Food & Wine

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Plant based diets could prevent type 2 diabetes

<p>Eating a diet high in plant foods with little or no red meat has been linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in the most comprehensive scrutiny of this connection so far.</p> <p>This protective effect is even stronger for diets high in healthier plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts.</p> <p>Diabetes has been called “the fastest growing health crisis of our time”. At the same time, plant-based diets are gaining popularity.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Therefore, the researchers thought it was important to quantify their link with diabetes risk, says first author Frank Qian from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, US – especially given the large variation in these diets. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">The analysis, </span>published<span style="font-family: inherit;"> in the </span>Journal of the American Medical Association<span style="font-family: inherit;">, included nine studies with more than 300,000 participants – of whom 23,544 had type 2 diabetes – over two to 28 years of follow-up. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">In the primary evaluation, Qian and co-authors focussed on an overall higher intake of plant-based foods along with little or no animal-based foods. Therefore, this included vegetarian or vegan dietary patterns.</span></p> <p>They found that people with the highest adherence to predominantly plant-based diets had a 23% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes compared to those with the lowest consumption of plant foods.</p> <p>But these dietary patterns didn’t exclude plant-derived foods that have been linked to higher diabetes risk, such as sugar and refined carbohydrates.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">When narrowing the analysis to four studies that defined a plant-based diet as the healthy whole food options, they found a 30% lower risk of type 2 diabetes.</span></p> <p>While it must be noted that the studies are observational, most, if not all, adjusted for well-known risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), gender, smoking status and family history of diabetes, among other potentially confounding variables.</p> <p>Several factors could explain the associations, the authors say.</p> <p>Plant-based diets typically include healthy plant foods packed with nutrients, polyphenols and fibre, which can improve insulin sensitivity, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation and help maintain a healthy weight.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">All of these can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Conversely, eating red and processed meat has been linked to higher risk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Because the studies controlled for BMI, and excess weight and type 2 diabetes are a deadly duo, the authors suggest the associations they found could underestimate the actual degree of protection conferred by the diets.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">“Overall,” says senior author Qi Sun, “these data highlight the importance of adhering to plant-based diets to achieve or maintain good health.” </span></p> <!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <p><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=26041&amp;title=Plant-based+diets+could+prevent+type+2+diabetes" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></p> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrition/plant-based-diets-could-prevent-type-2-diabetes/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/natalie-parletta">Natalie Parletta</a>.</p> </div>

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When is milk chocolate good for you?

<div class="copy"> <p>It’s always gratifying to hear that our guilty pleasures can have health benefits – like dark chocolate being <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/biology/eating-chocolate-helps-keep-your-heart-beating/" target="_blank">good for your heart</a>, or coffee <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/body-and-mind/coffee-may-prevent-chronic-liver-disease/" target="_blank">preventing</a> chronic liver disease, or wine keeping your teeth <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/biology/want-healthy-teeth-drink-red-wine/" target="_blank">healthy</a> – but what about milk chocolate?</p> <p>Though it’s higher in fat, sugar and calories than dark chocolate, milk chocolate’s effect on your health depends on when you eat it, according to a new study <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://faseb.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1096/fj.202002770RR" target="_blank">published</a> in <em>The FASEB Journal</em>.</p> <p>Spanish and US researchers set out to understand how the timing of milk chocolate consumption affects human health.</p> <p>Nineteen participants – all postmenopausal women – were split into groups and asked to eat no chocolate, eat 100 grams of milk chocolate within an hour of waking up, or eat the same amount an hour before going to sleep.</p> <p>During the study, other factors were recorded, including the participants’ weight, physical activity, hunger and cortisol levels, number of calories consumed per day, and glucose metabolism.</p> <p>“One of the surprises was that despite eating close to 550 kilocalories [of chocolate] per day for two weeks, people didn’t gain weight, either when taken in the morning or in the evening,” says co-researcher Frank Scheer, a neuroscientist and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.</p> <p>“The morning group showed more fat oxidation, as opposed to the evening group, which had more carbohydrate oxidation occurring. So the mechanisms appear to be different, but both led to no weight gain in these two cohorts.”</p> <p>In the morning group, fasting glucose levels also went down, along with waist circumference.</p> <p>“Waist circumference is really thought to be primarily related to visceral fat, which has been associated with adverse metabolic effects,” says Scheer.</p> <p>The mechanism behind the loss of waist circumference is unclear. It may be due to the fact that 100 grams of milk chocolate is approximately 30% of a typical daily calorie intake, so participants may have cut down other food intake for the day.</p> <p>This study builds on previous research, which has <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-63227-w" target="_blank">shown</a> that the timing of chocolate consumption in rats affected their circadian rhythms, preventing their sleep cycles from becoming disrupted during simulated jetlag. Other studies have also <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/proceedings-of-the-nutrition-society/article/shiftwork-is-time-of-eating-determining-metabolic-health-evidence-from-animal-models/8206519ACC4CA25C459525F01DB94280" target="_blank">suggested</a> that mistiming food intake can lead to obesity and problems controlling glucose.</p> <p>It’s clear that the time at which we eat is important to energy balance and metabolism. But further research is needed, with a larger and more diverse group of participants over a longer period of time, because the findings pose even more questions for the researchers.</p> <p>“Are these findings due to effects that the energy timing has on metabolism?” asks Scheer. “If you eat chocolate in the morning, for example, does the body, by perceiving this kind of excess energy, then dial up energy expenditure or dial down cravings for food? And then, in addition to hedonic mechanisms and energy-balance mechanisms, could it be anything more specific to the content of the micronutrients in chocolate?”</p> <!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=157513&amp;title=When+is+milk+chocolate+good+for+you%3F" alt="" width="1" height="1" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrition/when-is-milk-chocolate-good-for-you/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/lauren-fuge">Lauren Fuge</a>. Lauren Fuge is a science journalist at Cosmos. She holds a BSc in physics from the University of Adelaide and a BA in English and creative writing from Flinders University.</p> </div>

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Surprise warning for Kmart air fryer stuns Aussie mums

<p>A loyal Kmart fan is raising awareness about an often-overlooked warning regarding the popular air fryer, after finding something concerning in her kitchen.</p> <p>Kmart customer Rita shared her concerns to popular “Mums Who Build, Renovate &amp; Decorate” Facebook group after she noticed something strange happening with the bottom of her air fryer.</p> <p>“You hear all the horror stories about air fryers cracking benches (so glad I heard them) so I found this great terrazzo tray that matches my bench at Kmart, and it has cracked” Rita wrote.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843941/new-project-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d9205f4e74ee4e0ba9f4cc332a00caa1" /></p> <p><em>Image: Facebook </em></p> <p>“But at least it isn’t the bench!”</p> <p>The recently purchased terrazzo tray from Kmart was placed underneath her air fryer to protect the bench-top from heat damage, after hearing air fryers were at risk to damage surfaces they sit on due to their heat.</p> <p>As per Kmart’s instruction manual, air fryers should be placed and used on a “stable, horizontal, flat and heat-resistant” surface. The company also recommends putting the air fryer on an insulated heat pad.</p> <p>Rita was shocked the terrazzo tray had cracked from the heat underneath her air fryer and went out seeking advice from fellow Facebook group members.</p> <p>“Do I leave it and ignore the crack? Buy another but it will probably happen again or use something else?”.</p> <p>A large amount of group members came forward and said they had no idea air fryers came with this warning and were capable of doing this, whereas others had sage pieces of advice.</p> <p>“Wow, I’ve never heard that! We use ours on a stone bench and I guess I have just been lucky” one user writes. Another said “this is news to me too”.</p> <p>One group member shared she has hers kept on a thick wooden chopping board, also from Kmart. Another member made a similar suggestion although she doesn’t have a stone bench and claims her air fryer has never damaged her laminate bench.</p> <p>Thick wooden chopping boards or heat proof mats were among the most popular suggestions.</p>

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Tea drinkers may well live longer

<div class="copy"> <p>Tea is good for you, according to new research from – perhaps not surprisingly – China.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Habitual consumption – defined as at least three times a week – is associated with lower risks of cardiovascular disease and all-cause death, according to Xinyan Wang from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences.</span></p> <p>In other words, it contributes both to longer life expectancy and more healthy years of life.</p> <p>The favourable health effects appear to be particularly robust for green tea and for those with a long-term love of it.</p> <p>In their study, Wang and colleagues followed 100,902 participants in the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27682885">China-PAR</a> Project who had no history of heart attack, stroke or cancer for a median of 7.3 years. All were classified into one of two groups – habitual and never / non-habitual.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Regular drinkers were found to have a 20% lower risk of incident heart disease and stroke, a 22% lower risk of fatal heart disease and stroke, and a 15% decreased risk of all-cause death.</span></p> <p>The analyses estimated, for example, that 50-year-old habitual tea drinkers would develop coronary heart disease and stroke 1.41 years later and live 1.26 years longer than those who never or seldom drank tea.</p> <p>The potential influence of changes in tea drinking behaviour were analysed in a subset of 14,081 participants with assessments at two time points.</p> <p>Habitual drinkers who maintained their habit had a 39% lower risk of incident heart disease and stroke, 56% lower risk of fatal heart disease and stroke, and 29% decreased risk of all-cause death compared to consistent never or non-habitual tea drinkers.</p> <p>“Mechanism studies have suggested that the main bioactive compounds in tea, namely polyphenols, are not stored in the body long-term,” says Dongfeng Gu, senior author of a <a href="https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2047487319894685">paper</a> in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">“Thus, frequent tea intake over an extended period may be necessary for the cardioprotective effect.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">The study found green tea to be more beneficial than black, though Gu acknowledges that may be because of the preferences of those studied. Only a few preferred black tea.</span></p> <p>Nevertheless, the researchers say their findings “hint at a differential effect between tea types” – and suggest two factors may be at play.</p> <p>First, green tea is a rich source of the polyphenols which protect against cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, but black tea is fully fermented and during this process polyphenols are oxidised into pigments and may lose their antioxidant effects.</p> <p>Second, black tea is often served with milk, which <a href="https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/28/2/219/2887513">previous research</a> has shown may counteract the favourable health effects of tea on vascular function.</p> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=34602&amp;title=Tea+drinkers+may+well+live+longer" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrition/tea-drinkers-may-well-live-longer/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/nick-carne">Nick Carne</a>. </p> </div>

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Healthy and easy recipe with the grandkids: Four-layered fruit cake

<p><strong>Feeds:</strong> 8–10 birthday buddies</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 round seedless watermelon</li> <li>1 rockmelon</li> <li>1 honeydew melon</li> <li>Blueberries, strawberries and redcurrants for decoration (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Tools</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 long cook’s knife</li> <li>1 chopping board</li> <li>1 x 16-cm round cake tin</li> <li>1 plate</li> <li>1 x 11-cm round cookie cutter</li> <li>1 x 9-cm round cookie cutter</li> <li>1 x 6-cm round cookie cutter</li> <li>birthday candles toothpicks (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>How to make</strong></p> <p>1. Ask Mum or Dad to cut off both ends of the watermelon with a long knife. Sit the watermelon flat on the chopping board and place the cake tin on top. Using the cake tin as a guide, ask Mum or Dad to help you cut a round shape from the watermelon, approximately 10 cm deep. Transfer the watermelon round to the plate and keep any leftover watermelon to eat later.</p> <p>2. To make the second layer of the cake, ask Mum or Dad to cut the ends off the rockmelon and sit it flat on the chopping board. Use the 11-cm cookie cutter to cut out a circle, approximately 4 cm deep. Place the rockmelon round in the centre of the watermelon round.</p> <p>3. Next, ask Mum or Dad to cut the ends off the honeydew melon. Sit it flat on the chopping board and use the 9-cm cookie cutter to cut out the third layer of the cake. Transfer the honeydew melon round to the top of the rockmelon.</p> <p>4. Finally, use the 6-cm cookie cutter to cut out a small circle of rockmelon from the leftover rockmelon and then place this at the very top of your cake.</p> <p>5. Add your candles and feel free to decorate the cake with blueberries, strawberries and redcurrants, using toothpicks if you’d like.</p> <p><em>Recipes &amp;amp; Images taken from <a href="http://www.booktopia.com.au/kindy-kitchen-jessica-rosman/prod9780733334382.html">Kindy Kitchen by Jess Rossman &amp;amp; Nettie Lodge</a>, ABC Books, RRP: $16.75 – <a href="http://www.booktopia.com.au/kindy-kitchen-jessica-rosman/prod9780733334382.html">GET 16% OFF* The RRP – Order your copy now.</a></em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/healthy-fun-with-kids-in-the-kitchen">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Try this one pot lamb shanks with button mushrooms

<p>Need some weeknight dinner inspiration? Why not try this tender-to-the-bone lamb shank recipe?</p> <p>Serves: 3 | Cooks in: 3 hours and 10 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>50g (1/3 cup) plain flour, to dust</li> <li>4 lamb shanks, Frenched</li> <li>1½ tbsp olive oil</li> <li>½ bottle red wine</li> <li>12 eschalots, peeled</li> <li>1 bunch thyme, half trussed, half leaves picked</li> <li>400g Button Mushrooms, cleaned and trimmed</li> <li>Salt and pepper, to season</li> <li>Creamy polenta, to serve (¾ cup with 750ml mix of chicken stock and milk, butter and finely grated parmesan)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat the oven to 160°C. Place the flour into a large bowl and season well with salt and pepper. Dust the lamb shanks in the flour mixture, shaking off any excess.</p> <p>2. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a large, heavy-based, ovenproof saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook the shanks for 5 minutes, turning, until browned. Remove and set aside.</p> <p>3. Pour in the wine and boil for 5 minutes to cook off the alcohol. Return the shanks to the pan with the eschalots and trussed thyme. Pour in enough water to submerge the shanks and bring up to a simmer. Cover the surface with a piece of baking paper, then cover with a lid and place in the oven for 1.5 hours.</p> <p>4. Carefully remove the pan from the oven and turn the shanks over, topping up with water if necessary. Add the mushrooms and cover with the baking paper and lid, then return to the oven for a further 1.5 hours or until the shank meat is falling from the bone.</p> <p>5. Meanwhile, heat the remaining 2 tsp oil in a small frying pan over medium heat. Toast the remaining thyme until bright green, then remove and set aside.</p> <p>6. Remove the shanks from the pan and place in a bowl, loosely covered with foil and set aside to rest.</p> <p>7. Place the pan over high heat. Reduce the sauce for 10-12 minutes or until thickened and glossy.</p> <p>8. Divide polenta among bowls and top with a shank, mushrooms and eschalots. Spoon over the sauce and scatter with toasted thyme to serve. Season to taste with salt and pepper.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/recipes/one-pot-lamb-shanks-with-button-mushrooms" target="_blank">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Healthy creamy mushroom pasta sauce

<p>Serves: 4 | Cooks in: 15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>350g farfalle pasta</li> <li>1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to drizzle</li> <li>1 bunch sage, leaves picked</li> <li>500g Button Mushrooms, cleaned, thinly sliced</li> <li>50g butter</li> <li>2 tbsp plain flour</li> <li>2 garlic cloves, finely chopped</li> <li>750ml (3 cups) vegetable stock</li> <li>1 cup milk</li> <li>250g fresh ricotta</li> <li>75g walnuts, toasted, coarsely chopped</li> <li>Salt and pepper, to season</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method </strong></p> <p>1. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil. Cook the pasta according to packet instructions, then drain and set aside.</p> <p>2. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Toast the sage leaves until crisp and translucent, then remove with a slotted spoon and set aside.</p> <p>3. Melt the butter in the pan. Stir-fry the mushrooms and garlic for 4 minutes until golden. Sprinkle over the flour and cook for 1 minute, then gradually stir in the stock and milk. Cook for 5 minutes or until thickened. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Add the pasta and toss to combine.</p> <p>4. Divide the pasta among bowls. Spoon over the ricotta, scatter with the walnuts and sage and drizzle with oil, to serve.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/recipes/healthy-creamy-mushroom-pasta-sauce" target="_blank">Wyza.com.au. </a></em></p> <p><em>Recipe courtesy of Mushroom Association Australia. </em></p>

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You must try this prawn and broccolini pad Thai

<p>This recipe is a perfect mix of broccoli and Chinese kale. It has a mild peppery taste that becomes sweeter when cooked.</p> <p>Serves 4 | Takes 15 minutes</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 bunches Broccolini, roughly chopped</li> <li>200g packet pad Thai rice stick noodles</li> <li>¼ cup fish sauce</li> <li>2 tablespoons grated palm sugar or brown sugar</li> <li>1 lime, juiced</li> <li>2 tablespoons peanut oil</li> <li>700g medium green prawns, peeled, deveined</li> <li>2 eggs, lightly beaten</li> <li>3 tablespoons pad Thai paste</li> <li>3 green onions, thinly sliced</li> <li>bean sprouts, coriander leaves and fried shallots</li> <li>lime wedges, to serve</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>1. Cook the noodles following the packet directions. Drain and cover to keep warm. Combine the fish sauce, palm sugar and lime juice. Stir to dissolve the sugar then set aside.</p> <p>2. Heat the wok over a high heat until hot. Add 2 teaspoons of oil and swirl to coat the surface.  Add half the prawns and stir-fry for 1 minute or until they turn pink.</p> <p>3. Remove to a plate. Repeat with oil and remaining prawns.</p> <p>4. Add 2 teaspoons of oil and the Broccolini to the hot wok and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add 1 tablespoon of water, cover and steam for 30 seconds. Remove to the plate with the prawns. Add the remaining oil. Pour in the eggs. Cook, gently stirring for 1 minute, or until scrambled. Push to one side of the wok.</p> <p>5. Add stir-fry paste and cook for 30 seconds. Return the Broccolini and prawns to the wok with the noodles and fish sauce mixture. Stir-fry until combined and hot. Add the onions and stir fry for 30 seconds. Top with bean sprouts, coriander and fried shallots. Serve with lime.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>1. For a chicken and Broccolini pad Thai, replace the prawns with 600g chicken breast fillet, thinly sliced.</p> <p><em>Image and recipe courtesy of <a href="https://www.perfection.com.au/home">Perfection Fresh.</a></em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/recipes/broccolini-prawn-pad-thai">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Tasty rice paper rolls with persimmon

<p>Try this delicious meal with the perfect amount of sweetness. </p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>260g dried rice vermicelli</li> <li>8 16cm round rice paper wrappers</li> <li>8 medium butter lettuce leaves, washed</li> <li>8 large cooked king prawns, peeled, de-veined and sliced in half lengthways</li> <li>24 fresh mint leaves</li> <li>1 small Fuyu (crisp) persimmon, sliced</li> <li>1 small Lebanese cucumber, sliced</li> <li>24 fresh coriander leaves</li> </ul> <p><strong>Dipping sauce</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 tbs Japanese rice vinegar</li> <li>4 tbs hoisin sauce</li> <li>1 tbs unsalted peanuts (or almonds), roughly chopped</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>1. Prepare rice vermicelli as per packet instructions, drain well.</p> <p>2. Combine all sauce ingredients for dipping.</p> <p>3. Place one rice sheet in warm water until just softened, remove from water and place on a clean, damp tea towel.</p> <p>4. Lay a lettuce leaf over the wrapper, top with two pieces of prawn horizontally, three mint leaves, a little persimmon, cucumber, rice vermicelli and three coriander leaves.</p> <p>5. Fold bottom of wrapper up over the filling, fold one side in, roll up tightly. Keep rolls under damp cloth while preparing remaining ingredients.</p> <p>6. Serve with dipping sauce.</p> <p><em>For more information and recipe ideas, visit <a href="https://www.persimmonsaustralia.com.au/">Persimmons Australia</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/recipes/rice-paper-rolls-with-persimmon" target="_blank">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Try this healthy blueberry chocolate cake

<p>A healthy diet does not have to be boring. This indulgent cake is paleo-friendly, meaning that it is free from refined sugar, grains and dairy products. Perfect for the whole family!</p> <p><em>Serves 10-12</em></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Ingredients</strong></span></p> <p><strong>Base</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut</li> <li>1 cup raw walnuts</li> <li>¼ raw cacao powder</li> <li>2 tbs. coconut oil</li> <li>1 tbs. raw honey (or rice malt syrup)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Filling</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 cups raw cashews (soaked overnight – if you don’t it will still work, just won’t be as smooth!)</li> <li>1 cup coconut milk</li> <li>1 cup blueberries (fresh or thawed frozen)</li> <li>1/3 cup coconut oil</li> <li>1 tbs. raw honey</li> <li>1 tsp. 100% vanilla extract</li> </ul> <p><strong>Topping</strong></p> <ul> <li>1 cup fresh blueberries</li> <li>¾ cup raw cashews crushed</li> <li>1 tbs. coconut sugar</li> <li>1 tbs. ghee or coconut oil</li> <li>½ a batch of paleo chocolate (recipe available here)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <p>1. Line the base of a 20 cm spring form cake tin with baking paper and grease the edges with a little coconut oil.</p> <p>2. Start with the base. In a food processor (we use our Vitamix), place the walnuts, coconut and raw cacao powder. Whiz these ingredients until a fine meal forms.</p> <p>3. Add the coconut oil and raw honey and whiz until it becomes a choc butter.</p> <p>4. Once it’s all combined, press the base in to the cake tin, making sure you press it out evenly, covering the entire base.</p> <p>5. Place in the freezer.</p> <p>6. Now for the filling: Drain and rinse the cashews and place them in to the food processor along with the coconut milk, blueberries, coconut oil, raw honey and vanilla extract.</p> <p>7. Whiz until completely smooth, this will take around 5 minutes.</p> <p>8. Take the base out of the freezer and pour the filling on top of the base.</p> <p>9. Shake the tin to even out the top and place the cake in to the freezer for around 1 ½ hours or until set.</p> <p>10. Take the cake out of the freezer and let sit for 10 minutes.</p> <p>11. Meanwhile, time for the toppings! You'll need to make a ½ batch of paleo chocolate the place the crushed cashews, coconut sugar and ghee in a medium saucepan on medium heat.</p> <p>12. Stir continuously until the ghee is melted and the cashews have caramelised. Transfer these on to a plate and allow to cool.</p> <p>13. Rub the outside of the cake tin with a hot cloth and release the spring form slowly (you may need to run a knife around the edge).</p> <p>14. Top the cake with fresh blueberries, caramelised cashews and drizzle with paleo chocolate. Cut in to slices with a hot knife and store any left overs in an airtight container in the fridge or freezer.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/recipes/choc-blueberry-cake" target="_blank">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p> <p> </p>

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“Prince Charles wasn’t happy”: Royal cake-maker spills on Charles and Diana’s wedding creation

<p>Dave Avery, the man who designed and made Prince Charles and Diana's wedding cake for their big day, has revealed it was the prince who called him to make changes to the design – after Diana had approved it.</p> <p>The head baker of the Royal Naval Cookery School, Avery designed the couple's five-tier fruit cake which stood at 165cm for the July wedding 40 years ago in 1981.</p> <p>Avery, then 37, had been selected to bake the royal wedding cake – an auspicious task but one that he was more than capable of. Avery, now 78, told 9Honey via Zoom from the UK, he still clearly remembers walking into Buckingham Palace for his first meeting with Princess Diana – known at the time as ‘Lady Di.’</p> <p>“I’ll never forget it," says Avery. "She was beautiful. She was very pleasant, very polite, we had a few little chats.”</p> <p>Avery had been given the task of designing the wedding cake and he’d gone to the palace to show his plans to Diana. She had approved the designs with no changes but when Avery arrived back at the Royal Navy Cookery School in Chatham, he received word from the palace that Prince Charles was not happy.</p> <p>"I got a phone call that Prince Charles wasn't happy," says Avery. But thankfully, it wasn't a criticism but rather – something the Prince wanted added.</p> <p>"We hadn't put on the Red Dragon," says Avery. Once we added the Red Dragon symbol of Wales, which was Prince Charles' call sign when he was flying helicopters with the Navy, the Prince was happy.</p> <p>The cake’s design included hand-painted symbols representing Prince Charles' military roles, the Prince of Wales emblem, St Paul's Cathedral, Buckingham Palace and Highgrove – one of which took eight hours to complete.</p> <p><strong>How big was this Wedding Cake of the Century?</strong></p> <p>The five-tier cake stood at 165cm and took some time to bake with the bottom tier alone taking Avery 12 hours. As well, Avery used a spirit level and set square to ensure the dimensions were perfect.</p> <p>He was sworn to secrecy during the 14-week process of designing and making the cake and says the pressure was on to get everything perfect: "If there was anything wrong, the whole world would have known about it, not just me," he says.</p> <p>When it came to the baking of the cake, Avery turned to a favourite recipe he had from his mother for a rich fruit cake.</p> <p>"But I had to take things out and add things in to improve it. I had worked on that recipe for up to five years until I got it absolutely perfect."</p> <p>As perfect as it is, Avery says he won’t be sharing this recipe: “I’ve been asked many times, but no,” he adds.</p> <p><strong><em>The Wedding of the Century</em></strong></p> <p>2021 marks 40 years since Prince Charles married Diana Spencer at St Paul's Cathedral on July 29th - a wedding which drew a global television audience of more than 750 million people.</p> <p>A new documentary has been made to mark the occasion which will screen on BritBox Australia, aptly titled <em>Wedding of the Century.</em></p> <p>The original documentary includes remastered footage of the wedding plus never-before-seen interviews with those closely involved in the wedding planning, including the florist and one of the photographers.</p> <p><strong>Was it all successful?</strong></p> <p>After the wedding, Avery received a letter from the new Prince and Princess of Wales saying "how thrilled they were with the cake."</p> <p>They even saved the second tier to use at Prince William's christening on August 4th, 1982. Diana loved Avery's work so much she asked him to make William's first birthday cake, too, "a sponge with nursery rhymes around it.”</p> <p>These days Avery has retired from the Royal Navy after serving for 22 years. He went on to open a cake shop, baking wedding cakes (naturally) before going back into teaching.</p> <p>As Avery says: "It's the wedding of the century, it's the cake of the century.”</p> <p><strong>Image: Getty Images</strong></p>

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Woman’s INSANE tomato hack goes viral

<p><span>It has always been considered a perilous task to peel back the skin of tomatoes, however one chef on TikTok has shown a simple, three-step hack to peeling them with your fingers.</span><br /><br /><span>British home chef Jax Hamilton revealed her "quick skin tomatoes" hack to people online, and claims her method results in "no mess" or "watery toms".</span><br /><br /><span>"Let's get the skins off these bad boys — nice and quick," she says in her video, filming a dozen, robust tomatoes.</span><br /><br /><span>First slicing the tomatoes in half, Hamilton says to drizzle olive oil in a pan over medium heat.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7842543/daily-6.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6c5b02a80f1c4bb59c63ed3f00e0df28" /><br /><br /><span>"When your oil [is] warm, you want to pack all your tomatoes in and pop on the lid," she adds.</span><br /><br /><span>She says that within five minutes of sizzling on the stove, the skin melts off the tomatoes with her method.</span><br /><br /><span>She then goes on to pinch the loosened flesh between two fingers, and lifts off the shiny skin and discards it to the side, revealing soft, warmed tomatoes.</span><br /><br /><span>"And there we have it, check it out — skin free!" she said.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7842542/daily-5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8199922710c848e684721c6bc79da8b5" /><br /><br /><span>The hack has been viewed over five million times.</span><br /><br /><span>"This is amazing — tomato skins always make me stop eating when I find them in my sauce and it bothers me so much," one user wrote in the comments.</span><br /><br /><span>Another added: "This video relaxes me so much.”</span></p>

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Mum shamed for putting "alcohol-free" vodka in child's lunchbox

<p>What's the difference between an alcohol-free bubbly drink and a soft drink? Although they sound the same, there is a world of a difference - as one NZ mum and gym director has discovered.</p> <p>After putting cans of zero alcohol Pals (a vodka seltzer) in her kids' lunchboxes, the mum shared a photo to Instagram with the caption: "perfect addition to school lunches too."</p> <p>While the drinks are free from alcohol the post caused a bit of a stir, especially on Twitter where a screenshot was shared.</p> <p>"I'm already imagining young kids grabbing the wrong Pals from the fridge for an after school drink ... very irresponsible marketing. And not from Pals," one person wrote.</p> <p>"Wow putting a non alcoholic drink in a school lunch! How irresponsible," another commented.</p> <p>When the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/mum-criticised-for-putting-zero-per-cent-alcohol-pals-in-childrens-lunchboxes/FG7IHR3MEPFBFACYPRT5MUURSE/" target="_blank">NZ Herald</a><span> </span>contacted the mum for comment she claimed that the post had been a "gag."</p> <p>"Just like I have the personal rights to pop down to the booze shop and purchase a zero per cent Heineken and put it into my kids lunch boxes. For a gag," she explained.</p> <p>"A lot of my content is appealing to the general population and our clients who can have a laugh, not those who have the capacity to spin something completely out of context and actually think I sent my kids to pre-school and school with a Pal in their lunch boxes."</p> <p>Alcohol-free beverages are becoming quite popular amongst a wife group of people, from pregnant and breastfeeding mums to non-drinkers to people who just want to cut down on their consumption.</p> <p>But there are still some misconceptions about them and how they differ from soft drink.</p> <p>Irene Falcone is the founder of Australia's first physical alc-free bottle shop,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://sansdrinks.com.au/" target="_blank">Sans Drinks</a>.</p> <p>"Alc-free drinks are not soft drinks – they taste and smell just like alcohol," she says. "They have the same rules and regulations as alcohol."</p>

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