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5 books on work by French authors that you should read

<p>An emerging genre of fiction in France is providing an unlikely brand of escapism. Growing numbers of French writers are choosing work as their subject matter – and it seems that readers can’t get enough of their novels.</p> <p>The prix du roman d'entreprise et du travail, the French prize for the <a href="https://www.prixduromandentreprise.fr/">best business or work-related novel</a>, is testament to the sustained popularity of workplace fiction across the Channel. The prize has been awarded annually since 2009, and this year’s winner will be announced at the Ministry of Employment in Paris on March 14.</p> <p><a href="https://www.placedelamediation.com/">Place de la Médiation</a>, the body which set up the prize, is a training organisation specialising in mediation, the prevention of psychosocial risks, and quality of life at work. Co-organiser <a href="https://www.technologia.fr/">Technologia</a> is a work-related risk prevention consultancy, which helps companies to evaluate health, safety and organisational issues.</p> <p>The novels shortlisted for the prize in the past ten years reflect a broad range of jobs and sectors and a whole gamut of experiences. The texts clearly strike a chord with French readers, but English translations of these novels suggest many of the themes broached resonate in Anglo-Saxon culture too.</p> <p>The prize certainly seeks to acknowledge a pre-existing literary interest in the theme of work. This is unsurprising in the wake of the global financial crisis and the changes and challenges this has brought. But the organisers also express <a href="https://www.prixduromandentreprise.fr/">a desire to actively mobilise fiction</a> in a bid to help chart the often choppy waters of the modern workplace:</p> <blockquote> <p>Through the power of fiction, [we] want to put the human back at the heart of business, to show the possibilities of a good quality professional life, and to relaunch social dialogue by bringing together in the [prize] jury all the social actors and specialists of the business world.</p> </blockquote> <p>What better way to delve into this unusual genre than by reading some of the previous prize winners. Below are five books to get you started.</p> <p><strong>1. <em>Underground Time</em></strong></p> <p>The first prize was awarded to Delphine de Vignan for <a href="https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/underground-time-9781408811115/"><em>Les heures souterraines</em></a>. In this novel, the paths of a bullied marketing executive and a beleaguered on-call doctor converge and intersect as they traverse Paris over the course of a working day. A television adaptation followed, and an English translation was published by Bloomsbury in 2011. Work-related journeys and the underground as a symbol for the hidden or unseen side of working life have proved enduring themes, picked up by several subsequent winners.</p> <p><strong>2. <em>The Man Who Risked It All</em></strong></p> <p>Laurent Gounelle’s <a href="https://www.hayhouse.co.uk/catalog/product/view/id/21204/s/the-man-who-risked-it-all-1/"><em>Dieu voyage toujours incognito</em></a>, winner of the 2011 prize, takes us from the depths of the underground to the top of the Eiffel Tour, where Alan Greenmor’s suicide attempt is interrupted by a mysterious stranger. Yves promises to teach him the secrets to happiness and success if Alan agrees to do whatever he asks. This intriguing premise caught the attention of self-help, inspirational and transformational book publisher Hay House, whose translation appeared in 2014.</p> <p><strong>3. <em>The Reader on the 6.27</em></strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.panmacmillan.com/authors/jean-paul-didierlaurent/the-reader-on-the-6-27/9781509836857"><em>Le liseur du 6h27</em></a> by Jean-Paul Didierlaurent, the 2015 winner, tells the story of a reluctant book-pulping machine operative. Each day, Ghislain Vignolles rescues a few random pages from destruction, to read aloud to his fellow-commuters in the morning train. The novel crystallises the fraught relationship between intellectual life and manual work.</p> <p>It also illustrates the tension between culture and commerce, arguably at its most pronounced in France, where cultural policy has traditionally insisted on the distinction between cultural artefacts and commercial products. <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/reviews/the-reader-on-the-627-by-jean-paul-didierlaurent-book-review-set-to-woo-british-readers-and-become-a-10300236.html">The Independent review of the English translation</a> describes the book as “a delightful tale about the kinship of reading”.</p> <p><strong>4. <em>Undersea View</em></strong></p> <p>Slimane Kader took to the belly of a Caribbean cruise ship to research <a href="https://www.allary-editions.fr/publication/avec-vue-sous-la-mer/"><em>Avec vue sous la mer</em></a>, which claimed the 2016 prize. His hilarious account of life as “joker”, or general dogsbody, is characterised by an amusing mishmash of cultural references: “I’m dreaming of <em>The Love Boat</em>, but getting a remake of <em>Les Misérables</em>” the narrator quips. The use of “<a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/1892853.stm">verlan</a>” – a suburban dialect in which syllables are reversed to create new words – underlines the topsy-turvy feel.</p> <p>Unfortunately, there’s no English version as yet – I imagine the quickfire language play would challenge even the most adept of translators. But translation would help confirm the compelling literary voice Kader has given to an otherwise invisible group.</p> <p><strong>5. <em>Woman at Sea</em></strong></p> <p>Catherine Poulain’s <em><a href="https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/111/1112907/woman-at-sea/9781911214588.html">Le grand marin</a></em>, the 2017 winner, is a rather more earnest account of work at sea. The author draws on her own experiences to recount narrator Lili’s travails in the male-dominated world of Alaskan fishing.</p> <p><em>Le grand marin</em> (the great sailor) is ostensibly the nickname Lili gives to her seafaring lover. The relationship is something of a red herring though, as the overriding passion in this novel is work. But the English title perhaps does Lili a disservice – she is less a floundering Woman at Sea, and more the true <em>grand marin</em> of the original.</p> <p><a href="https://www.placedelamediation.com/prix/?service=la-selection-2017">This year’s shortlist</a> includes the story of a forgotten employee left to his own devices when his company is restructured, a professional fall from grace in the wake of the Bataclan terrorist attack, and a second novel from Poulain, with seasonal work in Provence the backdrop this time.</p> <p>The common draw, as in previous years –- and somewhat ironically, given the subject matter –- is escapism. We are afforded either a tantalising glimpse into the working lives of others, or else a fresh perspective on our own. English readers will be equally fascinated by French details and universal themes – and translators’ pens are sure to be poised.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/112115/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Amy Wigelsworth, Senior Lecturer in French, Sheffield Hallam University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/five-books-on-work-by-french-authors-that-you-should-read-on-your-commute-112115" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Why do I still write shorthand?

<p>I am frequently asked this question. Often it is prefixed by the statements “I thought shorthand was dead” or “It’s no longer used in business”, and it is usually said with some surprise that I may be unaware of this opinion! I am then quizzed as to my interest in shorthand – a question which I could answer in a number of ways.</p> <p>I <em>could</em> answer by explaining a brief history and the uses of shorthand. Although shorthand dates back to Roman times, it was Sir Isaac Pitman who revolutionized shorthand with the innovation of the phonographic method. Shorthand was developed for the purpose of recording words more quickly than using longhand, whether it was a person’s own thoughts or what others were saying. Pitman shorthand was originally taught to and used by men with positions of status – judges, barristers and businessmen so they could record the proceedings for their own benefit, even if not in complete verbatim form. Others, like Charles Dickens and US President Woodrow Wilson used Pitman shorthand to record their thoughts or works and prepare speeches.</p> <p>Later on, particularly in the early 1900s when many women learned shorthand, they gained employment in offices. Men still studied the skill, especially for court reporting and journalism. As the 20<sup>th</sup> century wore on stenography became known more as a female occupation, being taught in girls’ schools and with girls making up the majority of business college students. (as a stenographer I always wondered how shorthand could in any way be gender-specific!)</p> <p>Once the skill is learned thoroughly, it tends to be retained. I have read countless comments from shorthand writers who say they use it to jot down a thought, a Christmas list, or parts of an interview on TV. My use resembles that of Dickens and Wilson – in meetings I write accurate notes of important aspects and perhaps the discussions leading to decisions. I have a sense of privacy when others cannot read what I’m writing. I’m sure President Wilson felt the same.</p> <p>I <em>could</em> answer by explaining the brain benefits as to why I find shorthand so important. Writing shorthand stimulates the brain in several ways to assist neuroplasticity of the brain, which assists prevention of memory loss. Both the short-term and long-term memories are exercised as we make decisions as to the theory to apply, we store words heard, then we precisely write the outline. As well as memory we are using concentration, decision-making, motor skills and dexterity. This brain health concept lead to a German study conducted over several years on shorthand writers who regularly wrote shorthand. Results showed their memories either improved or suffered no deterioration with the regular writing of shorthand.</p> <p>Needless to say, these achieved benefits to the brain are not only applied to the writing of shorthand – the benefits of sharper thinking spreads across all their other activities. One woman in the study said she felt as if her brain ‘had been freed up’ by participating in the shorthand activities.</p> <p> I <em>could</em> answer the question by asking a range of other questions to justify other popular pastimes – Why do people ride bikes when they have a car? Why do people learn to paint when they could take a photo on their phone? Why do people learn a language when they could use Google translate or are not intending to spend a lengthy period of time in that country? Why learn music when they could just download that piece? – these questions could be applied to so many worthwhile, beneficial leisure activities in which we partake.</p> <p>The answer is that these activities are enjoyable and we do them because we love doing them. We need to stop thinking that shorthand was devised purely for the office situation and to be written by women. In Japan university students form shorthand clubs, whilst in Europe a number of stenography clubs have youth sections where they train for competitions. It is challenging and satisfying.</p> <p>I frequently read opinions online that shorthand is now useless and I generally find these opinions are from people who have not studied it, had difficulty learning it or who didn’t have a choice about learning it. I learned it because I wanted to. Parents, often unaware of the complexity of shorthand, pushed their daughters into the subject as a ‘back up’ skill for employment.</p> <p>For each of these comments, the number of positive comments is multiplied by the people who love it and gain great satisfaction from writing it. Of course, shorthand is not for everyone – no one hobby is. The people who come together at U3A in Melbourne to revise their skill are the ones who love this hobby. So do the members our Facebook group of “Pitman Shorthand Writers of Australasia” where we share history, readings, horoscopes in shorthand and a range of activities to exercise our skill. We are not seeking employment; we are seeking enjoyment. </p> <p>Yes, shorthand is very handy. Yes, shorthand has a unique brain benefit. There are other reasons I could give in my answer to the question, but my main answer is this: I write shorthand because I have a love for it, I find it challenging, and it gives me satisfaction – it is my hobby!</p> <p>Simple as that!</p> <p><em>Carmel Taylor has worked as a stenographer and personal assistant prior to teaching business. Her passion is shorthand and her hobbies are art deco, fashion and sewing. She is a member of the Commercial Education Society of Australia.</em></p>

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10 common sayings that sound way funnier in other languages

<p>‘Nice guys finish last’ means something very different in Spain… have a giggle at some of these international sayings. When you think about it, they’re probably giggling at some of ours!</p> <p><strong>Money doesn't grow on trees</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘Money doesn’t grow on trees’, try:</p> <p>‘The sky doesn’t throw chicks’. (Arabic)</p> <p><strong>Nice guys finish last</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘Nice guys finish last’, try:</p> <p>‘A cat in gloves catches no mice’. (Spanish)</p> <p><strong>Don’t count your chickens before they hatch</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘Don’t count your chickens before they hatch’, try:</p> <p>‘Don’t praise the day before evening’. (German)</p> <p><strong>All talk and no action</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘All talk and no action’, try:</p> <p>‘If he made 100 knives, none would have a handle’. (Farsi)</p> <p><strong>To beat around the bush</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘To beat around the bush’, try:</p> <p>‘To walk like a cat around hot porridge’. (Finnish)</p> <p><strong>The grass is always greener on the other side</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘The grass is always greener on the other side’, try:</p> <p>‘Tasty is the fish from someone else’s table’. (Yiddish)</p> <p><strong>A drop in the bucket</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘A drop in the bucket’, try:</p> <p>‘Nine cows, one hare’. (Chinese)</p> <p><strong>Out of the frying pan, into the fire</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘Out of the frying pan, into the fire’, try:</p> <p>‘Fallen from the sky, stuck on a date palm’. (Hindi)</p> <p><strong>To cost an arm and a leg</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘To cost an arm and a leg’, try:</p> <p>‘To cost the eyes in your head’. (French)</p> <p><strong>Nothing ventured, nothing gained</strong></p> <p>Instead of ‘Nothing ventured, nothing gained’, try:</p> <p>‘If you don’t enter the tiger’s cave, you won’t catch its cub’. (Japanese)</p> <p><em>Written by The Bathroom Reader's Institute. This article first appeared in </em><span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/10-common-sayings-that-sound-way-funnier-in-other-languages"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V" target="_blank"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Affect or effect?: How to use the terms

<p><span>It is one of the most popular conundrums in the English language. Choosing between the word “affect” and “effect” can indeed be confusing – they are both verbs and nouns, and their meanings overlap.</span></p> <p><span>To help quash any doubt, there is a simple trick. In most contexts, the acronym RAVEN – Remember Affect Verb, Effect Noun – can be applied.</span></p> <p><span>Affect is more often used as a verb, meaning to influence, produce a change, make a difference in something. For example, bad habits <em>affect </em>your health, an argument <em>affects </em>your relationship, and a nightmare will <em>affect </em>your mood. </span></p> <p><span>Effect is generally used as a noun, meaning a result or a consequence. The group warns of the <em>effects </em>of climate change. Cycling has positive <em>effects</em> on your health. The <em>effect</em> of the policies has been overwhelming.</span></p> <p><span>The word can also be used as part of phrasal verbs, such as take <em>effect</em> (rather than <em>affect</em>) and in <em>effect</em>. For example, the new rule may take effect soon and once it does, it is in effect.</span></p> <p><span>Keep in mind that some exceptions apply – affect can be used as a noun, and effect can be used as a verb. In the noun context, affect means a feeling or an emotion: “My friend has a sad affect”. Effect as a verb could be defined as to bring about or cause something to happen: “The government is unable to effect any change”, or “The tax cut is hoped to effect economic growth”.</span></p> <p><span>These cases are less common, but it is good to understand how the two words can be used in different ways.</span></p>

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In praise of the printed book: The value of concentration in the digital age

<p>There is an old saying that anxiety is the enemy of concentration.</p> <p>One of the best pieces of sports journalism I ever read was by <a href="http://spectator.org/archives/2007/02/22/the-man-who-wasnt-there">Gene Tunney</a>, world heavyweight champion of the 1920s, writing about how reading books helped him stay calm and focused in the lead-up to his most famous fight against former champion Jack Dempsey. While members of Dempsey’s camp ridiculed Tunney for his bookishness, Tunney kept calm, and went on to win.</p> <p>Most of us would feel stressed at the prospect of stepping into the boxing ring, but stress-related illnesses, especially depression and forms of anxiety and attention disorder, are becoming increasingly prevalent, especially in wealthy societies. According to a major <a href="http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;ved=0CCIQFjAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.plosmedicine.org%2Farticle%2FfetchSingleRepresentation.action%3Furi%3Dinfo%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.0030442.sd004&amp;ei=_3mgULrKOoWRigeI6IDoCw&amp;usg=AFQjCNFMmbioHNEqLYDf0H8jduBX-qV_hw">2006 projection of global mortality by Mathers and Loncar</a>, by 2030, unipolar depression will be almost 40% more likely to cause death or disability than heart disease in wealthy societies.</p> <p>Stress can of course have many causes, but in the most general sense, it spreads from factors that impact negatively on focus and concentration. We fear interruption or a surplus of tasks, responsibilities or options to choose, leading to heightened stress levels.</p> <p>The digital age is an age of distraction; and distraction causes stress and weakens concentration. Concentration, as the philosopher <a href="http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/james/">William James</a> argued in his classic 1890 work <a href="http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/James/Principles/"><em>Principles of Psychology</em></a>, is the most fundamental element of intellectual development. He wrote:</p> <blockquote> <p>The faculty of voluntarily bringing back a wandering attention over and over again, is the very root of judgement, character, and will … An education which should improve this faculty would be the education par excellence.</p> </blockquote> <p>Concentration is equally important emotionally, as is being increasingly revealed by new research into <a href="http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/collections/monash-authors/2008/9781741667042.html">“mindfulness” and meditation</a>. The inability to focus is associated with depression and anxiety and, amongst other things, an underdeveloped sociability and human empathy. Tests have revealed that people report greater happiness from being effectively focused on what they are doing than from daydreaming on even pleasant topics.</p> <p>How many memoirs include stories of the author surreptitiously reading books by torchlight underneath the blankets, with parents fearful of the child reading too much? (In my case I was reading The Hardy Boys so my mother’s objections were probably justified.)</p> <p>As <a href="http://www.jamescarroll.net/JAMESCARROLL.NET/Welcome.html">James Carroll</a> has argued, at its core, reading is <a href="http://www.commondreams.org/views01/0130-02.htm">“the occasion of the encounter with the self”</a>. In other words, the ultimate object of reading is not to take on information but to absorb and reflect upon it and, in the process, hopefully, form a more developed version of one’s own identity or being.</p> <p>It seems likely that the concentration required and encouraged by books is extremely valuable. Reading books is good for you. And this seems especially so in the case of print books, where a reader is most completely free from distraction.</p> <p>Ebooks, and more pertinently perhaps, the digital reading environment, are unquestionably transformative in the opportunities and experiences they offer to readers. Great oceans of knowledge otherwise only obtainable through tracking down print books or physical archives and records, have become available and, much more easily searchable. <a href="http://websearch.about.com/od/h/g/hyperlink.htm">Hyperlinks</a> mean readers no longer have to read in a straight line, as it were, but can follow innumerable paths of interest.</p> <p><a href="http://www.unimelb.edu.au/copyright/information/guides/wikisblogsweb2blue.pdf">Web2 technologies</a> enable “talking back” to publishers and media, the formation of groups of readers with common interests, easy (sometimes too easy) sharing of files and other information. Stories can be enriched by animated graphics and interactivity. And so on.</p> <p>No-one in their right mind would imagine that the e-reading environment can or should somehow be wound back.</p> <p>Nonetheless, by their nature e-reading devices facilitate and encourage the constant, inevitably distracting consideration of other reading options, more or less instantly attainable. This is probably their main selling point. <a href="http://ase.tufts.edu/epcd/faculty/wolf.asp">Maryanne Wolf</a> has even asked:</p> <blockquote> <p>“if the assumption that ‘more’ and ‘faster’ are necessarily better (will) have consequences that radically affect the quality of attention that can transform a word into a thought and a thought into a world of unimagined possibility?”</p> </blockquote> <p>It is interesting to consider, in light of this possibility that the greatest benefit of reading may come from its capacity to assist in the development of focus and concentration, that the print book may not actually have been superseded or, indeed, be supersede-able.</p> <p>This, I think, is what the novelist, critic, philosopher and communications historian <a href="http://www.umbertoeco.com/en/">Umberto Eco</a> means when he argues: “The book is like the spoon, scissors, the hammer, the wheel. Once invented, it cannot be improved.”<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/9855/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Nathan Hollier, Director, Monash University Publishing, Monash University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/in-praise-of-the-printed-book-the-value-of-concentration-in-the-digital-age-9855"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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“Man-eater:” The man who almost ruined Princess Diana’s reputation

<p>Our beloved Princess Diana had a life that was far from perfect. Afterall, if you were to strip back her beaming smile, elegant clothing and gleaming facade of happiness, the royal was dealing with a crumbling marriage, a world of criticism on her shoulders from the media and the world, and an uncertain future in Britain’s most famous family. </p> <p>However, there were reports that there was one thing – other than her beautiful boys, Prince William and Prince Harry – who brought her comfort and joy, and this was art dealer Oliver Hoare. </p> <p>The dashing, married tycoon was a close pal to both Prince Charles and his wife at the time, Princess Diana, in the early '90s – years before a royal divorce would be announced and fill the tabloids around the world. </p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7829235/di-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/750a7c3b900148f99c99fbfc364e46fc" /></p> <p><em>Prince Charles and Princess Diana with Oliver Hoare and his wife Diane behind at Royal Ascot horserace meeting, June 1986. </em></p> <p>Formal protection officer Ken Wharfe wrote in his book, <em>Diana: Closely Guarded Secret</em>, that the princess was “instantly” attracted to Oliver. </p> <p>“Diana later confessed to me that she had felt a little shy when, at Windsor [in 1992], she shook his hand for the first time, and had blushed as she flirted with him,” Wharfe wrote.</p> <p>“That conversation ended abruptly when Charles and the Queen Mother joined them.”</p> <p>Despite the 16-year age difference, Princess Di was said to have become “obsessed” with the married father-of-three. </p> <p>“She needed him at every conceivable moment,” Wharfe wrote.</p> <p>“She confided to me that he was the first man who had ever aroused her physically. That admission did much to explain the humiliating events that followed.”</p> <p>The pair were linked between 1990-1994 and the relationship, according to Chris Dicker in the 2018 book, <em>Princess Diana Biography: The Astonishing Life of the Princess of Wales</em>, was “damaging to Diana’s reputation.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7829236/di.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/44ed7c2d26c8480695dd34819196ceac" /></p> <p>"Diana's reputation as a man-eater was derived from her affair with Oliver Hoare. He was a married man and this was damaging to Diana's reputation.</p> <p>"She was convinced he was going to marry her. The press was very aggressive about getting pictures of them.</p> <p>"Hoare started sneaking into Kensington Palace with his head under a blanket. It was degrading to her.</p> <p>"Their affair was all over the tabloids. James Hewitt and Oliver Hoare were such rollercoaster romances for her."</p> <p>Princess Di said in the groundbreaking 1995 <em>Panorama</em> interview, she did indeed call Hoare over a period of six to nine months, however “certainly not in an obsessive manner.”</p> <p>Reports also said the royal was convinced they were going to be married and “daydreamed of living in Italy with the handsome Hoare.”</p> <p>Their relationship came to an end when Hoare’s wife complained about hundreds of nuisance phone calls. </p> <p>An investigation revealed the calls could be traced to the royal’s home in Kensington Palace, her mobile phone, Notting Hill and the home of Diana's older sister, Lady Sarah McCorquodale. </p> <p>Wharfe explained he was forced to tell Scotland Yard who was making the numerous phone calls. </p> <p>"I was asked to speak to a senior officer of mine who said to me, 'Somebody is using the princess’s telephone to make phone calls to Oliver Hoare’s household and even spoken to his wife.'</p> <p>"At that point I said to him, 'The Princess of Wales is having a relationship with this man and that she is making telephone calls'."</p> <p>While this relationship is widely believed and a number of close companions of the late Princess Di confirm a number of details, the world will never be able to know with absolute certainty. </p> <p>To the day he died, in August 23, 2018, Oliver Hoare refused to speak about the alleged affair he had with the most famous woman in the world.</p>

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Lisa Marie Presley set to write “shocking” tell-all book about Michael Jackson and Elvis

<p>Lisa Marie Presley is close to signing a blockbuster book deal which is said to reveal “shocking” details about her ex Michael Jackson while also providing a new perspective on her father, Elvis Presley.</p> <p>Reported by the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://pagesix.com/" target="_blank"><em>New York Post’s Page Six</em></a>, Lisa Marie’s book is allegedly such an explosive piece of work that Gallery Books purchased it for between $4.3 million and $5.8 million.</p> <p>An insider told<span> </span><em>Page Six</em><span> </span>that the book “promises shocking revelations about Michael Jackson and a completely new understanding of Elvis.”</p> <p>The 51-year-old was married to the entertainer from 1994 to 1996.</p> <p><img style="width: 333.99906015037595px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7829147/elvis.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1ed7c226b3c1412895b43f4d678bd21d" /></p> <p>They wed in secrecy as their ceremony was kept private before unveiling the relationship on MTV and splitting two years later.</p> <p>Lisa sat down with Oprah Winfrey in 2010, providing a cryptic account for why the marriage was destined to fail: “There was a very profound point in the marriage when he had to make a decision. Was it the drugs and the sort of vampires, or me? And he pushed me away.” She then clarified that by “vampires” she meant “sycophants”.</p> <p>She also said, “The one thing that correlates with Michael and with my father on this subject is that they have the luxury of creating whatever reality around them they wanted to create.”</p> <p>However, despite their relationship ultimately not working out, Lisa believes that claims about Jackson’s inappropriate actions towards children are false, telling Diane Sawyer in 1995, “I know that he’s not like that.”</p>

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Never seen before video footage of Duchess Meghan emerges

<p>It may have been only a few seconds the camera graced the Duchess of Sussex’s face, but it sure was memorable for royal fans.</p> <p>In a short video to launch UK<span> </span><em>Vogue’</em>s September issue, the Duchess – who was reportedly around five months pregnant with baby Archie at the time the clip was shot – is shown working alongside the magazine’s editor-in-chief Edward Enninful.</p> <p>With her baby bump on show to the world, the 37-year-old described working with the<span> </span><em>Vogue</em> team as “rewarding.”</p> <p>“These last seven months have been a rewarding process, curating and collaborating with Edward Enninful, British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief, to take the year’s most read fashion issue and steer its focus to the values, causes and people making impact in the world today,” she said in a statement.</p> <p>The<span> </span><span>@</span>SussexRoyal Instagram account said of the partnership: “Her Royal Highness, The Duchess of Sussex is the first Guest Editor for British Vogue’s September Issue and for the last seven months has worked to create an issue of inclusivity and inspiration, focusing on what connects us rather than what divides us.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ff0ctlVYT/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ff0ctlVYT/" target="_blank">A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal)</a> on Jul 29, 2019 at 12:26am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Through this lens I hope you’ll feel the strength of the collective in the diverse selection of women chosen for the cover as well as the team of support I called upon within the issue to help bring this to light.</p> <p>“I hope readers feel as inspired as I do, by the 'Forces for Change' they’ll find within these pages.”</p> <p>Duchess Meghan’s two brief appearances in the short film was purposeful and aimed to keep the attention away from herself and on the 15 women selected as “Forces for Change" for the empowering September issue of UK <em>Vogue</em>.</p>

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10 great books that all children should read

<p>The books we remember strongly as adults are often the ones we read as children. Not only do we remember particular books, but the emotions we experienced.</p> <p>Children’s books are reread and remembered over a lifetime, and many authors believe their <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/feb/16/childrens-books-are-never-just-for-children">best writing is for children</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/feb/16/childrens-books-are-never-just-for-children">Rereading favourites</a> is a good thing. With each rereading, deeper meanings emerge and understanding becomes richer.</p> <p>Reading books aloud, and being read to, is also important, with <a href="http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/17/bedtime-stories-for-young-brains/?emc=eta1&amp;_r=1">research</a> pointing to enhanced levels of brain activity for children who are read to before bed. Some research even recommends <a href="http://onecapehealthnews.com/reading-is-good-for-the-brain-even-for-babies/">reading to a child from birth</a> to help stimulate brain development and build language, literacy and social-emotional skill.</p> <p>For young people, reading fiction can provide excellent training for <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2015/may/13/reading-teach-children-empathy">developing and practising empathy</a> and understanding how others feel and think.</p> <p>Here is a selection of some of the best books to share with your child over the festive season on the topic of family and friends:</p> <p><strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/10-great-books-that-all-children-should-read-51203">1. <em>Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes</em> by Mem Fox and Helen Oxenbury</a></strong></p> <p>(<em>Penguin Books Australia, 2008</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 0-2 years</p> <p>Fox’s exuberant rhythm, rhyme and repetition feature in a short 148-word story, making it perfect read to aloud for babies. The book features eye-catching watercolour illustrations and a series of fun activities, including counting fingers and toes and an end game of a kiss on the nose.</p> <p><strong>2.<em><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22759458-over-the-hills-and-far-away"> Over the Hills and Far Away: A Treasure of Nursery Rhymes from Around the World</a> </em>by Elizabeth Hammill</strong></p> <p>(<em>Frances Lincoln Children’s Books, 2014</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 0-6 years</p> <p>A collection of nursery rhymes should be in every home. They are perfect for dipping into from birth and throughout the preschool years. This one features a multitude of enticing brief stories from different cultures, rhymes honed to perfection, and rich illustrations by 77 of the world’s best illustrators.</p> <p><strong>3. <em><a href="http://www.australianpicturebooks.com/2011/11/bear-and-chook.html">Bear and Chook</a></em> by Lisa Shanahan</strong></p> <p>(<em>Hodder Headline Australia, 2002</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 2-5 years</p> <p>Bear and Chook are close friends, loving and patient with each other’s eccentricities. Bear is adventurous and accident-prone. Chook is cautious and careful. As friends, they have an immense respect for each other. A perfect combination of rollicking, rich and enticing read-aloud language and humorous, touching illustrations.</p> <p><strong>4. <em><a href="http://www.enchantedlionbooks.com/node/231">The Lion and the Bird</a> </em>by Marianne Dubuc</strong></p> <p>(<em>Enchanted Lion Books, 2013</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 3-7 years</p> <p>The text says little. The illustrations are minimal. Yet we experience an immense satisfaction in this deep friendship between Bird and Lion. Lion nurses Bird back to health after an injury, and they share winter together. With spring’s return, Bird must leave and Lion is alone again. The illustrations convey the seasonal cycle, and we cheer as Bird returns. A powerful story of friendship with perfect images that linger.</p> <p><strong>5. <a href="http://www.harpercollins.com.au/9780007513765/the-day-the-crayons-quit"><em>The Day the Crayons Quit</em></a> by Drew Daywalt</strong></p> <p>(<em>HarperCollins, 2013</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 4-10 years</p> <p>A highly original, quirky and funny story for sophisticated readers. Duncan reaches for his crayons, but instead finds they have left him handwritten letters. They have quit their jobs as crayons and complain bitterly. Purple laments Duncan colouring outside the lines. Grey is tired of colouring large objects like elephants. Black wants to be more than an outline. Duncan finds a clever solution to remain friends with his crayons.</p> <p><strong>6. <a href="https://www.penguin.com.au/products/9780670076031/herman-and-rosie"><em>Herman and Rosie</em></a> by Gus Gordon</strong></p> <p>(<em>Penguin Books Australia, 2012</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 4-10 years</p> <p>An unlikely pair explore the meaning of friendship, loneliness and life in the big city in this unforgettable, multi-layered picture book. Herman, a crocodile, and Rosie, a deer, each lives alone on different floors of the same New York apartment block. They do not know each other, but they have common interests in music and both love films about the sea. Music brings them together when each loses their job. This story reveals the importance of friendship and belonging in understated elegance with quirky, whimsical illustrations.</p> <p><strong>7. <em><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20793857-my-two-blankets">My Two Blankets</a> </em>by Irena Kobald</strong></p> <p>(<em>Little Hare Books, 2014</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 4-10 years</p> <p>A young girl arrives in Australia unable to speak English. She wraps herself in her familiar blanket woven with cultural familiarities. A girl in the park befriends her and together they share experiences and language. Gradually she relinquishes her blanket, realising that her culture comes from within. A moving story for exploring cultural similarities and differences.</p> <p><strong>8. <em><a href="http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20724592-animalium">Animalium</a> </em>by Katie Scott and Jenny Broom</strong></p> <p>(<em>Five Mile Press, 2014</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 5+</p> <p>Animalium explores the animal kingdom with clarity, precision, excitement and highly detailed illustrations. Excellent features include its large size, sumptuous layout, tantalising questions and answers, clever analogies, multi-layered information and detailed index. Seven sections cover brief differences and commonalities, environment, food and behaviour. A perfect coffee table book for sharing among the family.</p> <p><strong>9. <em><a href="http://www.bloomsbury.com/au/harry-potter-and-the-philosophers-stone-9781408845646/">Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone</a> </em>(illustrated edition) by J K Rowling</strong></p> <p>(<em>Bloomsbury, 2015</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 6+</p> <p>Harry Potter appeals to all ages, making the series of seven books an ideal family sharing experience. The unique aspect of this book is its copious illustrations, which capture mood, magical moments, unique characters and above all a sense of other-worldliness. This illustrated edition is the perfect opportunity for families to share a reading aloud experience with bonus images.</p> <p><strong>10. <em><a href="http://www.philip-pullman.com/hdm?pageID=2">His Dark Materials</a> </em>trilogy by Philip Pullman</strong></p> <p>(<em>Scholastic Books, 1995</em>) <strong>Age:</strong> 10+</p> <p>His Dark Materials trilogy is a contemporary epic high-fantasy adventure with lyrical writing, highly original, memorable characters and a story with dazzling originality. It is the perennial story of pure evil and angelic good, of bravery and courage and inventive ideas rarely explored with such conviction and believability. A great book to share with the family.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/51203/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Belle Alderman, Emeritus professor of children's literature, University of Canberra</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/10-great-books-that-all-children-should-read-51203"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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The palace confirms Duchess Meghan's big new role

<p>It has been confirmed by the palace that the Duchess of Sussex is the guest editor for British <em>Vogue</em>’s famed September issue. </p> <p>While we won’t be seeing the royal grace the cover herself, she is choosing to include a number of other big names in September’s Forces of Change edition. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ebh7tlnVl/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ebh7tlnVl/" target="_blank">A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal)</a> on Jul 28, 2019 at 2:26pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Some of the faces that will be gracing the cover include New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, boxer Ramla Ali and actress Gemma Chan. </p> <p>The collection will feature 15 women who are “changemakers, united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers”.</p> <p>The palace also revealed a candid conversation with former US First Lady, Michelle Obama, and an interview between Prince Harry and ethologist and primatologist Dr Jane Goodall will be included. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ejj5dn6o9/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0ejj5dn6o9/" target="_blank">A post shared by The British Royal Family🇬🇧👑 (@royalwindsors.__)</a> on Jul 28, 2019 at 3:36pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"These last seven months have been a rewarding process, curating and collaborating with Edward Enninful, British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief, to take the year’s most read fashion issue and steer its focus to the values, causes and people making impact in the world today," the Duchess said in a heartfelt statement. </p> <p>"Through this lens I hope you’ll feel the strength of the collective in the diverse selection of women chosen for the cover as well as the team of support I called upon within the issue to help bring this to light.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7829020/new-project.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ae3eb501672c4f66a9eee53fe028becb" /></p> <p>"I hope readers feel as inspired as I do, by the 'Forces for Change' they’ll find within these pages."</p> <p>The magazine’s cover displays 15 women personally chosen by the Duchess of Sussex, along with a mysterious blank space which was revealed to be a mirror “so that when you hold the issue in your hands, you see yourself as part of this collective".</p> <p>The issue will be available online from this Friday, August 2.</p>

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What we know about the new Lord of the Rings series

<p><span>More <em>Lord of the Rings </em>is coming to your screen – after the success of the trilogy and its <em>Hobbit </em>prequels, Amazon is set to adapt the story into a high-budget TV series.</span></p> <p><span>Set in Middle-earth, the upcoming <em>The Lord of the Rings </em>TV series will explore new storylines preceding J.R.R. Tolkien’s <em>The Fellowship of the Ring</em>. Writers JD Payne and Patrick McKay are set to develop the series along with <em>Game of Thrones </em>alumna Bryan Cogman.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them, In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LOTRonPrime?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#LOTRonPrime</a> <a href="https://t.co/7TuQh7gRPD">pic.twitter.com/7TuQh7gRPD</a></p> — The Lord of the Rings on Prime (@LOTRonPrime) <a href="https://twitter.com/LOTRonPrime/status/1103656820130775050?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 7, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>Australian actress <a href="https://variety.com/2019/tv/news/lord-of-the-rings-series-amazon-cast-markella-kavenagh-1203268175/">Markella Kavenagh</a> has been revealed as the first cast member on the show. Kavenagh, who won the Rising Stars Award at the 2018 Casting Guild of Australia Awards for her performance on BBC drama <em>The Cry</em>, will be playing a character named Tyra on the Amazon adaptation.</span></p> <p><span>The streaming service reportedly acquired global TV rights to <em>The Lord of the Rings</em>, based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s legendary novels, in a deal that was reported to be worth nearly US$250 million in <a href="https://deadline.com/2017/11/amazon-the-lord-of-the-rings-tv-series-multi-season-commitment-1202207065/">2017</a>.</span></p> <p><span>“We are delighted that Amazon, with its longstanding commitment to literature, is the home of the first-ever multi-season television series for The Lord of the Rings,” said Matt Galsor, a representative for the Tolkien Estate and Trust and HarperCollins at the time. </span></p> <p><span>“[The team] at Amazon Studios have exceptional ideas to bring to the screen previously unexplored stories based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s original writings.”</span></p> <p><span>More news is expected to come as the series develops.</span></p> <p><span>The <em>Lord of the Rings </em>series is expected to launch on Amazon Prime Video in 2021.</span></p>

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Ted Kennedy car crash scandal that killed Mary Jo Kopechne: Letter exposes new claims

<p>After 50 years, the Ted Kennedy Chappaquiddick incident has remained one of the biggest mysteries surrounding the Kennedy family.</p> <p>The car crash on the US island ended the life of 28-year-old Mary Jo Kopechne and derailed Ted Kennedy’s presidential chances.</p> <p>On the evening of July 18, 1969, the then US senator Kennedy hosted a party on the small island for the Boiler Room Girls, a group of six women who had worked on his brother Robert F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign the year before. One of the women was 28-year-old Kopechne.</p> <p>Despite extensive reports on the incident, details of the events of the night have remained shrouded. Kennedy reportedly left the party with Kopechne, even though she did not bring her purse or hotel room key with her. The two drove off in his 1967 Oldsmobile Delmont 88.</p> <p>Kennedy said the car went over the bridge into Poucha Pond after he made a wrong turn. While he managed to escape the sinking vehicle, Kopechne remained trapped and was later found dead in the morning.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 368.449px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828778/kennedy-embed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6ea10144582044f594787fdf71a993a4" /><img style="width: 301.887px; height: 500px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828803/kennedy-2-embed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0d363094141545378a703127593d6400" /></p> <p>But a letter to Kopechne’s surviving family has challenged this story.</p> <p>The letter, recently revealed by <a href="https://people.com/politics/ted-kennedy-chappaquiddick-car-accident-50-years-later/"><em>PEOPLE</em></a>’s Cover-Up podcast, came from a man who claimed to have met a woman who had attended the party the night Kopechne died.</p> <p>The woman, referred to as “Betty”, said Kopechne had had too much to drink at the event. Betty then brought Kopechne to Kennedy’s car to rest, and then went back to the cottage.</p> <p>The letter claimed that Kennedy and another female guest went for a drive in the car. When the sedan plunged into the water, Kennedy and the passenger survived and returned to the party, unaware that Kopechne had been in the vehicle all along.</p> <p>Betty shared the story, and the letter said that was when “…the Kennedy damage control machine kicked in and informed the shocked senator.”</p> <p>After receiving the letter in 2018, Kopechne’s cousin Georgetta Potoski said the full story might not yet be revealed. </p> <p>“I’m not convinced the mystery has been solved,” she told <em>PEOPLE</em>. </p> <p>“I know there are things that we do not know about what happened that night. The truth, even if it’s not what you want to hear, at least has some dignity around it.</p> <p>“I don’t think there will ever be justice for the loss of her life. [But] I think the truth would make our hearts rest easier.”</p> <p>A week after the incident, Kennedy pleaded guilty to leaving the scene of the accident and was given a two-month suspended sentence. Later on the same day, he gave a national broadcast statement in which he said, “I regard as indefensible the fact that I did not report the accident to the police immediately.”</p> <p>Kennedy, who was preparing for his presidential run, delayed his campaign until 1980. His run for the country’s top office was unsuccessful, but he continued to be re-elected as senator seven more times until his death in 2009.</p> <p>In his posthumously published memoir <em>True Compass</em>, Kennedy described the incident as “a horrible tragedy that haunts me every day of my life”.</p>

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Rare Harry Potter book set to sell for $56,000 at auction

<p><span>If you have some old <em>Harry Potter </em>books at home, check them out today – you might be sitting on a copy worth tens of thousands of dollars.</span></p> <p><span>A 1997 print version of JK Rowling’s <em>Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone </em>bought for less than $2 at a yard sale is expected to sell for up to £30,000 (about NZ$56,000) at an auction at the end of July.</span></p> <p><span>The book, owned by a 54-year-old English office worker, is one of the only 500 copies in the world of the particular first edition. </span></p> <p><span>The owner, whose name is not revealed, told <a href="https://nypost.com/2019/07/02/rare-harry-potter-book-bought-at-yard-sale-could-fetch-thousands-at-auction/"><em>SWNS</em></a> that he bought the book in 1999 for a pound. “I thought nothing of it at the time. I read the book … and then put it away in a cupboard for years,” he said. </span></p> <p><span>“It’s so exciting to think that a holiday read could be worth so much now.” </span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7828733/harry-potter-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4af587c5fe9341fcadf09f7f7c266320" /></p> <p><span>The rare edition was published by Bloomsbury on June 30, 1997 and came with numerous misspellings and typos. </span></p> <p><span>Jim Spencer, rare books expert at Hansons Auctioneers said 300 of the first edition copies went to schools and libraries. “They are extremely rare,” he told the <a href="http://bit.ly/32cy6Gy"><em>Daily Mirror</em></a>.</span></p> <p><span>“This is a landmark in children’s literature, but it appeals to young and old. Everybody knows this book. This is the holy grail for so many collectors.”</span></p> <p><span>The book will be auctioned on July 31 at Hansons’ Library Auction at Bishton Hall, Wolseley Bridge, in Staffordshire, England.</span></p> <p><span>In April, another book of the same edition was <a href="https://www.gq.com.au/entertainment/film-tv/a-first-edition-harry-potter-book-just-fetched-126k-at-auction/news-story/3c7211062cb7c94c3184e32754b31e0a">sold at a Bonhams auction</a> in London for £68,812 or nearly NZ$132,500, above the original estimated worth of £40,000 to £60,000 ($NZ77,000 to 115,000).</span></p>

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Worth reading: Tried and true manuals for success

<p><em>The Conversation Canada asked our academic authors to share some recommended reading. In this instalment, Michael Armstrong, an operations research professor at Brock University who has written for</em> The Conversation Canada <em>on topics as diverse as <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-well-do-students-perform-when-retaking-courses-82559">student success rates in school</a> to the <a href="https://theconversation.com/picketts-charge-what-modern-mathematics-teaches-us-about-civil-war-battle-78982">mathematics of Civil War battle</a>, shares the top three books that he recommends for guidance on making the most of your career at any age.</em></p> <p>Here are three books that I often recommend to my students and friends. All are practical guides that have stood the test of time. The first will help you start your career, the second will help you succeed in it and the third will help you profit from it.</p> <p><strong><em>What Color Is Your Parachute? </em></strong><strong><em>A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers </em></strong>by Richard N. Bolles (Non-fiction. Paperback, 2016 and others. Ten Speed Press.)</p> <p>This is a popular guide for job seekers. Like most such books, it gives advice on the mechanical details of job hunting, such as good ways to organize a resume.</p> <p>More importantly — and less commonly — it helps people figure out what they want to do with their lives. What kind of career will best fit your personality? Will you be happier working with people or with data?</p> <p>The book is an obvious fit for graduates seeking their first job. But it could also help teenagers choose the best education to pursue after high school, or adults trying to make their careers more satisfying.</p> <p><strong><em>The Ropes to Skip and the Ropes to Know: </em><em>Studies in Organizational Theory and Behavior </em></strong>by R. Richard Ritti, Steve Levy and Neil Toucher (Non-fiction. Hardcover, 2016 and others. Chicago Business Press.)</p> <p>Don’t let the academic-sounding subtitle deter you. This is a highly readable book. It consists of short stories or parables that illustrate how people behave and interact at work.</p> <p>Every workplace has an official structure and formal rules. But workplaces contain people with individual personalities and relationships. This book will help you understand the unofficial structures and unwritten rules, before they get you into trouble.</p> <p>I often recommend <em>The Ropes to Skip and the Ropes to Know</em> to people starting their first job. It would be especially good for someone promoted to their first management or supervisory role.</p> <p><strong><em>The Wealthy Barber: </em><em>The Common Sense Guide to Successful Financial Planning </em></strong>by David Chilton (Non-fiction. Paperback, 2002 and others. Stoddart.)</p> <p>Once you receive your first paycheque, you’ll want to read this beginner’s guide to personal finance. It covers the basics of investing: retirement savings, mutual funds, etc. It also introduces a lot of other financial topics: savings versus spending, insurance that you do or don’t need, and so on.</p> <p>This probably isn’t the only financial guide you’ll ever need, but it is a good first one. I typically recommend it to recent graduates starting their careers. But it also suits mature adults dealing with money issues for the first time, perhaps after the death or divorce of their spouse.</p> <p>Have an enjoyable and productive season!<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/82305/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Michael J. Armstrong, Associate professor of operations research, Brock University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/worth-reading-tried-and-true-manuals-for-success-82305"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Coming soon to Netflix: Neil Gaiman's popular comic book series

<p><span>Fans of Neil Gaiman rejoice – one more of his work is set to be adapted for the screen.</span></p> <p><span>After more than three years of failed attempts to make a screen adaptation, Netflix has finally acquired <em>The Sandman </em>for a live-action TV series in a reportedly “massive” deal with Warner Bros.</span></p> <p><span>Throughout the years, attempts to adapt the popular horror fantasy comic book series – which has been running since 1989 – have floundered. The most recent was in 2016, when a plan to produce a feature film directed by <em>Third Rock From The Sun</em> star  Joseph Gordon-Levitt dissolved. </span></p> <p><span>According to the <a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/sandman-tv-series-neil-gaiman-david-goyer-a-go-at-netflix-1220761"><em>Hollywood Reporter</em></a>, industry insiders said the show will become “the most expensive TV series that DC Entertainment has ever done”.</span></p> <p><span>Gaiman will be involved in the show as an executive producer along with <em>Wonder Woman </em>(2017) screenwriter Allan Heinberg and <em>Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice </em>(2016) screenwriter David S. Goyer. </span></p> <p><span>“We’re thrilled to partner with the brilliant team that is Neil Gaiman, David S. Goyer and Allan Heinberg to finally bring Neil’s iconic comic book series, <em>The Sandman</em>, to life onscreen,” said Channing Dungey, VP of original series at Netflix. </span></p> <p><span>“From its rich characters and storylines to its intricately built-out worlds, we’re excited to create an epic original series that dives deep into this multi-layered universe beloved by fans around the world.”  </span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Are you prepared to meet the Lord of Dreams? THE SANDMAN is officially coming to <a href="https://twitter.com/netflix?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@netflix</a>! Head here for more: <a href="https://t.co/zlamTMHen0">https://t.co/zlamTMHen0</a> <a href="https://t.co/zQbgXKdrZX">pic.twitter.com/zQbgXKdrZX</a></p> — DC (@DCComics) <a href="https://twitter.com/DCComics/status/1145836913078755328?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 1, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>The show, which will have 11 episodes in its first season, was described as “a rich blend of modern myth and dark fantasy in which contemporary fiction, historical drama and legend are seamlessly interwoven”.</span></p>

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Serena Williams' heartfelt open letter to Naomi Osaka: "It's time for me apologise”

<p>Serena Williams has been heralded as one of the greatest tennis players of all time. However,a controversial defeat at the US Open in 2018 left a stain on the legendary American’s name.</p> <p>The championship match between Williams and Naomi Osaka left a bad taste in everyone’s mouth after a verbal altercation between the former world No. 1 and the chair umpire, Carlos Ramos, gave her three on-court violations.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzsm-PZnTQx/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzsm-PZnTQx/" target="_blank">A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams)</a> on Jul 9, 2019 at 6:04am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The 23-time Grand Slam champion was penalised for illegal coaching, verbal abuse and breaking her racket – later she suggested Ramos’ court violations were motivated by sexism. Earlier this week, Williams set the record straight on her side of the story in an essay for <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/features/a28209579/serena-williams-us-open-2018-essay/" target="_blank">Harper’s Bazaar </a></em>for their August cover and in the letter openly revealed she sent 21-year-old Osaka an apology after the match.</p> <p>“In the end, my opponent simply played better than me that day and ended up winning her first Grand Slam title,” Williams said.</p> <p>“I thought back to my first Grand Slam. It’s the one you remember best; it’s supposed to be the most special. This debacle ruined something that should have been amazing and historic.</p> <p>“Not only was a game taken from me but a defining, triumphant moment was taken from another player, something she should remember as one of the happiest memories in her long and successful career,” she continued.</p> <p>“My heart broke.”</p> <p>Williams detailed in the essay struggling to find peace in the days after the match against Osaka and once she began to see a therapist she realised there was “only one way to move forward".</p> <p>“It was time for me to apologize to the person who deserved it the most,” she said.</p> <p>“I started to type, slowly at first, then faster as if the words were flowing out of me.”</p> <p>In her letter to Osaka, Williams said: “Hey, Naomi! It’s Serena Williams. As I said on the court, I am so proud of you and I am truly sorry. I thought I was doing the right thing in sticking up for myself. But I had no idea the media would pit us against each other.</p> <p>“I would love the chance to live that moment over again. I am, was, and will always be happy for you and supportive of you. I would never, ever want the light to shine away from another female, specifically another black female athlete.</p> <p>“I can’t wait for your future, and believe me I will always be watching as a big fan! I wish you only success today and in the future. Once again, I am so proud of you. All my love and your fan, Serena.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzssfHDFnFM/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzssfHDFnFM/" target="_blank">A post shared by Harper's BAZAAR (@harpersbazaarus)</a> on Jul 9, 2019 at 6:52am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The tennis star said “tears rolled down” when she received Osaka’s response to her letter.</p> <p>“People can misunderstand anger for strength because they can’t differentiate between the two… No one has stood up for themselves the way you have, and you need to continue trailblazing.”</p> <p>The long journey on the road to self-recovery meant Williams considering she was to blame for Osaka’s bittersweet triumph disappeared when her former opponent encouraged her to keep fighting.</p> <p>“This incident — though excruciating for us to endure — exemplified how thousands of women in every area of the workforce are treated every day,” Williams wrote.</p> <p>“We are not allowed to have emotions, we are not allowed to be passionate. We are told to sit down and be quiet, which frankly is just not something I’m OK with. It’s shameful that our society penalises women just for being themselves.”</p>

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The best books to read at every age

<p><span>As we grow old, the books we read can serve as markers of the life stages we’ve gone through. If you’re looking for age-appropriate wisdom as you enter a new year, <em>The Washington Post </em>has curated a list of the best books to read for every age from 1 to 100.</span></p> <p><span>For those in their 60s, the list recommends a range of books on retirement and ageing. <em>The Five Years Before You Retire</em> by Emily Guy Birken (recommended for readers aged 60) as a guide for retirement planning, while <em>65 Things to Do When You Retire </em>edited by Mark Evan Chimsky (for readers aged 65) features ideas from figures such as Jane Fonda and Gloria Steinem. </span></p> <p><span>There are also titles to help you cope with changing life and circumstances – be it newfound passions in <em>Old in Art School </em>by Nell Painter (64), grief in <em>The Year of Magical Thinking </em>by Joan Didion (68), or failing memory in <em>I Remember Nothing </em>by Nora Ephron (69).</span></p> <p><span>Readers in their 70s are reminded of the joys and wonders of life with a range of life-affirming books in the list, including Mary Pipher’s <em>Women Rowing North </em>(76), Mark Helprin’s <em>Paris in the Present Tense </em>(74) and Peter Spiers’ <em>Master Class: Living Longer, Stronger, and Happier</em> (70).</span></p> <p><span>People in their 80s are encouraged to go back to poetry and literature classics with suggestions such as <em>Coming Into Eighty: Poems</em> (80), Shakespeare’s <em>King Lear </em>(87) and famous thrillers like Maisie Dobbs and Commissario Guido Brunetti (83).</span></p> <p><span>Finally, those aged 90 and above are advised to let go of their fears and regrets with titles such as <em>Nothing to be Frightened Of</em> from Julian Barnes (92), <em>Somewhere Towards the End</em> by Diana Athill (96) and <em>Little Boy </em>from Lawrence Ferlinghetti (99).</span></p> <p><span>Find the full list <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/entertainment/books/100-books-for-the-ages/">here</a>.</span></p>

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Queen Elizabeth has a secret journal only Prince Philip can read

<p>Queen Elizabeth has always been elusive and one secret that has managed to spill out about the most senior royal member has made her just the more mysterious.</p> <p>It has been revealed Her Majesty has kept a diary that she writes in every night, since she was just 15 years old.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.2165345898479px;" src="/media/7828281/queen-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d5f5994a195c4ed4a7b5d2455b40a15a" /></p> <p><em>Monty Python</em> actor Michael Palin said he learnt the unusual fact about the Queen while sitting next to the 93-year-old at an official royal dinner in Windsor castle.</p> <p>The actor had just been given his knighthood when he told Her Majesty he kept a nightly journal.</p> <p>“We were talking about diaries after I had mentioned that I kept a nightly journal of where I'd been and the people I encountered ... she said she did too, the difference being that while mine may have been for publication hers were definitely not.”</p> <p>He continued, “She commented that she found it quite difficult because it always made her a bit wooly and said, 'I usually manage to write for about 15 minutes before my head goes bump', and then she did an imitation of her head hitting the table, as if she had fallen asleep.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.2982998454405px;" src="/media/7828280/queen-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4ab25ae97e704b8485986648a21c1504" /></p> <p>Hugh Vickers, who is a royal expert, said the Queen was inspired by her father King George VI to start jotting down her own thoughts after she witnessed him doing so.</p> <p>What makes this little-known fact about the Queen even more interesting is that her diaries are reportedly guarded tightly.</p> <p>Not only are her close aides instructed to destroy the bottling paper used to absorb the ink from her pen, but her personal page is required to destroy the written-on paper so that the Queen’s thoughts can never be read.</p> <p>“The diary is taken with her wherever she is staying, whether it be Windsor or Sandringham or Balmoral, and is kept in a black leather case – a smaller version of one of the red dispatch boxes containing Government papers,” a royal insider revealed to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailystar.co.uk/" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Star</em>.</a></p>

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Letter reveals the Queen’s heartbreak over Princess Diana’s death

<p>Princess Diana’s passing is something that is still discussed to this day, despite taking place more than twenty years ago on August 31, 1997. This is because not only was it embedded in people’s minds but was also a pivotal moment in the history of the royal family.</p> <p>Upon Princess Diana’s passing, the British Royal Family was criticised for their initial reaction.</p> <p>However, a resurfaced letter written by The Queen sets to change all of that.</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal/1144891/royal-news-princess-diana-latest-the-queen-elizabeth-ii-letter-diana-death-william-harry" target="_blank"><em>The Express</em></a>, the Queen expresses her sadness in the letter.</p> <p>"It was indeed dreadfully sad, and she is a huge loss to the country.</p> <p>“But the public reaction to her death and the service in the Abbey seem to have united people around the world in a rather inspiring way.”</p> <p>The Queen also spoke about the strength of her grandchildren and Diana's sons, Prince William and Prince Harry.</p> <p>“William and Harry have been so brave and I am very proud of them.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwgm93uF4w6/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bwgm93uF4w6/" target="_blank">Wishing a very happy 93rd birthday to Her Majesty The Queen! Credit: 📸PA</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/kensingtonroyal/" target="_blank"> Kensington Palace</a> (@kensingtonroyal) on Apr 21, 2019 at 12:39am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The letter was written in response to condolences from Lady Henriette Abel Smith, who was a lady in waiting, as well as a close confidante to the Queen.</p> <p><span>F</span><span>ollowing the death of Lady Smith</span><span> in 2005, the letter was auctioned off the same year and initially obtained by the <em>Daily Mail</em>. </span></p> <p>A majority of the letter was typed, but it was the written postscript where the Queen let her true feelings show.</p> <p>”I think your letter was one of the first I opened – emotions are still so mixed up but we have all been through a very bad experience.”</p> <p> </p>

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"I never saw any evidence of marriage": New book claims Donald and Melania Trump lead separate lives

<p>A new book on Donald Trump has claimed that he and his wife Melania Trump live separate lives, with the 45th US President and First Lady only remaining together out of an arrangement.</p> <p>Following his commercially successful expose <em>Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House</em>, Michael Wolff has released another book on Trump’s presidency.</p> <p>In new book <em>Siege: Trump Under Fire</em>, Wolff claims that the speculations surrounding the First Lady – including rumours of a body double, an extended hospital stay, delayed relocation to the White House and multiple on-record slip-ups – are indications that the Trumps’ relationship is merely for publicity purposes.</p> <p>Wolff told <a href="https://www.news.com.au/world/north-america/inside-the-trump-marriage-michael-wolff-book-claims-donald-and-melania-lead-separate-lives/news-story/782af09528c7696217d116fd1460ff7d"><em>The Australian</em></a> that the couple’s marriage is a “deal” that is akin to the rumoured relationship contract between Hollywood stars Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes.</p> <p>The book, which cites more than 100 sources, features Trump’s former director campaign and adviser Steve Bannon. </p> <p>“I never saw any evidence of a marriage,” Bannon said as quoted in the book. </p> <p>He told Wolff that most mentions of the First Lady “drew a puzzled look from Trump, as if to say, ‘How is she relevant?’”</p> <p>Wolff also claimed that the First Lady’s delayed move from New York to the White House also spoke volumes.</p> <p>“Indeed, a distraught Melania, repeatedly assured by her husband during the campaign that there was no possibility he would win, had originally refused to move to Washington,” Wolff wrote.</p> <p>“And, in fact, the First Lady was not really in the White House. It had taken Melania almost six months to officially relocate from New York to Washington, but that was in name only.”</p> <p>However, many news outlets have expressed doubts over the claims in Wolff’s new book. </p> <p>“The book is full of stuff that is lurid and sensational, but so dubious in its attributions that even in a review setting I’m afraid to repeat them,” wrote Matt Taibbi of <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-features/michael-wolff-siege-book-taibbi-review-844398/" target="_blank"><em>Rolling Stone</em></a>.</p> <p>According to CNN political analyst Ryan Lizza, the book also contains “factual errors that mar the author’s credibility”.</p> <p>While Trump has not commented on the new <em>Siege</em> book, he rejected Wolff’s claims in <em>Fire and Fury</em>, describing the book as “the Fake Book of a mentally deranged author, who knowingly writes false information”.</p>

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