Food & Wine

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Relax with a mandarin margarita

<div class="article-body"> <p>Grab your cocktail shaker in one hand (or a blender in this case) and some tequilla in the other and create this fruity cocktail sensation!</p> <p><strong>28.2% alc/vol</strong></p> <p><strong>2.4 standard drinks</strong></p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>45ml gold tequila</li> <li>20ml Mandarine Napoleon</li> <li>15ml Cointreau</li> <li>30ml fresh lemon juice</li> <li>Slice of fresh orange</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Prepare a margarita glass with a salt-frosted rim.</li> <li>Pour tequila, Mandarine Napoleon, Cointreau and juice into a blender over cracked ice then blend.</li> <li>Strain into prepared glass and garnish with a slice of orange then serve with a short straw.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe and image from<span> </span></em>The Margarita Guide<em><span> </span>by Steve Quirk (New Holland Publishers RRP $24.99), available from all good bookstores or online<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.newhollandpublishers.com/" target="_blank"><span>newhollandpublishers.com</span></a></em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/mandarin-margarita.aspx" data-title="Mandarin Margarita | WYZA" data-description="Grab your cocktail shaker in one hand (or a blender in this case) and some tequilla in the other and create this fruity cocktail sensation! - wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-0d972b42-1df1-4030-af34-357e19efee11"><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/mandarin-margarita.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Try this for a sweet delight: Chocolate mousse cake with poached pears and crème fraîche

<p><strong>Time to prepare 30 mins + Overnight refrigeration, Cooking time 1h 40 mins | Serves 8</strong></p> <p>This melt-in-your-mouth mousse cake is beautifully garnished. It's the perfect sweet treat with the one you love.</p> <p><em>Recipe from </em><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmkr-order-now-for-your-chance-to-win--seven-network-operations-ltd%2Fprod9780733634758.html"><em>MKR: Best of the Best Cookbook</em></a><em> (RRP $39.99), published by Hachette Australia. </em><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmkr-order-now-for-your-chance-to-win--seven-network-operations-ltd%2Fprod9780733634758.html"><strong>Get 70% off</strong>*</a><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmkr-order-now-for-your-chance-to-win--seven-network-operations-ltd%2Fprod9780733634758.html"><strong> the RRP - Order here</strong></a><strong><u>.</u></strong></p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>340g dark chocolate, broken into small pieces</li> <li>225g unsalted butter, softened</li> <li>5 eggs</li> <li>340g caster sugar</li> <li>Crème fraîche, to serve</li> <li>½ teaspoon black salt, to garnish</li> <li>Extra cocoa, for dusting</li> <li>Mint leaves, to garnish</li> </ul> <p><strong>Poached pears</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 Beurre Bosc pears, peeled, cored and halved</li> <li>1 cinnamon stick, broken into pieces</li> <li>100g brown sugar</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. To prepare the pears, place in a small casserole dish and add the cinnamon, sugar and enough boiling water to cover the pears. Cover with foil and cook in the oven for about 40 minutes or until very tender. Remove the pears and set aside to cool. Refrigerate, covered, until required.</p> <p>2. To prepare the cake, preheat the oven to 160°C. Grease a 22cm round springform tin and line the base and sides with baking paper.</p> <p>3. Melt the chocolate and butter in a medium heatproof bowl over a saucepan of simmering water, stirring to combine. Remove from the heat and cool for 10 minutes.</p> <p>4. Whisk together the eggs and sugar until pale and creamy. Fold half the cooled chocolate mixture into the egg and sugar mixture, then repeat with the remaining batch.</p> <p>5. Pour the mixture into the prepared tin. Place in a roasting pan and add enough boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the cake pan. Cook in the centre of the oven for 55 minutes. Remove the cake pan from the roasting dish, set aside to cool and refrigerate overnight.</p> <p>6. To serve, remove the outer ring of the pan and cut the cake into generous slices. Place each slice on a serving plate, spoon over a generous amount of crème fraîche and garnish with black salt. Place a pear half beside each slice of cake, dust over a little cocoa and garnish with fresh mint.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>If black salt is unavailable, try garnishing the crème fraîche with a little grated chocolate.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/chocolate-mousse-cake-with-poached-pears-and-creme-fraiche.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Food & Wine

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Burger King offers Prince Harry a job

<p>Burger King has offered Prince Harry a job.</p> <p>The fast-food chain has kindly put forward a proposition, as they offered the 35-year-old royal and his wife Duchess Meghan a job at one of their franchises after the couple announced they were stepping down as “senior royals” and plan on becoming “financially independent”.</p> <p>Burger King Argentina was the first to reach out to the Duke of Sussex as they tweeted: “We found out that the prince and the duchess decided to give up their roles in the royal family and will work to become financially independent.</p> <p>“So, we have a proposition for you: Do as thousands of people and take your steps in the world of work with us.</p> <p>“You know that the crown will suit you perfectly. Also, after so many years of living as dukes, it is time for you to start eating like kings.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">@ harry, this royal family offers part-time positions</p> — Burger King (@BurgerKing) <a href="https://twitter.com/BurgerKing/status/1216823135359635456?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 13, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Burger King US later followed suit, by saying: “This royal family offers part-time positions.”</p> <p>Last week, the couple dropped a bombshell after they announced plans to “carve out” new roles.</p> <p>They said: “After many months of reflection and internal discussions, we have chosen to make a transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution. We intend to step back as 'senior' members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent, while continuing to fully support Her Majesty The Queen.</p> <p>"It is with your encouragement, particularly over the last few years, that we feel prepared to make this adjustment. We now plan to balance our time between the United Kingdom and North America, continuing to honour our duty to The Queen, the Commonwealth, and our patronages. This geographic balance will enable us to raise our son with an appreciation for the royal tradition into which he was born, while also providing our family with the space to focus on the next chapter, including the launch of our new charitable entity."</p>

Food & Wine

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How steak became manly and salads became feminine

<p>When was it decided that <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/09/food-gender-marketers-yogurt-women-chicken-men/405703/">women prefer some types of food</a> – yogurt with fruit, salads and white wine – while men are supposed to gravitate to chili, steak and bacon?</p> <p>In my new book, “<a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43726541-american-cuisine">American Cuisine: And How It Got This Way</a>,” I show how the idea that women don’t want red meat and prefer salads and sweets didn’t just spring up spontaneously.</p> <p>Beginning in the late 19th century, a steady stream of dietary advice, corporate advertising and magazine articles created a division between male and female tastes that, for more than a century, has shaped everything from dinner plans to menu designs.</p> <p><strong>A separate market for women surfaces</strong></p> <p>Before the Civil War, the whole family ate the same things together. The era’s best-selling household manuals and cookbooks never indicated that husbands had special tastes that women should indulge.</p> <p>Even though “<a href="https://academic.oup.com/jsh/article-abstract/48/1/1/947457">women’s restaurants</a>” – spaces set apart for ladies to dine unaccompanied by men – were commonplace, they nonetheless served the same dishes as the men’s dining room: offal, calf’s heads, turtles and roast meat.</p> <p>Beginning in the 1870s, shifting social norms – like the entry of women into the workplace – <a href="https://theconversation.com/in-americas-sandwiches-the-story-of-a-nation-86649">gave women more opportunities to dine without men</a> and in the company of female friends or co-workers.</p> <p>As more women spent time outside of the home, however, they were still expected to congregate in gender-specific places.</p> <p>Chain restaurants geared toward women, such as <a href="https://restaurant-ingthroughhistory.com/2008/08/27/when-ladies-lunched-schraffts/">Schrafft’s</a>, proliferated. They created alcohol-free safe spaces for women to lunch without experiencing the rowdiness of workingmen’s cafés or <a href="https://restaurant-ingthroughhistory.com/2011/09/06/lunch-and-a-beer/">free-lunch bars</a>, where patrons could get a free midday meal as long as they bought a beer (or two or three).</p> <p>It was during this period that the notion that some foods were more appropriate for women started to emerge. Magazines and newspaper advice columns identified fish and white meat with minimal sauce, as well as new products like packaged cottage cheese, as “female foods.” And of course, there were desserts and sweets, which women, supposedly, couldn’t resist.</p> <p>You could see this shift reflected in old Schrafft’s menus: a list of light main courses, accompanied by elaborate desserts with ice cream, cake or whipped cream. Many menus <a href="https://restaurant-ingthroughhistory.com/2008/08/27/when-ladies-lunched-schraffts/">featured more desserts than entrees</a>.</p> <p>By the early 20th century, women’s food was commonly described as “<a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=nzN3bRRIH-gC&amp;pg=PA56&amp;lpg=PA56&amp;dq=dainty+women%27s+food&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=CL96BjXjf6&amp;sig=ACfU3U3Li5Ts_UqW3lKpI3C90kJxniiJzw&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwis0q3O2LLlAhWsmeAKHanXBRcQ6AEwDHoECAcQAQ#v=onepage&amp;q=dainty%20women's%20food&amp;f=false">dainty</a>,” meaning fanciful but not filling. Women’s magazines included <a href="https://c8.alamy.com/comp/HNM1A7/1928-british-advertisement-for-my-lady-tinned-fruit-salad-HNM1A7.jpg">advertisements</a> for typical female foodstuffs: salads, colorful and shimmering Jell-O mold creations, or fruit salads decorated with marshmallows, shredded coconut and maraschino cherries.</p> <p>At the same time, self-appointed men’s advocates complained that women were inordinately fond of the very types of decorative foods being marketed to them. In 1934, for example, a male writer named Leone B. Moates wrote an article in House and Garden <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=3AKLDwAAQBAJ&amp;pg=PT299&amp;lpg=PT299&amp;dq=%22Leone+B.+Moates%22&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=6aAZiExudB&amp;sig=ACfU3U015psSPEEQ5t7IA5wgNBqM0mNLmw&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwi_ksaw3rLlAhVinuAKHUZYBU8Q6AEwAHoECAMQAQ#v=onepage&amp;q=%22Leone%20B.%20Moates%22&amp;f=false">scolding wives</a> for serving their husbands “a bit of fluff like marshmallow-date whip.”</p> <p>Save these “dainties” for ladies’ lunches, he implored, and serve your husbands the hearty food they crave: goulash, chili or corned beef hash with poached eggs.</p> <p><strong>Pleasing the tastes of men</strong></p> <p>Writers like Moates weren’t the only ones exhorting women to prioritize their husbands.</p> <p>The 20th century saw a proliferation of cookbooks telling women to give up their favorite foods and instead focus on pleasing their boyfriends or husbands. The central thread running through these titles was that if women failed to satisfy their husbands’ appetites, their men would stray.</p> <p>You could see this in midcentury ads, like the one showing an irritated husband saying “Mother never ran out of Kellogg’s Corn Flakes.”</p> <p>But this fear was exploited as far back as 1872, which saw the publication of a cookbook titled “<a href="https://books.google.com/books/about/How_to_Keep_a_Husband_Or_Culinary_Tactic.html?id=kuWlmgEACAAJ">How to Keep a Husband, or Culinary Tactics</a>.” One of the most successful cookbooks, “‘The Settlement’ Cook Book,” first published in 1903, was subtitled “The Way to a Man’s Heart.”</p> <p>It was joined by recipe collections like 1917’s “<a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=rPWI6Hy4yIYC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=%22A+Thousand+Ways+to+Please+a+Husband%22&amp;hl=en&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwiF0vrT0LLlAhVBSN8KHZn_BA8Q6AEwAHoECAAQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=%22A%20Thousand%20Ways%20to%20Please%20a%20Husband%22&amp;f=false">A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband</a>” and 1925’s “<a href="https://kalesijablog.wordpress.com/2013/08/20/history-of-feed-the-brute/">Feed the Brute!</a>”</p> <p>This sort of marketing clearly had an effect. In the 1920s, one woman wrote to General Mills’ fictional spokeswoman, “Betty Crocker,” <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=qctXdfqJo50C&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=Paradox+of+Plenty&amp;hl=en&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwipiY-R0LLlAhUCT98KHX5WBmUQ6AEwAXoECAMQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=Paradox%20of%20Plenty&amp;f=false">expressing fear</a> that her neighbor was going to “capture” her husband with her fudge cake.</p> <p>Just as women were being told they needed to focus on their husbands’ taste buds over their own – and be excellent cooks, to boot – men were also saying that they didn’t want their wives to be single-mindedly devoted to the kitchen.</p> <p>As Frank Shattuck, the founder of Schrafft’s, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1937/03/15/archives/frank-g-shattuck-of-schraffts-dies-founder-of-company-operating.html">observed in the 1920s</a>, a young man contemplating marriage is looking for a girl who is a “good sport.” A husband doesn’t want to come home to a bedraggled wife who has spent all day at the stove, he noted. Yes, he wants a good cook; but he also wants an attractive, “fun” companion.</p> <p>It was an almost impossible ideal – and advertisers quickly capitalized on the insecurities created by the dual pressure wives felt to please their husbands without looking like they’d worked too hard doing so.</p> <p><a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=3AKLDwAAQBAJ&amp;newbks=1&amp;newbks_redir=0&amp;lpg=PT287&amp;dq=american%20cuisine%20freedman%20grand%20appliance%20cooking%20in%20the%20grand%20manner&amp;pg=PT294#v=onepage&amp;q=american%20cuisine%20freedman%20grand%20appliance%20cooking%20in%20the%20grand%20manner&amp;f=false">A 1950 brochure</a> for a cooking appliance company depicts a woman wearing a low-cut dress and pearls showing her appreciative husband what’s in the oven for dinner.</p> <p>The woman in the ad – thanks to her new, modern oven – was able to please her husband’s palate without breaking a sweat.</p> <p><strong>The 1970s and beyond</strong></p> <p>Beginning in the 1970s, dining changed dramatically. Families <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/1985/10/30/garden/new-american-eating-pattern-dine-out-carry-in.html">started spending more money eating out</a>. More women working outside the home meant meals were less elaborate, especially since men remained loathe to share the responsibility of cooking.</p> <p><a href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/an-excerpt-about-the-1970s-from-paul-freedmans-new-book-american-cuisine-and-how-it-got-this-way">The microwave</a> encouraged alternatives to the traditional, sit-down dinner. The women’s movement destroyed lady-centered luncheonettes like Schrafft’s and upended the image of the happy housewife preparing her condensed soup casseroles or Chicken Yum Yum.</p> <p>Yet as food historians <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/11/chefs-gone-wild/309519/">Laura Shapiro</a> and <a href="https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520234406/paradox-of-plenty">Harvey Levenstein</a> have noted, despite these social changes, the depiction of male and female tastes in advertising has remained surprisingly consistent, even as some new ingredients and foods have entered the mix.</p> <p>Kale, quinoa and other healthy food fads are gendered as “female.” Barbecue, <a href="http://www.southerncultures.org/article/every-ounce-a-mans-whiskey-bourbon-in-the-white-masculine-south/">bourbon</a> and “<a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/11/chefs-gone-wild/309519/">adventurous foods</a>,” on the other hand, are the domain of men.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QNpfJNaRPGo?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="caption">Actor Matthew McConaughey stars in a Wild Turkey bourbon commercial from 2017.</span></p> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/09/fashion/09STEAK.html">A New York Times article from 2007</a> noted the trend of young women on first dates ordering steak. But this wasn’t some expression of gender equality or an outright rejection of food stereotyping.</p> <p>Instead, “meat is strategy,” as the author put it. It was meant to signal that women weren’t obsessed with their health or their diet – a way to reassure men that, should a relationship flower, their girlfriends won’t start lecturing them about what they should eat.</p> <p>Even in the 21st century, echoes of cookbooks like “The Way to a Man’s Heart” resound – a sign that it will take a lot more work to get rid of the fiction that some foods are for men, while others are for women.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/124147/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><em><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/paul-freedman-306213">Paul Freedman</a>, Chester D. Tripp Professor of History, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/yale-university-1326">Yale University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-steak-became-manly-and-salads-became-feminine-124147">original article</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Relax with a homemade apricot turnover

<p>Move over apples, it's the season for apricots! This crisp and flaky pastry turnover will bring out the summer flavours you know and love.</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare</strong>: 15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking</strong> <strong>time</strong>: 20 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves</strong>: 4</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 sheet puff pastry, thawed</li> <li>3-4 apricots, sliced and stones removed</li> <li>1 tablespoon arrowroot</li> <li>2 tablespoons sugar</li> <li>1 teaspoon vanilla paste</li> <li>1 tablespoon lemon juice</li> <li>1 tablespoon demerara sugar</li> <li>1 egg, beaten lightly, mixed with 1 tablespoon water</li> <li>Icing sugar for dusting</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Pre heat oven 200°C.</li> <li>In a medium bowl, toss apricot with arrowroot, sugar, vanilla, lemon juice until there are no lumps. Set aside for 10 minutes.</li> <li>Place pastry on a lightly flour surface, cut into 4 squares. Spoon apricots evenly into each square and gently pull one side over to the other, making a triangle.</li> <li>Use a fork to seal edges, brush with egg wash and cut a few slits in the top of each to allow steam to release. Sprinkle with demerara sugar and bake for 20 minutes or until risen and golden.</li> <li>Serve dusted with icing sugar.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe courtesy of <a rel="noopener" href="https://summerfruit.com.au/" target="_blank">Summerfruit Australia</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/apricot-turnovers-with-sugared-puff-pastry.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Enjoy a sweet peach cheesecake with peach syrup

<div class="article-body"> <p>What better way to enjoy summer than with in-season fruits? Create this delectable cake topped with fresh peaches and drizzled with an oh-so sweet syrup.</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>4 hours to set + 25 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 8</p> <p><strong>Crust</strong></p> <ul> <li>250g butternut snap cookies</li> <li> <p>80g unsalted butter, melted</p> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Cheesecake</strong></p> <ul> <li>3 teaspoon powdered gelatine</li> <li>500g cream cheese, softened</li> <li>½ cup sugar</li> <li>1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste</li> <li>250ml thickened cream, whipped</li> <li>6 yellow peaches, peeled, cored, 2 sliced to garnish</li> <li>Sugar syrup, cooled (½ cup sugar, ½ cup water, boiled, then simmer to dissolve)</li> <li>Optional: Whipped cream, and white chocolate curls, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p><strong>Crust</strong></p> <ol> <li>Grease and line a 20cm spring form cake tin.</li> <li>In a food processor, place biscuits and pulse until fine crumbs. Add butter and pulse again to combine, then tip into prepared tin and press firmly into the base. Chill in the fridge until needed.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Cheesecake</strong></p> <ol> <li>Place a small heat proof jug in a small saucepan of lightly simmering water.</li> <li>Add 2 tablespoons of water, then sprinkle the gelatine into the jug. Stir to dissolve set aside to cool for 5 minutes.</li> <li>Meanwhile, place cream cheese, vanilla and sugar into a stand mixer and beat until smooth. Add the cooled gelatine mix and beat to combine.</li> <li>Gently fold in whipped cream.</li> <li>Pour into prepared pan on top of the biscuit base. Cover and refrigerate until set. Minimum 4 hours to overnight.</li> <li>In a medium bowl, puree or mash 2 peaches, add sugar syrup then set aside to infuse.</li> <li>Place in a sieve over a bowl to strain, set drained syrup aside.</li> <li>To assemble, remove cheesecake from the fridge, use the peaches to decorate, and drizzle with the syrup.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe courtesy of <a rel="noopener" href="https://summerfruit.com.au/" target="_blank">Summerfruit Australia</a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/peach-cheesecake-with-peach-syrup.aspx" data-title="Peach cheesecake with peach syrup | WYZA" data-description="Treat yourself this summer with a delectable cheesecake with a double dose of peaches! -wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-84bb15f3-22bb-4ec9-9b4e-48e4dea2e418"><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/peach-cheesecake-with-peach-syrup.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Get into the spirit of summer with a pavlova

<div class="article-body"> <p>No cake book would be complete without a recipe for the much-loved Australian meringue cake topped with fresh cream and seasonal fruit. Unfortunately, Pavlova has the reputation of being difficult to master, but as long as you have time and patience, your results will be great!</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>20 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>60 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>12</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 large eggwhites</li> <li>220g caster sugar</li> <li>2 teaspoons cornflour</li> <li>1 teaspoon white vinegar</li> <li>whipped cream, to serve</li> <li>seasonal fruit, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 150°C. Line a heavy baking tray with baking paper.</li> <li>Using electric beaters, beat the eggwhites on medium speed until soft peaks form, adding a pinch of salt. Begin adding sugar, a spoonful at a time, then increase the speed to high and continue beating until the mixture is thick and glossy.</li> <li>Sift over the cornflour and add the vinegar. Fold into the eggwhites using a spatula and very gentle strokes.</li> <li>Pile the mixture onto the prepared baking tray and put in the preheated oven. Immediately turn the heat down to 130°C and bake for 1 hour. Turn oven off and leave meringue to cool overnight.</li> <li>Before serving, top with whipped cream, passionfruit, berries, kiwi or other seasonal fruits of your choice.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe and image from Bake Your Cake &amp; Eat it Too (New Holland Publishers), RRP $29.99,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.newhollandpublishers.com/" target="_blank"><span>newhollandpublishers.com</span></a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/pavlova.aspx" data-title="Pavlova | WYZA" data-description="Create the much-loved Australian meringue cake topped with fresh cream and seasonal fruit - wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-1686b76d-60ef-492d-b827-e0b8054211c7"><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/pavlova.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Indulge your sweet tooth with lemon polenta cake

<p>Polenta is made from dried corn and is a common staple in Northern Italy where it is served as an alternative to rice or potatoes. Used in cakes, it creates a wonderful dense texture and is perfect for people on a wheat-free diet. This makes quite a large cake which keeps beautifully for several days. I like to serve it warm with ice-cream as a dessert. </p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>20 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>70 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>12</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <div class="article-body"> <ul> <li>450g butter, softened</li> <li>450g sugar</li> <li>6 large eggs</li> <li>Zest and juice of 3 lemons</li> <li>Zest and juice of 1 orange</li> <li>2 teaspoons vanilla extract</li> <li>450g ground almonds</li> <li>300g instant yellow polenta</li> <li>2 teaspoons baking powder</li> <li>Icing sugar, to serve</li> <li>Mascarpone, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the oven to 170°C. Grease a 26cm non-stick springform tin. 
</li> <li>Using electric beaters, beat the butter, sugar and zests of lemon and orange together until thick and pale. With the motor running, add the eggs, one at a time and beat well after each addition. 
</li> <li>Fold in the lemon juice, orange juice, vanilla extract, ground almonds, polenta and baking powder. Mix thoroughly so all the ingredients are combined. 
</li> <li>Pour the batter into the prepared tin, tapping gently to make sure there are no air bubbles. 
</li> <li>Bake for 40 minutes, then reduce the heat to 150°C and bake for a further 20–30 minutes. If necessary, cover the cake with foil if it is beginning to brown too quickly.
</li> <li>Remove the cake from the oven and allow to cool in the tin. When cold, remove from the tin.</li> <li>To serve, sprinkle with icing sugar and serve with a dollop of mascarpone mixed with some lemon zest or lemon gelato.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>To make baby polenta cakes, halve the recipe and bake in lined muffin cups for 25 minutes, then 15 minutes at the reduced temperature.</p> <p><em>Recipe and image from Bake Your Cake &amp; Eat it Too (New Holland Publishers), RRP $29.99,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.newhollandpublishers.com/" target="_blank"><span>newhollandpublishers.com</span></a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lemon-polenta-cake.aspx" data-title="Lemon Polenta Cake | WYZA" data-description="A common staple in Northern Italy, using polenta in cakes creates a wonderful dense texture and is perfect for people on a wheat-free diet - wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-0d0bd90e-658a-43d4-80a6-1fd1f5aaa696"> <p><em>Written by Wyza. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lemon-polenta-cake.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au</em></a><em>.</em></p> </div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Relax into the new year with a berry margarita

<div class="article-body"> <p>Deliver a delightful, refreshing concoction - it's the perfect way to welcome guests at a dinner party.</p> <p><strong>14.4% alc/vol</strong><br /><strong>1.8 standard drinks</strong></p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>45ml white tequila</li> <li>15ml Cointreau</li> <li>60ml fresh lime juice</li> <li>4 fresh strawberries (diced)</li> <li>Fresh strawberry</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Prepare a margarita glass with a sugar-frosted rim.</li> <li>Pour tequila, Cointreau and juice into a blender over a large amount of crushed ice then add diced strawberries.</li> <li>Blend until slushy and pour into prepared glass. Garnish with a strawberry and serve.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe and image from<span> </span></em>The Margarita Guide<em><span> </span>by Steve Quirk (New Holland Publishers RRP $24.99), available from all good bookstores or online<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.newhollandpublishers.com/" target="_blank"><span>newhollandpublishers.com</span></a></em></p> </div> <div class="social-media-column"> <div class="addthis_sharing_toolbox" data-url="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/berry-margarita.aspx" data-title="Berry Margarita | WYZA" data-description="Deliver a delightful, refreshing concoction - it's the perfect way to welcome guests at a dinner party - wyza.com.au"> <div id="atstbx3" class="at-share-tbx-element addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-84d7078e-1f0f-4c28-ac3a-868b6bc5b67a"><em>Written by Wyza. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/berry-margarita.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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BBQ mushroom skewers with rosemary gremolata

<p>Have mushrooms laying in the fridge but not sure what to do with them? Simply throw them on the barbie and let the magic happen with this recipe.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p>2 large bunches rosemary<br />500g button mushrooms, cleaned, stems removed<br />1 garlic clove<br />2 tbsp olive oil<br />1 lemon, zest finely grated<br />10g butter<br />Salt and pepper, to season</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Strip the leaves from sharpest end of the rosemary sprigs, leaving a few at the top, making enough for 12 skewers. Alternatively, you can use short, soaked bamboo skewers. Thread 3 mushrooms onto each skewer.</p> <p>2. Finely chop the garlic and 1 tbsp of the rosemary leaves together on a board. Heat 2 tsp oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Lightly toast the garlic and rosemary mixture for 1 minute or until lightly golden. Remove and combine with the lemon zest in a bowl.</p> <p>3. Increase the heat to medium-high. Melt the butter and remaining oil in the pan. Cook the mushrooms skewers for 4 minutes each side or until golden and cooked. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to a platter and scatter over the gremolata to serve.</p> <p><strong>Tips:</strong></p> <p>You will need thick, sturdy rosemary sprigs to be used for skewers in this recipe. Soaked bamboo skewers are the best alternative. If using rosemary sprigs as skewers, use a bamboo skewer to make the first incision to make it easier to insert the rosemary sprigs.</p> <p><em>Recipe by<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.australianmushrooms.com.au/" target="_blank"><span>Australian Mushrooms</span></a>.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/bbq-mushroom-skewers-with-rosemary-gremolata.aspx" target="_blank">Wyza.com.au</a>. </em></p>

Food & Wine

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Perfect summer meal: Barbecued tuna steaks with walnut sauce

<p><em>Serves 4. </em></p> <p>This quick, simple dish showcases meaty tuna with a walnut sauce based on tarator, a Middle Eastern sauce often served with fish in Lebanon and Syria.</p> <p>Freshness is the key and Californian walnuts work best for this moreish sauce.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 x 180g sashimi-grade tuna steaks (see notes)</li> <li>Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste</li> <li>⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>100g wild or baby rocket, washed and dried</li> <li>1 lemon, quartered</li> </ul> <p><strong>Walnut Sauce</strong></p> <ul> <li>100g shelled walnuts</li> <li>1 clove garlic, finely chopped</li> <li>1 slice stale white bread, soaked in water</li> <li>1 tablespoon white wine vinegar</li> <li>3 teaspoons lemon juice</li> <li>⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>Salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper, to taste</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Place the walnuts and garlic in a food processor. Squeeze the water out of the bread and add to the walnuts. Pulse until walnuts are finely chopped. Add vinegar, lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper and pulse to combine. Chill until ready to serve.</p> <p>2. Heat a barbecue or char-grill plate.</p> <p>3. Brush the steaks with some of the olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook the steaks for 3 minutes on one side, then turn and cook the other side for 1 minute, so that they are still pink in the centre, or until cooked to your liking. Rest fish in a warm place for a few minutes before serving.</p> <p>4. Meanwhile, arrange rocket leaves on plates, drizzle with remaining olive oil.</p> <p>5. Place a steak on top and spoon walnut sauce over each steak. Serve with a lemon wedge.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <ul> <li>Remove the fish from the fridge 20-30 minutes before you cook it, to allow it to come to room temperature, this is particularly important if it is being served rare in the centre.</li> <li>Sashimi-grade fish is normally sold trimmed, if it is not, trim off any skin and dark muscle before cooking.</li> <li>Alternative species: Albacore, bonito, mackerel, salmon, striped marlin, swordfish.</li> </ul> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/barbecued-tuna-steaks-with-walnut-sauce.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Food & Wine

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Did you know this was Princess Diana’s favourite recipe? Uncovered letters reveal surprising meal

<p>Princess Diana’s favourite dish has been revealed in what was a previously unseen letter written by her private secretary.</p> <p>The meal she delighted in before she was a royal might surprise you, however as it only requires a few ingredients and is easy to conjure up in your own kitchen.</p> <p>In 1981 a South African care home charity reached out to celebrities asking for their favourite recipes, which would be featured in an upcoming cookbook.</p> <p>While the novel was only ever sold locally, previously unseen letter have uncovered that the Princess of Wales’ favourite dish was borscht soup.</p> <p>The hearty meal originates from the Ukrainian and is made predominantly from beetroot.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7833721/before-you-conquer-your-bucketlist.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cfdbe2fe3912445596e605126c5af12f" /></p> <p>The soup is quite simple to make and a home favourite across much of Eastern Europe.</p> <p>"The Lady Diana Spencer has asked me to thank you very much for your letter," the response, which was written by Diana's private secretary, reads.</p> <p>"The Lady Diana's favourite recipe is Borsch. It has the following ingredients – beetroot, natural yogurt, onions, chicken stock, milk, sour cream, salt and pepper."</p> <p>The recipe offers royal fans a small look into the kind of meals and foods the royal enjoyed in the comfort of her own home.</p> <p>The letter written on April 7 of 198 – just three months shy of Diana marrying into the royal family.</p> <p>The South African charity contacted Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother as well as a young Princess Di.</p> <p>She wasn't so forthcoming with her recipes though, and had her Lady-In-Waiting write back that while she was thankful the charity reached out – she wouldn't be sharing her favourite dish with anyone.</p> <p>"I am afraid it is not possible for The Queen Mother to send you a recipe for your proposed cookbook, as there is a rule whereby Queen Elizabeth never gives recipes to anyone however worthy the cause," the Lady-In-Waiting wrote.</p>

Food & Wine

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Amazon driver refuses to deliver alcohol to 92-year-old woman without ID

<p><span>An Amazon driver refused to deliver liquor to a 92-year-old UK woman after she failed to show her ID.</span></p> <p><span>Louise Wilkinson was expecting a bottle of Harveys Bristol Cream sherry from her grandson Carl Johnston as a holiday present, <em><a href="https://nypost.com/2019/12/31/amazon-driver-refuses-to-deliver-booze-to-92-year-old-granny-without-id/">The Sun</a> </em>reported.</span></p> <p><span>However, the grandmother of four was left surprised after the Amazon delivery driver arrived at her County Durham home and asked for her ID. She failed to produce a passport or driver’s licence, and the bottle was taken away despite her insistence that she was of legal age.</span></p> <p><span>“I can understand that if you are lucky enough to look around 18 you should have to show ID,” Johnston said. “But my grandma is 92.”</span></p> <p><span>A second attempt to deliver the item was again unsuccessful after the widow tried to use a bus pass as identification. “A bus pass isn’t on Amazon’s list of accepted identifications,” said Johnston.</span></p> <p><span>The accepted forms of identification are military ID cards, a biometric immigration document or a photographic identity card bearing a national Proof of Age Standard Scheme (PASS) holograms.</span></p> <p><span>Johnston questioned why the online marketplace’s drivers could not “just accept a visual check if you are clearly over 18”.</span></p> <p><span>The grandson said he plans to purchase another bottle and deliver it himself.</span></p>

Food & Wine

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Why does pizza taste so good?

<p> </p> <blockquote> <p><strong>Why does pizza taste so good? – Annika, age 5, Oneonta, New York</strong></p> </blockquote> <hr /> <p>Pizza is <a href="https://www.historytoday.com/archive/historians-cookbook/history-pizza">one of the world’s most popular foods</a>.</p> <p>In the U.S., <a href="http://mentalfloss.com/article/69737/46-mouthwatering-facts-about-pizza">350 slices</a> are eaten every second, while <a href="http://mentalfloss.com/article/69737/46-mouthwatering-facts-about-pizza">40% of Americans</a> eat pizza at least once a week.</p> <p>There’s a reason why pizza is so popular. <a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/1307.7982.pdf">Humans are drawn to foods</a> that are fatty and sweet and rich and complex. Pizza has all of these components. Cheese is fatty, meat toppings tend to be rich, and the sauce is sweet.</p> <p>Pizza toppings are also packed with a compound called <a href="https://neurohacker.com/what-is-glutamate">glutamate</a>, which can be found in the tomatoes, cheese, pepperoni and sausage. When glutamate hits our tongues, it tells our brains to get excited – and to crave more of it. This compound actually causes our mouths to water in anticipation of the next bite.</p> <p>Then there are the combinations of ingredients. Cheese and tomato sauce are like a perfect marriage. On their own, they taste pretty good. But according to culinary scientists, they contain flavor compounds <a href="http://specertified.com/blog/view/why-does-pizza-taste-so-good-the-science-of-the-5-basic-tastes-and-pizzas-c">that taste even better when eaten together</a>.</p> <p>Another quality of pizza that makes it so delicious: Its ingredients become brown while cooking in the oven.</p> <p>Foods turn brown and crispy when we cook them because of two chemical reactions.</p> <p>The first is called <a href="https://www.scienceofcooking.com/caramelization.htm">caramelization</a>, which happens when the sugars in a food become brown. Most foods contain at least some sugar; once foods are between 230 and 320 degrees, their sugars begin to turn brown. Caramel <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/221871719_Unraveling_the_Chemical_Composition_of_Caramel">is made from several thousand compounds</a>, making it one of the most complex food products. On a pizza, ingredients like onions and tomatoes become caramelized during baking, making them rich and sweet and flavorful. That brown and crispy crust is also the result of the dough caramelizing.</p> <p>While the meat and cheese on your pizza also get brown, this is due to a different process called the “<a href="https://cen.acs.org/articles/90/i40/Maillard-Reaction-Turns-100.html">Maillard reaction</a>,” which is named after French chemist Louis-Camille Maillard.</p> <p>The Maillard reaction occurs when the amino acids in high-protein foods like cheese and pepperoni react with the sugars in those foods when heated. Pepperonis that become crispy with curled edges, and cheese that browns and bubbles, are examples of the Maillard reaction at work.</p> <p>With bread, cheese and tomato sauce as its base, pizza might seem like a simple food.</p> <p>It isn’t. And now, the next time you’re about to devour a slice, you’ll be able to appreciate all of the elements of pizza that excite our brains, thrill our taste buds and cause our mouths to water.<!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jeffrey-miller-465603">Jeffrey Miller</a>, Associate Professor, Hospitality Management, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/colorado-state-university-1267">Colorado State University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-does-pizza-taste-so-good-125618">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Enjoy some delicious custard apple, rum and coconut pannacotta

<p>Celebrity Adam Liaw shares a recipe that adds a tropical touch to your desserts.</p> <p>The sweet and unique taste of custard apple, slightly reminiscent of pineapple and vanilla, is a perfect match with dark rum and coconut in this creamy and delicious panna cotta.</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>10 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>5 minutes</p> <p><strong>Freezing time: </strong>120 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>4 – 6</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>400ml pouring cream</li> <li>400ml coconut milk</li> <li>2 tsp dark rum</li> <li>1 tbsp honey</li> <li>2 tbsp caster sugar</li> <li>18g powdered gelatin</li> <li>400ml custard apple pulp and juice</li> <li>Toasted coconut or macadamia nuts, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong> </strong><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Place the pouring cream, coconut milk, rum, honey and caster sugar in a saucepan and sprinkle the gelatin over the top.</li> <li>Heat the liquid gently until nearly simmering, stirring until all of the gelatin has dissolved. (To check this, lift your stirring spoon out of the mixture and make sure there is no gelatin granules sticking to it.)</li> <li>Allow to cool for 5 minutes and then stir through the custard apple pulp and juice.</li> <li>Freeze in individual moulds or glasses for at least 2 hours, or until the panna cotta is set.</li> <li>To serve, scatter the top of the panna cotta with either toasted coconut or macadamia nuts.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe courtesy of </em><a href="http://www.custardapple.com.au/"><em>Custard Apples Australia</em></a><em>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/custard-apple-rum-and-coconut-panna-cotta.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

Food & Wine

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Why we shouldn't demonise processed food

<p>I have a radical suggestion: let’s ban processed and ultra-processed foods. Not the products, but the terms.</p> <p>With so many diet plans and nutritional instructions offering such varied advice on how to eat healthily, a simple message like avoiding processed food is understandably attractive. As a result, some journalists, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/aug/11/why-we-fell-for-clean-eating">social media influencers</a> and even <a href="https://www.centerforfoodsafety.org/issues/305/food-and-climate/1-eat-fresh-unprocessed-foods">health charities</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/forget-about-fats-its-processed-food-we-should-be-worried-about-59850">academics</a> have gathered behind the idea that processed food is bad for you – and so-called ultra-processed food is even worse.</p> <p>This position has been taken to <a href="https://medium.com/better-humans/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-whole-foods-diet-e4025c3d116c">detailed extremes</a>, with commandments not to eat food with more than five ingredients, with more than five steps in its manufacture, or even that contains any preservatives, “chemicals” or anything made in a factory.</p> <p>As a food scientist, I think such blanket advice, while easy to remember, is ultimately unhelpful. The demonisation of processing <a href="https://theconversation.com/processed-food-linked-to-cancer-uncritical-media-coverage-ignores-problems-with-study-91935">promotes misunderstanding</a> and mistrust of the ways in which science and manufacturing actually make food better for us.</p> <p>For a start, <a href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/molecules-microbes-and-meals-9780190687694?cc=us&amp;lang=en&amp;">all food is processed</a>, and that’s a good thing. Processing is anything that transforms food from raw materials to something more suitable for human consumption. It can make food safer, more digestible and less susceptible to undesirable changes, while retaining or improving its nutritional and aesthetic qualities.</p> <p>At its simplest, processing is cooking, the discovery of which <a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdfplus/10.1086/692113">has been highlighted</a> as a <a href="https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2009/06/invention-of-cooking-drove-evolution-of-the-human-species-new-book-argues/">key step in human evolution</a> because it allowed us to absorb more energy to fuel our increasingly powerful bodies and brains. Today, besides a range of heat treatments that kill germs, other common processes used to preserve food include drying, fermentation, filtration, and freezing. In recent years, <a href="https://www.foodsafetymagazine.com/signature-series/an-overview-of-novel-processing-technologies-for-the-food-industry/">advanced treatments</a> involving ultra-high pressures or pulsed electric fields have been proposed to make food safer to eat while preserving its taste, texture and nutritional value.</p> <p>So why has the term “processed food” become so negative? Partly it’s because the term more often now refers to what’s in a food item and its nutritional information. In particular, it’s used to highlight foods with high levels of salt, sugar or fat, which can be linked to a <a href="https://www2.gov.scot/resource/0043/00438754.pdf">range of health problems</a>.</p> <p>Yet “processed food” is also often used to indicate products that contain a large number of ingredients, particularly what some deem “chemical” additives. It’s true that foods that haven’t had anything added to them can’t contain extra salt, sugar or fat. But there is no correlation between the number of ingredients and a product’s quality or safety.</p> <p>Meanwhile even simple food products are likely to be made up of many chemical components. For example, a banana contains fructose, maltose, tocopherol, phylloquinone and 2-methylpropan-1-ol. An apple contains acetic acid (E260), tartaric acid (E334), carotene (E160a), ascorbic acid (vitamin C, E300) and citric acid (E330), among other compounds.</p> <p>Those aren’t ingredients, you might say, but natural components. Mixing them together in a blender in the same proportions would not give the fruit back, or even the same nutritional profile. This may be the case, but they are still very clever assemblages of chemicals, often the exact same chemicals that can be found in manufactured food products with long lists of added ingredients.</p> <h2>Natural isn’t necessarily better</h2> <p>Many of these added chemicals are derived from natural sources. Others are often artificially synthesised versions of naturally occurring compounds, such as beta-carotene, which can be found in carrots, or vanillin, which is responsible for the flavour in vanilla. If the molecules from the factory and those from the carrot are identical, why is one seen as different to the other? Would it be preferable to have much more <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-problem-with-vanilla/">costly and wasteful processes</a> to extract them from their natural sources?</p> <p>Other ingredients are not found in natural food sources, and there is no question that, in the past (indeed for centuries), things were added to food that were not safe. For example, lead and mercury were once used <a href="https://www.safefood.eu/Food-Colour-Resource/History.aspx">as food colouring</a>. However, today the food industry in many countries is highly regulated, and modern understanding of food science and safety has resulted in the prohibition of potentially harmful additives.</p> <p>In Europe, food additives are given codes known as E-numbers. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17825405">Research from 2007</a> that found six out of the hundreds of existing E-number additives were linked to hyperactivity in children led to the term becoming a pejorative description. But food containing any of those six compounds must now carry a warning label, while in all other cases an E-number actually reflects the fact that an additive has been tested and <a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-what-are-e-numbers-and-should-you-avoid-them-in-your-diet-43908">certified safe</a>.</p> <p>The other thing to remember about all the added ingredients in food products is that including them costs the manufacturers money and so they must serve a function. Today, consumers have an enormously diverse range of needs, and foods are becoming increasingly specialised and tailored, with categories for infants, the elderly, vegans, people with allergies and many other specific markets.</p> <p>Making products that meet these people’s nutritional needs and still taste good often relies on large numbers of ingredients. Specialised products are needed to replace the nutrients of milk, the springiness provided by gluten, or the texture of meat. Food science has solved these problems by carefully optimising ingredients and control of their behaviour, from plant proteins for nutrition to xanthan gum for texture.</p> <p>Ultimately, <a href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/molecules-microbes-and-meals-9780190687694?q=Molecules%2C%20microbes%20and%20meals&amp;lang=en&amp;cc=ie">all food is made of chemicals</a>, all ingredients have functions, and food products are not random assemblies of compounds added for no reason. These products are formulated to give them the number and type of ingredients they need to provide the nutritional, sensory, stability or safety attributes that consumers demand and legislation allows – no more and no less.</p> <p>The merits of a food should not be judged on the basis of its ingredient list, and food processing is not something of which we should be suspicious. But understanding processing, and what ingredients are in food and why they are there, has never been more important.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/128442/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alan-kelly-893104">Alan Kelly</a>, Professor, Food Science and Technology, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/university-college-cork-1321">University College Cork</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/demonising-processed-food-undermines-our-trust-in-science-128442">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Relax with ricotta pancakes with redbelly citrus compote

<p>Lyndey Milan delivers this unique citrus twist on a scrumptious breakfast classic!</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare:</strong> 10 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>25 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>3 – 4</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>Redbelly compote</li> <li>8 redbelly citrus (also known as blood oranges)</li> <li>1 tablespoon honey</li> <li>2 star anise</li> <li>½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract</li> </ul> <p><strong>Ricotta pancakes</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 eggs, separated</li> <li>150g (¾ cup) low-fat ricotta</li> <li>75ml low fat milk</li> <li>75g (½ cup) self-raising flour</li> <li>Pinch of salt</li> <li>Greek yoghurt to serve (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p><strong>For the redbelly compote:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Finely zest two redbelly and reserve zest for the pancakes. Juice 2 redbelly to give approximately 100ml juice, strain and set aside.</li> <li>Cut a small slice off the ends of each remaining redbelly. Stand up on one end, and carefully, following the contour of the redbelly, cut down to remove the peel and the pith. Slice crosswise into about 6-8 pieces each. Using the tip of the knife, carefully pick out any seeds. Place in a shallow dish.</li> <li>Combine honey, 2 tablespoons of water and star anise in a small saucepan over medium heat. Allow this to bubble up, then stir in redbelly juice. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla. Pour over the redbelly slices and allow it to infuse.</li> </ol> <p><strong>For the ricotta pancakes:</strong></p> <ol start="4"> <li>Whisk the egg whites in a small bowl with an electric beater. Place reserved zest, ricotta, milk, egg yolks, flour and salt in food processor and whizz until combined or beat with an electric beater. Fold in the egg whites. (Mixture can be covered and stored in the fridge for later use.)</li> <li>Melt butter in a small 15cm non-stick frying pan, over medium heat until it melts. Wipe out with a paper towel. Spoon about 3 tablespoons of batter mixture into the pan, tilt to cover pan. Cook for around 3 minutes or until bubbles rise to the surface. Flip over the other side and cook for a further 2 minutes, or until just cooked. Place on a plate and keep warm, either in a very low oven (with the fan turned off) or by covering with a clean cloth. Repeat with remaining mixture.</li> <li>Either ladle compote on top of pancakes and serve to the centre of the table – with extra compote and Greek yoghurt on the side – or divide pancakes between serving plates, ladle compote on top of the pancakes. Serve immediately with Greek yoghurt if desired.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>The compote is also delightful for breakfast, simply served on yoghurt with quartered fresh dates and sprinkled with chopped toasted pistachios.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/ricotta-pancakes-with-redbelly-citrus-compote.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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Feel fuller for longer with a roast sweet potato and cherry tomato omelette

<p>A perfect breakfast after an early morning walk or workout, this omelette is sure to leave you feeling full and satisfied.</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>1</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>3 eggs</li> <li>½ small sweet potato (cubed)</li> <li>¼ bunch of fresh parsley finely chopped</li> <li>6 cherry tomatoes</li> <li>2 large handfuls fresh spinach</li> <li>½ tsp smoked paprika</li> <li>Salt and pepper</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <ol> <li>Cut the sweet potato into small cubes and lay onto an oven tray and roast until soft at 180°C. They should only take about 10-12 minutes. Half way through cooking throw the cherry tomatoes onto the tray and roast for the remaining time.</li> <li>Microwave the spinach in a bowl for 30s.</li> <li>Whisk the eggs then season with salt and pepper and smoked paprika, pour into a pan on medium heat. Stir the eggs quickly once or twice then evenly scatter the sweet potato and cherry tomatoes across half of the omelette, sprinkle chopped fresh parsley over the top then carefully fold the other half over the top.</li> <li>Slide onto a plate and serve. I love a little squeeze of spicy sriracha sauce over the top.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe courtesy of Richard Kerrigan, <u><a href="https://www.instagram.com/rkthebeachlife/">The Beach Life</a></u>, Qualified Chef and Personal Trainer. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/roast-sweet-potato-and-cherry-tomato-omelette.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

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