Eye Care

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What colour are these hearts?

<p>If, thanks to the surge of optical illusions sweeping the world of late, you feel like you have no idea how your brain actually works, prepare to feel even more confused.</p> <p>A new video by Bite Size Psych has shown how our brains can be fooled into seeing colours in different ways, and our minds are blown.</p> <p>Just look at the images below and above, and ask yourself what colours the hearts are.</p> <p><img width="496" height="200" src="/media/18743/more-hearts-_496x200.jpg" alt="More Hearts -" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>What do you think?</p> <p>We're seeing a magenta and an orangey-red - but it turns out, we're completely wrong.</p> <p>Both hearts are, in fact, bright pink.</p> <p>"If you zoom in on the picture you find that the striped bars aren't actually the same colour," explains the video's narrator.</p> <p>"These surrounding blue bars make the heart seem purple while these surrounding green bars make the heart seem orange.</p> <p>"This gives us a vital clue to how our vision works. It suggests that we perceive an object's colour based on its proximity and contrast with surrounding shades."</p> <p>Well, that's something new to think about when we get dressed in the morning.</p> <p><em>First appeared on <a href="http://www.Stuff.co.nz" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Stuff.co.nz</strong></span></a>. </em></p> <p><em>Video credit: YouTube / Bite Size Psych</em></p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2016/04/eyesight-test-red-circle-hidden-image/" target="_blank"><strong>Can you see the image hidden in this circle?</strong></a></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2016/04/animal-optical-illusion-the-puzzled-fox/" target="_blank"><strong>How many animals can you see in this picture?</strong></a></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2016/01/glasses-tricks/" target="_blank"><strong>Glasses tricks everyone should know</strong></a></em></span></p>

Eye Care

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How many animals can you see in this picture?

<p>We’ve already shown you a couple of optical illusions this week, with the <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/health/eye-care/2016/04/eyesight-test-red-circle-hidden-image/" target="_blank">red dot puzzle</a><a href="/health/eye-care/2016/04/eyesight-test-red-circle-hidden-image/" target="_blank"></a></strong></span> and the <a href="/news/news/2016/04/leopards-hidden-photo-south-africa-royal-kruger/" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>hidden leopards</strong></span></a> in Royal Kruger National Park, but this one’s really going to put you to this test.</p> <p>This picture, known as The Puzzled Fox, first came out by printmakers Currier and Ives in 1872. The almost-150-year old brainteaser is once again confounding people.</p> <p>How many animals can you see in this woodland scene?</p> <p><img width="500" height="368" src="/media/18142/woodland-scene-hero-_500x368.jpg" alt="Woodland Scene Hero -" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>Did you see them all? There are some human faces, hidden in the woods as well.</p> <p>You should be able to find 16 animals and hidden faces all up!</p> <p>This brainteaser is quite difficult, so don’t feel bad if you missed a few. We’ve highlighted the answers below! </p> <p><img width="497" height="370" src="/media/18143/woodland-scene-two_497x370.jpg" alt="Woodland Scene Two" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/news/news/2016/01/can-you-find-the-6-words-hidden-in-this-picture/">Can you find the 6 words hidden in this picture?</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/news/news/2015/12/spot-the-cat-hidden-in-this-picture/">Can you spot the cat hidden in this picture?</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/news/news/2016/01/spot-chewbacca-in-this-image/">Can you find Chewbacca in this illustration?</a></strong></em></span></p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p>

Eye Care

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Can you see the image hidden in this circle?

<p>This picture is the latest brainteaser to take the internet by storm, and it’s actually also quite a good way to gauge the strength of your eyesight.</p> <p>Can you see the image that’s hidden in the red circle below?</p> <p>If not, scroll down for a quick hint! </p> <p><img width="500" height="449" src="/media/17991/red-circle-_500x449.jpg" alt="Red Circle -" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>To help you out we’ve outlined some of the details below. </p> <p><img width="500" height="375" src="/media/17992/d71027af-8223-4d97-8af1-4b5a7cca78fb_500x375.jpg" alt="D 71027af -8223-4d 97-8af 1-4b 5a 7cca 78fb" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>Getting easier? We thought it would.</p> <p>Scroll down to see the full image. It's actually more detailed than you'd think!</p> <p><img width="500" height="375" src="/media/17993/1dd3a372-6fa3-4b47-8389-7eb4bfc50368_500x375.jpg" alt="1dd 3a 372-6fa 3-4b 47-8389-7eb 4bfc 50368" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/> </p> <p> </p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/news/news/2016/01/can-you-find-the-6-words-hidden-in-this-picture/">Can you find the 6 words hidden in this picture?</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/news/news/2015/12/spot-the-cat-hidden-in-this-picture/">Can you spot the cat hidden in this picture?</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/news/news/2016/01/spot-chewbacca-in-this-image/">Can you find Chewbacca in this illustration?</a></strong></em></span></p>

Eye Care

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Glasses tricks everyone should know

<p>Wearing glasses can be a real pain sometimes. From struggling to find them in the dark, to having frames slide down your nose when you sweat, there are some issues only four-eyes can understand.</p> <p>Make your life that little bit easier with these genius glasses hacks from the team at Mashable.</p> <p><strong>Hack 1: Find glasses in the dark</strong></p> <p>Glow in the dark paint is translucent in day light but lights up once the lights go out, making it perfect to locate a pair of specs in the dark. Dab a spot of paint on the arms of your glasses and never misplace a pair again.</p> <p><strong>Hack 2: Distinguish between similar shower products</strong></p> <p>Do you struggle to make out what products you’re reaching for when you go sans spectacles in the shower? Help distinguish between a similar-looking shampoo and conditioner bottle by fixing a bright-coloured hair elastic around the neck of the bottle.</p> <p><strong>Hack 3: Find your specs if you’re nearsighted</strong></p> <p>Near-sighted people can use the camera on their phone to locate a misplaced pair of glasses. The camera will magnify your surrounds and present it closer to your face so you can scan around the room with ease.</p> <p><strong>Hack 4: Stop glasses sliding down your nose</strong></p> <p>Whether you sweat a lot or your frames have loosened, glasses that won’t stay put on your face can be really annoying. Put a pesky pair in place with this genius hack. Grab two hair elastics and wrap each around the end of your glasses arms, just where they meet your ears. Wrapping the elastics around the arms will thicken the frames, and give them more friction to grip onto your ears.</p> <p><strong>Hack 5: Keep lenses clean anywhere, any time</strong></p> <p>Few things are more annoying than smudged glasses lenses. Stock up on microfiber clothes and store them in places you frequent- from the car glovebox to your desk drawer- so you’ll never see the world through blurry lenses again.</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/10/glasses-that-make-you-look-younger/">These glasses make you look younger</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/11/how-often-should-you-get-your-eyes-tested/">How often should you visit your optometrist</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/08/why-wear-computer-glasses/">Why you should consider wearing computer glasses</a></strong></em></span></p>

Eye Care

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5 at-home eye exercises for better vision

<p>As we age, it’s important to take special care of our eyes. Follow these five simple at-home eye exercises for improved focus, blood circulation and more.</p> <p><strong>To regulate circulation</strong></p> <p>This one’s simple. Close your eyes for three to five seconds, then open them. Do this several times. It will help increase blood circulation to your eyes and relax your muscles. </p> <p>Another simple exercise is to focus on one point in the room, and rotate your head in a circular motion. Start with left to right, then try up and down.</p> <p><strong>To maintain clear vision</strong></p> <p>Place your palms over closed eyes and relax for one minute. Darkness is said to help strengthen the photoreceptor cells in your eyes, which in turn help maintain clear vision.</p> <p><strong>To improve vision focus</strong></p> <p>Stand near a window so your face is close to the glass. Focus on the window pane first, then allow your gaze to rest on the distance. Repeat this ten times.</p> <p><strong>To strengthen eye muscles</strong></p> <p>Sit in a comfortable position and hold out your thumb in a hitchhiking pose. Focus on your outstretched thumb and slowly bring it closer to your face, until it’s five centimetres from your nose. Move it back and forth slowly so your eyes are forced to maintain focus.</p> <p><strong>To stimulate your eyes</strong></p> <p>Try this easy eye spa: apply a hot and cold compress by draping a hot towel over your eyes, followed by a cold one. The alternating temperatures is said to cause vasoconstriction and vasodilation which should stimulate your eyes and improve blood circulation.</p> <p><strong>To control eye movement</strong></p> <p>Focus on a point on the floor and imagine a figure eight. Using your eyes, trace around the figure eight slowly. Trace it one way, then the opposite direction.</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/12/are-elderly-drivers-more-dangerous/">Does ageing make one more dangerous behind the wheel?</a></strong></span></em></p> <p><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/11/first-borns-near-sightedness/">First-born children are more likely to be nearsighted</a></strong></span></em></p> <p><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/11/how-often-should-you-get-your-eyes-tested/">How often should you visit your optometrist?</a></strong></span></em></p>

Eye Care

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Colour-blind man listens to colour

<p>Imagine a world without colour. Imagine a landscape in complete greyscale, where sunflowers are pale grey and grass, black. For Neil Harbisson, that is a reality.</p> <p>Harbisson suffers from a rare visual condition called achromatopsia, which is total colour blindness. He’s never seen colour.</p> <p>At age 21, Harbisson decided to take on his greatest challenge and find a way to interpret colour. What he created with computer scientist Adam Montandon is astounding.</p> <p>“In 2003, I started a project… for an electronic eye,” explains Harbisson, at a TEDGlobal conference. “It’s a colour sensor that detects the colour frequency in front of me and sends this frequency to a chip installed in the back of my head. [Then] I hear the colour in front of me.”</p> <p>No, it’s not a scene from a sci fi film. Harbisson has created a wearable device that allows him to listen to colour. It’s a non-visual way for his brain to interpret the world around him, which has now become second nature.</p> <p>It wasn’t always completely normal to ‘hear’ colour though. “At the start, I had to memorise the names you give for each colour. But after some time, all this information became a perception. I didn’t have to think. And after some time, this perception became a feeling. I started to have favourite colours and I started to dream in colours,” he says.</p> <p>According to Harbisson, each colour has its own unique sound. Pink is C major- “a happy chord”- while turquoise if B minor.</p> <p>Indeed, the device opens up a new world of beauty and appreciation. I can listen to Picasso. It’s like going to a concert hall!” he says. Supermarkets are also a new-found place of beauty, which he likens to a nightclub of noise. “Especially the aisle with cleaning products. It’s just fabulous,” he laughs.</p> <p>Take a look at Neil Harbisson’s TED Talk, where he showcases how he uses the ‘electronic eye,’ and how it might revolutionise life for the colour blind.</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/health/mind/2015/12/positive-thinking-and-mental-health/">Can positive thinking improve your mental health?</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/health/hearing/2015/12/myths-about-hard-of-hearing-people/">7 myths about hard of hearing people that aren’t true</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="/health/caring/2015/11/lonely-elderly-couple-calls-police/">Elderly couple calls police because they’re desperately lonely</a></strong></em></span></p>

Eye Care

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Eye drops could reverse cataracts

<p>Those who suffer from cataracts will know the frustration that comes from this degenerative eye disease. Cataracts affect more than 20 million people worldwide and are caused when the lenses of the eyes lost their transparency. In exciting eye care news, a team of American researchers believe to have made a breakthrough in the treatment of cataracts, using eye drops to reverse cataracts altogether. Impressive.</p> <p>Researchers from the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF) have identified a new compound that is soluble enough to be administered via a simple eye dropper. What’s more, when tested on mice, results were seen in as little as two weeks.</p> <p>While cataracts are treatable, surgery can be uncomfortable and very expensive. Elderly people in developing nations are also affected by this disease, as many don’t have access to resources to treat it.</p> <p>Jason Gestwicki, associate professor at UCSF, says this finding has the potential to help millions of people, and potential lots of applications. "If you look at… the protein aggregates that cause cataracts, you'd be hard-pressed to tell them apart from those that cause Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, or Huntington's diseases," he said. "By studying cataracts we've been able to… show by proof-of-concept that these technologies could also be used in nervous system diseases.”</p> <p>Imagine treating Alzheimer’s Disease or eye issues with a simple drop. Well, it might not belong in the realm of imagination anymore. </p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/health/hearing/2015/12/gene-therapy-breakthrough-hearing-loss/">Gene therapy breakthrough for treatment of hearing loss</a></strong></span></em></p> <p><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/11/how-often-should-you-get-your-eyes-tested/">How often should you visit your optometrist?</a></strong></span></em></p> <p><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/news/news/2015/11/specsavers-spectacle-style-competition/">83-year-old crowned “Spectacle Wearer of the Year”</a></strong></span></em></p> <p> </p>

Eye Care

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Find the best glasses style to suit your face shape

<p>Whether you have a round, oval or heart-shaped face, find the best style of glasses to suit you with this simple guide.</p> <p><strong>Round face:</strong></p> <p>You have a round face if: you have full cheeks, a rounded chin and your face is equal length and width.</p> <p>Your perfect glasses match: Look out glasses that have strong details, such as a think frame or side pattern. Opt for wider rather than tall lenses, which will give your face shape definition, rather than broaden your features. Adjustable nose pads are a must as many people would a round face shape have higher cheeks.</p> <p><strong>Oval face:</strong></p> <p>You have an oval face if: you have high cheekbones and a narrower chin and jawline than forehead.</p> <p>Your perfect glasses match: Try on glasses that have bold shapes, such as a cat-eye frame. Your face shape is one of the most versatile, so have fun with it and give coloured or textured glasses a try. Experiment with the size of the frames and aim for glasses that maintain a symmetrical balance.</p> <p><strong>Heart face:</strong></p> <p>You have a heart-shaped face if: you have a broad forehead, pointed chin and high cheekbones.</p> <p>Your perfect glasses match: Opt for glasses frames that are wider than your forehead. As your face is naturally smaller towards your chin, look for glasses that have details on the lower half, such as a colour gradient. Light colours are ideal.</p> <p><strong>Square face:</strong></p> <p>You have a square face if: you have a prominent jawline, angular features and a wide forehead.</p> <p>Your perfect glasses match: Counteract angular features with round frames. Avoid glasses with harsh corners in dark colours as they’ll appear exaggerated. Instead, try on thinner frames in neutral colours like taupe or light tortoiseshell.</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/10/glasses-that-make-you-look-younger/">These glasses make you look younger</a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/12/are-elderly-drivers-more-dangerous/">Does ageing make one more dangerous behind the wheel?</a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/08/why-wear-computer-glasses/">Why you should consider wearing computer glasses</a></em></strong></span></p>

Eye Care

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The most iconic glasses in film

<p>Hollywood stars are a regular go-to for style inspiration but every once in a while, they play a character that defines a trend. Think Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s or Carrie Bradshaw in Sex and the City. And, once it’s worn by a stylish star, an accessory as simple as a pair of sunglasses lands on everyone’s must-have list.</p> <p>Channel these movie stars who put unique glasses frames on our sartorial radar. </p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/06/eye-colour-and-health/"></a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/12/are-elderly-drivers-more-dangerous/">Does ageing make one more dangerous behind the wheel?</a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/06/eye-colour-and-health/"></a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/10/glasses-that-make-you-look-younger/">These glasses make you look younger</a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/06/eye-colour-and-health/"></a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/08/why-wear-computer-glasses/">Why you should consider wearing computer glasses</a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/06/eye-colour-and-health/"> </a></em></strong></span></p>

Eye Care

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New technology allows blind to see with sound

<p>Something as simple as assessing whether to cross the road or when to take a boiling pot off the stove can be a challenging task for the vision impaired. But new research from the California Institute of Technology may have a solution the will give blind people the ability to sense their surrounds… through sound.</p> <p>Researchers have discovered that intrinsic neural connections- also known as crossmodal mappings- can be used with a device to help blind people ‘see’ their environment with sound. The impacts could be dramatic, with blind people able to complete attention consuming tasks that once took minutes, in mere seconds.</p> <p>The study involved the use of a vOICe device, which allows images to be translated into sounds. It’s made up of a small computer connected to a camera, attached to darkened glasses. Each camera image is scanned, and a computer algorithm translates the pixels into a unique sound. For example bright pixels, perhaps from looking at clouds, would have a loud, high-frequency pitch.</p> <p>What’s more, participants in the study were able to use the device, even without being trained to identify the sound frequencies.</p> <p>Shinsuke Shimojo, Gertrude Baltimore Professor of Experimental Psychology, says the findings open up a discussion of more philosophical questions, like ‘what is seeing?’</p> <p>"It seems like such an obvious question, but it gets complicated," says Shimojo. "Is seeing what happens when you open your eyes? Our research has shown that the visual cortex can be activated by sound, indicating that we don't really need our eyes to see. It's very profound--we're trying to give blind people a visual experience through other senses."</p> <p><strong>Related links: </strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/12/are-elderly-drivers-more-dangerous/"><strong>Does ageing make one more dangerous behind the wheel?</strong></a></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/10/glasses-that-make-you-look-younger/">These glasses make you look younger</a></em></strong></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="/health/eye-care/2015/08/why-wear-computer-glasses/">Why you should consider wearing computer glasses</a></em></strong></span></p>

Eye Care

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Does ageing make one more dangerous behind the wheel?

<p>The older we get, the more experience we gain, right? If that popular belief is correct, then older drivers should be some of the best on the roads. But, according to a new study about eye helath that’s not the case.</p> <p>Psychologists at Nottingham Trent University examined a group of over 65s, and their ability to quickly process visual information. They found the older group were able to process basic visuals just as fast as the younger participants, but when distracting objects were added, older people became significantly slower.</p> <p>In other words, older people have the same every day driving ability to their younger counterparts, but if a distraction presents- say, a dog runs onto the road or a kid chases a ball which rolls onto the street- they’re less equipped to respond.</p> <p>Think you’re a better driver than your teenage granddaughter? The Association of British insurers agrees. They claim that people over 70 are half as likely to be involved in an accident as 18-20 year olds.</p> <p>Tell us: do you think elderly drivers are more dangerous, or does experience make you a better driver?</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/11/first-borns-near-sightedness/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>First-born children are more likely to be nearsighted</strong></em></span></a></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/11/how-often-should-you-get-your-eyes-tested/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>How often should you visit your optometrist</em></span></a></strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/eye-care/2015/11/eye-colour-change-with-age/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>Your eyes change colour as you age</strong></em></span></a></p>

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First-born children are more likely to be nearsighted

<p>According to a study published in<em> JAMA Opthamology</em>, first-born children are more likely to be nearsighted than their younger siblings, and education investment might have something to do with it.</p> <p>Research lead by Dr Jeremy A. Gugenhenheim of Cardiff University, UK sought to determine whether there is a correlation between this phenomenon and increased exposure to environments that have been known to pre-dispose children to near-sightedness, also known as myopia, such as time spent outdoors or reading and writing.</p> <p>They studied 89,000 UK participants aged 40 to 69 years, all of which had no history of eye disorders. From this examination, first-born individuals were found to be 10 per cent more likely to be myopic and 20 per cent more likely to have high myopia.</p> <p>"Our findings that statistical adjustment for indices of educational exposure partially attenuated the magnitude of the association between birth order and myopia, and completely removed the evidence for a dose-response relationship, therefore support the idea that reduced parental investment in children's education for offspring of later birth order contributed to the observed birth order vs. myopia association and produced the observed dose-response relationship,” researchers explained.</p> <p>In other words, the tendency for parents to invest more in their first children in areas such as education may be a cause of increased near-sightedness amongst first-borns.</p>

Eye Care

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Why you need transition lenses

<p>If you’re looking to update your glasses, you might want to consider the technology of transition lenses: lenses that adjust to the indoor and outdoor lighting for you so you don’t have to worry about sunglasses.</p> <p>We spoke to Specsavers’ Ophthalmic Lens Product Manager, Silvia Zutavern, to find out everything you need to know about transition lenses before you make your purchase.</p> <p>So, how do they work? “[Transition lenses] darken automatically when exposed to sunlight, then fade back when you return indoors. The lenses darken with the presence of UV light. They are designed to darken to just the right level depending on the available light,” Zutavern says.</p> <p>When it comes to transition lenses, the technology has both its pros and cons. On the positive side, “One pair of glasses can fill the function of both clear prescription glasses and prescription sunglasses and they provide eyes with full UV protection in any state,” says Zutavern. Transition glasses are also a great option for people of all ages, including the grandkids. “They offer convenience as you don't need to carry a pair of prescription sunglasses with you everywhere you go. They are also great and quite practical for children as they do not have to worry about a second pair that could be lost, and they will always have their eyes protected from UV rays.”</p> <p>However, transition lenses might not be the best option for those who seek to wear them while driving. “The lenses need UV light to activate, so the lenses tend not to react as quickly inside a car as they do in normal conditions. This is because the windscreen blocks the UV light needed to help the lens react. At night or in poor visibility, you must not wear tinted glasses when driving,” Zutavern explains.</p> <p>“If one of the intended use of the glasses is for driving, then a second pair in the form of sunglasses is recommended.”</p>

Eye Care

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6 surprising risks with laser eye surgery

<p>For most, corrective laser eye surgery brings great results, correcting nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism and more. But for some rarer cases, eye surgery can have painful and sometimes disastrous consequences. Here are some of the laser eye risks you should be aware of when considering undergoing the corrective surgery.</p> <p><strong>Infection –</strong> One of the worst outcomes post laser-surgery, infection can occur in one in every 5000 cases. In the rarest cases, patients can develop a corneal ulcer as a result. To avoid infection, it is recommended that patients avoid swimming and hot tubs in the first few weeks post-surgery.</p> <p><strong>Glare/haziness –</strong> For some shortsighted patients, they will experience more glare than they had before the surgery, though this generally goes away after a few months. For some, however it is occasionally permanent.</p> <p>For most patients post-surgery, they will experience hazy vision which is caused by the healing of their eye and which usually dissipates in the weeks to come. In some cases, further surgery may be necessary to fix hazy vision complications.</p> <p><strong>Under/over-correction –</strong> Because everyone’s eyes are unique, some patients can leave surgery with their vision over- or under-corrected. Significant under-correction can call for a re-surgery, while over-correction can be treated with eye drops, further surgery, and temporary contact lenses.</p> <p><strong>Regression –</strong> Some patients experience regression, or the return to some extent of their pre-surgery shortsightedness, but a slight regression is normal as the eye heals.</p> <p><strong>Dry eyes –</strong> Post-surgery, many patients experience the discomfort of dry eyes, though it generally improves as time passes. For some, the damage may be permanent, and the prolonged use of artificial tears may be necessary. For those who already suffer from dry eyes, laser surgery is not recommended.</p>

Eye Care

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Tips for choosing an optometrist

<p>If your vision is starting to get a tad blurry, or you’re in the market for a new optometrist, these are the points to consider before choosing an optometrist. Remember that if the optometrist you initially choose doesn’t meet expectations, don’t be afraid to try someone else. Eye health is important, especially as you age, so make the effort to find an optometrist you get along with and trust.</p> <p><strong>1. Experience</strong></p> <p>An optometrist with a long history may be better at diagnosing problems simply because they’ve seen more patients, and consequently more eye conditions. This is not always the case but often it’s best to err on the side of experience.</p> <p><strong>2. Credentials</strong></p> <p>Don’t hesitate to check your optometrist credentials. These days you can find details online like on the optometrist’s website or you can ask the optometrist in question.</p> <p><strong>3. Specialty</strong></p> <p>If you have a particular condition such as glaucoma or macular degeneration, make sure your optometrist has experience treating the eye condition. It’s worth asking if your optometrist specialises with specific diseases or treating age-related conditions.</p> <p><strong>4. Knowledge</strong></p> <p>In your consultation, the optometrist should be offering you detailed information about all aspects of your vision, eye conditions and spectacles. You should leave the exam feeling like you thoroughly understand your eyesight.</p> <p><strong>5. Rapport</strong></p> <p>When you go for your first appointment think carefully about the exam experience. Did you feel comfortable? Did your optometrist take the time to listen to your questions and respond to them in a thorough and clear fashion? All these factors are important as if you don’t like your optometrist you’ll be less likely to go for check-ups.</p>

Eye Care

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Why the size of your glasses matters

<p>It can be frustrating when you’ve picked up your news glasses only to find the frame presses against your head or the glasses keep slipping down your nose. Getting the right pair of glasses isn’t just about the right prescription, finding a comfortable frame is also key to enjoying relaxed and (almost) perfect vision. So if you’ve ever suffered buyer’s remorse after a glasses purchase, here are the tips to follow so you always get the perfect fit for your new glasses.</p> <p><strong>The lens</strong></p> <p>In general, the thinner and lighter the lens, the more comfortable the spectacles will be to wear. If possible, choose a thinner lens so your glasses won’t feel as heavy on the nose and ears.</p> <p><strong>The nose bridge</strong></p> <p>As one of the few points of contact with your face, it’s important to carefully consider the comfort of the glasses’ nose bridge. You want the nose pads to sit solidly on your nose, otherwise they can quickly lose their grip and keep sliding down.</p> <p><strong>The sides</strong></p> <p>The sides of your spectacles shouldn’t press into your temples. Some people mistakenly believe pressure means the glasses fit properly, but there should never be any heaviness felt on the temples. You might feel some pressure behind the ear, but that’s ok as this keeps the weight of the glasses from being borne wholly by your nose.</p> <p><strong>The frame</strong></p> <p>As a general rule, when you look through your glasses it should be at the middle of the lens. The top of the frame should sit below the eyebrows but above the fold of the eye and the frame should not be much wider than your face.</p>

Eye Care

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Different vision test results – how can this happen?

<p>If you have regular eye examinations (which everyone should) you may have found that the results differed – even when the tests were taken by the same optician and in a very short time frame. If this has happened to you, don’t panic! It’s actually a very common occurrence due to a couple of different reasons.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Your eyes –</strong> The visual performance of our eyes varies throughout the day due to fluctuations in our hormones and blood sugar amongst other things. A test taken before the workday and after an hour on the computer will often yield a different result due to the stress that has occurred to the eye in a short period. To achieve the best result, try and schedule your test for a time when you’re relaxed, hydrated and not hungry. First thing in the morning is ideal.</li> <li><strong>The conditions during your test –</strong> The conditions in which a sight test is performed can have a distinct impact on the result. You should see an experienced optician for a thorough and comprehensive test in a dark examination room without any daylight present. To ensure the best result, make an appointment with your optician and discuss any issues or questions you may have.</li> <li><strong>Exterior influencers –</strong> Wearing contact lenses, taking medication and conditions like diabetes can all lead to an incorrect eye test result. To ensure the most accurate reading, let your optician know what medication you’re taking and if you suffer any medical issues. Try wearing your glasses instead of your contacts for 24 hours before your test as well if you can.</li> </ol>

Eye Care