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Ted Kennedy car crash scandal that killed Mary Jo Kopechne: Letter exposes new claims

<p>After 50 years, the Ted Kennedy Chappaquiddick incident has remained one of the biggest mysteries surrounding the Kennedy family.</p> <p>The car crash on the US island ended the life of 28-year-old Mary Jo Kopechne and derailed Ted Kennedy’s presidential chances.</p> <p>On the evening of July 18, 1969, the then US senator Kennedy hosted a party on the small island for the Boiler Room Girls, a group of six women who had worked on his brother Robert F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign the year before. One of the women was 28-year-old Kopechne.</p> <p>Despite extensive reports on the incident, details of the events of the night have remained shrouded. Kennedy reportedly left the party with Kopechne, even though she did not bring her purse or hotel room key with her. The two drove off in his 1967 Oldsmobile Delmont 88.</p> <p>Kennedy said the car went over the bridge into Poucha Pond after he made a wrong turn. While he managed to escape the sinking vehicle, Kopechne remained trapped and was later found dead in the morning.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 368.449px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828778/kennedy-embed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6ea10144582044f594787fdf71a993a4" /><img style="width: 301.887px; height: 500px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828803/kennedy-2-embed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0d363094141545378a703127593d6400" /></p> <p>But a letter to Kopechne’s surviving family has challenged this story.</p> <p>The letter, recently revealed by <a href="https://people.com/politics/ted-kennedy-chappaquiddick-car-accident-50-years-later/"><em>PEOPLE</em></a>’s Cover-Up podcast, came from a man who claimed to have met a woman who had attended the party the night Kopechne died.</p> <p>The woman, referred to as “Betty”, said Kopechne had had too much to drink at the event. Betty then brought Kopechne to Kennedy’s car to rest, and then went back to the cottage.</p> <p>The letter claimed that Kennedy and another female guest went for a drive in the car. When the sedan plunged into the water, Kennedy and the passenger survived and returned to the party, unaware that Kopechne had been in the vehicle all along.</p> <p>Betty shared the story, and the letter said that was when “…the Kennedy damage control machine kicked in and informed the shocked senator.”</p> <p>After receiving the letter in 2018, Kopechne’s cousin Georgetta Potoski said the full story might not yet be revealed. </p> <p>“I’m not convinced the mystery has been solved,” she told <em>PEOPLE</em>. </p> <p>“I know there are things that we do not know about what happened that night. The truth, even if it’s not what you want to hear, at least has some dignity around it.</p> <p>“I don’t think there will ever be justice for the loss of her life. [But] I think the truth would make our hearts rest easier.”</p> <p>A week after the incident, Kennedy pleaded guilty to leaving the scene of the accident and was given a two-month suspended sentence. Later on the same day, he gave a national broadcast statement in which he said, “I regard as indefensible the fact that I did not report the accident to the police immediately.”</p> <p>Kennedy, who was preparing for his presidential run, delayed his campaign until 1980. His run for the country’s top office was unsuccessful, but he continued to be re-elected as senator seven more times until his death in 2009.</p> <p>In his posthumously published memoir <em>True Compass</em>, Kennedy described the incident as “a horrible tragedy that haunts me every day of my life”.</p>

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Rare Harry Potter book set to sell for $56,000 at auction

<p><span>If you have some old <em>Harry Potter </em>books at home, check them out today – you might be sitting on a copy worth tens of thousands of dollars.</span></p> <p><span>A 1997 print version of JK Rowling’s <em>Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone </em>bought for less than $2 at a yard sale is expected to sell for up to £30,000 (about NZ$56,000) at an auction at the end of July.</span></p> <p><span>The book, owned by a 54-year-old English office worker, is one of the only 500 copies in the world of the particular first edition. </span></p> <p><span>The owner, whose name is not revealed, told <a href="https://nypost.com/2019/07/02/rare-harry-potter-book-bought-at-yard-sale-could-fetch-thousands-at-auction/"><em>SWNS</em></a> that he bought the book in 1999 for a pound. “I thought nothing of it at the time. I read the book … and then put it away in a cupboard for years,” he said. </span></p> <p><span>“It’s so exciting to think that a holiday read could be worth so much now.” </span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828733/harry-potter-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4af587c5fe9341fcadf09f7f7c266320" /></p> <p><span>The rare edition was published by Bloomsbury on June 30, 1997 and came with numerous misspellings and typos. </span></p> <p><span>Jim Spencer, rare books expert at Hansons Auctioneers said 300 of the first edition copies went to schools and libraries. “They are extremely rare,” he told the <a href="http://bit.ly/32cy6Gy"><em>Daily Mirror</em></a>.</span></p> <p><span>“This is a landmark in children’s literature, but it appeals to young and old. Everybody knows this book. This is the holy grail for so many collectors.”</span></p> <p><span>The book will be auctioned on July 31 at Hansons’ Library Auction at Bishton Hall, Wolseley Bridge, in Staffordshire, England.</span></p> <p><span>In April, another book of the same edition was <a href="https://www.gq.com.au/entertainment/film-tv/a-first-edition-harry-potter-book-just-fetched-126k-at-auction/news-story/3c7211062cb7c94c3184e32754b31e0a">sold at a Bonhams auction</a> in London for £68,812 or nearly NZ$132,500, above the original estimated worth of £40,000 to £60,000 ($NZ77,000 to 115,000).</span></p>

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Worth reading: Tried and true manuals for success

<p><em>The Conversation Canada asked our academic authors to share some recommended reading. In this instalment, Michael Armstrong, an operations research professor at Brock University who has written for</em> The Conversation Canada <em>on topics as diverse as <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-well-do-students-perform-when-retaking-courses-82559">student success rates in school</a> to the <a href="https://theconversation.com/picketts-charge-what-modern-mathematics-teaches-us-about-civil-war-battle-78982">mathematics of Civil War battle</a>, shares the top three books that he recommends for guidance on making the most of your career at any age.</em></p> <p>Here are three books that I often recommend to my students and friends. All are practical guides that have stood the test of time. The first will help you start your career, the second will help you succeed in it and the third will help you profit from it.</p> <p><strong><em>What Color Is Your Parachute? </em></strong><strong><em>A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers </em></strong>by Richard N. Bolles (Non-fiction. Paperback, 2016 and others. Ten Speed Press.)</p> <p>This is a popular guide for job seekers. Like most such books, it gives advice on the mechanical details of job hunting, such as good ways to organize a resume.</p> <p>More importantly — and less commonly — it helps people figure out what they want to do with their lives. What kind of career will best fit your personality? Will you be happier working with people or with data?</p> <p>The book is an obvious fit for graduates seeking their first job. But it could also help teenagers choose the best education to pursue after high school, or adults trying to make their careers more satisfying.</p> <p><strong><em>The Ropes to Skip and the Ropes to Know: </em><em>Studies in Organizational Theory and Behavior </em></strong>by R. Richard Ritti, Steve Levy and Neil Toucher (Non-fiction. Hardcover, 2016 and others. Chicago Business Press.)</p> <p>Don’t let the academic-sounding subtitle deter you. This is a highly readable book. It consists of short stories or parables that illustrate how people behave and interact at work.</p> <p>Every workplace has an official structure and formal rules. But workplaces contain people with individual personalities and relationships. This book will help you understand the unofficial structures and unwritten rules, before they get you into trouble.</p> <p>I often recommend <em>The Ropes to Skip and the Ropes to Know</em> to people starting their first job. It would be especially good for someone promoted to their first management or supervisory role.</p> <p><strong><em>The Wealthy Barber: </em><em>The Common Sense Guide to Successful Financial Planning </em></strong>by David Chilton (Non-fiction. Paperback, 2002 and others. Stoddart.)</p> <p>Once you receive your first paycheque, you’ll want to read this beginner’s guide to personal finance. It covers the basics of investing: retirement savings, mutual funds, etc. It also introduces a lot of other financial topics: savings versus spending, insurance that you do or don’t need, and so on.</p> <p>This probably isn’t the only financial guide you’ll ever need, but it is a good first one. I typically recommend it to recent graduates starting their careers. But it also suits mature adults dealing with money issues for the first time, perhaps after the death or divorce of their spouse.</p> <p>Have an enjoyable and productive season!<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/82305/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Michael J. Armstrong, Associate professor of operations research, Brock University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/worth-reading-tried-and-true-manuals-for-success-82305"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Coming soon to Netflix: Neil Gaiman's popular comic book series

<p><span>Fans of Neil Gaiman rejoice – one more of his work is set to be adapted for the screen.</span></p> <p><span>After more than three years of failed attempts to make a screen adaptation, Netflix has finally acquired <em>The Sandman </em>for a live-action TV series in a reportedly “massive” deal with Warner Bros.</span></p> <p><span>Throughout the years, attempts to adapt the popular horror fantasy comic book series – which has been running since 1989 – have floundered. The most recent was in 2016, when a plan to produce a feature film directed by <em>Third Rock From The Sun</em> star  Joseph Gordon-Levitt dissolved. </span></p> <p><span>According to the <a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/sandman-tv-series-neil-gaiman-david-goyer-a-go-at-netflix-1220761"><em>Hollywood Reporter</em></a>, industry insiders said the show will become “the most expensive TV series that DC Entertainment has ever done”.</span></p> <p><span>Gaiman will be involved in the show as an executive producer along with <em>Wonder Woman </em>(2017) screenwriter Allan Heinberg and <em>Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice </em>(2016) screenwriter David S. Goyer. </span></p> <p><span>“We’re thrilled to partner with the brilliant team that is Neil Gaiman, David S. Goyer and Allan Heinberg to finally bring Neil’s iconic comic book series, <em>The Sandman</em>, to life onscreen,” said Channing Dungey, VP of original series at Netflix. </span></p> <p><span>“From its rich characters and storylines to its intricately built-out worlds, we’re excited to create an epic original series that dives deep into this multi-layered universe beloved by fans around the world.”  </span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Are you prepared to meet the Lord of Dreams? THE SANDMAN is officially coming to <a href="https://twitter.com/netflix?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@netflix</a>! Head here for more: <a href="https://t.co/zlamTMHen0">https://t.co/zlamTMHen0</a> <a href="https://t.co/zQbgXKdrZX">pic.twitter.com/zQbgXKdrZX</a></p> — DC (@DCComics) <a href="https://twitter.com/DCComics/status/1145836913078755328?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 1, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>The show, which will have 11 episodes in its first season, was described as “a rich blend of modern myth and dark fantasy in which contemporary fiction, historical drama and legend are seamlessly interwoven”.</span></p>

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Serena Williams' heartfelt open letter to Naomi Osaka: "It's time for me apologise”

<p>Serena Williams has been heralded as one of the greatest tennis players of all time. However,a controversial defeat at the US Open in 2018 left a stain on the legendary American’s name.</p> <p>The championship match between Williams and Naomi Osaka left a bad taste in everyone’s mouth after a verbal altercation between the former world No. 1 and the chair umpire, Carlos Ramos, gave her three on-court violations.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzsm-PZnTQx/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzsm-PZnTQx/" target="_blank">A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams)</a> on Jul 9, 2019 at 6:04am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The 23-time Grand Slam champion was penalised for illegal coaching, verbal abuse and breaking her racket – later she suggested Ramos’ court violations were motivated by sexism. Earlier this week, Williams set the record straight on her side of the story in an essay for <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a28209579/serena-williams-us-open-2018-essay/" target="_blank">Harper’s Bazaar </a></em>for their August cover and in the letter openly revealed she sent 21-year-old Osaka an apology after the match.</p> <p>“In the end, my opponent simply played better than me that day and ended up winning her first Grand Slam title,” Williams said.</p> <p>“I thought back to my first Grand Slam. It’s the one you remember best; it’s supposed to be the most special. This debacle ruined something that should have been amazing and historic.</p> <p>“Not only was a game taken from me but a defining, triumphant moment was taken from another player, something she should remember as one of the happiest memories in her long and successful career,” she continued.</p> <p>“My heart broke.”</p> <p>Williams detailed in the essay struggling to find peace in the days after the match against Osaka and once she began to see a therapist she realised there was “only one way to move forward".</p> <p>“It was time for me to apologize to the person who deserved it the most,” she said.</p> <p>“I started to type, slowly at first, then faster as if the words were flowing out of me.”</p> <p>In her letter to Osaka, Williams said: “Hey, Naomi! It’s Serena Williams. As I said on the court, I am so proud of you and I am truly sorry. I thought I was doing the right thing in sticking up for myself. But I had no idea the media would pit us against each other.</p> <p>“I would love the chance to live that moment over again. I am, was, and will always be happy for you and supportive of you. I would never, ever want the light to shine away from another female, specifically another black female athlete.</p> <p>“I can’t wait for your future, and believe me I will always be watching as a big fan! I wish you only success today and in the future. Once again, I am so proud of you. All my love and your fan, Serena.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzssfHDFnFM/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzssfHDFnFM/" target="_blank">A post shared by Harper's BAZAAR (@harpersbazaarus)</a> on Jul 9, 2019 at 6:52am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The tennis star said “tears rolled down” when she received Osaka’s response to her letter.</p> <p>“People can misunderstand anger for strength because they can’t differentiate between the two… No one has stood up for themselves the way you have, and you need to continue trailblazing.”</p> <p>The long journey on the road to self-recovery meant Williams considering she was to blame for Osaka’s bittersweet triumph disappeared when her former opponent encouraged her to keep fighting.</p> <p>“This incident — though excruciating for us to endure — exemplified how thousands of women in every area of the workforce are treated every day,” Williams wrote.</p> <p>“We are not allowed to have emotions, we are not allowed to be passionate. We are told to sit down and be quiet, which frankly is just not something I’m OK with. It’s shameful that our society penalises women just for being themselves.”</p>

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The best books to read at every age

<p><span>As we grow old, the books we read can serve as markers of the life stages we’ve gone through. If you’re looking for age-appropriate wisdom as you enter a new year, <em>The Washington Post </em>has curated a list of the best books to read for every age from 1 to 100.</span></p> <p><span>For those in their 60s, the list recommends a range of books on retirement and ageing. <em>The Five Years Before You Retire</em> by Emily Guy Birken (recommended for readers aged 60) as a guide for retirement planning, while <em>65 Things to Do When You Retire </em>edited by Mark Evan Chimsky (for readers aged 65) features ideas from figures such as Jane Fonda and Gloria Steinem. </span></p> <p><span>There are also titles to help you cope with changing life and circumstances – be it newfound passions in <em>Old in Art School </em>by Nell Painter (64), grief in <em>The Year of Magical Thinking </em>by Joan Didion (68), or failing memory in <em>I Remember Nothing </em>by Nora Ephron (69).</span></p> <p><span>Readers in their 70s are reminded of the joys and wonders of life with a range of life-affirming books in the list, including Mary Pipher’s <em>Women Rowing North </em>(76), Mark Helprin’s <em>Paris in the Present Tense </em>(74) and Peter Spiers’ <em>Master Class: Living Longer, Stronger, and Happier</em> (70).</span></p> <p><span>People in their 80s are encouraged to go back to poetry and literature classics with suggestions such as <em>Coming Into Eighty: Poems</em> (80), Shakespeare’s <em>King Lear </em>(87) and famous thrillers like Maisie Dobbs and Commissario Guido Brunetti (83).</span></p> <p><span>Finally, those aged 90 and above are advised to let go of their fears and regrets with titles such as <em>Nothing to be Frightened Of</em> from Julian Barnes (92), <em>Somewhere Towards the End</em> by Diana Athill (96) and <em>Little Boy </em>from Lawrence Ferlinghetti (99).</span></p> <p><span>Find the full list <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/entertainment/books/100-books-for-the-ages/">here</a>.</span></p>

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Queen Elizabeth has a secret journal only Prince Philip can read

<p>Queen Elizabeth has always been elusive and one secret that has managed to spill out about the most senior royal member has made her just the more mysterious.</p> <p>It has been revealed Her Majesty has kept a diary that she writes in every night, since she was just 15 years old.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.2165345898479px;" src="/media/7828281/queen-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d5f5994a195c4ed4a7b5d2455b40a15a" /></p> <p><em>Monty Python</em> actor Michael Palin said he learnt the unusual fact about the Queen while sitting next to the 93-year-old at an official royal dinner in Windsor castle.</p> <p>The actor had just been given his knighthood when he told Her Majesty he kept a nightly journal.</p> <p>“We were talking about diaries after I had mentioned that I kept a nightly journal of where I'd been and the people I encountered ... she said she did too, the difference being that while mine may have been for publication hers were definitely not.”</p> <p>He continued, “She commented that she found it quite difficult because it always made her a bit wooly and said, 'I usually manage to write for about 15 minutes before my head goes bump', and then she did an imitation of her head hitting the table, as if she had fallen asleep.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.2982998454405px;" src="/media/7828280/queen-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4ab25ae97e704b8485986648a21c1504" /></p> <p>Hugh Vickers, who is a royal expert, said the Queen was inspired by her father King George VI to start jotting down her own thoughts after she witnessed him doing so.</p> <p>What makes this little-known fact about the Queen even more interesting is that her diaries are reportedly guarded tightly.</p> <p>Not only are her close aides instructed to destroy the bottling paper used to absorb the ink from her pen, but her personal page is required to destroy the written-on paper so that the Queen’s thoughts can never be read.</p> <p>“The diary is taken with her wherever she is staying, whether it be Windsor or Sandringham or Balmoral, and is kept in a black leather case – a smaller version of one of the red dispatch boxes containing Government papers,” a royal insider revealed to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailystar.co.uk/" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Star</em>.</a></p>

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Letter reveals the Queen’s heartbreak over Princess Diana’s death

<p>Princess Diana’s passing is something that is still discussed to this day, despite taking place more than twenty years ago on August 31, 1997. This is because not only was it embedded in people’s minds but was also a pivotal moment in the history of the royal family.</p> <p>Upon Princess Diana’s passing, the British Royal Family was criticised for their initial reaction.</p> <p>However, a resurfaced letter written by The Queen sets to change all of that.</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal/1144891/royal-news-princess-diana-latest-the-queen-elizabeth-ii-letter-diana-death-william-harry" target="_blank"><em>The Express</em></a>, the Queen expresses her sadness in the letter.</p> <p>"It was indeed dreadfully sad, and she is a huge loss to the country.</p> <p>“But the public reaction to her death and the service in the Abbey seem to have united people around the world in a rather inspiring way.”</p> <p>The Queen also spoke about the strength of her grandchildren and Diana's sons, Prince William and Prince Harry.</p> <p>“William and Harry have been so brave and I am very proud of them.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwgm93uF4w6/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwgm93uF4w6/" target="_blank">Wishing a very happy 93rd birthday to Her Majesty The Queen! Credit: 📸PA</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/kensingtonroyal/" target="_blank"> Kensington Palace</a> (@kensingtonroyal) on Apr 21, 2019 at 12:39am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The letter was written in response to condolences from Lady Henriette Abel Smith, who was a lady in waiting, as well as a close confidante to the Queen.</p> <p><span>F</span><span>ollowing the death of Lady Smith</span><span> in 2005, the letter was auctioned off the same year and initially obtained by the <em>Daily Mail</em>. </span></p> <p>A majority of the letter was typed, but it was the written postscript where the Queen let her true feelings show.</p> <p>”I think your letter was one of the first I opened – emotions are still so mixed up but we have all been through a very bad experience.”</p> <p> </p>

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"I never saw any evidence of marriage": New book claims Donald and Melania Trump lead separate lives

<p>A new book on Donald Trump has claimed that he and his wife Melania Trump live separate lives, with the 45th US President and First Lady only remaining together out of an arrangement.</p> <p>Following his commercially successful expose <em>Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House</em>, Michael Wolff has released another book on Trump’s presidency.</p> <p>In new book <em>Siege: Trump Under Fire</em>, Wolff claims that the speculations surrounding the First Lady – including rumours of a body double, an extended hospital stay, delayed relocation to the White House and multiple on-record slip-ups – are indications that the Trumps’ relationship is merely for publicity purposes.</p> <p>Wolff told <a href="https://www.news.com.au/world/north-america/inside-the-trump-marriage-michael-wolff-book-claims-donald-and-melania-lead-separate-lives/news-story/782af09528c7696217d116fd1460ff7d"><em>The Australian</em></a> that the couple’s marriage is a “deal” that is akin to the rumoured relationship contract between Hollywood stars Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes.</p> <p>The book, which cites more than 100 sources, features Trump’s former director campaign and adviser Steve Bannon. </p> <p>“I never saw any evidence of a marriage,” Bannon said as quoted in the book. </p> <p>He told Wolff that most mentions of the First Lady “drew a puzzled look from Trump, as if to say, ‘How is she relevant?’”</p> <p>Wolff also claimed that the First Lady’s delayed move from New York to the White House also spoke volumes.</p> <p>“Indeed, a distraught Melania, repeatedly assured by her husband during the campaign that there was no possibility he would win, had originally refused to move to Washington,” Wolff wrote.</p> <p>“And, in fact, the First Lady was not really in the White House. It had taken Melania almost six months to officially relocate from New York to Washington, but that was in name only.”</p> <p>However, many news outlets have expressed doubts over the claims in Wolff’s new book. </p> <p>“The book is full of stuff that is lurid and sensational, but so dubious in its attributions that even in a review setting I’m afraid to repeat them,” wrote Matt Taibbi of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-features/michael-wolff-siege-book-taibbi-review-844398/" target="_blank"><em>Rolling Stone</em></a>.</p> <p>According to CNN political analyst Ryan Lizza, the book also contains “factual errors that mar the author’s credibility”.</p> <p>While Trump has not commented on the new <em>Siege</em> book, he rejected Wolff’s claims in <em>Fire and Fury</em>, describing the book as “the Fake Book of a mentally deranged author, who knowingly writes false information”.</p>

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Romance author Judith Krantz passes away aged 91

<p>Best-selling romance author Judith Krantz has passed away from natural causes at the age of 91. She died in her Bel Air home in California and was surrounded by family, friends and her four dogs at the time of her passing.</p> <p>Krantz was a successful journalist, writing in the industry for 27 years and interviewed a number of prominent women as well as writing numerous articles about sex. Her most popular article was “The myth of the multiple orgasm”.</p> <p>She sold more than 100 million copies of her romance novels in dozens of languages and became an author later in life, at age 50, after conquering her fear of flying, according to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-06-23/judith-krantz-novelist-who-mixed-sex-with-shopping-dies-at-91" target="_blank"><em>Bloomberg</em></a>.</p> <p>Each of her novels usually involved a young heroine who satisfies her taste for glamorous clothing and powerful men while navigating her way through the world of fashion, advertising and the Hollywood movie industry.</p> <p>Krantz drew on personal experience to help write her romance novels.</p> <p>“I strongly suspect that the difficulties I lived through are the elements in my life that finally made me a storyteller,” she wrote in her autobiography<span> </span><em>Sex and Shopping: The Confessions of a Nice Jewish Girl</em> (2000). </p> <p>“Looked at as a stream in which one thing led to another, the events of my life, and how I coped with them, tell me who I am. And a woman should have a clear idea of who she is.”</p> <p>Krantz also spoke about how she travelled her own “inner-directed path” in her autobiography.</p> <p>"While I seemed like another 'nice Jewish girl,' underneath that convenient cover I'd travelled my own, inner-directed path and had many a spicy and secret adventure," she wrote.</p> <p>"I grew up in a complicated tangle of privilege, family problems, and tormented teenaged sexuality."</p> <p><em>Scruples</em>, which was her first novel and told the story of the over-the-top lifestyle of the people who work in a Beverly Hills boutique, was a massive success and remained on The New York Times Best Sellers list for more than a year.</p> <p>Some of her novels were also developed into television miniseries.</p> <p>Krantz is survived by her son, Tony, daughter-in-law Kristin Dornig Krantz and grandson Nicholas.</p>

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Anxiety: What it is and how to deal with it

<p><span>All of us have felt worried or anxious at some point in our lives – but for some people, these uncomfortable feelings can be more serious and debilitating. </span></p> <p><span>Anxiety is the most common mental health condition in Australia, affecting one in four people at some stage in their lives. Those with anxiety may have persistent, excessive worries about seemingly unimportant problems, along with trouble relaxing and constant restlessness. The condition can interfere with your ability to concentrate, sleep and carry out everyday activities.</span></p> <p><span>Fortunately, it can be managed with the right treatment. Clinical psychologist and author Sarah Edelman has delved into the subject in her new book, <a href="https://www.harpercollins.com.au/9780733339776/no-worries-a-guide-to-releasing-anxiety-and-worry-using-cbt/"><em>No Worries: A Guide to Managing Anxiety and Worry Using CBT</em></a>. <em>Over 60 </em>talked with Edelman to gain a deeper look into the condition and discuss the best strategies to deal with unhelpful thinking.</span></p> <p><strong><span><em>Over 60</em>:</span></strong><span> <strong>What is the most common misconception about dealing with worry and anxiety?</strong></span></p> <p><span>Sarah Edelman: The most common misperception is that you can just get over it by thinking rationally, or just trying to see reason.  To change ingrained habits, we need a better understanding of anxiety, how it influences the way that we think and how it affects our behaviour. It is also helpful to recognise the beliefs that maintain the urge to worry. People can substantially reduce the frequency and intensity of anxiety, but it requires knowledge, self-awareness and practice of new habits.</span></p> <p><strong><span><em>O60</em>: Why do we develop worries and anxious thoughts?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Edelman: The human brain evolved in environments that were highly dangerous, so paying attention to threat had evolutionary benefits.  Although our world is far safer than the one occupied by our Stone Age ancestors, our brain is still designed to pay attention to threats. </span></p> <p><span>Many people are particularly prone to experiencing anxiety because they are genetically wired that way. Often there is a family history of anxiety, and sometimes depression as well. In addition, early life experiences have shaped our view of the world. People who grew up in an environment where aversive experiences are unpredictable and uncontrollable are more likely to have developed a vigilant, threat focused thinking style. This makes them prone to anxiety and worry.</span></p> <p><span>People may also become more anxious in later life because of feelings of vulnerability that come with having less control over our lives. If we have already developed habits such as excessive worry and overthinking, these may become more ingrained in later years, particularly if we don’t have lots of distractions.</span></p> <p><strong><span><em>O60</em>: Why do some people have difficulty letting go of this “unhelpful thinking”?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Edelman: In addition to our history and genetic disposition, we develop beliefs about the benefits of overthinking and staying vigilant to threat. These beliefs are usually unconscious, but can be brought to consciousness quite easily through introspection. Common beliefs that maintain the urge to worry include:</span></p> <ul> <li><span>Worry prepares me for the worst</span></li> <li><span>Worry help me to solve problems and motivates me to get things done</span></li> <li><span>Worry gives me control</span></li> <li><span>Worry means I care</span></li> <li><span>Worry can prevent bad things from happening</span></li> <li><span>To not worry would make me careless and irresponsible.</span></li> </ul> <p><span>As long as we believe that worry is protective, we are highly motivated to keep it up.  Most often, we don’t even realise that these beliefs affect our urge to worry. </span></p> <p><strong><span><em>O60</em>: Are there any simple habits that people can apply to their daily life to reduce worry and anxiety?</span></strong></p> <p><span>Edelman: Don’t confuse thoughts for reality. Just because you think something, doesn’t mean it’s true. If you are anxious, your perspective is likely to be biased by anxiety. Your thoughts become catastrophic. You cannot trust the content of your thoughts when you are in an anxious state.</span></p> <p><span>Use mindfulness exercises to build awareness of what is happening within your own mind. Observe your current experience, including the contents of your mind. Identify and label worry thoughts in action. Recognise that thoughts are just thoughts. They are not you, and they are not reality. </span></p> <p><span>Practise relaxation techniques to help identify physical tension as it emerges, and learn how to release it. </span></p> <p><span>Reflect on why you feel drawn to engage with worry. Remember that worry is about trying to be safe by considering all negative possibilities, but it never brings you the reassurance that you seek. </span></p> <p><span>Don’t confuse worry for problem-solving. You can problem-solve without worrying, by brainstorming solutions with pen and paper in hand. Worry does not add value to problem-solving. Don’t assume that worry prevents good or bad things from happening. Worry makes no difference to life events. </span></p> <p><span>Problem-solve if appropriate, but if it is out of your hands, practise acceptance. Many things are not within your control. Uncertainty is a normal part of life. Relax into uncertainty. </span></p> <p><span>Many problems resolve themselves. You don’t always need to intervene. Give them time. </span></p> <p>When we feel bad, it feels like this is our new reality, and things will never change. But upsetting emotions pass. Sometimes the situations themselves change, but if they don’t, we adjust to the new reality. Time heals.</p>

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5 of the best writing tips from Stephen King

<p><span>Very few authors are as accomplished and influential as Stephen King. With 60 novels under his belt and more than 350 million copies sold worldwide, King’s works have become cultural icons and touchstones of the horror and suspense genre. His impact also extends beyond the literary world – many of his works have been adapted to classic box office hits, such as <em>IT</em>, <em>Carrie </em>and <em>The Shawshank Redemption</em>.</span></p> <p><span>Over the years, King has shared some of the tricks behind his masterful storytelling. Here are some of them.</span></p> <p><strong><span>1. Read a lot</span></strong></p> <p><span>King has no patience for aspiring writers who claim to have no time to read. “You can’t put it off… you gotta read just about everything,” he said during a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=19&amp;v=hqp7A0B7abc">lecture</a> at Yale University. </span></p> <p><span>A pleasant surprise awaits once you become a seasoned reader, King said. “There’s a magic moment – if you read enough, it will always come to you if you want to be a writer – where you put down some book and say, ‘This really sucks. I can do better than this. And this guy got published’.” </span></p> <p><strong>2. Be concise</strong></p> <p><span>King is a strong advocate of compact, incisive prose. “For me, a good description usually consists of a few well-chosen details that will stand for everything else,” he wrote in his book <em>On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft</em>. “It’s also important to know what to describe, and what can be left alone while you get on with your main job, which is telling a story.”</span></p> <p><strong>3. Avoid adverbs</strong></p> <p><span>You may think moderate use of adverbs elevate your work, but King is not a fan. “To put it another way, they’re like dandelions,” he explained. </span></p> <p><span>“If you have one on your lawn, it looks pretty and unique. If you fail to root it out, however, you find five the next day… fifty the day after that… and then, my brothers and sisters, your lawn is totally, completely, and profligately covered with dandelions. By then you see them for the weeds they really are, but by then it’s – gasp!! – too late.”</span></p> <p><strong>4. Edit, edit and edit</strong></p> <p><span>According to King, a manuscript is not done before it is marked up, polished and even rewritten multiple times. “Only God gets things right the first time,” he wrote in a <a href="https://jerryjenkins.com/stephen-king-writing-advice/">blog post</a>. “Don’t be a slob.”</span></p> <p><strong>5. Let go of the plot</strong></p> <p><span>In what might be his most <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/8btcvo/why_is_stephen_king_not_considered_a_great_writer/dx9gu9j?utm_source=share&amp;utm_medium=web2x">controversial</a> piece of advice, King said that the best stories are unearthed rather than created.</span></p> <p><span>“I distrust plot for two reasons,” he said. “First, because our lives are largely plotless, even when you add in all our reasonable precautions and careful planning; and second, because I believe plotting and the spontaneity of real creation aren’t compatible.”</span></p> <p><span>Instead of trying to build a storyline, he simply acts as a narrator, watching characters react to predicaments. “Stories are relics, part of an undiscovered pre-existing world,” he said. “The writer’s job is to use the tools in his or her toolbox to get as much of each one out of the ground intact as possible.”</span></p>

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How Danielle Steel became one of the world's bestselling authors

<p><span>Danielle Steel is probably one of the most productive writers in the world. Since 1973, she has written 179 books, averaging to about seven each year. She has sold more than 800 million copies, and was listed in the<em> Guinness Book of World Records</em> for the most consecutive weeks on <em>The New York Times </em>best seller-list with an impressive record of 381 weeks. </span></p> <p><span>The secret, she revealed, was nothing short of steely commitment and work ethic.</span></p> <p><span>In an interview with <a href="https://www.glamour.com/story/danielle-steel-books-interview"><em>Glamour</em></a>, the 71-year-old novelist said she works 20 to 22 hours per day – not to mention the 24-hour sessions she puts herself into “when she feels the crunch”. Sustaining herself on a diet of toast, decaf coffee and chocolate bars, she spends the day on her desk to type away. “Dead or alive, rain or shine, I get to my desk and I do my work,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>Steel persists even in the face of writer’s block. “I keep working. The more you shy away from the material, the worse it gets. You're better off pushing through and ending up with 30 dead pages you can correct later than just sitting there with nothing.”</span></p> <p><span>Steel is also less sympathetic with the “burnout culture” that many millennials found themselves in due to exhausting work demands. “They expect to have a nice time,” she says. “To me your twenties and a good part of your thirties are about working hard so that you have a better quality of life later on. I mean, I never expected that quality of life at 25. I had three jobs at the same time, and after work I wrote.”</span></p> <p><span>Experts and writers alike have expressed skepticism over the 22-hour-work day claim. “The idea that someone could sustain that pattern effectively – work, write, commit things to memory, use their full brain capacity – is just unbelievable to me,” sleep consultant Katie Fischer told the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/shortcuts/2019/may/13/danielle-steel-works-22-hour-days-is-it-possible"><em>Guardian</em></a>.</span></p> <p><span>“The appeal of Steel’s process, then, seems to be that every day is race day. But you can’t sustain that,” English author Liam Murray Bell wrote on <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-to-write-a-novel-four-fiction-writers-on-danielle-steels-insane-working-day-117155"><em>The Conversation</em></a>. “Little and often is my mantra, with every day building momentum.”</span></p> <p>However, creative writing lecturer David Bishop said Steel’s routine merits an important lesson. “To be a writer does not require 22 hours at a desk each day, but Steel is right that there are no miracles, either,” he said. “If you want to be a writer, you have to write – however you do it. That much is inescapable.”</p>

Books

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Why rereading the same book is good for you

<p><span>Ever found yourself picking up the same book again, even though you’ve read it cover to cover multiple times? Or do you go for the same TV show each night despite the fact that you have seen every episode? If you’ve ever wondered why it is so satisfying to revisit your favourite entertainment over and over again, there is an explanation for it.</span></p> <p><span>According to a study published by the <a href="https://www.gwern.net/docs/culture/2012-russell.pdf"><em>Journal of Consumer Research</em></a>, the phenomenon of rereading books, rewatching movies and returning to your favourite spots in town could be referred to as “reconsumption”.</span></p> <p><span>The researchers said: “Consumers gain richer and deeper insights into the reconsumption object itself but also an enhanced awareness of their own growth in understanding and appreciation through the lens of the reconsumption object.”</span></p> <p><span>They concluded that repeated reconsumption is a way for people to express and affirm “their individual experience and its special meanings to them”.</span></p> <p><span>Indeed, art and entertainment can have a lasting impact on people’s lives, even long after they were first brought into the world. This explains the appeal of nostalgia, where people would go back to old films, songs and books and see how they hold up after years have passed.</span></p> <p><span>So instead of starting a new book, you may want to look back into your shelf and find an old title – chances are, you may spot some previously unseen details in your umpteenth read.</span></p>

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Why you should set your phone to black and white

<p><span>Feeling more glued to your phone than you should be? According to a <a href="https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2017/02/smartphone-habits-and-pet-peeves-of-australians/">2017 study</a>, the average person in Australia spends 2.5 hours each day on their smartphones, with three out of four men (74 per cent) admitting to having their phone at hand throughout the whole day compared with 60 per cent of women. </span></p> <p><span>If you are concerned about your screentime, setting your phone to grayscale may help.</span></p> <p><span>Replacing the saturated colours with black-and-white tones may help make the apps look less enticing, saving you from endless checking and scrolling. Switching to grayscale can also help you save battery life and make it easier on your eyes, especially if you have visual impairments such as colour blindness.</span></p> <p><span>Here’s how you can change your phone to black and white.</span></p> <p><strong><span>iPhone</span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Open Settings &gt; General &gt; Accessibility &gt; Display Accommodations.</li> <li>Select Color Filters, then toggle the switch on.</li> <li>Select Grayscale.</li> </ol> <p><span>To set it back to the colourful setting, simply switch the toggle back.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Android</span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Open Settings &gt; About device &gt; Software info.</li> <li>Tap on the Builder number several times until a notification appears that you are now a developer.</li> <li>Go back to Settings and choose Developer options on the bottom of the list. Toggle on the switch at the top if it is not already on.</li> <li>Open Simulate color space.</li> <li>Select Monochromacy.</li> </ol>

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The brilliant way Disney celebrated the birth of baby Archie

<p>Plenty of babies and young children have Disney products in their possession, but not many can say they have a special gift directly from the animation company itself.</p> <p>Following the arrival of baby Archie Mountbatten-Windsor on May 6, Disney created a Winnie-The-Pooh animation video to celebrate his birth.</p> <p>The brilliant clip details the honey-loving bear travelling all the way to Windsor Palace to bring a special book to the Duke and Duchess of Sussex and the newborn son in a cradle.</p> <p>In the animation, Winnie-the-Pooh travels all the way from the Hundred Acre Wood to the new royal parents, with a book with a crown on the cover under his arm.</p> <p>The bear then is seen sitting beside the Duke and Duchess as they flip through the book with a smile on their faces.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">To celebrate the birth of Archie Mountbatten-Windsor, <a href="https://twitter.com/Disney?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Disney</a> have created a special Winnie-the-Pooh animation as a gift for Harry and Meghan. The short was hand-painted in watercolour by Disney’s senior principal artist Kim Raymond. Really special🎨 <a href="https://t.co/PrY5wlMeBQ">pic.twitter.com/PrY5wlMeBQ</a></p> — Omid Scobie (@scobie) <a href="https://twitter.com/scobie/status/1126580022150598657?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 9, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The video was shared to social media, garnering in over 7,000 likes and retweets with the caption: “The short was hand-painted in watercolour by Disney’s senior principal artist Kim Raymond.”</p> <p>Royal commentator Omid Scobie shared the sweet animation, one that might have had quite a profound impact on Prince Harry in particular.</p> <p>When his nephew Prince Louis was born in April last year, the Prince reportedly bought a very special gift for the latest royal arrival, which was a rare first-edition of the AA Milne classic.</p> <p>The book, <em>Winnie-The-Pooh </em>was published originally in 1926 and is reported to cost upwards of $15,000.</p> <p>Royal insiders claimed the first-of-its-kind novel was just a small part of a number of first editions Prince Harry planned to obtain for his young nephews and niece.</p> <p>“He originally wanted to get Lewis Carroll’s <em>Through The Looking Glass</em>, which was on sale for £24,000 ($AU45,000), but decided Winnie-The-Pooh would be more suitable reading material,” they told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6727671/prince-harry-louis-winnie-the-pooh-christening/" target="_blank" title="The Sun">The Sun</a></em> last year.]</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the special animation for baby Archie through images.</p>

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World's most hackable passwords: Is yours on the list?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many people still stick to “easy” passwords to secure sensitive accounts, a study has suggested.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The UK National Cyber Security Centre has released the top 100,000 passwords that have been exposed in data breaches around the world. Using the data from Troy Hunt’s </span><em><a href="https://haveibeenpwned.com/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Have I Been Pwned</span></a></em> <span style="font-weight: 400;">site, the study aimed to identify the gaps in cyber-security knowledge and help reduce the occurrence of account breaches and exploitation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The most popular password on the list was 123456, which was used by more than 23 million breached accounts. On the second place was 123456789, followed by “qwerty”, “password” and 111111.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The most common name to be used as a password was “ashley” with more than 430,000 appearances. Other top names included “michael”, “daniel”, “jessica” and “charlie”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dan U, senior security researcher at the NCSC said blocking these common passwords would help users protect their accounts. “Security works when people act as a community, whether that's allowing people to realise how common their password is, or just giving them confidence that the password they've picked at work or home is more sensible,” he wrote in </span><a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/blog-post/passwords-passwords-everywhere"><span style="font-weight: 400;">a statement</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">More websites and Internet services have been hit with security breaches in recent years, including Facebook, Microsoft, </span><a href="https://money.cnn.com/2017/10/03/technology/business/yahoo-breach-3-billion-accounts/index.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and more.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The NCSC recommended choosing three random yet memorable words to create a strong password, such as “walltinshirt” or “coffeetrainfish”, and avoiding credential reuse. </span></p> <p><strong>Top 20 most popular passwords:</strong></p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">123456</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">123456789</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">qwerty</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">password</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">111111</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">12345678</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">abc123</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1234567</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">password1</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">12345</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1234567890</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">123123</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">000000</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">iloveyou</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1234</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">1q2w3e4r5t</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">qwertyuiop</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">123</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">monkey</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">dragon</span></li> </ol>

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Should your dog go vegan?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Veganism and vegetarianism have become increasingly popular for New Zealanders, but what about their four-legged best friends?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The idea of giving dogs a vegan diet has remained controversial in the recent years. For vegan owners, it might be uncomfortable and against their values to feed pets with another animal. However, dissenters believe meat and bones are essential for dogs’ health and growth.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So what does science have to say in this matter? </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In short, it is still inconclusive. According to Wanda McCormick, animal physiologist and senior lecturer at Anglia Ruskin University, dogs may digest plant-based food more easily than their canine predecessors, thanks to extensive domestication. However, this also means that they are more vulnerable to tooth loss and decay due to lower exposure to bones.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There’s also the fact that bones, raw hide and meat-based chews can offer significant behavioural benefits to dogs,” McCormick wrote on </span><a href="https://theconversation.com/vegan-dogs-should-canines-go-meat-free-103404"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>The Conversation</em></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. “Chewing can be an immensely satisfying and relaxing experience for dogs. And in a world where many pets experience long periods of time alone, such opportunities can be invaluable.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many other experts are also undecided. So far, there are no longitudinal studies on veganism in dogs. “Most of what we know about their nutrition is by trial and error,” Greg Aldrich, associate professor at Kansas State University specialising in pet food nutrition told </span><a href="https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/4/11/18301016/dog-food-feeding-pets-vegan-history"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Vox</em></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This might explain why some vets are more open to meat-free meal plan, while others are more reluctant. “Can I create a vegetarian diet for a dog? Yes, I can … We have to pay very, very, very special attention, though, because they do have tendencies toward a more carnivorous physiology,” said Aldrich.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Only today, knowing all I know about nutrition and all of the analytical techniques, would I feel comfortable feeding a dog a vegetarian diet.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nevertheless, Aldrich said he still would not put his Labrador retriever on a vegetarian diet.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brisbane pet nutritionist Ruth Hatten recommends a mixed diet to ensure that your dog gets all the nutrients it needs. “I still encourage including raw meaty bones, raw free-range eggs and fish. While not vegan, it allows reduction of meat while significantly reducing any health concerns that may arise from a vegan diet,” Hatten told </span><em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/home/pets/im-raising-my-dogs-vegan/news-story/18a4a4e6ffc1b93e4f0911340de8f39f"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I understand it can be challenging for vegans to feed their dog meat, but I believe that our primary obligation is to the animals in our care. Sometimes a dog won’t enjoy a vegan diet, and that is an important factor, too.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are set on a vegan or vegetarian diet for your dog, vet Derek McNair advises taking gradual steps. “Take at least a month to allow time for gut bacteria to adjust,” McNair told </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/home/pets/im-raising-my-dogs-vegan/news-story/18a4a4e6ffc1b93e4f0911340de8f39f"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>news.com.au</em></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. “Have them checked every six months … After about two years, if everything is looking good with blood tests and so on, stretch it out to annually, which is what we recommend for every dog, regardless of diet.”</span></p>

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Books to help spend less live more

<p>We all want to save money, but it’s a lot easier said than done. So, if you’re looking to spend less and save more, why not turn to those who have turned their lives around with some ingenious financial experiments? Here are five books to help you reinvent your attitude towards money, debt and happiness.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/93981/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fthe-50-weekly-shop-jody-allen%2Fprod9780143797326.html" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The $50 Weekly Shop</span></strong></em></a> by Jody Allen </p> <p>After being made redundant in 2009, mother of two Jody Allen created the blog Stay at Home Mum to share her tried-and-true money-saving tips for supporting a young family of four on one wage. Eight years on, she runs her own business and, despite being in a much more comfortable financial position, continues to follow a strict budget, feeding her family with healthy meals for just $50 a week. In this book, the savings extraordinaire shares her tips on how you can do the same.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/93981/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmind-over-money-claudia-hammond%2Fprod9781782112051.html" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Mind Over Money</span></strong></em></a> by Claudia Hammond </p> <p>Money has immense power over us. We need it, we want it, and it can sometimes drive us to some unlikely extremes. In this fascinating book, Claudia Hammond delves deep into the psychology of money and why our relationship with it is so complicated. From learning how being grumpy can save you money to why you should spend more when it comes to pain relief, this clever guide will change the way you see money forever.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/93981/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fthe-art-of-frugal-hedonism-annie-raser-rowland%2Fprod9780994392817.html" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The Art of Frugal Hedonism</span></strong></em></a> by Annie Raser-Rowland with Adam Grubb </p> <p>Who says you need to spend money to enjoy life? In The Art of Frugal Hedonism, you’ll learn how you can save more money whilst still living your life to the fullest. Not only will this book revolutionise your financial philosophy, but applying the strategies in this guide will make you happier, healthier, wealthier and more in love with life than ever before.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/93981/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fthe-no-spend-year-michelle-mcgagh%2Fprod9781473652149.html" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The No Spend Year</span></strong></em></a> by Michelle McGagh </p> <p>Could you live for a whole year without spending a cent on anything but the essentials? That’s exactly what London-based finance journalist Michelle McGagh did. After selling 80 per cent of her belongings and calculating the minimum amount of money she needed each week to spend on bills and groceries, she’s happier than ever – not to mention financially stronger – and learned how to live more on less.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/93981/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fthe-spender-s-guide-to-debt-free-living-anna-newell-jones%2Fprod9780062367181.html" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The Spender’s Guide to Debt-Free Living</span></strong></em></a> by Anna Newell Jones </p> <p>In 2009, photographer Anna Newell Jones was almost $24,000 in debt. After finally realising it was time to act, she set up a blog and tracked her journey from spender to saver. 15 months later, her debt was gone. With her method, you’ll find out how you can get a clear idea of your financial situation, how you can make more money on the side, and, once you’re out of debt, to relearn how to spend the right way.</p>

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