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Old picnic favourite: The Pan Bagnat

<p><strong>Serves 4</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Love using olive oil in the kitchen? This hearty and delicious lunch recipe will delight!</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When you prepare this sandwich, make sure not to be stingy on the olive oil, pan bagnat literally means ‘bathed bread’. This old picnic favourite tastes of the French Riviera – a pan bagnat is simply a salad Niçoise in a practical bread packaging. Don't slice the sandwich up until it’s time to eat. Then you won’t have to deal with any mess. Too easy!</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Recipe from The Ultimate Sandwich which include 100 classic sandwiches from Reuben to Po'Boy and everything in between (Pavilion, $34.99).</span></p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1 Sicilian loaf - click here for recipe</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1 tomato </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1 egg </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">200g can of tuna in oil, drained </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">½ red onion, sliced </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">a bunch of fresh basil</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">6 anchovies </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">50g/½ cup chopped black olives </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">2 tbsp capers </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">olive oil </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">red wine vinegar </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">salt and freshly ground black pepper</span></li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Cut the top off your Sicilian loaf as if it was a lid and then scrape out quite a lot of the crumb from the bottom. The hole should be big enough to stuff with filling but no so big so only the crust remains. Slice the tomato and place in the bottom. Then add layers of sliced egg, tuna, onion, basil, anchovy, olives and capers. Drizzle over some oil and vinegar, then season with salt and pepper.</p> <p>2. Now it’s time to press this sandwich together into one yummy unity. Do this by placing it back in the tin, cover with a piece of greaseproof paper, then place a plate on top and finally, a weight. Leave in the fridge for 1–2 hours, or until it’s time to set off for the picnic.</p> <p>3. When it’s time to eat you just have to take out the sandwich from the tin, slice it into four pieces and enjoy it on a blanket with the sun in your face.</p> <p> </p> <p>Tips</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For more luxurious sandwiches see the Sicilian Loaf and the Vietnamese baguette, Banh mi.</span></p> <p> </p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/old-picnic-favourite-the-pan-bagnat.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au. </span></a></p>

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How to host the perfect BBQ

<p>Nothing gets the tastebuds tingling like the smell and sizzle of a great aussie barbecue. The warmer weather makes it almost compulsory and there is no better way to get family and friends together. But how can you make sure your next barbie is trouble free and has some extra-special touches that take it out of the ordinary? To help you out, we have put together a smorgasbord of simple ideas that will make sure you impress without any stress.</p> <p><strong>Get your equipment in good shape</strong></p> <p>It’s difficult to have a great barbecue if the tools of trade are not in good condition. Every 10 sessions or so you should dismantle plates grills and drip trays for a wash with soapy water followed by a light oiling to protect from rust. Every time you cook you also need to ensure that the plate and grill are free from any residue from previous uses. This is critical to avoid meat sticking to the grill. It is well worthwhile investing in a solid barbecue brush with wire bristles and notched scraper, so that you can get right into the difficult to reach places in between the grill grates.</p> <p>Check your burners are giving an even flame and use some wire to clear any blocked outlet holes. If you have lava rocks, then make sure they are not clogged with grease and replace them if they are. Now you’re ready to start cooking.</p> <p>There’s nothing more embarrassing than running out of gas, so use this quick trick to check your bottle isn’t empty. Pour some hot tap water down the side of the bottle, which will heat up the metal. Because the gas is naturally at a lower temperature the metal will cool a lot quicker, so simply run your hand down the bottle and wherever the metal suddenly becomes cooler is where your gas level is.</p> <p><strong>Do some delegation</strong></p> <p>If you are inviting guests they will invariably want to contribute something, so get them involved and delegate some of the menu. There are two general approaches to this. One is to keep the barbecued food under your control and ask guests to bring salads and side dishes. This has the advantage of allowing you to keep control over the barbecuing itself. Just remember to let guests know if there is a particular cuisine theme in your cooking, so that they bring sides that are complimentary.</p> <p>The second approach is to do all the sides inhouse and ask guests to bring their own meat. You lose a bit of control on the cooking front, but it will save on costs for you.</p> <p><strong>Top tips for great grilling</strong></p> <p>Let’s get down to the business end of things. To get the best of that great barbecue char flavouring, it is best to grill on a grate rather than a flat plate. It is essential to have your grill well and truly preheated to a high temperature before you begin cooking – that is key to getting the all-important char effect. If your barbecue has a lid then always use it to avoid heat loss and to maximise the smoky flavour.</p> <p>With those basics in mind, here are some specifics on cooking different types of meats:</p> <p><strong>Steak</strong></p> <ul> <li>For the perfect steak, always season generously about 15 minutes before cooking and have the meat at room temperature – not straight out of the fridge.</li> <li>To get those classic cross-hatch patterns on a steak, use the “10 and 2 method”. Position the steak so it is angled on the grill with the top end pointing to the 10 o’clock position. Leave it for 3 or 4 minutes without moving it and then lift and place it back down pointing to 2 o’clock for a couple more minutes. Turn the steak and repeat the process (with a little less cooking time on the second side).</li> <li>If you prefer your steak well done, move it away from the direct heat for the last few minutes of cooking to avoid it drying out.</li> <li>Always rest meat with a loose foil covering for a few minutes before serving.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Chicken</strong></p> <ul> <li>Use boneless for a quicker and more predictable result.</li> <li>Thigh fillets are a lot more forgiving that breast. Breast can go from perfect doneness to dry in a matter of a minute, whereas thigh will remain juicier even if overcooked a little.</li> <li>Chicken can be a bit bland on its own and will benefit from oil based marinades – particularly for breast meat, which is a lot leaner.</li> <li>Always cook the shinier side of the breast or thigh first. The key to avoiding the chicken sticking and tearing is to LEAVE IT ALONE once it hits the grill. You need to hold your nerve and let it develop caramelised grill marks BEFORE you attempt to turn it. If it’s sticking when your try to turn it, leave a little longer – it will eventually release easily.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Fish</strong></p> <ul> <li>Baste with oil before cooking and don’t be afraid to start with high heat – it’s essential to the caramelisation process.</li> <li>Place the fish on the grill skin side up and LEAVE IT ALONE until it has caramelised enough to release easily from the grill, before turning.</li> <li>Use the 70/30 – 70% of the cooking time is on the first side and just 30% on the second.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Vegetables</strong></p> <ul> <li>Unlike meat, vegetables only need a medium heat</li> <li>Vegetables such as eggplant, zucchini and capsicum are ideal for barbecuing. Cut them lengthwise to achieve maximum surface area. Large mushroom caps are also a perfect BBQ choice.</li> <li>Brush with oil to prevent sticking and to preserve moisture</li> <li>Avoid overcooking which can leave them soggy.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Change it up with BBQ entrée or dessert</strong></p> <p>If you go the BYO meat route, then why not surprise and delight your guests with entrée and dessert done on the barbecue. It can be super quick and easy . . . and sure to make an impact. Try these ideas:</p> <ul> <li>BBQ nachos – a great way to spark the socialising. Simply layer corn chips, grated cheese and salsa in an aluminium tray and throw on the barbecue with lid down for 5 minutes. Dollop on some avocado puree and sour cream and watch the smiles ignite when you serve.</li> <li>Paul Hogan tribute – The famous “shrimp on the barbie” is an ideal entrée. Peel, clean and pack the prawns tightly on kebabs (to maintain succulence) using two skewers (for easier flipping). Brush with olive oil and a generous sprinkle of your favourite seasoning. Use a high heat and cook 2 minutes one side and 1 minute on the other.</li> <li>Brilliant bruschetta – Whisk up a dressing of olive oil, julienne basil leaves, balsamic and salt, then toss through some quartered cherry tomatoes. Brush some olive oil on to sliced baguette and toast on the grill. Rub the toasted bread with a cut garlic clove, spoon on the tomato and top with some crumbled fetta.</li> <li>For a glorious finish, what could be simpler for dessert than a range of grilled fruits, such as melon, pineapple, stone fruit, apple and pear. Just cut into thick slices and grill for a couple of minutes on each side, while you melt down a glaze of melted butter, brown sugar and cinnamon in a small saucepan. Brush on the glaze and grill for another couple of minutes and serve with vanilla ice cream.</li> </ul> <p><strong>How to become “world’s best grandparent”!</strong></p> <p>Make the grandkids feel a little special with some easy BBQ mini burgers. Just slice hamburger buns into 3 slices, discard the middle slice and use a 4cm scone cutter to punch out mini buns from the top and bottom slices. Combine grated onion, salt, Worcester sauce and an egg with 250 grams of mince and form into flattened balls to grill on the BBQ plate. Melt some cheese slices on the cooked burgers and using large toothpicks skewer the bun, burger, sliced cherry tomato and lettuce leaves.</p> <p>Treat them for dessert too by slitting along the inside curve of a banana and pressing in some choc bits and mini marshmallows in the banana flesh. Wrap in foil and throw on the barbecue for a few minutes. The rich, gooey result will blow the kids away when served with some ice cream.</p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/food-and-wine/how-to-host-the-perfect-bbq.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

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Try this healthy chia seed pudding

<p>Time to prepare 10 (+ 3 hours refrigeration) mins | Serves 4</p> <p>Recipe courtesy <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/ahealthyview.com.au">A Healthy View,</a> by Holly Hedge.</p> <p>Chocolate pudding for breakfast? Yes! This chia seed pudding is super yummy, quick and full of fibre which keeps you full for longer. The coconut milk is a good fat and is the ONLY fat that our body recognises straight away and can use as brain fuel. </p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 1/2 cups Coconut milk ( or 1 cup coconut milk, 1/2 cup almond milk)</li> <li>6 tbsp Chia Seeds</li> <li>5 Dates, chopped</li> <li>1 tsp Vanilla</li> </ul> <p><strong>Flavours – choose one of:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Lime – juice of 1 lime</li> <li>Chocolate – 1 1/2 tblsp cacao powder</li> <li>Coconut – 4 tbsp shredded coconut</li> <li>Berry – handful frozen berries</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>1. Blend all ingredients, besides chia, in blender until well combined. Add chia and blend for 5 seconds</p> <p>2. Pour into jars or containers</p> <p>3. Crush almonds/berries/coconuts and pour over the top</p> <p>4. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours and enjoy cold</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>Mix up the recipe and pour your pudding into a smoothie for a thick and nutrient dense drink on the go.</p> <p>Experiment with the different flavours above to change the taste.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/chia-seed-pudding.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Can you be addicted to food?

<p>Are you a “carb craver” or “chocaholic”? We often use language associated with addiction to describe our relationships with food. But is it really possible to be addicted to certain types of food?</p> <p>The idea of “food addiction” <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23057499">remains controversial</a> and is not yet recognised as a disorder that can be diagnosed in clinical settings. But a growing body of scientific research suggests food addiction may exist. We recently <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352853215000243">surveyed young Australian adults</a> and found that approximately 15 per cent displayed addictive-like eating tendencies.</p> <p>Certain foods and eating patterns can prompt <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666308006223">behaviours</a> and <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25263466">brain responses</a> similar to those seen in more traditional forms of addiction such as drugs and alcohol. These addictive-like eating behaviours could be contributing to <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25338274">overeating and subsequent obesity</a> in vulnerable individuals. So it could be an important piece of the obesity puzzle.</p> <p><strong>Food addiction or overeating?</strong></p> <p>Food addiction is commonly characterised using the <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666308006223">2009 Yale Food Addiction Scale</a>. This applies the criteria for substance addiction, such as tolerance and withdrawal, to eating behaviours.</p> <p>This interpretation of food addiction shares many similarities with the criteria we use to diagnose binge eating disorder such as loss of control and intense craving for specific foods. So how can food addiction be set apart from other types of overeating?</p> <p>Studies <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22684991">have shown</a> that while there is some overlap (around 50 per cent) between individuals who display addictive-like eating behaviours and those who meet the diagnostic criteria for binge eating disorder, these can also occur independently.</p> <p>A <a href="http://www.hindawi.com/journals/isrn/2013/435027/">more recent suggestion</a> is that overeating should be viewed across a continuum ranging from non-problematic occasional overeating to the most severe and compulsive forms, which can be harmful to the person’s health and social life.</p> <p>Much like drinking alcohol can be viewed along a spectrum, with the most severe drinkers labelled as alcoholics, food addiction may be better understood in the same way, representing these <a href="http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13679-013-0049-8">more severe subtypes</a> of overeating.</p> <p><strong>Salt, fat and sugar</strong></p> <p>Human studies aimed at identifying foods associated with addictive-like eating are rapidly emerging. The types of foods we typically <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24365525">self-identify</a> as potentially addictive are processed “junk” foods high in fat, sugar and salt.</p> <p>In <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17617461">animal studies</a>, rats that are fed a healthy diet do not show the same addictive-like changes in the brain as rats fed highly palatable foods. This suggests that certain properties or ingredients may make specific foods more capable of triggering an addictive-like response.</p> <p>The <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25644095">ingredients added</a> to palatable foods may have properties that <a href="http://www.nature.com/nrendo/journal/v10/n9/full/nrendo.2014.91.html">can change</a> a number of physiological factors such as hormones that regulate our appetite and neurotransmitters in the brain, particularly the “feel-good” chemical dopamine.</p> <p>The effects of highly processed foods mirror those of other addictive substances. More refined and rapidly absorbed substances increase the rewarding and addictive potential of the substance. This is also not surprising from an <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25540603">evolutionary</a> point of view, as the potency of these rewarding ingredients is far greater in processed foods than in naturally occurring foods.</p> <p>A <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352853215000243">recent Australian survey</a> found that people displaying addictive-like eating tendencies had significantly higher intakes of high-kilojoule, packaged foods. A <a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0117959">study from the United States</a> also demonstrated that the addition of rewarding ingredients such as fats and sugar, as well as the level of processing, increases the addictive properties of a food.</p> <p>However, when we try to think about what actually triggers an addictive eating episode, it is difficult to separate food from the actual act of eating. It is therefore likely that both the specific rewarding characteristics of the food as well as problematic <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25205078">eating behaviours</a> play a role in addictive-like eating episodes.</p> <p>Unfortunately, with the increasing abundance of convenience foods in today’s food environment, heavily manufactured foods are easily accessible and heavily marketed. This could be especially problematic for those vulnerable to addictive-like eating, such as <a href="http://www.researchgate.net/publication/270106741_'Food_addiction'_What_happens_in_childhood">children</a>.</p> <p><strong>Treating and targeting food addiction</strong></p> <p>In coming years, rigorous research is needed to better understand what food addiction means, and how it can be identified and potentially treated. Such a strategy could inform the development of better weight-loss treatments that target addictive-like foods or behaviours in certain individuals.</p> <p>In addition, understanding the underlying mechanisms for these addictive-like behaviours could identify <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3793279/">new drug targets</a> to treat obesity in some individuals. This type of research may also inform <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3171738/">better public health policy</a> and environmental changes to help people make more informed decisions about their food and reduce triggers of addictive-like eating in vulnerable individuals.</p> <p>If you relate to these types of behaviours or have any concerns about your eating habits, talk to your local GP or an <a href="http://daa.asn.au/">accredited practising dietitian</a>.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Tracy Burrows, Senior Lecturer Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Newcastle and Kirrilly Pursey, PhD Candidate Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Newcastle</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-can-you-be-addicted-to-food-43067"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Full of goodness: Papaya chia oat breakfast parfait

<p>These parfaits are super easy to pull together, and are full of the goodness of papaya, oats and chia seeds. The combination is packed with flavour, vitamins and fibre, and will keep you satisfied for hours.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients: </strong></p> <p><strong>Oat Layer</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 cup oats</li> <li>1 cup almond milk unsweetened (or milk of choice)</li> <li>Natural sweetener to taste</li> <li>1/2 cup water</li> </ul> <p><strong>Papaya Layer</strong></p> <ul> <li>1/2 Ruby Rise Red Papaya, seeds removed; chop pulp to desired size</li> </ul> <p><strong>Papaya Chia Layer</strong></p> <ul> <li>1/4 cup chia seeds</li> <li>2 Tbsp Ruby Rise Red Papaya pulp mashed</li> <li>1 cup yoghurt (eg coconut, almond, soy)</li> <li>1/2 tsp vanilla extract (optional)</li> <li>Natural sweetener to taste (white granulated stevia, xylitol, coconut sugar, maple syrup)</li> <li>1/2 cup water (as required)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Mix all the ingredients for the oat layer well. Allow to soak for 30 minutes or overnight. Add more liquid as required when ready to serve.</li> <li>Mix all ingredients for the papaya chia later in a jar and place in the fridge for 30 minutes or overnight to swell. Add additional liquid as required prior to serving.</li> <li>Layer compote in desired pattern.</li> <li>Sprinkle with muesli, nuts or seeds to serve if desired.</li> </ol> <p><em>Photo and recipe by Jo Ross, Healthy Eating Jo.</em></p>

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Shellfish allergies: Can they be treated?

<p>Seafood platters? Bouillabaisse? Arroz de Marisco? Seafood paella? Oysters Rockefeller? Lobster Thermidor? Dining out with friends, a romantic meal, celebrating Christmas or a holiday on a wind-swept coast with these seafood dishes on your table are enjoyable moments.</p> <p>But have any of you, your friends or family experienced swelling of lips or eyelids, itchiness and rashes developed over your face or body, or even difficulty in breathing just a few minutes after eating shrimp, lobster, crab, clam, mussels, oysters or scallops? If yes, you could well have a shellfish allergy.</p> <p><strong>What is shellfish allergy?</strong></p> <p>Shellfish allergy is a type of hyper-immune response mediated by <a href="https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immunoglobuline_E">Immunoglobulin E</a> (IgE), an antibody produced by B cells.</p> <p>When someone who is allergic eats some shellfish, the allergens – primary <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropomyosin">tropomyosin</a>, a muscle protein – bind with IgE. This allergen-IgE complex then cross-links on mast cells. These cells play a key role in the inflammatory process, by which they contain many granules rich in inflammatory mediators like <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histamine">histamine</a>. Histamine can increase the permeability of the blood capillaries, exert effects on mucous glands and bronchila tubes, and is a central mediator of allergic reactions like itching.</p> <p><strong>A lifelong condition</strong></p> <p>As designated by the United States <a href="https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/Allergens/ucm106890.htm">Food Allergen Labelling and Consumer Protection Act</a>, crustacean shellfish are one of the top eight allergens alongside with milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soybeans and fish accounting for 90 per cent of food-related allergic reactions.</p> <p>Unlike allergies to egg and cow’s milk for which children often gradually acquire <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11882-016-0627-4">natural tolerance</a>, shellfish allergies usually <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11882-016-0627-4">persist throughout life</a>.</p> <p>Shellfish is the leading offending food in the United States, Canada, Portugal, and in the Asia-Pacific regions, including <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18808390">Hong Kong and Taiwan</a>. A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24372074">multi-centre survey</a> conducted in Europe, on the other hand, reported 4.8 per cent of adults with IgE sensitisation to shrimp and in some areas like Zurich, the sensitisation rate can be up to 7 per cent.</p> <p><strong>Poor diagnosis</strong></p> <p>Despite such a high impact, diagnosis and treatment of shellfish allergy remains suboptimal. The standard clinical diagnostic involves a thorough review of a patient’s clinical history followed by <a href="https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/allergy-tests/about/pac-20392895">skin prick test</a> (SPT) and measurement of shellfish-specific IgE level. A SPT reaction spot that is 3mm or more in diameter and an IgE level of greater than or equal to 0.35 kUA/L which stands for kilo unit of allergen-specific IgE per litre, are commonly defined as a positive diagnosis of a shellfish allergy.</p> <p>However, the rapidly growing number of diagnoses have highlighted concerning the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21651567">shortcomings of these conventional procedures</a>. SPT and IgE measurement with shellfish extract have low specificity of only 50 per cent, meaning that 50 per cent of people with a positive result in these tests may never experience clinical symptoms of shellfish allergy.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/M_qeE5BsynY"></iframe></div> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><span class="caption">Skin prick tests are usually efficient to determine allergies but also present several shortcomings (Imperial College London).</span></div> <p>Although reactions to all sorts of shellfish is common, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18498545">reports</a> have suggested species-specific allergic reactions – for example, you may be able to eat one species of prawn even if you are allergic to another. However, because tests cannot identify cross-reactivity, patients are often suggested to avoid all types of shellfish if they have allergic reactions to one type of shellfish.</p> <p>The oral food challenge, a test that involve giving increasing amounts of a food to a patient to determine if he or she has a food allergy, remains the gold standard. But it is resource-intensive, time-consuming, costly and risky. Subjects’ reluctance due to a fear of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30298065">side effects</a> preclude the implementation of this procedure in clinical settings.</p> <p><strong>Treatment could be improved</strong></p> <p>“Active” treatment options that would desensitize shellfish-allergic patients are unfortunately not yet available. Patients are recommended to avoid shellfish that trigger symptoms, educated to read food labels to avoid accidental consumption, take antihistamines to alleviate mild symptoms, and use epinephrine auto-injector – a hand-held device that delivers epinephrine to relax the airways by intramuscular injection – in case of an anaphylactic reaction. However, none of these first-line measures cures the disease.</p> <p>Food desensitisation and tolerance induction could be achieved by “re-educating” the immune system through giving small doses of the offending food and increasing it over time. However, existing interventions have reservations and limitations: the efficacy in developing tolerance is debatable; the adherence of patients is poor as the treatment is lengthy (2 to 5 years to “complete”); there are risks such as developing allergic side effects; and they’re costly, running between US$800 and $1,000 per year.</p> <p>Our research team therefore focused our effort to address these shortcomings through investigating the value of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26610061">peptide-based oral immunotherapy</a>, by which these peptides are short fragments of tropomyosin with molecular nature of modifying the immune system, and also by constructing hypoallergens of shrimp <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25365343">tropomyosin</a> and hypoallergen-based vaccines. Hypoallergens are modified from tropomyosin to be less than normally allergenic.</p> <p><strong>Using a small DNA molecule to counter the allergy</strong></p> <p>With the lower IgE reactivity, hypoallergens are of lower risk in triggering allergic reactions. We also adopted the concept of <a href="https://www.livescience.com/37247-dna.html">DNA</a> vaccination – the injection the DNA sequence of the hypoallergen in a small circular piece of bacterial DNA.</p> <p>When taken up by body cells, this piece of circular DNA is used by the cells’ machinery to produce the hypoallergen protein. Because these proteins are regarded as foreign, the immune system is alerted to trigger immune response. The continual production of the hypoallergen protein by the vaccine and body cells therefore “educates” the immune system as in the conventional immunotherapy but achieved with fewer shots.</p> <p>This combinatorial approach offers the advantages of improved vaccine stability, relative ease of large-scale manufacture, reduced shots and treatment duration, and thus a lower cost of immunotherapy.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8h4FVAJ0Ifs"></iframe></div> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><span class="caption">Dr. Wai explaining her hypoallergene-DNA vaccine project.</span></div> <p>From our <a href="https://patents.google.com/patent/US20170107265A1/en">animal experiments</a> three shots of this hypoallergen-DNA vaccine resulted in the decrease of IgE level by 70 per cent, accompanied by the increase in the number and activity of immune cells with regulatory functions. This suggests that this vaccine may be a valuable treatment for inducing immune tolerance against shellfish allergy achievable with much fewer injections and within shorter time period.</p> <p>However, the only FDA-approved plasmid, pVAX1, has limited immunogenicity in human, meaning that DNA vaccines constructed using pVAX1 has limited capacity in provoking immune responses in the body of a human.</p> <p>Engineering next-generation vaccines with optimised plasmids and studying their effects and mechanism would be our next steps, and we hope to provide a promising option in the future. Until then, be cautious with that lobster.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Christine Wai, Post-doctoral researcher, Axa research fund fellow, Chinese University of Hong Kong</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/shellfish-allergies-can-they-be-treated-112143"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Perfect detox salad

<p>This salad hits the mark for taste and health. Bonus: it is super easy to make!</p> <p>“From the perfectly ripe avocados to the Meyer lemons, this is the perfect Cali livin’ dish. Light, fresh and bright, it’s totally moreish and also very, very good for you. If I want a green salad option for lunch, I’ll swap the quinoa for salad greens. Be sure to include the mint and tons of lemon juice, preferably from Meyer lemons, if you can find them – they really make this salad spectacular.” - Robyn Youkilis, nutritionist</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>175g uncooked quinoa (or 200g salad greens)</li> <li>1 daikon radish, grated</li> <li>2 carrots, grated</li> <li>20-35g mix of micro greens and/or sprouts of any kind</li> <li>½ bunch fresh mint leaves, roughly chopped or torn</li> <li>1 avocado, diced</li> <li>Handful of raw sunflower seeds</li> <li>Juice of 1 lemon, preferably Meyer</li> <li>2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil</li> <li>Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste</li> <li>1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <ol> <li>Cook the quinoa. Drain and use it warm or refrigerate it until cold, depending on your preference. </li> <li>To make the salad, combine all the ingredients thoroughly and serve immediately!</li> </ol> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>“I eat minimal grains, while my hubby eats maximum grains. So how do we get along when it comes to dinnertime? Simple: about twice a week I’ll throw either quinoa or millet (or a mix of the two!) into the rice cooker for him, ‘set it and forget it’ style. I chose those as the main grains featured in this book because they are the easiest to digest, naturally gluten-free, alkalising and high in protein. You can add these grains to almost any of the star dishes for an extra-filling meal.”  - Robyn Youkilis, nutritionist</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/perfect-detox-salad.aspx">Wyza</a>.</em></p>

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French classic: Pear tarte tatin

<p>Here’s another French classic that has made it onto our favourites list. A traditional tarte tatin is made with apples, but I’ve gone for pears here, although poached quinces would work wonderfully too. You could also use granny smith apples. </p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p><strong>Baked pears</strong><br />4 small pears<br />110g (½ cup) caster sugar<br />20g unsalted butter<br />1 vanilla bean, halved lengthways and seeds scraped<span> </span><br />2 tablespoons brandy</p> <p>100g caster sugar<br />100ml brandy<br />1 vanilla bean, halved lengthways and seeds scraped<span> </span><br />50g unsalted butter, cubed<span> </span><br />1 sheet ready-rolled puff pastry<br />Cream or ice-cream, to serve</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. To make the baked pears, preheat the oven to 160°C. Butter an ovenproof dish that will fit the pears snugly.</p> <p>2. Peel, quarter and core the pears. Arrange the pears in the dish. Sprinkle the sugar over the pears, then dot with a little butter and some of the vanilla seeds. Pour in the brandy and cover with baking paper and foil. Bake for 1½–2 hours, or until the pears are soft and light golden brown. Remove and set aside.</p> <p>3. Increase the oven to 190°C. You will need an ovenproof frying pan to cook the tart. Put the pan over medium heat and add the sugar, brandy, vanilla seeds and bean. Let the sugar dissolve and cook until the mixture forms a light caramel.</p> <p>4. Add the baked pears, arranging them neatly in the pan, and cook for about 5 minutes, shaking the pan gently to make sure the pears aren’t catching on the base. Dot with the cubed butter, then lay the pastry over the top. Using a wooden spoon, tuck the pastry edge down around the pears, taking care not to touch the caramel, as it is very hot.</p> <p>5. Bake for 25–30 minutes, or until the pastry is golden and the caramel is bubbling up around the edge. Remove from the oven.</p> <p>6. Get a serving plate that is larger than your pan and put the plate on top of the pan. Using oven gloves to protect your hands, invert the pan onto the plate. Allow the caramel to cool slightly before serving with cream or ice-cream.</p> <p>Image and recipe from <em><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fall-day-cafe-stuart-mckenzie%2Fprod9781743368404.html" target="_blank">All Day Café</a></em><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fall-day-cafe-stuart-mckenzie%2Fprod9781743368404.html" target="_blank"> by Stuart McKenzie</a>. Photography: © Armelle Habib 2017.</p> <p><em>Written by Stuart McKenzie. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/pear-tarte-tatin.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Lyndey Milan’s chocolate pretzel and marshmallow slice

<p>Home cook hero Lyndey Milan shares a wickedly delicious chocolate pretzel slice recipe.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>250g shortbread biscuits</li> <li>100g salted butter, melted</li> <li>250g dark chocolate bits (chips)</li> <li>150g marshmallows, halved</li> <li>75g mini pretzels</li> <li>250g pecans, walnuts or macadamias, roughly chopped</li> <li>100g milk chocolate buttons, roughly chopped</li> <li>100g white chocolate bits (chips)</li> <li>395g can condensed milk</li> <li>2 teaspoons salt flakes (optional)</li> <li>125g dark chocolate (melted)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to moderate, 180°C (160°C fan-forced). Line a <a href="http://lyndeymilan.com/bakeware-range/">33 x 24 x 4.5 baking tray </a>with baking paper.</li> <li>Crush biscuits in a food processor until fine, add butter, just long enough to combine. Press over base of tin and push down. Scatter over dark chocolate chips, marshmallows, pretzels and pecans.</li> <li>Sprinkle with the chopped milk buttons and white chocolate bits. Drizzle condensed milk over top. Sprinkle with salt flakes if desired.</li> <li>Bake for 25-30 minutes or until the slice is mostly firm. If the top is browning too quickly cover loosely with a sheet of foil.</li> <li>Leave to cool completely or refrigerate. Cut into small squares or slices to serve. Before serving melt dark chocolate in a snap lock bag in a bowl filled with hot water, snip corner and drizzle melted chocolate over slices.</li> </ol> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>Most slices take time, preparing the different layers and cooking and preparing different layers. This one doesn’t but it is very, very rich. Don’t even think about using skim condensed milk.</p> <p><em>Recipe from <a href="http://lyndeymilan.com/">Lyndey Milan</a>. As seen in Episode 4 in Lyndey Milan's Easy Summer Baking Secrets. More recipes at <a href="http://lyndeymilan.com/">www.lyndeymilan.com</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lyndey-milan-chocolate-pretzel-marshmallow-slice.aspx">Wyza</a>.</em></p>

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Entertain with ease: Avocado, garlic and cheese pull-apart bread

<p><span>Impress friends and family with this fabulous and easy pull apart</span>.</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare: </strong>20 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>4 to 6</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <p><span>1 loaf sourdough bread </span></p> <p><span>1 ripe avocado, peeled and halved lengthways</span></p> <p><span>1 tbs olive oil</span></p> <p><span>2 garlic cloves, crushed</span></p> <p><span>1 tbs lemon juice</span></p> <p><span>1½ cups grated 3-cheese mix </span></p> <p><span>Salt and pepper to season</span></p> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p><span>1. Preheat oven to 200˚C/180˚C fan-forced. </span></p> <p><span>2. Using a sharp knife, deeply cut the bread into a honeycomb pattern (don’t cut through the base of the loaf).</span></p> <p><span>3. Scoop avocado flesh into a bowl and add oil, garlic and lemon juice and seasoning, and lightly mash with a fork.</span></p> <p><span>4. Gently ease bread open and spoon avocado mixture into the loaf.</span></p> <p><span>5. Repeat using cheese. </span></p> <p><span>6. Place loaf onto a large sheet of foil and loosely wrap. Place on a baking tray and bake for 12 minutes. </span></p> <p><span>7. Uncover and bake for a further 8-10 minutes until hot and golden. <br /></span></p> <p><span><em>Recipe courtesy of <a rel="noopener" href="http://australianavocados.com.au/" target="_blank">Australian Avocados</a></em>. <em>Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/avocado-garlic-and-cheese-pull-apart-bread.aspx" target="_blank">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></span></p>

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Enjoy a healthy burger with egg-free sweet potato and lentil patties

<p>Fantastic for a healthy burger or served on their own, these patties are the perfect light meal for entertaining!</p> <p><strong>Time to prepare:</strong> 25 minutes</p> <p><strong>Cooking time: </strong>30 minutes</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>4</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p>500g sweet potato, peeled, cubed </p> <div class="article-body"> <p>2 tablespoons olive oil</p> <p>½ cup brown lentils<span> </span></p> <p>1 small onion, finely chopped</p> <p>2 garlic cloves, crushed</p> <p>1 teaspoon ground cumin</p> <p>½ teaspoon ground coriander</p> <p>½ teaspoon turmeric</p> <p>60g baby spinach, roughly chopped</p> <p>⅓ cup plain flour</p> <p>Natural yoghurt and lemon wedges, to serve</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat oven to 220°C/200°C fan-forced. Line an oven tray with baking paper. Place sweet potato on tray and drizzle with half of the oil.</p> <p>2. Bake for 15-20 minutes until tender. Mash in a bowl and set aside.</p> <p>3. Cook lentils in a pan of boiling water for 15-20 minutes until softened. Drain well. Transfer to a large bowl to cool.</p> <p>4. Meanwhile, heat oil in a large frying pan on medium. Cook onion and garlic for 4-5 minutes until softened. Add spices and cook for 1 minute until fragrant. Add spinach, stirring until just wilted.</p> <p>5. Transfer to bowl with lentils and sweet potato. Mix well and season to taste. Chill until cold. Form into patties and toss in flour to coat. Place on a baking paper-lined tray.</p> <p>6. Heat oil in frying pan on medium-high. Cook patties for 2-3 minutes each side until golden. Drain on paper towel. Serve patties with yoghurt and lemon wedges.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>Brown lentils are also labelled as green lentils. They are larger than the French lentils.</p> <p>For a gluten-free option – replace plain flour with gluten-free flour.</p> <p><em>Recipe thanks to <a rel="noopener" href="http://australiansweetpotatoes.com.au/" target="_blank">Australian Sweet Potatoes</a>. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/sweet-potato-and-lentil-patties-(egg-free).aspx">Wyza.com.au</a></em></p> </div>

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How to make hot or cold asparagus and salmon frittata

<p><strong>Time to prepare 35-40 mins | Serves 4</strong></p> <p>Recipe from the <a href="http://www.asparagus.com.au/">Australian Asparagus Council</a>.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 tablespoons olive oil </li> <li>300g salmon fillet </li> <li>8 free range eggs </li> <li>1 cup plain Greek yoghurt </li> <li>1 tablespoon lemon thyme, finely chopped </li> <li>Salt and pepper </li> <li>1 red capsicum, chopped </li> <li>2 bunches asparagus, woody ends removed, sliced </li> <li>Greek yoghurt to serve (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat oven to 180ºC.</p> <p>2. Heat an ovenproof frying pan over high heat. Add 1 tablespoon of the olive oil and cook salmon fillet skin side down for 2 minutes to seal. Turn salmon over to lightly brown other side. Remove from pan, place on a plate and set aside in refrigerator to cool. Reserve pan to use later.</p> <p>3. Crack eggs into a mixing bowl. Add yoghurt, thyme, salt and pepper and whisk until all ingredients are well combined.</p> <p>4. Take cooled salmon from refrigerator, remove skin and break up flesh into small bite-size pieces. Combine capsicum and asparagus with egg mix. Carefully stir in chunks of salmon.</p> <p>5. Heat the pan the salmon was cooked in and add the remaining tablespoon of olive oil. Pour frittata mixture into pan. Bake in preheated oven for 30-35 minutes or until cooked through.</p> <p>6. Remove from oven and allow frittata to cool slightly before cutting. Serve accompanied with thick yoghurt.</p> <p><strong>Tips:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Delicious served with a simple green salad with a lemon olive oil dressing.</li> <li>For a vegetarian version replace salmon with 125g feta broken into pieces or 125g grated cheese.</li> <li>For this recipe to be gluten-free, avoid using stocks, sauces and condiments containing wheat. Take care to check ingredient labels on all products you use.</li> </ul> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/asparagus-and-salmon-frittata.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

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Make this delicious tuna nasi goreng on a cold night in!

<p><strong>Time to prepare 15 mins | Cooking Time 24 mins | Serves 4</strong><br />A great alternative to fried rice for a mid-week meal.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 cup rice</li> <li>2 cups chicken stock</li> <li>2 eggs, lightly beaten</li> <li>1 teaspoon oil</li> <li>1 shallot, diced</li> <li>1 garlic clove, crushed</li> <li>1 cup Birds Eye Country Harvest – Peas, Corn and Capsicum</li> <li>2 x 95g cans John West Indonesian Sambal Chilli Tuna</li> <li>1 cup bean shoots</li> <li>Kecap manis, for serving</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Place rice, stock and 1 cup water into a saucepan and bring to the boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes or until rice is cooked and liquid has evaporated. <br /><br />2. Heat a non-stick wok over medium heat. Pour in egg, cook and break up until scrambled to your liking. Remove from wok and set aside.<br /><br />3. Increase heat to medium-high and add oil. Sauté onion and garlic for 1 minutes or until softened. Add Birds Eye Vegetables and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add undrained John West Indonesian Sambal Chilli Tuna, bean shoots, egg and rice. Stir to combine. Spoon into serving bowls and drizzle with kecap manis. Serve immediately.</p> <p><strong>Tips:</strong></p> <p>Cooking the rice in stock adds flavour to the dish. Chicken, vegetable or fish stock can be used.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/tuna-nasi-goreng.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au</em></a></p>

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Indulge yourself with chocolate coconut porridge and poached cherries

<p>Wake up with a treat and whip up this quick chocolate porridge for breakfast - it's the perfect end-of-week indulgence (without the guilt)!</p> <p><strong>Serves: </strong>2</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <p><strong>For the poached cherries</strong></p> <p>160g cherries, de-stoned and halved</p> <p>½ a vanilla pod, split</p> <p>100ml water</p> <p><strong>For the porridge</strong></p> <p>80g coconut flour</p> <p>60g desiccated coconut</p> <p>40g coconut flakes</p> <p>2 tablespoons raw cacao powder</p> <p>300 ml coconut milk</p> <p>50 ml double cream, to serve<span> </span></p> <p>2 tablespoons grated 85% dark chocolate or 20g cacao nibs, to serve</p> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Place the cherries, vanilla pod and water into a small saucepan and put over a low heat for 20 minutes. The poaching process should be gradual so the fruit releases its natural sugars and juices.</p> <p>2. While the fruit is poaching, place all the porridge ingredients into a medium-sized saucepan and place over a low heat.</p> <p>3. Gently cook for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring regularly, until the porridge starts to thicken and become creamy. Continue until the porridge has reached your preferred consistency.</p> <p>4. To serve, divide the porridge between two bowls, add the fruit and syrup, drizzle with cream and top with cacao nibs.</p> <p><strong>This is an edited extract from <span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/pioppi-diet-dr-aseem-malhotra/prod9781405932639.html" target="_blank"><em>The Pioppi Diet</em>  by Dr Aseem Halhotra &amp; Donal O'Neill</a></span>, Penguin Books, RRP $24.99.</strong></p>

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Enjoy a tasty cherry tomato, macadamia, walnut & silverbeet pasta

<p>Up your nut intake with this easy and simple recipe.</p> <p><strong>Preparation</strong> <strong>time</strong>:<span style="font-weight: 400;"> 5 mins</span></p> <p><strong>Cooking</strong> <strong>time</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;">: 15 mins </span></p> <p><strong>Serves</strong>:<span style="font-weight: 400;"> 4 </span></p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong> </p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">2 Tbsp olive oil </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">2 cloves garlic, crushed </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1/2 cup raw walnuts, roughly chopped (60g) </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1/2 cup raw, unsalted macadamias, roughly chopped (70g) </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1 cup fresh breadcrumbs </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">400g dry spaghetti </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">500g cherry tomatoes, halved </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1/2 bunch silverbeet or kale leaves, torn </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">zest of 1 lemon </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1/4 cup chopped parsley </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">sea salt and fresh cracked pepper </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong> <span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Warm half the olive oil and half the garlic in a large skillet over medium heat. Add all the breadcrumbs, and half the walnuts and macadamias. Cook, stirring regularly for 5-6 minutes until fragrant and toasted. Tip into a bowl, season with salt and pepper, and set aside. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil. Cook spaghetti according to packet directions. Drain, reserving 1 cup cooking water. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">While pasta cooks, return the large skillet to medium-high heat and drizzle in remaining olive oil. Add cherry tomatoes and remaining garlic. Sauté for approximately 5 minutes, until tomatoes begin to break down. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Add reserved pasta cooking water, silverbeet, and remaining walnuts and macadamias to pan with tomatoes. Cook for a minute or two, until greens are just wilted. Remove from heat and stir through lemon zest. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Add parsley to cooled breadcrumb mixture. Serve pasta with generous spoonfuls of sauce, and plenty of nutty breadcrumbs on top. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">
</span></li> </ol> <p><strong>Tips</strong> </p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can find fresh breadcrumbs at good grocery stores, or make your own by pulsing a slice or two of day-old sourdough in a food processor. </span></p> <p>Recipe and images by Jennifer Jenner for <a href="https://www.nutsforlife.com.au/">Nuts for Life</a> </p>

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Enjoy a prawn cocktail with avocados

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These are always popular! Just cut those buttery, delicious avocados in half and fill with the ingredients you use to make a prawn cocktail your family will love. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Serves:</strong> 4</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Ingredients:</strong> </span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">16 cooked tiger prawns, peeled and deveined </span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">2 avocados </span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">4 lettuce leaves, thinly sliced </span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">1⁄4 cup (60g) cocktail sauce </span></li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Cut the avocados in half and discard the pit.</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scoop half the avocado out, adding the flesh to a bowl, to create a larger round.</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scatter the lettuce evenly across each avocado half and top each with 4 prawns. </span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Season and mash the avocado. 5. Spoon across each before serving with a dollop of complementary seafood sauce. </span></li> </ol> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Optional</em>: To make your own seafood sauce, simply mix 1⁄4 cup (60ml) cream with 2 tablespoons (30g) tomato sauce, a splash of Worcestershire sauce and drop of tabasco. Season to taste. </span></p> <p><em>Recipes by 4Ingredients for Australian Avocados.</em></p>

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Gwyneth Paltrow's Carbonara – will you give it a go?

<p><strong>Time to prepare Under 30 mins | Serves 4</strong></p> <p>Carbonara is the perfect lazy dinner—it’s cozy, comforting, and shockingly easy to make. Not to mention the fact that everyone almost always has the ingredients on hand. Keep some cubed bacon or pancetta in the freezer so you can make this anytime, in just minutes.</p> <p><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fit-s-all-easy-gwyneth-paltrow%2Fprod9780751555493.html"><em>Recipe from It’s All Easy: Delicious Weekday Recipes for the Super-Busy Home Cook by Gwyneth Paltrow (RRP $45), published by Hachette Australia.</em></a></p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Salt</li> <li>30 grams pancetta or bacon, cut into small dice</li> <li>2 egg yolks (or 3, to make it extra creamy)</li> <li>1 large egg</li> <li>1½ cups finely grated Parmesan cheese, plus more as needed</li> <li>1 teaspoon freshly ground</li> <li>Black pepper, plus more as needed</li> <li>340 grams bucatini</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Bring a large pot of heavily salted water to a boil over high heat for the pasta.<br /><br />2. In an 8-inch sauté pan, cook the pancetta over medium heat until crispy, 5 to 7 minutes. <br /><br />3. Combine the egg yolks, egg, parmesan, and pepper in a large bowl.</p> <p>4. Cook the pasta according to the package instructions until al dente. Reserve 1 cup of the hot pasta cooking water (the temperature is important because you are going to use it to cook the egg) and set aside. <br /><br />5. Next, drain the pasta, and add it to the bowl with the cheese and eggs, tossing immediately to mix everything together.<br /><br />6. Add the pancetta and any rendered fat from the pan to the bowl, toss to coat, and add the pasta water 1 tablespoon at a time until the sauce reaches a creamy consistency (this usually takes about ¼ cup).<br /><br />7. Adjust with extra cheese, pepper, and salt to taste.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/gwyneth-paltrows-carbonara.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p> <p> </p>

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You must try this sweet potato, chicken and pomegranate salad

<p>With a zesty dressing and sweet pomegranate seeds, this salad looks and tastes like a masterpiece.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>600g sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into wedges</li> <li>400g skinless chicken breast fillets</li> <li>2–3 tablespoons wholegrain mustard</li> <li>1–2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh or dried rosemary leaves</li> <li>75g watercress or rocket </li> <li>2 witlof, leaves separated and halved lengthways</li> <li>Seeds of 1 pomegranate</li> </ul> <p><strong>Dressing</strong></p> <ul> <li>Zest and juice of 1 orange</li> <li>2 tablespoons walnut oil</li> <li>2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions:</strong></p> <p>1. Pour boiling water into a saucepan or wok and put a steamer basket into the pan. The water shouldn’t touch the basket. Put the sweet potatoes into the basket and steam them for 10–15 minutes, or until tender. Transfer the sweet potatoes to a bowl, sprinkle with salt and leave to cool.<br /><br />2. Cover the chicken with the mustard and sprinkle with salt and the rosemary. Put the chicken into the steaming basket, cover the pan and steam for 8 minutes or until cooked. (If you own a multi-level steamer basket, you can steam the chicken and sweet potatoes simultaneously.)<br /><br />3. To make the dressing, whisk the orange zest with 4 tablespoons orange juice, the walnut oil and olive oil. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. <br /><br />4. Lightly toss the watercress, witlof, pomegranate seeds and dressing together and divide between four plates. Thickly slice the chicken and top the salad with the chicken and sweet potatoes. Lovely served with steamed broccoli florets.</p> <p><em>Image and recipe from </em><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fsalads-all-year-round-makkie-mulder%2Fprod9781743368831.html"><em>Salads All Year Round</em></a><em> by Makkie Mulder (Murdoch Books, RRP $35).</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of</em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/sweet-potato-chicken-and-pomegranate-salad.aspx"><em> Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

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Just like us! Jacinda Ardern bakes classic Women's Weekly cake for daughter's 1st birthday

<p>Once again, the people’s prime minister Jacinda Ardern has proven that she’s just like the rest of us. Excited to celebrate her daughter Neve’s first birthday, the politician took to the pages of classic cookbook <em>Women’s Weekly Kids’ Party Cakes </em>to guide her into baking a cake for the occasion.</p> <p>Neve Te Aroha Ardern Gayford turned one on June 21, and to mark the monumental moment, the leader of New Zealand chose to make her a bunny cake.</p> <p>“Doing what so many parents have done before me,” Ardern wrote on Instagram. “Waited till baby was up in bed before trying to magic up a passable cake for the big first birthday.”</p> <p>Ardern then thanked everyone for the well wishes during Neve’s first trip around the sun.</p> <p>“To the many, many people who have wished our family well, sent knitted goods and passed on a piece of wisdom about parenthood over the past year – thank you. It truly takes a village (and someone in said village may get a call if I don’t sort this cake!)”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/By9yyGEAnAI/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/By9yyGEAnAI/" target="_blank">Doing what so many parents have done before me. Waited till baby was in bed before trying to magic up a passable cake for the big first birthday. Wish me luck. PS To the many, many people who have wished our family well, sent knitted goods and passed on a piece of wisdom about parenthood over the past year - thank you. It truly takes a village (and someone in said village may get a call if I don’t sort this cake!)</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/jacindaardern/" target="_blank"> Jacinda Ardern</a> (@jacindaardern) on Jun 21, 2019 at 1:43am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>And the final result was a success.</p> <p>“I may be smiling but about an hour earlier I was not enjoying the first birthday cake making experience (like just about every parent I know!),” she wrote. “I recommend cakes that you can legitimately cover in coconut – it hides almost everything. Happy Birthday wee Neve!”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/By_4s3VA8FM/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/By_4s3VA8FM/" target="_blank">I may be smiling but about an hour earlier I was not enjoying the first birthday cake making experience (like just about every parent I know!) I recommend cakes that you can legitimately cover in coconut - it hides almost everything. Happy Birthday wee Neve!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/jacindaardern/" target="_blank"> Jacinda Ardern</a> (@jacindaardern) on Jun 21, 2019 at 9:13pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>And Neve’s birthday was remembered by someone very special, a person who shares the same birthdate with the one-year-old: Prince William. Taking to Twitter, dad Clarke Gayford shared photos of the present the royal sent Neve, a Buzzy Bee toy engraved with the note, “Happy Birthday Neve, from Prince William.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Torn between letting the 1st birthday girl continue to maul this amazing gift or putting it somewhere safe FOREVER.<br />Happy Birthday Prince William, what a great shared birthday (I'm pretty sure you win with this) <a href="https://t.co/KvXtOcfmfq">pic.twitter.com/KvXtOcfmfq</a></p> — Clarke Gayford (@NZClarke) <a href="https://twitter.com/NZClarke/status/1141980166840676352?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 21, 2019</a></blockquote>

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