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Olivia Newton-John “had to learn to walk again” amid breast cancer battle

<p>As she battles stage 4 breast cancer, Olivia Newton-John has provided fans with an optimistic health update.</p> <p>The 70-year-old star made an appearance at the Industry Dance Awards and Cancer Benefit Show at the Avalon Theatre and revealed that she is “doing great”.</p> <p>“I just want everyone to know, I’m here, I’m doing great,” she told<span> </span><em>Entertainment Tonight</em>. “I’m doing really well and I’m really healthy.”</p> <p>The<span> </span><em>Grease</em><span> </span>star has been diagnosed with cancer two times prior, making the most recent her third. Her first was in 1992, then in 2013. She was then told she had breast cancer in May 2017, where she was informed the cancer had spread to her bones.</p> <p>She also spoke about a few physical setbacks this year, and she’s focusing on remaining strong.</p> <p>“It was a challenging year because I broke my sacrum and I had to learn to walk again and everything,” she said. “But I am strong and I am back and I’m feeling good and loving every minute.”</p> <p>At the Industry Dance Awards and Cancer benefit, the triple threat was presented with a lifetime achievement award. She was also given a generous donation for her Cancer Wellness &amp; Research Centre in Heidelberg, Victoria.</p> <p>Newton-John passionately mentioned how she aims to help those receiving treatment at her facility.</p> <p>“It’s such an honour, and I am so grateful to receive that amazing cheque for my cancer wellness centre,” she said. “That it will help so many people with the programs to support them going through their cancer journey.”</p>

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The surprising reason newborn babies don’t cry tears

<p>Newborn babies cry a lot. It’s their only mode of communication to be able to tell mummy or daddy what they want and need. But what you may not have noticed, or noticed but never had the answer, is that newborn babies don’t produce tears. They just produce the sound of crying.</p> <p>Dr Phillipa Sharwood, a Brisbane paediatric ophthalmologist and member of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists, explains all the causes and effects of this interesting situation.</p> <p>And now for some biology, but bear with us here, it’s not as complicated as you might think.</p> <p>Tears are produced by tear glands that are small almond-shaped organs that sit under the top eyelid, above the eyeball.</p> <p>“It’s almost like a cloud that makes it rain. The tears then come down over the eye, and there’s a drainage system (the tear duct) in the inside corners of the eye that goes down into the nose,” Dr Sharwood told <a href="https://www.mamamia.com.au/newborn-baby-tears/"><em>Mamamia</em></a>.</p> <p>“How much we actually cry – as in how much spills down our cheek – depends on how good the drainage system is, versus how much tears the glands produce,” she went on to explain.</p> <p>Dr Sharwood shared that the tear production of newborns is limited: “Babies don’t produce a normal amount of tears when they’re born, because their tear glands aren’t completely developed yet.”</p> <p>She continued to discuss the overall function and development of a newborn’s eye, stating that they have the basic developmental features to maintain good eye health.</p> <p>“We have a few different types of tears, there’s a baseline level that keeps the eyes moist and healthy, newborns have that.</p> <p>“The next is reflex tears, which are the tears that form when you get something in your eye, or you sneeze or cough. They start to develop that in the first few weeks after birth,” Dr Sharwood continued.</p> <p>“Then there’s the emotional tears. That’s where newborns fall short. Emotionally triggered tears are produced at a higher volume, and their still-developing tear glands simply don’t have that output yet.”</p> <p>The doctor then shared her knowledge of when babies start developing the ability to produce emotionally driven tears.</p> <p>“Babies don’t produce enough from their tear glands to get full emotional tears, usually, until at least a couple of months after birth,” she revealed.</p> <p>Shockingly, there are very few people who never fully develop tear production. Although the situation is significantly rare, Dr Sharwood informs that it is a possibility.</p> <p>“As long as a child has nice, white, comfortable eyes, we wouldn’t be too worried,” she reassured.</p> <p>If there is any irritation or noticeable difference in a child’s eyes, they should be taken to a doctor.</p>

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Trouble sleeping? Ultimate guide to a good night’s rest

<p>Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) specialises in brain and nervous system research and has dedicated its resources to find the answer to a better quality of sleep. It exposes the bad habits and factors that influence how you sleep and the quality of rest you get each night, as well as providing solutions to benefit your quality of sleep.</p> <p>The bad habits of drinking, smoking, presence of pets in the bed, eating rich foods less than two hours before bed and a lack of exercise in your daily routine have all been revealed to impact sleep patterns.</p> <p>The researchers have also confirmed what we have all heard before – the light from your phone or tablet keeps your brain stimulated, making it harder to sleep.</p> <p>Hanna Hensen, a sleep scientist from NeuRA, reveals that 40 per cent of Australians aren’t getting an adequate amount of sleep, which she admits affects an individual’s mental wellbeing.</p> <p>“Disrupted or inadequate sleep can negatively impact every organ in your body and is associated with anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders,” Dr Hensen said.</p> <p>Researchers have discovered that a lack of sleep influences our ability and quality of work as we become less creative and efficient, we become less motivated due to our fatigue, as well as limiting our judgement and decision making.</p> <p>Hensen reveals who is most at risk of these factors within the work environment.</p> <p>“If you are working with large figures, writing an article, handling transactions or controlling machinery, inadequate sleep will adversely affect your success and accuracy at work,” the doctor revealed.</p> <p>Hensen also elaborated on the importance of maintaining mental wellbeing and identified two major categories of sleep – quiet sleep and rapid eye movement (REM).</p> <p>Every 90 minutes a normal sleeper cycles between two important categories of sleep – quiet sleep –– where the deepness of the sleep gradually increases. As we fall into our deeper sleep, we experience a drop in our body temperature, the relaxation of muscles and the decreasing rate of heart rate and breathing.</p> <p>Dr Hensen shared the benefits of quiet sleep, stating, “The deepest stage of quiet sleep – called slow wave sleep – is the constructive phase of sleep, repairing damaged tissues, stimulating growth and development, and boosting the immune system.”</p> <p>The second major category of sleep is REM, also known as dream sleep. Surprisingly, this quality of sleep plays an important role in learning and memory, which impacts emotional health.</p> <p>“By getting insufficient sleep or sleeping poorly, we are not giving the brain and the body space to recover from the previous day,” Dr Hensen said. “This causes us to be less sociable, more emotionally unstable and less resilient the following day.”</p> <p>Still not convinced your quality of sleep is important? Maybe these statistics will change your mind.</p> <ul> <li>18 hours without sleep is equivalent to having a blood alcohol level of 0.08, while 24 hours with no sleep is the same as a blood alcohol level of 0.12.</li> <li>Poor sleep makes you eight times more likely to have a car accident.</li> <li>Lack of sleep increases the risk of anxiety and depression.</li> <li>Men who get 5 hours of sleep for one week have significantly lower levels of testosterone mirroring someone 10 years older than what they are.</li> </ul> <p>Convinced now? Here’s the advice Dr Hensen suggested in order to get a good sleep.</p> <p>Hensen encourages routine and advises to go to bed around the same time every night and wake up at the same time every morning. To help get relaxed and ready for bed, dim bright lights or turn on soft lamps within two hours of going to sleep.</p> <p>Sadly, Hensen discourages naps that exceed 20-30 minutes, as well as recommending people turn off their technological devices and storing them away from their sleeping space.</p> <p>That’s right. No phone, tablet or laptop in your bedroom. If that demand is simply impossible, put your phone on night mode or put a blue light filter on your screen.</p> <p>Caffeine, sugar or cigarettes four hours before bed can stimulate the mind and keep you awake, Hensen suggests avoiding these for a better night’s sleep, as well as advising against lounging around in your bed for more than 30 minutes.</p> <p>We know the covers are irresistible, but Dr Hensen suggests moving to a chair to read a book or listen to soft music elsewhere before returning to bed to sleep once you’re tired.</p> <p>Replace music with soft and soothing sounds instead of loud stimulating music. Also avoid eating heavy foods such as rich, fatty or fried meals, spicy dishes, citrus fruits or carbonated drinks as they can trigger indigestion and heartburn that disrupts sleep.</p> <p>Happy sleeping!</p>

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Your guide to meal prepping for beginners

<p><span>Meal prepping is a sensible option for helping you save time, waste less food and get your daily meals on the table much faster than usual. Are you interested in getting started with meal prepping? Read on to learn more, plus find meal prepping ideas, tips and suggestions for beginners.</span></p> <p><strong><span>What is meal prepping?</span></strong></p> <p><span><a href="https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-meal-prep-beginner-261658">Meal prepping</a> is the act of consciously allotting time for preparing your meals, or the ingredients you use for making your meals, in bulk ahead of when you will need them. The idea is that you can save time by cooking once, portioning out the food and having it ready to use when you need it.</span></p> <p><span>You’re likely to also save money with this method. This is because you won’t end up buying overpriced takeaway meals at the last minute when you’re hungry and in too much of a hurry to cook a meal from scratch. You’re also likely to waste far less food with this method – because you consciously plan out what to do with each morsel of food instead of letting leftovers go to waste.</span></p> <p><span>Here’s an example of how meal prepping can save you time and increase your efficiency. Let’s say that it takes you 4 hours to make a 2.5 kilogram roast from start to finish. As long as you’re going to all that trouble, why not make 2 roasts, then divide each roast into 12 portions to use for meal prepping? The roast beef meals can then be frozen for later use as needed.</span></p> <p><span>That’s an extreme example of a time consuming meal prep. You do not have to allot that much time to meal prepping if you’d rather prepare simpler meals, or portions of meals.</span></p> <p><span>If you hustle, it is possible to prepare a week’s worth of meals <a href="https://www.thekitchn.com/meal-prep-rules-261129">in only one hour</a>. </span></p> <p><span>Or meal prepping can be as simple as returning from the farmer’s market and then chopping up a week’s worth of fresh salads using the produce you bring home. If you serve a main dish plus a helping of fresh salad for dinner every night, having the salad made ahead of time frees you to focus on the main dish when it comes time to prepare dinner.</span></p> <p><strong>Tools and supplies you’ll need for meal prepping</strong></p> <p><span>First and foremost, you’ll need suitable containers for meal prepping. To avoid creating excess <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/home-garden/ways-to-reduce-household-waste">household waste</a>, and to minimise your environmental footprint, avoid using single-use plastics such as plastic baggies or disposable containers for this purpose. Instead, select mason jars, glass storage containers or reusable stainless steel lunch containers for storing the foods you’ll prepare.</span></p> <p><span>There are many kitchen gadgets, utensils and appliances that can make meal prepping more convenient. A few <a href="https://www.mealprep.com.au/p/kitchen-essentials-for-meal-prepping/">meal prepping essentials</a> include a blender, an accurate digital kitchen scale and a set of high-quality kitchen knives.</span></p> <p><strong><span>How to meal prep</span></strong></p> <p><span>Start with a clean kitchen. First, clean out the refrigerator and freezer to make space for the meals you’re going to prep.</span></p> <p><span>Next, wash any dirty dishes that may be lingering in the kitchen. Put everything away except for the gadgets, dishes and utensils you plan to use during the meal prepping process.</span></p> <p><span>Next, decide which meals you’re going to prep. If you’re totally new to meal prepping, it’s probably wise to start small. Choose one meal – breakfast, lunch, or dinner -- to start with. Then decide which dishes you want to prepare for the week. Locate recipes you want to use. The ingredients you need for the recipes will form the basis for your grocery list. Prepare the grocery list and take it to the market with you to shop for the ingredients you need.</span></p> <p><span>When you’ve returned from the market, it’s time to get busy prepping. Cook your ingredients. Set out your containers and your scale. Measure out your ingredients and assemble your meals. Then place everything in the refrigerator or freezer so it’s all ready to go when you need it.</span></p> <p><span>If you freeze your meals, you will obviously need to allow adequate defrosting time before you can easily use them. You may wish to make notes on your calendar to defrost a particular item the night before you need it.</span></p> <p><span>This <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/food-wine/15-dollar-kmart-hack-will-save-you-thousands">clever and affordable hack</a> can also help you with planning out your meals if you like to have a visual means of keeping track of your meal plans.</span></p> <p><span>Those are some of the most essential basics you need to know about meal prepping. Like most other skills in life, you will get faster and more efficient at meal prepping if you do it repeatedly. You’ll learn what works best for you, and the process will get easier in time.</span></p> <p><strong><span>Related links</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/home-garden/five-tips-for-an-organised-freezer">5 Tips to help you perfectly organise your freezer</a></span></li> <li><span><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/money-banking/21-tricks-to-drastically-slash-your-grocery-bill">21 Tricks to drastically slash your grocery bill</a></span></li> </ul>

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Why drug cheats are still being caught 7 years after the 2012 London Olympics

<p>When two swimmers <a href="https://theconversation.com/swimmer-protests-at-the-world-championships-renew-calls-for-urgent-anti-doping-reforms-120848">refused to acknowledge victories</a> by Chinese swimmer Sun Yang at the last month’s world swimming championships, the very public protests riveted the swimming world and cast a spotlight (again) on suspected doping in sport.</p> <p>But in the midst of the drama, a separate, failed drug test was slightly overshadowed. Uzbek wrestler Artur Taymazov became the <a href="https://www.bbc.com/sport/olympics/49092020">60th athlete</a> – and seventh gold medallist – to retrospectively test positive for doping from samples taken at the 2012 London Olympics.</p> <p>In addition to the nine athletes caught doping during the games themselves, that brings the <a href="https://www.olympic.org/-/media/Document%20Library/OlympicOrg/IOC/Who-We-Are/Commissions/Disciplinary-Commission/2019/Antidoping-factsheet-retests-23-07-2019.pdf">total number of disqualified athletes from London to 69</a> – more than triple the number caught doping at the 2004 Athens Olympics.</p> <p><strong>When did retrospective testing begin?</strong></p> <p>That athletes from the 2012 Olympics are still being caught cheating might come as surprise. But the World Anti-Doping Code (<a href="https://www.wada-ama.org/en/resources/the-code/world-anti-doping-code">WADC 2015</a>) provides for a 10-year window following a competition to test athletes’ samples for a possible doping violation. This is known as retrospective testing.</p> <p>Under the old regime, authorities had eight years to test samples. This means that samples from the 2012 London Olympics <a href="https://www.olympic.org/news/ioc-sanctions-one-athlete-for-failing-anti-doping-tests-at-london-2012-3">can be tested until 2020</a>.</p> <p>The WADC’s limitation period first came to prominence in 2010, with the release of <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/22/books/review/Tanenhaus-t.html">Andre Agassi’s autobiography, Open</a>. In it, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2009/oct/28/andre-agassi-wada-doping">the tennis star admitted</a> to taking a banned drug, crystal methamphetamine, in 1997. He also revealed he avoided suspension by the tennis authorities, who, in confidence, accepted his plea that the positive test had resulted from a drink spiked by one of his entourage, known as “Slim”.</p> <p>The then-head of WADA, John Fahey, wrote to the tennis authorities for an explanation of “Slim’s spiked soda”, but further investigation was <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2009/oct/28/andre-agassi-wada-doping">barred because the WADC’s statute of limitations</a> had long since expired.</p> <p>In another prominent case in 2012, the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) <a href="http://cyclinginvestigation.usada.org/">argued</a> it should be able to expunge all of cyclist Lance Armstrong’s competitive results from 1998 onwards – including all seven of his Tour de France victories. This was due to evidence that Armstrong’s cycling team had run.</p> <p>the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.</p> <p>USADA acknowledged this would be in breach of the WADC’s statute of limitations, but justified the move on the grounds that Armstrong had fraudulently concealed his doping for many years. The International Cycling Union <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/23/sports/cycling/armstrong-stripped-of-his-7-tour-de-france-titles.html">did not challenge</a> USADA’s interpretation of the time limitation rule and Armstrong’s results were subsequently erased.</p> <p>Due to the level of doping in the sport at the time, no retrospective champion was declared for the seven Tours between <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-cycling-armstrong/no-winner-for-1999-2005-tours-says-uci-idUSBRE89P0S620121026">1999-2005</a>.</p> <p><strong>How many athletes have been caught?</strong></p> <p>The reason the 10-year window exists is because drug testing has failed to keep pace with cheating. There is a lag period between WADA both becoming aware of a new performance-enhancing substance that it needs to prohibit and developing a test that can, with scientific accuracy, detect it.</p> <p>Put simply, the 10-year limitation period allows anti-doping authorities to retrospectively test samples of athletes after new methods allow them to do so, thus acting as a deterrent against doping in the future.</p> <p>In 2017, WADA testing figures revealed that of the 322,050 samples taken in and out of competitions that year, only 1.43% led to an <a href="https://www.wada-ama.org/en/media/news/2018-07/wada-publishes-2017-testing-figures-report">adverse analytical finding</a>. But <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/aug/29/sport-doping-study-revealing-wider-usage-published-after-scandalous-delay">some research</a>indicates the prevalence of doping among athletes may be much higher than that.</p> <p>The hit rate of retrospective testing in the Olympics has increased in recent years. The International Olympic Committee <a href="https://www.olympic.org/news/ioc-sanctions-one-athlete-for-failing-anti-doping-tests-at-london-2012-3">began storing samples</a> and allowing retrospective testing from the Athens Olympics in 2004. <a href="https://www.olympic.org/-/media/Document%20Library/OlympicOrg/IOC/Who-We-Are/Commissions/Disciplinary-Commission/2019/Antidoping-factsheet-retests-23-07-2019.pdf">Five athletes</a> were caught retrospectively from those games, followed by 65 from the 2008 Beijing Olympics and now 60 (and counting) from London.</p> <p>And in theory, USADA’s interpretation in the Armstrong decision – which was supported by rulings in the Court of Arbitration for Sport - leaves open the possibility that the statute of limitations for drugs violations could be extended even beyond ten years.</p> <p>In theory, this could allow the International Olympic Committee to revisit the results from the Olympics of the 1970s and 1980s, where there is documented evidence – <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jan/03/stasi-files-east-germany-archivists-losing-hope-solving-worlds-biggest-puzzle">from Stasi files</a>, for example – that countries such as East Germany engaged in a state-sponsored doping program to achieve sporting success.</p> <p>Interestingly, one of the first former Australian Olympians to support Horton in his protest last month at the world swimming championships was <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/sport/swimming/taking-a-stance-or-overstepping-20190723-p52a14.html">Raelene Boyle</a>, who has long claimed she was denied two gold medals at the 1972 Olympics by East German athletes suspected of doping.</p> <p><strong>Limitations of retrospective testing</strong></p> <p>Although more cheats are being caught, this doesn’t mean the system of retrospective testing is working perfectly.</p> <p>For starters, a decade-late public declaration that an athlete was the rightful winner of a championship offers some recompense, but the denial of immediate glory often has severe financial and even <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/01/sports/olympics/shirley-babashoff-swimming-montreal-olympics-medals.html">health consequences</a>.</p> <p>Moreover, having to correct the result of races held years previously may be adding to a growing <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-to-argue-about-doping-in-sport-43600">public indifference</a> to doping in sport. The <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/10/26/olympic-weightlifting-class-notorious-for-positive-doping-tests-may-get-chopped/?utm_term=.fda76e8a8d5d">men’s 94-kilogram weightlifting event</a>from the 2012 Olympics shows just how little confidence remains in certain sports: all three medallists were disqualified for doping, as were the fourth, sixth- and seventh-place finishers.</p> <p>Finally, there is one strange quirk within WADA’s system of retrospective testing. If, for example, <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-02/shayna-jack-vows-to-clear-name-doping-swimmer-ligandrol-asada/11376924">Australian swimmer Shanya Jack</a> loses her appeal following her positive test for ligandrol, then her samples, <a href="https://www.independent.ie/au/sport/other-sports/athletics/ewan-mackenna-the-curious-case-of-sprinter-steven-colvert-the-positive-test-the-destroyed-sample-and-the-lurking-questions-37723196.html">as with all proven cases</a>, will be destroyed.</p> <p>This is a questionable, unnecessary practice. Although the scientific integrity of the anti-doping testing regime has greatly improved thanks to WADA, the system still has flaws.</p> <p>Former Liverpool FC player Mamadou Sakho, for instance, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/football/2019/jul/24/crystal-palace-mamadou-sakho-sues-wada-for-13m-over-drugs-test-error-liverpool">is suing WADA</a> for an alleged drug-test blunder. And Chinese swimmer Sun Yang was permitted to compete at last month’s world swimming championships <a href="https://theconversation.com/snubbing-chinese-swimmer-sun-yang-ignores-the-flaws-in-the-anti-doping-system-120895">after a tribunal ruled in his favour</a> over another questionable testing procedure.</p> <p>WADA protocol could easily be changed to mandate that all samples be maintained for ten years to allow athletes who have been punished for a positive test to later challenge that sanction, with the aid of advancing technology.</p> <p>The strength of any justice system lies not only in how often it closes cases against athletes rightly accused of doping, but how open it is to giving athletes the opportunity to the show that, on occasion, the system got it wrong.</p> <p><em>Written by Jack Anderson. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/why-drug-cheats-are-still-being-caught-seven-years-after-the-2012-london-olympics-121123"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Perfect for every body shape: The $181 Serena Williams dress fans can't get enough of

<p>Apart from her stellar tennis career, Serena Williams has continued to make headlines with her bold outfits both on and off the court.</p> <p>Now, the 23-time grand slam winner is once again making waves after a new dress from her clothing line gets so popular it’s nearly sold out.</p> <p>The Twist Front Dress, priced at US$120 (NZ$181), is described as an “endlessly elegant” midi dress. The apparel has long sleeves and a front-twist detail, and is made of 95 per cent polyester and 5 per cent spandex.</p> <p>“I designed the Twist Front Dress for everybody and every BODY,” Williams wrote on her Instagram account.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0a8uvFHpQ8/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0a8uvFHpQ8/" target="_blank">We’re having a red hot summer over @serena. I designed the Twist Front Dress for everybody and every ✨BODY✨ P.S. Have you checked out the Serena IGTV channel? New content coming every week 💥 #BeSeenBeHeard . Score by @thefrontrunnaz</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/serenawilliams/" target="_blank"> Serena Williams</a> (@serenawilliams) on Jul 27, 2019 at 6:01am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>In a clip, the 37-year-old explained how the same dress can flatter different body types, showcasing the piece on her and six other women with varying heights and body shapes.</p> <p>“No one in the world looks exactly the same,” Williams said. “We all look different and we’ve got to bring our personalities out.”</p> <p>On her fashion brand’s website, the dress is sold in red and black. Look out if you’re looking to score the red one – it has sold out in all sizes but 2X and 3X.</p> <p>The popularity of the dress has led to some shoppers’ frustration. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">TFW the Serena Williams dress is sold out online in your size... <a href="https://t.co/Jcgxxu9klL">https://t.co/Jcgxxu9klL</a> <a href="https://t.co/mb8CaDVboo">pic.twitter.com/mb8CaDVboo</a></p> — Elizabeth Cherneff (@echerneff) <a href="https://twitter.com/echerneff/status/1155936885899816961?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 29, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“[That feeling when] the Serena Williams dress is sold out online in your size…” a disappointed woman posted on Twitter.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the $181 dress that's perfect for every body shape. </p>

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Kensington Palace releases rare statement regarding Duchess Kate

<p>The Duchess of Cambridge’s beauty is all her own despite rumours circulating she has had work done for years – and the Kensington Palace has issued a rare statement slamming any claims she has. </p> <p>A plastic surgeon took to Instagram to share in a now deleted post of the 37-year-old royal two side-by-side images in a “before and after” comparison. </p> <p>“Our Kate loves a bit of baby Botox,” Somji wrote under the photos, reported the <a rel="noopener" href="https://pagesix.com/2019/07/24/palace-denies-kate-middleton-got-baby-botox/?_ga=2.262437071.2119636388.1563969036-35188090.1532599696" target="_blank"><em>New York Post</em>.</a></p> <p>“Note the reduction of fine lines on the forehead. But also note the depression of the medial (middle part) brow but elevation of the lateral tail of the brow.”</p> <p>Baby botox is a more subtle form of injections used to soften and relax wrinkles. </p> <p>"It prevents wrinkles but you'll still have movement. It acts like a little complexion freshener," Pamela Benito, a cosmetic dentist and aesthetic medicine specialist, told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.byrdie.com/baby-botox-review" target="_blank">Byrdie.</a></p> <p>While it is unusual for the palace to comment on juvenile rumours including the Duchess’ beauty skin routine – it seems they have had enough of the slack talk and have absolutely refuted the royal has had any cosmetic procedures. </p> <p>The Kensington Palace said the Instagram post is “categorically not true” and added that, “The Royal Family never endorse commercial activity.”</p>

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Why do some people worry more than others?

<p><strong><em>Why do some people worry more than others? - Shifra, age 5, Melbourne.</em></strong></p> <p>You might think there are some people who never worry. But that’s not true. We all worry but at different times and about different things. A bit of worrying is normal and healthy.</p> <p>It’s your brain telling you something helpful. It might be telling you there’s something you need to think more about. We couldn’t get rid of worries even if we really wanted to!</p> <p><strong>Why people worry</strong></p> <p>Some people worry more than others because they’re born that way. Some experts say your genes or personality can make a person more likely to be a worrier. Worries can run in families – maybe mum, dad, your sibling or grandparents could be worriers too.</p> <p>Worries are actually really common. In your class, there’s a good chance that three or four other kids would know about worries because they’ve got them too. Maybe they’re thinking about a few worries right now.</p> <p>Worrying has nothing to do with being brave, strong or your character.</p> <p><strong>Big worries and small worries</strong></p> <p>Worries can be helpful. There is a part of the brain called the amygdala. It’s not very big and it’s shaped like an almond. It switches on really quickly when it thinks you’re in danger. It’s there to protect you. Its job is to get you ready to run away from any danger.</p> <p>But worries become a problem when they show up at unexpected times. Sometimes you can’t forget the worry. The worry stays on your mind, and maybe you feel sick in your tummy or have a headache. These worries can turn your brain’s amygdala on, and make it feel like you need to run even when there is no danger around.</p> <p>Sometimes people can worry a lot because something in their life is hard.</p> <p>If you are having a hard time in your life – like an illness, family or school issues, or problems with friends – that can make you feel worried. We could call these big worries.</p> <p>Big worries can feel scary and confusing. Sometimes a little worry can feel like a big one, too.</p> <p>Avoiding worries big or small doesn’t help. It can make them worse. But we can ease our big worries into smaller ones so they’re not on our mind all the time.</p> <p>That way they don’t stop us from doing things or make us feel like we need to run away from danger when there is none there.</p> <p><strong>What can help with worrying too much?</strong></p> <p>If you feel like you worry too much, the most important thing you can do is make yourself the boss of your worries. Whether they are big or small, you can try:</p> <p><a href="https://www.heysigmund.com/how-to-calm-anxiety-with-hot-cocoa-breathing/">Hot Cocoa Breathing</a>: Pretend you have a mug of hot cocoa in your hands. Smell the warm chocolatey smell for three seconds, hold it for one, blow it cool for three, hold it for one. Repeat three or four times;</p> <p><a href="https://copingskillsforkids.com/blog/2016/4/27/coping-skill-spotlight-5-4-3-2-1-grounding-technique">Grounding</a>: Distract yourself from the worry by looking and finding:</p> <ul> <li>five things you can see</li> <li>four things you can touch</li> <li>three things you can hear</li> <li>two things you can smell</li> <li>one thing you can taste</li> </ul> <p>Talk to an adult you trust like a teacher, neighbour or parent.</p> <p><em>Written by Christine Grove. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-do-some-people-worry-more-than-others-119874"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Dissociative disorders: What are they and why haven’t we heard about them?

<p>Dissociative disorders are often said to be <a href="http://www.teachtrauma.com/controversial-topics-trauma/myths-media-portrayals-dissociative-identity-disorder/">rare</a>. But our soon-to-be published analysis of <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334625332">international studies</a> suggest they affect 10-11% of the population at some point in their lives. This makes them nearly as common as <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/070674370404900208">mood disorders</a> (such as clinical depression).</p> <p>So what are dissociative disorders, why is diagnosis controversial and how can people be treated?</p> <p><strong>What is dissociation?</strong></p> <p>Dissociation occurs when a person experiences being disconnected from themselves, including their memories, feelings, actions, thoughts, body and even their identity.</p> <p>People with dissociative disorders have one or more of the following <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1995-98841-000">symptoms</a>:</p> <ul> <li>amnesia and other memory problems</li> <li>a sense of detachment or disconnection from their self, familiar people or surroundings</li> <li>an inner struggle about their sense of self and identity</li> <li>acting like a different person (identity alteration).</li> </ul> <p>For some people, symptoms can last days or weeks, but for others they can persist for months, years, or a lifetime.</p> <p>Dissociation allows the person to compartmentalise and disconnect from aspects of traumatic and challenging experiences that could otherwise overwhelm their capacity to cope.</p> <p>A person whose spouse has died may become emotionally numb, allowing them to focus on arranging the funeral; a man who has separated from his wife and lost his job soon afterwards may become so disconnected from his identity that he no longer recognises himself in the mirror and feels his life is happening to someone else; and a young woman who is sexually assaulted may remember her attacker moving too quickly towards her, recalls being safely back in her family home, but cannot remember the assault.</p> <p>If the traumatic and overwhelming experiences happen repeatedly over a long period of time, the person’s <a href="https://books.wwnorton.com/books/detail.aspx?id=9227">personality may become fragmented</a>. The traumatised part of the personality that contains the emotions, thoughts, sensations and experiences relating to the trauma becomes separated from the part of the personality that is trying to get on with daily life.</p> <p>This <a href="http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674068063&amp;content=reviews">allows young children to be with frightening and abusive caregivers</a> they can neither fight nor flee from as they are dependent on them.</p> <p>The person may have no (or only some) conscious awareness of the compartmentalised memories, thoughts, feelings and experiences.</p> <p>These may, however, intrude into the person’s awareness. For example, the person may be aware of thoughts, feelings and internal voices that don’t “belong” to them, or may speak or act in ways that are completely out of character.</p> <p>The most extreme form of structural dissociation is <a href="https://theconversation.com/dissociative-identity-disorder-exists-and-is-the-result-of-childhood-trauma-85076">dissociative identity disorder</a>, once known as multiple personality disorder. This is where the person has at least two separate personalities that exist independently of one another and that emerge at different times.</p> <p>These personality differences are not just psychological. <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry/article/aiding-the-diagnosis-of-dissociative-identity-disorder-pattern-recognition-study-of-brain-biomarkers/DCF85A7D69652C06E61524593B266E8C">Neuroimaging confirms structural differences</a> in the brains of people with dissociative identity disorder.</p> <p><strong>A controversial diagnosis</strong></p> <p>There are two competing theories about what causes dissociation: trauma and fantasy.</p> <p>With the <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-06384-001">trauma model</a>, dissociative symptoms arise from physical, sexual and emotional abuse; neglect, particularly in childhood; attachment problems if a child fears the caregiver or the caregiver is not adequately attuned to the child’s emotional or safety needs; and other severe stress or trauma, such as experiencing or witnessing domestic violence.</p> <p>This trauma model is reflected in the <a href="https://icd.who.int/en/">World Health Organisation</a> and <a href="https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/practice/dsm">American Psychiatric Association</a> past and present diagnostic criteria.</p> <p>However, the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24773505">fantasy model</a> is based on the idea that dissociative disorders are not “real”. Instead, they are the delusion of people who are troubled (and often traumatised), suggestible, fantasy-prone and sleep-deprived.</p> <p>Fantasy model theorist <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bjpsych-advances/article/dissociative-identity-disorder-validity-and-use-in-the-criminal-justice-system/C1C27EE9731782570E1376A3EDA48CE4">Joel Paris</a> describes dissociative disorders as a North American “fad” that has nearly died out.</p> <p>Yet <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/334625332">my analysis of 98 studies</a> found rates are not declining. In fact, I found dissociation is an international phenomenon far more common in countries that are comparatively unsafe. This is supported by other research which finds dissociation more common in people that have experienced trauma, such as <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/08039488.2014.977344?src=recsys&amp;journalCode=ipsc20">refugees</a>.</p> <p>All up, the evidence indicates dissociative disorders are real (not imagined) and caused by trauma (not fantasy).</p> <p><strong>Dissociative disorders are under-diagnosed and misdiagnosed</strong></p> <p>Even though there are accurate ways of diagnosing dissociative disorders, most people will <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Humanising-Mental-Health-Care-in-Australia-A-Guide-to-Trauma-informed/Benjamin-Haliburn-King/p/book/9780367076603">never be diagnosed</a>. This is due to the lack of health professional education and training about dissociation, the symptoms being less obvious to observers, and scepticism that the disorder even exists.</p> <p>The person also may not realise they have dissociative symptoms. Even if they do, they may not reveal them due to fear or embarrassment, or may find them difficult to put into words.</p> <p>At least <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry/article/assessment-of-the-prevalence-of-psychiatric-disorder-in-young-adults/5673B18071E22D850EF4E5F3241763FB">three-quarters of people with a dissociative disorder</a> will also have one or more other mental disorders. <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Humanising-Mental-Health-Care-in-Australia-A-Guide-to-Trauma-informed/Benjamin-Haliburn-King/p/book/9780367076603">They may be diagnosed with and treated for other mental health difficulties</a>, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, borderline personality disorder, or psychosis. They may also be treated for addictions, self-harm, and/or suicidal thoughts (<a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18195639">2% of those diagnosed complete suicide</a>).</p> <p>They may also be misdiagnosed with schizophrenia because <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27209638">hearing voices is common to both</a>.</p> <p>But their dissociative disorder usually remains undiagnosed. However, treatment for other mental health issues is not likely to be effective unless the underlying dissociation is addressed.</p> <p><strong>How to treat? What does the evidence say works?</strong></p> <p>The mental health and quality of life of people with a dissociative disorder <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-08580-001">improves </a>significantly with psychotherapy (a type of talk therapy) that recognises the impact of trauma <a href="https://besselvanderkolk.net/the-body-keeps-the-score.html">is physiological</a> (affecting the brain and body) as well as psychological.</p> <p>In therapy consistent with international treatment <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15299732.2011.537247">guidelines</a>, people can learn skills to cope with unbearable emotions, thoughts and physical sensations. Once people are stable and have constructive coping strategies, therapists can then help people process traumatic and dissociated memories. Dissociative, post-traumatic, and depressive <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-08580-001">symptoms improve</a>. And hospitalisations, self-harm, drug use, and physical pain declines.</p> <p>There is no medication that specifically treats dissociation.</p> <p><strong>Where to get help</strong></p> <p>Dissociative disorders are one of the most common, yet most unrecognised, mental disorders. Symptoms are often debilitating, but significant improvements are possible if the dissociation is diagnosed and treated correctly.</p> <p>If you are concerned, you can speak to your GP and ask for a referral to a therapist knowledgeable about trauma and dissociation. A list of therapists with this expertise in Australia is available from the <a href="https://www.blueknot.org.au/Helpline">Blue Knot Foundation</a> and worldwide from the <a href="https://isstd.connectedcommunity.org/network/network-find-a-professional">International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation</a>.</p> <p><em>Written by Mary-Anne Kate. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/dissociative-disorders-are-nearly-as-common-as-depression-so-why-havent-we-heard-about-them-116731"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Why do I have a cough and what can I do about it?

<p>Dry, moist, productive, hacking, chesty, whooping, barking, throaty. These are just some of the terms people use to describe their cough.</p> <p>While we’re deep into cold and flu season, it’s one of the most common reasons people see their family doctor.</p> <p>But what is a cough anyway? And what’s the best way to get rid of it?</p> <p><strong>What is a cough?</strong></p> <p>People can <a href="http://www.mattioli1885journals.com/index.php/actabiomedica/article/view/6182">cough on purpose or spontaneously in a protective reflex action</a>. The aim is to both protect the airways from material that shouldn’t be there (like dust) or to clear the secretions that come with respiratory diseases, such as the mucus and phlegm that come with colds and flu.</p> <p>Nerve receptors throughout the lungs, and to a lesser extent in the sinuses, diaphragm and oesophagus (food pipe), detect the irritant or mucus. Then, they send messages via the vagus nerve to the brain. The brain, in turn, sends messages back through the motor nerves supplying the diaphragm, chest muscles and vocal cords.</p> <p>This results in a sudden, forceful expulsion of air.</p> <p>Your cough may be a one off. Alternatively, you can have a run of repeated coughs, especially in <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/whooping-cough-pertussis">whooping cough</a>, which people describe as a bout, attack or episode.</p> <p><strong>Which type of cough do I have?</strong></p> <p>There are many different types of cough but no one definition that everyone agrees on. This can be confusing as patients classify their cough in descriptive terms like hacking or chesty, while doctors classify them on how long they last: acute (under three weeks), subacute (three to eight weeks) and chronic cough (more than eight weeks).</p> <p><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1094553908001430?via%3Dihub">Neither of these approaches</a> tells us about the cause of the cough.</p> <p>Coughs can also be called wet or dry. <a href="http://jtd.amegroups.com/article/view/25427/19122">Officially</a>, you have a wet cough when you produce more than 10mL of phlegm a day.</p> <p>For people with chronic coughs, their cough can further be classified after an x-ray — either with lung pathology to indicate something like pneumonia or tuberculosis, or without signs of underlying disease (an x-ray negative cough).</p> <p><strong>What caused my cough?</strong></p> <p>Whether you have a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29080708">wet or dry cough</a> may tell you what has caused it.</p> <p><a href="http://jtd.amegroups.com/article/view/25427/19122">A dry cough</a> indicates a non-infectious cough from conditions including <a href="https://www.nationalasthma.org.au/understanding-asthma/what-is-asthma">asthma</a>, <a href="https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/emphysema">emphysema</a>, <a href="https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/gord-reflux">oesophageal reflux</a> and <a href="https://bestpractice.bmj.com/topics/en-us/1209">upper airway cough syndrome</a>, previously called post-nasal drip.</p> <p><a href="http://jtd.amegroups.com/article/view/25427/19122">A wet cough</a> is more common in people with sinus and chest infections, including influenza, bronchitis and pneumonia, and serious infections such as <a href="https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/Infectious/factsheets/Pages/tuberculosis.aspx">tuberculosis</a>. A smoker’s cough is usually wet, as the precursor to chronic bronchitis. As it progresses, or when complicated with infection, larger amounts of mucus may be coughed up daily.</p> <p>Then there is a dry cough associated with a cold or flu that turns into a moist cough. People tend to describe this as “chesty” and it makes them worry the infection has moved to their lungs.</p> <p>Yet mostly their lungs are clear of infectious sounds when examined with a stethoscope. Even a small amount of mucus stuck around the vocal cords or back of the throat may produce a moist sounding cough. But this is not necessarily a wet or “productive” (producing lots of mucus) cough.</p> <p><a href="https://coughjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-9974-2-1">One study</a> showed even doctors struggled to make an accurate diagnosis based only on the sound of the cough. Their diagnosis of the cough was correct only 34% of the time.</p> <p>For people with chronic “unexplained cough”, a common hypothesis is that cough receptors <a href="https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/rccm.200905-0665OC">become more sensitive</a> to irritation the more they are exposed to the irritant. These cough receptors are so sensitive that even <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20051447">perfumes, temperature changes, talking and laughing</a>may trigger the cough.</p> <p>People with <a href="https://bestpractice.bmj.com/topics/en-us/1209">upper airway cough syndrome</a> may feel mucus secretions moving down the back of the throat, causing them to cough. New evidence suggests the cough <a href="https://journal.chestnet.org/article/S0012-3692(19)31122-5/pdf">is caused by</a> the increased thickness of the mucus and slowness of that mucus being cleared by cilia (hair like structures in lining cells whose job is to move mucus along).</p> <p>This mechanism keeps the chronic cough going through a feedback loop I call the “cough and mucus” cycle. In other words, the more the throat is irritated by the sticky mucus, the more you cough, but the cough is poor at shifting the mucus. Instead, coughing irritates the throat and fatigues the cilia, and the mucus becomes stickier and harder to shift, stimulating further coughing.</p> <p><strong>When coughing gets too much</strong></p> <p>Coughing is hard work so no wonder you can feel physically exhausted. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7925902">In one study</a>, people with asthma coughed as many as 1,577 times in one 24-hour period. But for people with a chronic cough, it was up to 3,639 times.</p> <p>The high pressures generated in vigorous coughing <a href="http://jtd.amegroups.com/article/view/25427/19122">can cause</a> symptoms including chest pains, a hoarse voice, and even rib fractures and <a href="https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/hernias">hernias</a>. Other complications include vomiting, light-headedness, urinary incontinence, headaches and sleep deprivation. Chronic cough may also lead to people becoming embarrassed and avoiding others.</p> <p><strong>Is it true?</strong></p> <p>People still seemed surprised and worried when a cough persists after a cold and flu despite the fact cough outlasts other symptoms in most cases. When an <a href="https://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=380082015528918;res=IELHEA">Australian study</a> followed 131 healthy adults with an upper respiratory tract infection, 58% had a cough for at least two weeks and 35% for up to three weeks.</p> <p>Then there’s the colour of your mucus. Patients and doctors commonly interpret discoloured mucus, particularly if green, as a sign of bacterial infection. But there’s <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02813430902759663">clear evidence</a> that the colour alone is not able to differentiate between viral and bacterial infections in otherwise healthy adults.</p> <p><a href="https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/38/1/119">Another study</a> found that people with acute cough who coughed up discoloured phlegm were more likely to be prescribed antibiotics, but they did not recover any faster than those not prescribed antibiotics.</p> <p><strong>When and how should I treat my cough?</strong></p> <p>Due to the multiple causes and types of cough there is not room to cover this question adequately. A safe approach is to diagnose the disease that is causing the cough and treat it appropriately.</p> <p>For chronic dry coughs and coughs that last after acute upper respiratory tract infections, the cough is no longer serving a useful function and treatments can be targeted at breaking the cycle of irritation and further coughing. The evidence for effective treatments is patchy, but cough suppressants, steam inhalation and saline nasal irrigations, as well as prescribed anti-inflammatory sprays may help.</p> <p>A spoonful of honey <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22869830">reduces cough</a> in children more than placebo and some cough mixtures. It is thought that the soothing effect on the throat is the way this works.</p> <p>However, there is no good evidence for the effectiveness of commonly used over-the-counter medicine (cough medicine or syrup) to alleviate acute cough, yet they are still sold. Some contain drugs with the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25420096">potential to cause harm</a> in children, such as antihistamines, and codeine-like products.</p> <p>Recent expert panel reports <a href="https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0012369217314083">don’t recommend the use of these cough medicines</a> for adults and children with acute cough, until they are shown to be effective.</p> <p><strong>When should I be concerned?</strong></p> <p>It is fine to try to treat yourself, but if a cough persists or is bothersome, your doctor may be able to suggest or prescribe treatments to reduce your symptoms.</p> <p>If you cough up blood or are becoming more unwell, consult a doctor, who will investigate further.</p> <p>Children who cough up phlegm for more than four weeks <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28143696">have been found to benefit</a> from medical investigations and antibiotics.</p> <p><em>Written by David King. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-why-do-i-have-a-cough-and-what-can-i-do-about-it-119172">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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Everything you need to know about vitamin drips

<p>Want to boost your immune system, reduce your physical signs of ageing, or cleanse your blood to get rid of toxins? Intravenous (IV) vitamin therapy, or vitamin drips, promise to help. Some claim they can even benefit serious conditions like cancer, Parkinson’s disease, the eye condition macular degeneration, the pain of fibromyalgia and depression.</p> <p><a href="https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/2018/03/192731/vitamin-iv-drip-side-effects-kendall-jenner-hospitalized">Celebrities</a> have promoted them on social media. The demand has led to <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/mar/03/intravenous-vitamin-injection-goes-mainstream">alternative therapy lounges</a> popping up around the world, including in Australia. Patients can kick back in comfy leather chairs while they’re hooked up to IVs in the infusion lounge, watch Netflix and have some tea.</p> <p>But do they work? Or are you just paying for really expensive urine? Let’s look at what the science says.</p> <p><strong>What is IV vitamin therapy?</strong></p> <p>IV vitamin therapy administers vitamins and minerals directly into the bloodstream via a needle that goes directly into your vein. Fans of the therapy believe this enables you to obtain more nutrients as you avoid the digestion process.</p> <p>Providers of these injections say they customise the formula of vitamins and minerals depending on the perceived needs of the patient.</p> <p>Right now for example, many Australian lounges are offering drip “cocktails” containing immune boosting vitamins like vitamin C and zinc to help <a href="https://www.irefresh.com.au/">protect against the flu</a>. Other popular therapy sessions come under names like <a href="https://infusion.clinic/treatments">“Energy Cocktail”</a> and <a href="https://www.dripiv.com.au/services">“Glow”</a>. One vitamin IV therapy session can take 30-90 minutes and will cost between A$80 to $1,000.</p> <p><strong>Does IV vitamin therapy work?</strong></p> <p>IV therapy itself is not new and has been used in the medical profession for decades. In hospitals, it is commonly used to <a href="https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg174">hydrate patients</a> and administer <a href="https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-2-18">essential nutrients</a> if there is an issue with gut absorption, or long-term difficulty eating or drinking due to surgery. Single nutrient deficiencies like vitamin B12 or iron are also often treated in hospital with infusions under medical supervision.</p> <p>But the “cocktails” IV vitamin therapy clinics create and administer are not supported by scientific evidence. There have been no clinical studies to show vitamin injections of this type offer any health benefit or are necessary for good health. In fact, there are very few studies that have looked at their effectiveness at all.</p> <p>There is <a href="http://www.altmedrev.com/archive/publications/7/5/389.pdf">one review</a> on the use of the “Myers’ cocktail” (a solution of magnesium, calcium, vitamin C and a number of B vitamins). But it just contains a collection of anecdotal evidence from singular case studies.</p> <p>Another <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2894814/">trial</a> looked into the effectiveness of IV vitamin therapy in reducing symptoms of 34 people with the the chronic pain condition fibromyalgia. It found no significant differences between those who received the “Myers’ cocktail” once a week for eight weeks and those who did not. In fact, the authors noted a strong placebo effect. In other words, many people said their symptoms improved when they were only injected with a “dummy” cocktail.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17515022">Another study</a> that examined IV vitamin use in fibromyalgia patients was missing a placebo group, involved just seven patients and showed only short-term improvement in symptoms. The only other published <a href="https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-3-6">study</a> examined IV vitamin therapy use for asthma. But that study was of even poorer quality.</p> <p><strong>What are the risks of IV vitamin therapy?</strong></p> <p>Even when it comes to vitamins and minerals, you can have too much of a good thing. For example, if you take in more of the fat soluble <a href="https://onlinelibrary-wiley-com.libraryproxy.griffith.edu.au/doi/abs/10.1002/lt.21007">vitamin A</a> than you need, your body stores it, risking <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK234920/">damage</a> to major organs, like the liver.</p> <p>IV vitamin therapy “cocktails” also often contain significant levels of the water soluble vitamins C and B. These are processed by the kidneys and excreted into urine when the body cannot store any more. This makes for some very expensive urine.</p> <p>There is also the risk of infection with IV vitamin therapy. Any time you have an IV line inserted, it creates a direct path into your bloodstream and bypasses your skin’s defence mechanism against bacteria.</p> <p>People with certain conditions like <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/0886022X.2014.882714">kidney disease or renal failure</a> shouldn’t have IV vitamin therapy because they cannot quickly remove certain minerals from the body. For these people, adding too much <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1525-139X.2001.00087.x?casa_token=Q5YupqqGg5gAAAAA:raHNHEk0AHDe45EvVsC3MnNjfxlFqoCoJL8QijrwJLQW5MLCERDly2g_krTTYjMNvreuQuzya211">potassium</a> could lead to a heart attack.</p> <p>People with heart, kidney or blood pressure conditions should also avoid IV vitamin therapy as there is risk of <a href="https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.115.002922">fluid overload</a> without consistent monitoring. The <a href="https://bmcnephrol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12882-016-0323-6">consequences</a>of fluid overload in these patients can include heart failure, delayed wound healing, and impaired bowel function.</p> <p><strong>What’s the bottom line?</strong></p> <p>For most of us, the quantities of vitamins and minerals needed for good health can be obtained by eating a healthy diet with a wide range of foods and food groups. Obtaining vitamins and minerals from your diet is much easier, cheaper, and safer.</p> <p>Unless you have a medically diagnosed reason for getting a vitamin infusion and it was prescribed by your doctor, you are always better off obtaining vitamins and minerals through food.</p> <p><em>Written by Emily Burch. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/do-vitamin-drips-really-work-the-evidence-says-no-so-save-your-money-and-eat-real-food-116823"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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"Delusional" men ridiculed after 1 in 8 say they can beat Serena Williams

<p>One in eight men believe they could win a point in a game of tennis against the 23-time grand slam winner Serena Williams, a new survey has found.</p> <p>12 per cent of men think they could win a point off Williams if they were playing their “very best tennis”, a recent YouGov survey of 1,732 British adults discovered. Only three per cent of women think they could score a point against the American player.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">One in eight men (12%) say they could win a point in a game of tennis against 23 time grand slam winner Serena Williams <a href="https://t.co/q0eNBjn7Vu">https://t.co/q0eNBjn7Vu</a> <a href="https://t.co/3InBOWdYwh">pic.twitter.com/3InBOWdYwh</a></p> — YouGov (@YouGov) <a href="https://twitter.com/YouGov/status/1149699495002853376?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 12, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The results have left social media users baffled over how the men can believe that they could hold their own against the world’s number nine, calling them "delusional".</p> <p>“Lord, grant me the confidence of a mediocre white man,” one joked.</p> <p>“This is why men run for President when they have no business doing so,” another wrote.</p> <p>“Clearly those 1 in 8 men are either deluded or Grand Slam-winning professional tennis players,” one added.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Clearly those 1 in 8 men are either deluded or Grand Slam-winning professional tennis players.</p> — syedhossain (@syedhossain) <a href="https://twitter.com/syedhossain/status/1149702812751806465?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 12, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Some noted the potential in the premise put forward in the question. One wrote, “Turn this into a TV show, not just with tennis. Regular Cocky Man VS Female Athlete. I’d watch it every week.”</p> <p>“Please [Serena Williams] WE NEED TO SEE THIS please please please I would like to cry of laughter,” wrote model Chrissy Teigen.</p> <p>Others wondered about the context of the hypothetical situation. “Is she blindfolded, too? Is there a 50 pound weight around her neck? Is her side of the court covered in tar and other hazards?” one wrote.</p> <p>“If you gave me 500 chances, I bet Serena gets distracted by my fat belly and laughs herself into a double fault,” another joked.</p> <p>“Reading through the replies, 1 in 8 men tried to logic out how they *could* get a point off under certain circumstances, rather than just admitting that they straight up couldn’t do it on skill which is the actual god****ed question and you know it,” another added.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Is she blindfolded, too? Is there a 50 pound weight around her neck? Is her side of the court covered in tar and other hazards?</p> — Pé Resists (@4everNeverTrump) <a href="https://twitter.com/4everNeverTrump/status/1149830196020649984?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 12, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Reading through the replies, 1 in 8 men tried to logic out how they *could* get a point off under certain circumstances, rather than just admitting that they straight up couldn’t do it on skill which is the actual goddamned question and you know it. Don’t @ me with semantics.</p> — Aqua Tofana (@lochnesshamstr) <a href="https://twitter.com/lochnesshamstr/status/1150050352521261056?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Even regular blokes joined in on poking fun at the survey results.</p> <p>“Based off 33 years of being on this planet, I’d happily have guessed that 1 in 8 of us blokes are genuinely thick as p*****t, so this isn’t really surprising. Bless em,” one chimed in.</p> <p>“One in eight men are cooked,” rapper Briggs posted on his account.</p> <p>“I could definitely stand there and ask myself where the hell the ball disappeared to after Serena hit it,” another man wrote.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">One in eight men are cooked 😂 <a href="https://t.co/mVlqUISJ9m">https://t.co/mVlqUISJ9m</a></p> — Senator Briggs (@Briggs) <a href="https://twitter.com/Briggs/status/1150219842181402624?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 14, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Well, I mean it's definitely possible, she might just double-fault on the first point, before she'd had a chance to realise that she could consistently ace me by gently tapping the ball right into the middle of my side of the court while sitting in a nice comfy chair <a href="https://t.co/b2gKHkMnZc">https://t.co/b2gKHkMnZc</a></p> — Tom Freeman (@SnoozeInBrief) <a href="https://twitter.com/SnoozeInBrief/status/1149703895284953100?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 12, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>While women athletes do not generally play against regular guys, the “Battle of the Sexes” between male and female professional players is a well-known tradition in tennis. One of the most famous games was the 1973 match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs, where the former emerged triumphant in a straight-sets win of 6-4 6-3 6-3.</p>

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Duchess Meghan glows in stunning black frock as she flaunts post-baby body

<p>The Duchess of Sussex has been praised for showing off her post-baby body at the UK premiere of <em>The Lion King</em> in London.</p> <p>Making her first red carpet appearance since giving birth, Meghan showed support for her Hollywood family in a $6,183 black satin dress with sheer sleeves by Jason Wu.</p> <p>The 'Mesh Panel Flared Dress' is surprisingly still available to purchase.</p> <p>She paired the simple ensemble with a black satin Gucci clutch which retails for $3,007 and matching shoes.</p> <p>The new mum kept her hair out of her face in a chic up-do, while showcasing a pair of dazzling earrings by Greek designer Nikos Koulis.</p> <p>Prince Harry was by her side the entire time, looking dapper in a tradition tux and evening shoes.</p> <p>After gracing the red carpet, fans took to social media to commend Meghan for not hiding her post-pregnancy figure.</p> <p>One person wrote: “I get that no one should be lauded for this, but I really respect that Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, has not starved herself to pre-baby weight because it’s ‘expected’ of public figures.”</p> <p>Another agreed, saying: “Meghan looks better now than she ever has and I thought that would have been impossible. That post pregnancy face, body and glow is everything.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">I get that no one should be lauded for this, but I really respect that Megan, Duchess of Sussex has not starved herself to pre-baby weight because it's "expected" of public figures.</p> — A Goose Named Keith (@duke_duke_goose) <a href="https://twitter.com/duke_duke_goose/status/1150451951626260480?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">14 July 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Meghan looks better now than she ever has and I thought that would have been impossible. That post pregnancy face, body, glow is EVERYTHING. EVERY DAMN THING! 🔥</p> — The Age of Sussex (@brenbrenchie) <a href="https://twitter.com/brenbrenchie/status/1150452684266385408?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">14 July 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">And she’s so beautiful! Postnpartum weight is healthily lost within 6 months after giving birth. Meghan’s size 4 clothes aren’t going anywhere, except back on her body! 🤗</p> — Nana (@SoccerNana) <a href="https://twitter.com/SoccerNana/status/1150456304718307330?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">14 July 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan strut the red carpet.</p>

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Why this is the most dangerous time of the day to eat

<p>We all know the routine of trying to eat healthy and maintain a healthy weight.</p> <p>The food preparation and calorie counting.</p> <p>The Tupperware containers filled with healthy meals to help you stay on track.</p> <p>You do all the hard work to stay on track only for it all to come ravelling undone when you get home from work hungry and snack on everything you can get your hands on.</p> <p>That’s right, arriving home from work is the most dangerous time of the day for people who are aiming to eat healthy and lose weight.</p> <p>Most people feel tired, unmotivated and have low blood glucose levels once they get home from a long day.</p> <p>A glass of wine or beer, some crackers and dip – and anything else we can munch on – suddenly falls into our lap.</p> <p>This is why our evening food routine is just as important as the eating routine we implement throughout the day.</p> <p>At night our body stores the calories we consume during the evening due to hormonal shifts and our body winding down for the night, therefore not moving as much.</p> <p>Here are some tips to ensure your hard work isn’t destroyed.</p> <p><strong>1. Create good dinner habits</strong></p> <p>One of the most important things you can achieve is building positive health habits, reinforcing them so often that they become a part of your day. A way to kick post-work hunger is to replace wine with sparkling water and crackers and dip for cut up fruit and vegetables. This supports weight loss instead of encouraging weight gain and fills your tummy with nutritious snacks.</p> <p><strong>2. Know your go-to meals</strong></p> <p>Not being prepared and having no idea what to cook for dinner increases the likelihood of ordering takeaway. This means we consume even more calories than we already should be.</p> <p>A good idea is to have meals prepared in advance, although we are human and are sometimes disorganised.</p> <p>It would help to have two or three quick and easy meals handy, which are great for weight loss, to fall back on when you have no clue what to make.</p> <p>Some options to keep in mind include salad with lamb strips, grilled chicken breast or tuna, vegetable omelette or barbeque chicken and vegetables.</p> <p><strong>3. Have a food cut-off</strong></p> <p>The majority of the damage includes sweet treats and snacks we consume while watching TVa.</p> <p>Biscuits, ice cream and chocolate can quickly transform themselves from an occasional indulgence to a daily habit.</p> <p>Small treats are encouraged, but overconsumption is not.</p> <p>Give yourself a cut-off time of 8pm or 9pm, which stops you eating completely and controls your daily calorie intake.</p> <p><strong>4. Head for the mints</strong></p> <p>Changing the taste in your mouth can be an easy way to curb cravings.</p> <p>One you finish your evening meal, brush your teeth, chew some gum, have a mint or have a cup of herbal tea.</p> <p>This will signal your body that it’s completing its food consumption for the day.</p> <p><strong>5. Move around</strong></p> <p>Sitting around after eating a large meal is not good for your digestion or metabolism. The more you move around your home, even incidentally, will be helpful for weight control and encourage digestion of the meal.</p>

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“60 is the new 40!" Melanie Griffith flaunts her incredible bikini body at 61

<p>Actress Melanie Griffith has taken bikini body goals to a whole new level in her latest photos shared on her official Instagram account.</p> <p>The 61-year-old treated her supporters to an intimate look into her vacation with friends in Spain – the birthplace of her third husband, Antonio Banderas. The couple divorced in 2015. </p> <p>The <em>Working Girl </em>actress showed snapshots from the fun trip of her posing with poolside pal Masha Adonyeva while looking stunning in a black two-piece and oversized sunglasses.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzfmbL1hb9h/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzfmbL1hb9h/" target="_blank">A post shared by MELANIE (@melaniegriffith)</a> on Jul 4, 2019 at 4:49am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The latest holiday pics had fans in awe over her bikini-body, with one follower writing: “60 is the new 40!”</p> <p>Another comment read, “Melanie, you look amazing in a bikini.”</p> <p>“Dang Melanie ... you really look like you are 45 years old!” another fan wrote.</p> <p>Griffith recently said to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.instyle.com/news/melanie-griffith-why-get-married-working-girl" target="_blank">InStyle Magazine</a></em> that she’s the happiest she had ever been in a thoughtful admission.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BznyugGhK5U/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BznyugGhK5U/" target="_blank">A post shared by MELANIE (@melaniegriffith)</a> on Jul 7, 2019 at 9:10am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I really don’t think it’s relevant for anyone anymore. But especially if you’re 60 and you have four kids and you’re living the life you’ve always wanted. Then why get married?” she said.</p> <p>“It’s, like, I would love to fall in love and have a romance, a relationship, but I haven’t. I keep looking. I’ve had a couple of lovers but not a relationship,” Griffith said.</p> <p>“All of my husbands, my three husbands — I love them all so much, and we’re all very close.”</p> <p>Griffith turns 62 on August 9.</p>

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Kate looks uncomfortable: Body language expert's verdict on Archie’s christening photo

<p>Body language experts have weighed in on the two beautiful family photos taken at baby Archie’s christening and released by new parents, Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan.</p> <p>The verdict, however, has left fans and body language professionals gawking at the apparent awkwardness of the photograph.</p> <p>The portrait taken in Windsor Castle’s Green Drawing Room has left royal watchers admiring the new pictures of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex with baby Archie who was christened on July 6 in a private ceremony.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzlHhZylvwT/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzlHhZylvwT/" target="_blank">A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal)</a> on Jul 6, 2019 at 8:14am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Experts and fans have said the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge appear as stiff and awkward in the new snap which is a great contrast to Prince Charles, 70, and his wife, Duchess Camilla, 71, who come off as relaxed and composed.</p> <p>Royal expert, Judi James told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a>: “Given all the rift rumours the rather ‘ready to flee’ tension in her pose could be seen as awkwardness.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7828429/royal-family.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/431483bcad2a44368af029e20b297362" /></p> <p>“But it could also show a desire to lower her own status signals and not upstage the happy couple.</p> <p>“With a very relaxed and jolly-looking Camilla down one end of this pose, Kate sits at the other looking oddly self-diminished and prim, with her arms pulled into her torso and a part-smile on her face.”</p> <p>Mum of three,Duchess Kate looked “ready to flee” according to Judi who was pictured sitting upright in her chair, with a tense smile.</p> <p>Further, the body language expert said Prince William was standing like a “nightclub bouncer.”</p> <p>“Kate doesn't have a real smile on her face. She looks pained,” one person took to Twitter to say.</p> <p>“William looks like he smelled something terrible. They don't look thrilled to be there.”</p> <p>Another wrote Duchess Kate “definitely had a forced smile.”</p> <p>The Prince of Wales, Duchess of Cornwall, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Duchess Meghan’s mother Doria Ragland were a few members or the small 30 guests present for baby Archie’s baptism, along with Princess Diana's sisters, LadyJane Fellowes and Lady Sarah McCorquodale, who are pictured in the official photo.</p>

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Rafael Nadal's on-court superstitions: Can you spot them?

<p>Competitive sports are rife with superstitions – many athletes will perform a specific routine or carry ‘lucky’ items in the belief that they will improve the chance of winning.</p> <p>Rafael Nadal is no exception to this. The world number two player has a series of well-documented habits.</p> <p>He always walks on court with one racquet in hand, and then puts down his bag on the bench and turns his tournament ID to face up. He will then take off his jacket facing the audience while jumping. His two drink bottles will be lined up on the floor with the labels facing the baseline of the end he is playing.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The most 'Ritual-Tennistic' player of all time.<br />Rafa 'The King of Clay' Nadal.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Wimbledon2017?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Wimbledon2017</a> <a href="https://t.co/H1k6JkSQeN">pic.twitter.com/H1k6JkSQeN</a></p> — Naman Saxena (@iamnamansaxena) <a href="https://twitter.com/iamnamansaxena/status/883338032664805379?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 7, 2017</a></blockquote> <p>“I put the two bottles down at my feet, in front of my chair to my left, one neatly behind the other, diagonally aimed at the court,” Nadal wrote about the ritual in a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/tennis/8703175/Rafael-Nadal-my-pre-game-rituals-sharpen-my-senses-before-I-go-into-battle.html" target="_blank">2011 article</a>. “It’s a way of placing myself in a match, ordering my surroundings to match the order I seek in my head.”</p> <p>He will not leave his chair or cross on changeovers before his opponent moves first.</p> <p>When he is about to serve, he will pick his shorts out from his bottom, tuck his hair behind his left ear and then his right before wiping his forehead or fiddling with his nose or shirt, bouncing the ball a certain number of times and then serving. If he has a ball in his pocket, he will take two more from the same ball boy or girl, never from two different people.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Nadal’s little ear/nose touching ritual is iconic. <a href="https://t.co/JU28KgyZgf">pic.twitter.com/JU28KgyZgf</a></p> — Elöise Clarke (@eloisegclarke) <a href="https://twitter.com/eloisegclarke/status/1146841368872083458?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 4, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Shoulders, Hair behind the ears, Nose, Shorts out the Arse Crack...Nadals ritual and new take on head shoulders knees &amp; toes before a serve 😂 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Wimbledon?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Wimbledon</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Tsonga?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Tsonga</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Nadal?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Nadal</a> <a href="https://t.co/8B2knbd6Bk">pic.twitter.com/8B2knbd6Bk</a></p> — Michael Roberts (@MikeyRobs91) <a href="https://twitter.com/MikeyRobs91/status/1147529566195503105?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 6, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">As if I never noticed nadals superstition before serve when it's soooo noticeable 😂 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Nadal?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Nadal</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Wimbledon?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Wimbledon</a> <a href="https://t.co/SdYAPuc14W">pic.twitter.com/SdYAPuc14W</a></p> — wendy brannigan (@wendynwo) <a href="https://twitter.com/wendynwo/status/884442132429365248?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 10, 2017</a></blockquote> <p>The habit recently infuriated Nick Kyrgios, who complained that <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/i-wanted-to-hit-him-nick-kyrgios-crashes-out-in-fiery-grudge-match-against-rafael-nadal">Nadal took too long between serves</a>.</p> <p>He will also request his towel after every point, and perform the same footwork routine in between with his right foot stepping first across the left.</p> <p>While the eccentric habits may seem funny to some, psychologist Christoper Mogan said they are no laughing matter. In 2014, Mogan sent a complaint to Channel Seven after Jim Courier and Lleyton Hewitt made repeated comments on Nadal’s rituals during a match against Gael Monfils.</p> <p>“What upset me is that I think it’s known that Rafa has obsessive-compulsive indications,” Mogan told the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.smh.com.au/sport/tennis/doctor-warns-against-trivialising-rafael-nadals-oncourt-routines-20140121-316w8.html" target="_blank"><em>Sydney Morning Herald</em></a>. </p> <p>“Two to three per cent of people have this seriously disabling condition and they would be identifying with him – when he does his square walk … how he places his bottles in a row, very carefully.</p> <p>“They are routines, but the point is they’re meant to try and control anxiety. It’s about getting a ‘just right’ feeling: ‘I can feel just right if I line my bottles up’. It brings a sense of completion, and if you leave something incomplete, it creates a stress.</p> <p>“It is possible it could be just a manifestation of the control athletes seek to get.”</p>

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Health check: How long should you stay away when you have a cold or the flu?

<p>Most adults get around <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html">two to three colds a year</a>, and children get even more. In terms of the flu, there are around <a href="http://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/influenza-(seasonal)">3-5 million severe cases of influenza</a> worldwide each year and 290,000 to 650,000 deaths.</p> <p>The symptoms of a cold and the flu are similar, so it’s hard to tell the difference. But the flu is usually more severe and develops more quickly than a cold.</p> <p>Colds and flus can be easily passed from person to person through the air, when an infected person coughs or sneezes, and touch, when a person touches an infected surface or object like doorknobs and light switches.</p> <p>So what’s the difference between colds and flus, and how long should you stay away?</p> <p><strong>Colds</strong></p> <p>Cold <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html">symptoms</a> include a sore throat, cough, runny or stuffy nose, tiredness and headache.</p> <p>Most people become contagious with cold symptoms one to two days after exposure to a cold virus. These symptoms usually peak two to four days later. The <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17397266">common cold usually lasts</a> about ten days.</p> <p>There is nothing you can take to shorten the duration of a cold, and most people will get better without needing to see a doctor. But some over-the-counter medications can help alleviate the symptoms. These include anti-inflammatories (to reduce inflammation or swelling), analgesics (to reduce pain), antipyretics (to reduce fever) and decongestants (to relieve nasal congestion).</p> <p>But be careful you follow the instructions and recommended dosage for these medications. A <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29516533">recent study of US adults</a> who used paracetamol, the active ingredient in many cold and flu medicines, found 6.3% of users exceeded the maximum recommended daily dose. This mostly occurred during the cold and flu season.</p> <p>Natural products such as <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23440782">vitamin C</a> and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4068831/">echinacea</a> are sometimes recommended to prevent and treat a cold, but there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness.</p> <p><strong>The flu</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm">Common symptoms of the flu</a> include fever (a temperature of 38°C or higher), cough, chills, sore throat, headache, runny or stuffy nose, tiredness and muscle aches.</p> <p>An infected person can <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm">spread the flu</a> for five to seven days after becoming infected. The infectious period can begin 24 hours before the onset of symptoms. This means you can spread the flu without even knowing you’re sick.</p> <p>Influenza viruses can cause mild to severe illness in people of all ages. Most people will fully recover within one to two weeks and won’t require any medical attention. Similar to a cold, people can take some over-the-counter medications and other remedies to help alleviate symptoms.</p> <p>But some people can become acutely unwell with the flu. They may require <a href="http://www.who.int/features/qa/seasonal-influenza/en/">antiviral medication</a> and, in severe cases, hospitalisation. Those at <a href="http://www.who.int/features/qa/seasonal-influenza/en/">high risk</a> include pregnant women, children, the elderly, and people with certain medical conditions such as HIV/AIDS, asthma, diabetes and heart and lung diseases.</p> <p>The flu virus strains that circulate usually change every year, so the <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/vaccine/general.htm">best way to prevent getting the flu</a> is to get the annual flu vaccine. The vaccine is <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S147330991170295X">moderately effective</a> and recommended for adults and children over the age of six months. Some common side effects may occur, such as temporary soreness, redness and swelling at the injection site, fever, headache, muscle aches and nausea.</p> <p><strong>Avoid passing it on</strong></p> <p>If you feel unwell, stay home from work or school and rest (and get plenty of fluids) until you feel better. If you’ve had a fever, <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/flu/takingcare.htm">stay home for at least 24 hours</a> after the fever has broken.</p> <p>When you go back to work or school, you may still be infectious, so avoid passing the virus on by:</p> <ul> <li>regularly washing your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and drying them properly – if soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitiser</li> <li>practising good cough and sneeze etiquette: cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your upper shirtsleeve when you cough or sneeze, and throw away used tissues immediately</li> <li>not touching your eyes, nose and mouth</li> <li>frequently cleaning the surfaces and objects you’ve touched.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Nadia Charania. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/health-check-how-long-should-you-stay-away-when-you-have-a-cold-or-the-flu-98702"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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The heartbreaking moment that left Wimbledon spectators shattered

<p>Russian tennis legend Margarita Gasparyan has suffered one of the crueller exits from Wimbledon as an old injury flared up and left her unable to continue the match.</p> <p>The world no. 62 had victory in her sights as she was playing against 8th seed Elina Svitolina and took the first set 7-5 in 51 minutes. The domination continued into the second set as Elina caught up and served at 6-5 to level the match.</p> <p>Margarita has had knee troubles in the past and as the second set of the match came to a close, she looked to be in increasing amounts of pain.</p> <p>Her movement was impacted, and she was unable to stand up at 5-5, which led her to having to lie down on the grass court as the cramp was speculated to be the reason behind her collapse.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Gasparyan in a lot of pain now. Leg appears to be cramping after landing on it after a serve. She’s lying on the ground, but seemed to tell umpire she’s ok, just cramping. 5-5, 0-30. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Wimbledon?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Wimbledon</a></p> — WTA Insider (@WTA_insider) <a href="https://twitter.com/WTA_insider/status/1146386127072497670?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 3, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Margarita could only watch on as her rival brought her water and comforted her at the baseline as the pair waited for physio to arrive. The crowd could only watch on in silence as they waited for the outcome.</p> <p>Margarita continued to play, but barely managed to finish the game. She tried to get around the court as best she could without further aggravating her injury, but her opponent broke to take the lead at 6-5.</p> <p>The physio treated Margarita’s left quad in the changeover, but there was not much more to be done.</p> <p>She was in tears as she limped to the net to retire and continued to sob as she realised that her dreams of being in the third round were at her fingertips.</p> <p>Her opponent, Elina, was stunned. <span>S</span><span>he told </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/sport/tennis/wimbledon/margarita-gasparyan-suffers-cruel-wimbledon-injury-heartbreak-while-leading-elina-svitolina/news-story/d2381871e5e6dc75894eda3e21fc928c" target="_blank">news.com.au</a><span>: </span><span>“Honestly, I was a little bit shocked. It’s never nice to get this when someone is injured like that. It puts you a little bit off.</span></p> <p><span></span><span>“At the end we’d expect that she would go and play. Yeah, it happened that way and really unfortunate for her.</span></p> <p>“You give her some water, because I know when there is cramps you need to drink lots of water. Your muscles are contracting, so it’s important just to drink lots of fluids.</p> <p>“So that’s why I gave her some water, because no one really did anything. I mean, we were trying to help, but, yeah, it’s tough to react straight away.”<span data-mce-fragment="1">The heartbreaking moment that left Wimbledon spectators shattered </span></p>

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