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Woman reveals how to perfectly ripen avocados in just 24 hours

<p>A popular health influencer has shared a unique avocado ripening hack, demonstrating the method in a Instagram video.</p> <p>Caroline Groth says the hack is "something I heard about years ago".</p> <p>"The kiwi actually doesn't ripen, funnily enough," she says.</p> <p>In the video descriptions she writes: "Guys, Green Skin + Shepard Avocado season means I legit need a spreadsheet to keep track of when I'll have avocados to eat because they take foreeeeeeeever to ripen."</p> <p>"But no more… insert the best 101 life hack ever," Caroline continues.</p> <p>She explains: "The kiwi fruit releases ethylene gas - a plant hormone that aids the ripening process - and the paper bag traps the gas so the process works faster meaning you'll have ripe avocados in 24 hours."</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CdVQwgqjU30/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CdVQwgqjU30/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Caroline Høgh Groth (@carolinehgroth)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Caroline ends her video description by saying: "You're bloody welcome."</p> <p>Caroline makes the most of this hack, sharing recipes of some of her favourite meals using avocados including salads and variations of breakfast favourite smashed avocado on toast.</p> <p>Once your avocado is perfectly ripe, there is another hack that will keep it that way for longer.</p> <p>Cut your avocado in half and remove the stone, then it can stay fresh for longer by being placed in a container filled with cold water and then stored in the fridge.</p> <p>"As a major avocado lover I will definitely be using this hack," one person commented.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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Toddler orders $130 worth of McDonald's cheeseburgers

<p>A DoorDash driver handed one very confused mum 31 cheeseburgers and thanked her for leaving a generous tip.</p> <p>When Kelsey Burkhalter Golden checked her phone she realised her toddler Garrett had been “playing” on her phone, logging the large order.</p> <p>"He was really just flicking it around and making like roller coaster moves with his arms and fingers," she said. "I thought he was just looking at his reflection and carrying the phone around and about 30 minutes later, I got a text from the DoorDash company that was like, 'Hey, it's gonna take a little bit longer than usual to take your order.'"</p> <p>When the doorbell rang and Golden saw the size of the order, she was shocked.</p> <p>"So I go and open the door and there's this girl standing there and she's like, 'Your 31 cheeseburgers?'" Golden laughed. "I just stared at her awkwardly for like 15 seconds but then I just took them, like, 'Oh, thank you!'"</p> <p>"And she was like, 'Thank you for the tip!'."</p> <p>The cost of the cheeseburgers came to $US61.58, but with a $16 tip and app fees, the total came to $91.70 ($AU131.85).</p> <p>"He actually doesn't even like cheeseburgers. He ate half of one," the mum said. "We had about 30 and a half cheeseburgers on our hands."</p> <p>Trying to find a solution, Kelsey posted in a neighborhood Facebook group that she had "31 free cheeseburgers from McDonald's if anyone is interested. Apparently my 2 yr old knows how to order DoorDash," accompanied by a hilarious picture of Garrett sitting next to the stacked cheeseburgers with a smug smile on his face.</p> <p>The majority was taken by a large local family, as well as other neighbours.</p> <p>"It was an innocent thing. He was just playing with my phone," she said.</p> <p>"I don't strive too much for perfection. My kids are really super happy and that's what matters."</p> <p><em>Image: Facebook</em></p>

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Is your dog happy?

<p>It is difficult to refer to what dogs, as a collective, like and dislike and how they behave. Just as humans do, dogs all have their own personalities and learned preferences and so can differ dramatically in how they approach life and what they take from it.</p> <p>In our book, Making Dogs Happy, we use scientific research, illustrative photos and practical tips to help dog owners to appreciate what their dogs may be feeling from moment to moment, and have strategies ready to respond in ways that support their dogs.</p> <p>Making Dogs Happy is focused on the pragmatic application of current theory to improve your relationship with your dogs and, of course, in the process make them happy.</p> <p>There are many ways in which we can misjudge dogs by assuming that they are little furry humans. Here are ten common misconceptions that stem from assigning human values and needs to dogs.</p> <p><strong>1. Dogs have a human appreciation of sharing</strong></p> <p>Humans can rationalise and appreciate the benefits of sharing. In contrast, among dogs, possession is ten-tenths of the law. So we should not take toys, bones and chews away from dogs unless we have trained them to accept this form of intervention.</p> <p><strong>2. Dogs always enjoy common human physical displays of affection</strong></p> <p>Humans often show their affection for others by hugging and cuddling them. Dogs simply do not have the limbs and joints to achieve this and so have not evolved to give each other a loving squeeze. When embraced by humans, many can find this uncomfortable or threatening. The same goes for patting dogs on the head.</p> <p><strong>3. Barking and growling dogs are always threatening or dangerous</strong></p> <p>These are distance-increasing behaviours. The dogs using these signals are chiefly trying to buy space so they can feel safer. All dogs, regardless of their temperament or training, can at times want more space. They usually try more subtle signalling first, but many dogs learn that subtle signals don’t work and go straight for shouting.</p> <p><strong>4. Dogs will welcome unfamiliar dogs to their home</strong></p> <p> </p> <p>Dogs evolved from wolves and are therefore primed to defend what is theirs. They have an attachment to their home territory and the resources within it. Dogs have no way of knowing that the dogs and human we invite around to our home, for example for a play-date, are ever going to leave. They can be forgiven for thinking that this is the way it is going to be from hereon. So it is to be expected that they will often try to lay out the local ground-rules and put the new arrivals in their place.</p> <p><strong>5. Dogs like relaxing as much as humans do</strong></p> <p>We go to work and go to school, so we greatly value the opportunity to chill out at home and maybe watch TV. In contrast, dogs spend most of their time at home and so value exercise off the property far more than time spent on the sofa. So, for dogs, a change is not just as good as a rest – it’s much better.</p> <p><strong>6. An effusive dog is a friendly dog</strong></p> <p>“Friendly” for one dog is not friendly for all dogs, and some dogs use excessive friendliness as a way to alleviate anxiety associated with meeting another dog or human. Owners of very friendly dogs may be surprised when every other dog does not cheerfully receive their dog. Some dogs prefer sedate greetings, and lots of personal space.</p> <p><strong>7. Dogs approach when they want to engage playfully</strong></p> <p>Sometimes owners are confused when a dog approaches a human or another dog in a friendly fashion and then growls or snaps at them. These dogs may be motivated to approach chiefly to gain information, rather than to interact, and some may like strangers in principle, but nevertheless become anxious and overwhelmed all of a sudden. If you are seeing this pattern, call your dog away from new dogs and humans after a couple of seconds.</p> <p><strong>8. A big yard can replace walks</strong></p> <p>Because dogs spend so much time at home in the yard, they often find the area a little too familiar and sometimes rather dull. The size of a yard is far less important to dogs than what happens in it. Dogs truly thrive on play with each other, with us and with toys. They particularly love to do so in a novel environment, so time spent out of the yard is the very best of fun.</p> <p><strong>9. Dogs are wilfully defiant when they don’t do as they are told</strong></p> <p>Rather than deciding to disobey us, dogs sometimes simply can’t do what we ask them to. Either they don’t actually know what we’re asking them to do, or they have much, much more pressing things to do at the time. Dogs are not great at generalising, so just because they sit nicely when asked to in the kitchen when you have treats in your hand doesn’t mean they automatically know what “sit” means when they are at the off-leash dog park.</p> <p>And while your dogs might know what “sit” means when being trained at home without distractions, asking them to do so when visitors are at the door might be like asking a child to kneel and pray upon arriving at an amusement park.</p> <p><strong>10. Barking, snapping, or lunging is the first sign of an unhappy dog</strong></p> <p>Dogs often give subtle signs they are becoming anxious, like avoiding eye contact with whatever is worrying them, licking lips, brow furrows, lifting a paw, tightening muscles in their face. If nothing is done to help these dogs move away from whatever is worrying them, these signs can often escalate to more troubling behaviour that is more obvious, such as growling and snapping.</p> <p>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-your-dog-happy-ten-common-misconceptions-about-dog-behaviour-97541">The Conversation.</a> </p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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Chicken Pho for the soul

<p dir="ltr">This warm and hearty Vietnamese chicken noodle soup is perfect for the cooler weather. Wth 25g of protein and 5g of fibre, this is a healthy seasonal staple. </p> <h2 dir="ltr">Ingredients</h2> <p dir="ltr">170g fresh shiitake mushrooms</p> <p dir="ltr">7cm piece ginger, peeled and sliced</p> <p dir="ltr">1 Tbsp coriander seeds</p> <p dir="ltr">4 whole cloves</p> <p dir="ltr">1kg bone-in chicken thighs, skin removed</p> <p dir="ltr">1.5L (6 cups) water</p> <p dir="ltr">500ml (2 cups) salt-reduced or gluten-free salt reduced chicken stock</p> <p dir="ltr">1 large brown onion, sliced</p> <p dir="ltr">30g dried porcini mushrooms, rinsed, drained and broken</p> <p dir="ltr">1 Tbsp brown sugar</p> <p dir="ltr">5 cloves garlic, sliced</p> <p dir="ltr">125g dried rice noodles, soaked (see Cook's Tip)</p> <p dir="ltr">2 bunches Asian greens, trimmed, chopped, steamed</p> <p dir="ltr">Coarsely grated carrot, slivered red onion, sliced chillies, coriander leaves, Thai basil, and/or lime wedges, to serve (optional)</p> <h2 dir="ltr">Method</h2> <ol> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Remove and reserve stems from the shitake mushrooms. Thinly slice the caps. Transfer the sliced mushrooms to a bowl, cover and put in the fridge until required. </p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Place the shiitake stems, ginger, coriander seeds and cloves on a double thick 20cm piece of muslin. Bring up corners and tie closed with string.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Place the spice bag, chicken, water, stock, onion, porcini mushrooms, sugar and garlic in a slow cooker. Cover and cook on low for 8 hours or on high for 4 hours. Remove and discard the spice bag. </p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Remove the chicken from the cooker. Remove the meat from the bones. Discard the bones. Coarsley shred the chicken. Cover and set aside. Stir the reserved shiitake mushrooms and noodles into the broth. Cover and cook for a further 10 minutes.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Divide the greens between serving bowls. Ladle the noodle mixture over the greens. Add the shredded chicken. Top with carrot, onion, chilli, coriander, basil and lime wedges, if using. </p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Chef’s tip</strong><br />To soak rice noodles, place in a large heatproof glass bowl. Cover noodles with boiling water. Set aside for 5-7 minutes or until noodles are tender but still firm, stirring occasionally.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Pho Flavours</strong><br />Pho (pronounced fuh) is a traditional Vietnamese noodle dish. It is easily adaptable to your family's favourite foods. Use pork, beef or tofu instead of chicken. No rice noodles? Try cooked wholemeal spaghetti.<br />And the topper ideas are endless! Give fresh green shallots, basil, shredded cabbage and a drizzle of sriracha sauce a try. </p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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“The world’s biggest not-a-potato”

<p dir="ltr">A New Zealand couple who thought they had grown the world’s largest potato have been informed that it actually isn’t a potato.</p> <p dir="ltr">Colin and Donna Craig-Brown were weeding their garden on a small farm in Hamilton, when his hoe hit something hard under the ground.</p> <p dir="ltr">Colin bent down to make sure it was a potato and tasted the strange looking object, confirming to his wife that it was a “potato”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The couple named it Dug, took it for walks and even dressed it up when they finally decided to submit the heavy 7.8kg find to the Guiness Book of Records.</p> <p dir="ltr">The record for the world’s largest potato is currently held by someone in Britain, who grew a massive potato weighing just under 5kg.</p> <p dir="ltr">Unfortunately, Colin and Donna’s dreams were shattered when they were told Dug was in fact not a potato.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Sadly the specimen is not a potato and is in fact the tuber of a type of gourd. For this reason we do unfortunately have to disqualify the application,” the email read.</p> <p dir="ltr">He said he couldn’t fight their conclusion because they had submitted Dug’s DNA for testing.</p> <p dir="ltr">“What can you say? We can’t say we don’t believe you, because we gave them the DNA stuff,” Colin told <a href="https://apnews.com/article/worlds-largest-potato-doug-a440afd3c656018c585078ed3ac18970" target="_blank" rel="noopener">AP</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the disappointment, Colin and Donna still care for Dug who now sits in their freezer.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I say ‘gidday’ to him every time I pull out some sausages. He's a cool character,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Whenever the grandchildren come round, they say, ‘Can we see Dug?'"</p> <p dir="ltr">“Dug is the destroyer from Down Under. He is the world’s biggest not-a-potato.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

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All hail the mighty prawn!

<p dir="ltr">Vibrant in colour, sweet in flavour and firm in texture – there’s nothing more delicious than a good ol’ Aussie prawn. So, to mark National Prawn Day on March 19, we’ve got an original recipe by Susie Burrell, prepared especially for Tropic Co, for you to whip up at home.  </p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Preparation time: 00:15</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Cooking time: 00:10</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Serves: 4</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Level: Easy</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">Ingredients List:</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">12 Raw Tropic Co Tiger Prawns, peeled, tails left on</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Panko Bread Crumbs</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">1⁄2 cup plain flour</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Salt &amp; Pepper</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">1 egg</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Lime wedges, to serve</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Dipping Sauce</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">1⁄2 cup low-fat greek yoghurt</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">2 tbsp sweet chilli sauce</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">Method</p> <p dir="ltr">Step 1</p> <p dir="ltr">Remove heads from prawns and shell, however leaving the tails intact</p> <p dir="ltr">Step 2 </p> <p dir="ltr">Combine flour, panko crumbs, and salt and pepper. In a third bowl crack the egg and whisk with a fork.</p> <p dir="ltr">Step 3</p> <p dir="ltr">Dip each prawn in an air-fryer and lightly spray with extra virgin olive oil. Cook the</p> <p dir="ltr">Tropic Co Tiger Prawns at 180 degrees for 8-10 minutes, turning halfway throughout the time.</p> <p dir="ltr">Step 4</p> <p dir="ltr">While prawns cook, in another bowl, combine ingredients for dipping sauce. Store in</p> <p dir="ltr">the fridge until ready to eat.</p> <p dir="ltr">Step 5 </p> <p dir="ltr">Serve prawns with dipping sauce and a squeeze of fresh lime</p> <p dir="ltr">Serve right away!</p>

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How to make the best classic scones

<p dir="ltr">There’s a reason the classic scone is a timeless snack. Here is a classic, go-to recipe that you just KNOW is going to result in perfect scones every single time. </p> <p dir="ltr">Prep time: 15 mins</p> <p dir="ltr">Cook time: 12 mins</p> <h2 dir="ltr">Ingredients</h2> <p dir="ltr">3 cups self-raising flour</p> <p dir="ltr">100g unsalted butter, chopped</p> <p dir="ltr">1 cup milk</p> <p dir="ltr">Extra flour, for dusting</p> <p dir="ltr">Jam and whipped cream, for serving</p> <h2 dir="ltr">Method</h2> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">1. Preheat oven to 220C. Dust an oven tray with extra flour. Sift flour into a large mixing bowl. Add butter. Use your fingertips to rub  butter into flour until mixture resembles breadcrumbs.</p> <p dir="ltr">2. Make a well in the centre. Add milk and mix with a butter knife until mixture comes together to form a soft loose dough. Turn out onto a floured surface and knead briefly (about 30 seconds) until dough is smooth.</p> <p dir="ltr">3. Use the palm of your hand to press dough into a 2cm thick round. Use a 5cm cookie cutter to cut 12 rounds from dough. Place rounds onto prepared tray, about 2cm apart. Dust with a small amount of flour.</p> <p dir="ltr">4. Bake for 12 minutes or until golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature with jam and cream.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>COOK'S TIPS</strong></p> <p> </p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">If you don’t have a cookie cutter on hand, just form the dough into a rectangular shape. Use a sharp knife to cut dough into 12 rectangles.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">You can re-roll any scraps but try to limit the amount of times you re-roll to once, as the scones won’t be as light and tender.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Wrapping warm cooked scones with a clean tea-towel will give them a soft crust.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">If the weather is really cold, and you’re finding it hard to soften your butter at room temperature, chill your butter and grate it. This will make it easy to incorporate it into the flour.</p> </li> </ul> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

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15 foods you can ignore the best-before date on

<p dir="ltr">Ignoring the best before date on some items could save you thousands each year, new research has revealed.</p> <p dir="ltr"> While it seems sensible to pay attention to best before labels, you could accidentally be throwing out food that’s perfectly good to eat, according to a food waste movement started in the UK.</p> <p dir="ltr">Too Good To Go has urged shoppers not to rely on best before dates and use by labels in order to tell whether or not food is good enough to eat.</p> <p dir="ltr">It also said Australian consumers throw away around 3.1 million tonnes of food per year which on average costs households between $2000 to $2500 per year, Oz Harvest says.</p> <p dir="ltr">But Too Good To Go, which according to its website is set to launch in Australia soon, says that as long as an item looks, tastes and smells OK, you can probably use it past the best before date.</p> <p dir="ltr">Common items that are safe to eat if they pass this three-step test include eggs, milk and cheese.</p> <p dir="ltr">Frozen food, dried pasta and bread are also likely to remain edible after the best before date has passed.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What is a best before date?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">The best before date is related to quality and there is no harm in eating items that have gone past “best” if they have been stored correctly, like at the right fridge temperature.</p> <p dir="ltr">This is different from the use-by date, which is very important in the safety of food.</p> <p dir="ltr">You can eat food right up to the use-by date but not after, according to <a href="https://www.foodstandards.gov.au/consumer/labelling/dates/Pages/default.aspx">Foods Standards Australia New Zealand</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Even if it looks, smells and tastes OK, food after its use-by date can still contain unseen bacteria that can make you ill.</p> <p dir="ltr">Many people don’t understand the difference between the two labels.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Reducing food waste is a win-win solution,” Jamie Crummie, co-founder of Too Good To Go told <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/money/17743721/foods-ignore-best-before-dates-save-money/">The Sun</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Not only do you reduce its harmful impact on the environment, but you save money in the process too.</p> <p dir="ltr">“In the midst of a cost-of-living crisis, reducing our food waste is a really simple and easy thing that everyone can do to reduce their food costs, all the while knowing you’re doing something great for the planet too.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Which products can I eat past the best before date?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">With food prices rising, household finances are under pressure for millions of Australians.</p> <p dir="ltr">Official data says groceries have risen by 4.2% between December 2019 and December 2021, excluding tobacco and alcohol.</p> <p dir="ltr">That’s a touch slower than overall consumer price inflation which has gone up 4.39% in total over two years.</p> <p dir="ltr">But overall, Australians are reporting feeling like their grocery bills have gone up far, far more than the official figures.</p> <p dir="ltr">Avoiding throwing out food that’s still good could help you save some much-needed cash.</p> <p dir="ltr">Of course, the exact amount you can save depends on how much you usually chuck out and which items you can rescue before they are binned.</p> <p dir="ltr">Here’s what you can eat:</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Milk</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Milk is the fifth most wasted food and drink product in Australia, after potatoes, bread, bananas and lettuce according to Aus Food News.</p> <p dir="ltr">With the average cost of a liter of milk currently $1.72, that’s millions of dollars down the drain too. It’s easy to tell if milk has gone off as it can go lumpy, smell funky, or taste sour.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Bread</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">If you store your bread in the fridge you can use it for up to two weeks past the best before date.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bread that has gone a little hard will still be great for toast, Too Good To Go says.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bread sold in long-life packaging like pittas can last for considerably longer too – potentially months.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Eggs</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Millions of eggs are thrown out every year.</p> <p dir="ltr">Keep them in the fridge and this could increase usability by as much as three weeks after the best before date.</p> <p dir="ltr">An easy test to see if an egg is good to eat is putting it in a bowl of water – if it sinks it’s fine to eat, if it floats then it’s not.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Hard cheese</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Hard cheeses like cheddar are perfectly good to eat after the best before date.</p> <p dir="ltr">You can cut any surface mould off of hard cheeses and eat the rest safely if it’s free from mould.</p> <p dir="ltr">But this is not recommended for soft dairy products like goats cheese.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to Too Good To Go, spores from mould often pass through soft cheese quite quickly.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Yoghurt</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">While the texture and taste of yoghurt may change as time goes on, the acidic nature of the product means bad bacteria are kept at bay almost indefinitely.</p> <p dir="ltr">This is particularly true if the yoghurt is unopened, and has been stored correctly.</p> <p dir="ltr">It means as long as it passes the look, smell and taste test you can eat it several weeks after the best before date.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Canned food</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">We’ve all had cans of food lurking for too long in our cupboards at some point and the good news is that they’re safe to eat years after the best before date.</p> <p dir="ltr">That’s because of the extremely high heat process products go through when being canned that kills bacteria and sterilises the contents.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Frozen food</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">When you leave food in the freezer the quality deteriorates over time, but it’s still safe to use.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s generally recommended to eat most freezer foods within three to six months if you want them at their best.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Dried pasta</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Dried pasta can last up to three years after the best before date.</p> <p dir="ltr">You just need to make sure that it’s been stored in an airtight container for that time</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>White rice</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">White rice can last for years too, if kept in an airtight container.</p> <p dir="ltr">It can become stale as the starch naturally crystallises, but it’s safe to eat.</p> <p dir="ltr">But you want to look out for rice weevils, which can appear in flour too.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you spot these, don’t eat it – throw it away.</p> <p dir="ltr">This only applies to white rice though, not brown, as it is refined and the preservatives keep it good for longer.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Biscuits</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Unopened biscuits can be eaten weeks after the best before date and up to six months, according to Wrap.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Honey</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Honey can last for a very long time, according to To Good To Go, even when it crystallises.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s safe to eat and there’s a simple trick to get the consistency back – just place the jar or bottle into a bowl of boiling water.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Soy sauce</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">This cooking essential will last years after the best before date if it’s kept sealed.</p> <p dir="ltr">That’s because it contains a lot of salt, which acts as a preservative.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Vinegar</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Vinegar is used as a preservative, to make other foods last longer like pickles and eggs.</p> <p dir="ltr">So the condiment will last well past its best before date.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Sugar</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Sugar can last indefinitely, the food waste organisation says, just keep it in an airtight container.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Bicarbonate of soda</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">If you took up baking during lockdown but didn’t take it up as a full time hobby, you can still dig out and use up an old tub of bicarb.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s safe to use years after the best before, though be warned that it can lose some of its power as a raising agent.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-cf6c8024-7fff-1a39-557d-d870898fd8f6"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">It’s also still good to use as a cleaning agent around the house.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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Intense debate sparked among fiercely loyal Aldi customers

<p dir="ltr">A new feature on Aldi bread has sparked intense debate among the supermarket’s loyal customers.</p> <p dir="ltr">The retail giant is currently trialling cardboard recyclable tags on many of its loaves of bread, replacing plastic tags. ALDI said it’s made the step as part of its commitment to become more sustainable.</p> <p dir="ltr">“ALDI Australia has a number of commitments to improve the sustainability of our product packaging, including a goal to reduce the amount of plastic packaging across our own-label range by a quarter by 2025,” an ALDI Australia spokesperson has told 7NEWS.com.au. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We have started trialling recyclable cardboard bread tags on a select range of our bread products, and we continue to work closely with our business partners to identify opportunities to transition to cardboard tags on more of our products.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The next few years will see us continue to remove plastics from our range or replace it with sustainable alternatives and by 2025 all remaining packaging will be either recyclable, reusable or compostable.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Since being shared on social media, ALDI’s new cardboard bread tags have sparked intense debate.</p> <p dir="ltr">Many agree that the new sustainable tags are “a brilliant idea”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Every bit of plastic that we can easily replace with a recyclable version is so much better for our environment,” said one.</p> <p dir="ltr">Added another: “This makes me very happy. Hopefully we can lose the vegetables in plastic wrap next. Good direction.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Said a third: “I was impressed by this too!!! And I found the plastic ones would sometimes pierce the bag.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Wrote one more: “ALDI has a commitment to recycling, I think it’s great, use the reuse-able clips, save our environment.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Others have said they were disappointed in the cardboard tags, saying that they don’t work as well.</p> <p dir="ltr">“These really are the worst thing since sliced bread,” said one Facebook user.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another wrote: “I absolutely hate them… they break or become flimsy the first time you open the bread! So I’ve saved a whole heap of plastic ones and swap them as soon as I get home!”</p> <p dir="ltr">Added a third: “My bread ended up through the boot of my car these clips are useless.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Said another: “I love that it’s not plastic but the cardboard isn’t working well. I got a loaf of bread and it was raining, all open by the time I got to the car.”</p> <p dir="ltr">One more wrote: “It’s a great sustainability initiative however they’re so crap that they fall off after the second time getting bread out. Same for other stores too, not just an Aldi issue.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Another added: “Can’t stand them. They break so easily. I’m glad I kept my old plastic ones.”</p> <p dir="ltr">However, other Facebook users urged ALDI users to rise above the various issues.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Tip to anyone that is complaining. You can buy reusable metal pegs or even reuse other plastic tags,” one wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You just need to think outside the box. Man we are living in an interesting time of convenience and self entitlement. These tags are the worst thing for our ocean.”</p> <p dir="ltr">A few others pointed out a very Australian problem with the new cardboard tags.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You can never really fix a thong blow-out with it though,” said one.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-ef1705f7-7fff-3f2b-a59b-73467a04c56c"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Another joked: “Won’t last long when I use it to fix my flip flops! Seriously though, good on ya ALDI.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: 7News</em></p>

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Coriander and ice-cream: the cross over nobody asked for

<p dir="ltr">McDonald’s in China has launched a very unusual dessert. It is safe to say fast-food fans are not convinced. </p> <p dir="ltr">The “Cilantro Sundae” is a limited-edition twist on McDonald’s popular ice cream dessert that is topped with a bright green coriander sauce and fresh “crumbs” of the distinctive herb.</p> <p dir="ltr">While it may seem like an early April fools prank, the menu item is actually very real, reportedly launching on February the 21st for a limited time until February the 25th.</p> <p dir="ltr">Coriander widely acknowledged as being super divisive with some loving it and most hating it, so it comes as no surprise social media has erupted like this.</p> <p dir="ltr">Twitter user @ZhugeEX appears to have started the debate around the unique combination after sharing a promotional photo of the McDonald’s item.</p> <p dir="ltr">“McDonald’s China launched a Cilantro Sundae special menu item today, which is interesting...” the video games expert told his 161,000 followers.</p> <p dir="ltr">Reaction came in thick and fast, with some declaring they were “desperate to try this terrible thing”. Customers have also been sharing snaps of the 6.6 Chinese Yuan dessert which is roughly $1.45 and has been grossed out in the process. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Cilantro is one of my favourite things so I would try it lol,” one stated.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Dear @Mcdonalds, when is coriander sundae ice cream coming to Singapore? Pretty pls...” one coriander fan pleaded.</p> <p dir="ltr">Others mocked the unusual colour, one even comparing it to the green of Ireland’s St Patrick’s Day.</p> <p> </p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m reporting this for violent and graphic content,” one user joked. </p> <p dir="ltr">Image: Instagram</p>

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Clever hack for banishing fruit flies from your kitchen

<p>There’s nothing worse than trying to keep a clean kitchen, only to be greeted by a swarm of pesky fruit flies.</p> <p>Once they arrive, it seems like nothing will ever work to get rid of them.</p> <p>According to Good Housekeeping, fruit flies can lay up to 500 eggs at a time and even worse, those eggs hatch within 24 hours.</p> <p>Now one clever Sydney woman has revealed her genius hack for bidding them farewell once and for all, with a cheap and effective method that she happened to come across quite by chance.</p> <p>“I realised I could use red wine when I left a glass out and came back in the morning and it had a bunch of flies in it,” she told Yahoo Lifestyle.</p> <p><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/02/fruit-fly-hack2.jpg" alt="" width="584" height="299" /></p> <p>“I didn’t realise that wine would work so well – I’d tried traps with apple cider vinegar and dish soap before but it’s never worked as well as this."</p> <p>Fruit flies are attracted to ripe and rotting fruit and vegetables, things like beer and wine, bins and cleaning rags, so the mixture was the perfect solution.</p> <p>She first took a glass jar and filled it three-quarters of the way up with water. While from the photos it might look like there is a lot of wine in the mixture, it’s actually 90% water.</p> <p>She then added a few splashes of red wine and some dish soap.</p> <p>Then, she sealed the top of the jar with glad wrap and poked a few holes in the top with a fork. She then secured the whole thing together with a rubber band to keep it all in place.</p> <p>Now, the jar with the mixture lives on her windowsill next to her fruit bowl and the results speak for themselves!</p> <p><em>Images: Yahoo</em></p>

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Wahlburgers opens first Aussie restaurant

<p dir="ltr">Burger lovers rejoice! Cult US chain Wahlburgers has finally opened its doors in Australia.</p> <p dir="ltr">The burger restaurant, founded by actors Mark and Donnie Wahlberg with the help of their chef brother Paul, has launched in Circular Quay, Sydney, as the first of several planned Australian Wahlburgers outlets.</p> <p dir="ltr">Wahlburgers Australia CEO Sam Mustaca told Goodfood they plan to open more Wahlburgers restaurants in Warriewood, Surfers Paradise and Byron Bay.</p> <p dir="ltr">While the menu includes typical US burger fare, they’ve also included an Aussie Schnitty Burger along with some other local delicacies.</p> <p dir="ltr">While Wahlburgers celebrates its official opening this Thursday, some burger fanatics have been able to get in early to sample the menu.</p> <p dir="ltr">Food blogger @issac_eatsalot shared his review, saying the menu was “much broader than your average burger place – think of it more as a diner with a stacked burger menu”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Fries and fried pickles were solid sides to share. HEAPS of taps of local craft beers and they’ve got locally sourced coffee beans on machine as well … I’ll be back ASAP to try more!”</p> <p dir="ltr">Issac’s post sparked plenty of food envy in burger lovers, many of whom commented that they “need to get here ASAP” as the meals “look epic”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Wahlburgers opened its first restaurant in the famous family’s hometown of Boston back in 2011. Interest was so high in the celebrity-run restaurant that they even got their own reality series Wahlburgers, which ran for 10 seasons from 2014 to 2019.</p> <p dir="ltr">They opened their first franchise location in Toronto, Canada, in 2014. </p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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How to create an eggless choc-caramel masterpiece

<p dir="ltr">This choc cake with creamy choc icing is topped with choc-caramel flakes and, when you cut into it, choc sauce oozes out. Here’s how to create this delicious treat.</p> <h2 dir="ltr">Ingredients</h2> <p dir="ltr">1¾ cups plain flour</p> <p dir="ltr">1 cup caster sugar</p> <p dir="ltr">¼ cup Dutch cocoa powder</p> <p dir="ltr">1½ tsp bicarbonate of soda</p> <p dir="ltr">½ tsp fine salt</p> <p dir="ltr">½ cup vegetable oil</p> <p dir="ltr">2 tsp vanilla extract</p> <p dir="ltr">1½ tsp white vinegar</p> <p dir="ltr">1 cup water</p> <p dir="ltr">Cadbury Flake and Flake Caramilk bars, roughly broken, to serve</p> <h3 dir="ltr">Icing</h3> <p dir="ltr">75g unsalted butter, at room temperature</p> <p dir="ltr">1 cup pure icing sugar</p> <p dir="ltr">¼ cup Dutch cocoa powder</p> <p dir="ltr">1 tsp vanilla extract</p> <p dir="ltr">1 Tbsp milk</p> <h3 dir="ltr">Chocolate sauce</h3> <p dir="ltr">200g dark chocolate, chopped</p> <p dir="ltr">300ml thickened cream</p> <p dir="ltr">2 Tbsp honey</p> <h2 dir="ltr">Method</h2> <ol> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Preheat oven to 160°C fan-forced (180°C conventional). Grease and line a 22cm round cake pan with baking paper.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Sift flour, caster sugar, cocoa, bicarb and salt into a bowl. Whisk the oil, vanilla, vinegar and water in a second bowl, then stir into the flour mixture. Spoon into prepared pan and bake for 35-40 minutes, until a skewer can be inserted into the centre and removed cleanly. Stand in pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes, then invert cake onto rack to cool completely.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">For icing, combine butter, icing sugar, cocoa and vanilla in a bowl and beat well. Add milk and beat until very smooth. Set aside for 5 minutes.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Meanwhile, to make the chocolate sauce, melt chocolate gently in a heatproof bowl over a saucepan of simmering water. Bring cream and honey to the boil in a small saucepan, whisking until smooth. Whisk into melted chocolate.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Use a melon baller to make holes in the top of the cake (reserving cake balls for another use), then pipe or spoon in the chocolate sauce, reserving leftover sauce. Top cake with icing and scatter with roughly broken Flakes. Served with reserved chocolate sauce.</p> </li> </ol> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-f8252476-7fff-50f5-3908-096f90a982e7"><br /></span><span id="docs-internal-guid-f8252476-7fff-50f5-3908-096f90a982e7"><em>Image: Better Homes &amp; Gardens</em><br /></span><span id="docs-internal-guid-f8252476-7fff-50f5-3908-096f90a982e7"></p> <p></span></p>

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School slammed for going completely meat free

<p dir="ltr">A school’s decision to go “meat free” permanently has sparked anger among parents, with some even trying to transfer their children to different schools.</p><p dir="ltr">Barrowford Primary School in Lancashire, England, has begun offering vegetarian dinners and urged students not to bring meat in their packed lunches.</p><p dir="ltr">Though the school introduced the new rule last year, a letter informing parents was only sent out last week, according to <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/17631295/school-bans-meat-vegetarian-packed-lunches/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>The Sun</em></a>.</p><p dir="ltr">The school has said it hasn’t received any complaints about the new meals, but unhappy parents have taken to Facebook to share their feelings.</p><p dir="ltr">Zoe Douglas, whose children attend Barrowford, is even attempting to transfer her children to a new school as she has “had enough”.</p><p dir="ltr">“It is a joke. I’m looking to move mine as I’ve had enough of that school,” she said.</p><p dir="ltr">“I think they forget that non-meat eaters and vegans have to take a lot of supplements. What supplements are they getting instead at that school?</p><p dir="ltr">“Nothing, probably saving on food costs.”</p><p dir="ltr">Ms Douglas is also angered by the fact the meal plan was introduced “ages ago”, but she has only just found out why her daughter returned from school talking about “disgusting” new sausages.</p><p dir="ltr">“I only found out this week in an email,” Ms Douglas said.</p><p dir="ltr">“Amelia ordered sausage and mash and when she bit into her sausage she said ‘eww’.</p><p dir="ltr">“Teachers said, ‘oh, it’s a vegetarian sausage’ but they hadn’t told her before she ordered.</p><p dir="ltr">“She ended up just having mash for her dinner. I’m fuming. She’s been on packed lunches since.”</p><p dir="ltr">Another parent, who wished to remain anonymous, questioned why everyone couldn’t be accommodated, rather than forcing meat-eating kids to adapt their diet.</p><p dir="ltr">“Why not accommodate the veggies, vegans, whatever and add to the menu instead of making our kids adapt?” they queried.</p><p dir="ltr">“And to request parents pack lunches that are veggie as well, not to mention the local farmers, this is absolutely ludicrous.</p><p dir="ltr">“No wonder my kids are starving and raid the fridge before the shoes are off.</p><p dir="ltr">“Vegetarian is a choice for when they are older.”</p><p dir="ltr">Other parents asked, “what happened to freedom of choice?”, while others said they were “dumbstruck” at the “absolutely ridiculous” decision.</p><p dir="ltr">Some locals are particularly upset, due to the school’s rural location where farming is a core part of the area.</p><p dir="ltr">Livestock buyer Alex Nutter said: “We have absolutely no hope of teaching the younger generation about our food production when primary schools are teaching them to be ‘meat-free’.</p><p dir="ltr">“It’s very worrying what we’re up against.”</p><p dir="ltr">Other parents have welcomed the move and see it as the school catering to the different needs of students.</p><p dir="ltr">Head teacher Rachel Tomlinson said the decision was made to “stop climate change” in the letter sent to parents.</p><p dir="ltr">Ms Tomlinson noted that meat and dairy products “come at a huge environmental cost” as the livestory industry has a large carbon footprint.</p><p dir="ltr">“If you still want to send packed lunches, could you please consider meat-free options to further support us in doing our bit to reduce carbon emissions as a school community?” she concluded in the letter.</p><p dir="ltr">When approached by <em>The Sun</em>, Ms Tomlinson said the decision was made to show changing daily habits can have an impact.</p><p dir="ltr">“Our children learn about the principles of sustainable development as part of the national curriculum, and are really interested in how they can contribute to better looking after our environment,” she said.</p><p dir="ltr">“We have been careful to approach this in a balanced way, and teach that it is fine to eat meat, but that reducing our consumption can help our planet.”</p><p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Restaurant in strife for accepting puppy pics instead of vaccination proof 

<p>A restaurant in Canada was ordered to temporarily cease its indoor dining services after it was discovered that customers were being allowed a seat after presenting cute dog photos instead of proof of vaccination against COVID-19 or negative test results, health officials said.</p><p>Alberta Health Services issued the closure order Friday after it investigated complaints about the Granary Kitchen in Red Deer.</p><p>Two investigators posing as customers visited the restaurant at different times after providing photos and personal identification to restaurant staff, the agency said in the order.</p><p>“In both instances, facility staff used a tablet to make it appear as if they were scanning a QR code, when in fact the staff member was presented with a photograph of a dog,” the agency said.</p><p>“The staff member then proceeded to ask the test shopper for personal identification and offered dine-in services.”<br />The restaurant was ordered to close its indoor dining area and submit a written COVID-19 compliance plan that follows the province’s indoor dining rules.</p><p>In a Facebook post Friday, the restaurant called the incident “an unfortunate circumstance at our front door which involved one of our underage hostesses”.</p><p>“We are taking the weekend to retrain and regroup,” the restaurant said.</p><p>“We look forward to serving you again as soon as we are ready to reopen.</p><p>"In closing we would like to remind everyone of the tremendous pressure being placed on front staff, and please remember to be kind.”</p><p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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The perfect poached egg in 45 seconds

<p>A teacher has shared her simple cooking method for poaching the perfect egg in just 45 seconds without using a stovetop.</p><p>Katie Lolas, from Sydney, shared a video on <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CZahE4JJGBh/">Instagram</a>, showing exactly how she made poached an egg in the microwave using just a glass of water.</p><p>“If you don’t have a poaching contraption on hand and hate the taste of vinegar in your poached eggs, then this is for you,” she said.</p><p>“Whether it’s for eggs Benedict or avocado toast, this is the foolproof way to make poached eggs in the microwave.”</p><p>She started by adding a quarter of a cup of water to a microwave-safe glass.</p><p>“Crack an egg into the water ensuring that the egg is covered with water,” she explained.</p><p>“Poke the whites around the egg yolk three times with a fork or knife so the whites cook well .”</p><div id="taboola-mid-article-thumbnails"></div><p>Katie then cooked the egg on high for 45 seconds in the microwave.</p><p>“Cook in extra 15 second blasts if the egg isn’t cooked to your liking,” she said.</p><p>Once it’s cooked, strain the egg and serve with your dish of choice.</p><p>Katie said if you’re cooking more than one egg, you should always use fresh cool water.</p><p>“Never use the same water twice in the microwave - it will get too hot,” she said.</p><p class="css-1316j2p-StyledParagraph e4e0a020" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.125rem;line-height: 1.7;color: #292a33;font-size: 15px;background-color: #ffffff"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/02/Eggs-2.jpg" alt="" width="563" height="370" /></p><p>The video has since been viewed more than 80,000 times with many saying they couldn’t wait to give the method a go.</p><p>“Oh my god no way! I need to try this,” one wrote.</p><p>Another said: “This is going to change my life. Thanks for sharing.”</p><p>While one added: “Wow! What a cheat! Love it.”</p><div> </div><p>Those who tried the microwave method confirmed their eggs were poached perfectly every time.</p><p>“Love it! I do this at home as well. Never fail,” one wrote.</p><p>Another said: “I do this in the office microwave. Minds were blown. Courtesy saucer placed on top of the cup in case you get an egg-splosion and don’t want to clean the microwave.”</p><p>While one added: “Woah I just tried this and it works perfectly.”</p><p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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The one meal Victoria Beckham has eaten every day for 25 years

<p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">David Beckham has exposed his wife Victoria Beckham’s eating habits, revealing she eats the same meal every day for the last 25 years.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">The famous footballer recalled one of his “favourite evenings” when Victoria deviated from her strict diet, eating something off his plate when she was pregnant with their fourth child.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">David spoke on the <em style="margin: 0px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline">River Cafe Table 4</em> podcast about the food his family eats, telling the host: “I get quite emotional about food and wine. When I’m eating something great I want everyone to try it.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">“Unfortunately I’m married to someone that has eaten the same thing for the last 25 years,” he went on to say.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">“Since I met her she only eats grilled fish, steamed vegetables, she will very rarely deviate from that,” he said.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">David looked back fondly on one particular evening when his wife ate something off his plate, back when she was pregnant with their youngest child Harper, now 10 years old.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">“The only time she’s probably ever shared something that’s been on my plate was actually when she was pregnant with Harper and it was the most amazing thing.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">“It was one of my favourite evenings. I can’t remember what it was but I know she’s not eaten it since,” David said.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">Victoria has previously admitted that she won’t eat any food cooked in oil, butter, or sauces, and she doesn’t eat red meat or dairy.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">The former <em style="margin: 0px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline">Spice Girls</em> singer also shared that her comfort food is a piece of wholegrain toast with salt on it and on her birthday she celebrates with a cake made from fruit.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">David told the podcast that when he has the house to himself he loves cooking whatever he fancies.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">Pretty recently I was in isolation for five days because I’d just been to Italy so I came back and on one of the last days Victoria’s parents had a party and I couldn’t actually go to it, so everyone was out of the house and I secretly loved it."</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">“I literally had two most amazing cuts of meat. One was a T-bone and I had some English wagyu."</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">“I poured one glass of the most amazing red wine that I treated myself to because I was on my own looking forward to watching the football in the afternoon on my own. So I set the barbecue up,” David told the podcast host.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">David shows off his love of cooking on his Instagram, sharing a video of himself preparing a meal in Gordon Ramsay’s kitchen.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">He captioned the clip: “Learnt a new dish to celebrate Lunar New Year… Sweet and sour Mandarin Fish.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff">“Must say I’m quite proud of how it turned out. Thanks for letting me use your kitchen @gordongram #LunarNewYear,” David wrote.</p><p style="font-size: 16px;margin: 0px 0px 5px;padding: 0px;border: 0px;vertical-align: baseline;color: #323338;font-family: Roboto, Arial;background-color: #ffffff"><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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