips and mushy peas, to which Mr White responded: “We take note that you and your nine friends won’t be visiting here in the future and will take this into account when preparing next year’s budget forecasts.”</p> <p>Another complained about the long wait for his food, and that the chips were “greasy and soft”, the fish “dry” and the portions “miserably small”. To which Mr White issued a lengthy response, where he offered a chip colour chart for his servers to consult.</p> <p>He wrote: “Each customer will be asked when placing their order, exactly what shade of chip they’d prefer. After pointing to a chip chart at the back of the shop, our fryer can then leave each separate customer’s chips in frying, until they reach their particular favourite shade.</p> <p>“That way, there’ll be no worry that customers, like your good self sir, will be going away with chips of the wrong hue. Absolutely brilliant, even if I say so myself.</p> <p>“So, let me thank you again for taking time out of your busy schedule to moan in length about the catastrophe that happened in your day.</p> <p>“I hope you’ve managed to calm down now, got a good night’s sleep, and can get on with the rest of your disaster-filled life without too much worry. Anyway, must dash, got a chip chart to prepare.”</p> <p>Mr White, who co-owns the business with his brother-in-law, doesn’t have an explanation as to why he signs his responses with “Lionel Blair” or “Montgomery Applegate” but has said that the comments are a result of “exasperation".</p> <p>“You deal with hundreds of people a day and you cannot please everybody,” he said.</p>

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