Body

Placeholder Content Image

How to tell if you are dehydrated

<p>Our bodies are made up of 70 per cent water, so when you’re dehydrated, you are compromising yourself from essential nutrients that are necessary to live a healthy life.</p> <p>While it may seem like dehydration is the simple act of drinking more water, in some cases, the issue can escalate and cause serious problems if pushed to the final stage.</p> <p><strong>So, what is dehydration?</strong></p> <p>When the term dehydration is used, people are generally referring to what medical professionals call “volume depletion” or hypovolaemia.</p> <p>Volume depletion is a reduction in the volume of water in the blood vessels. But dehydration is not the same as hypovolaemia and is something that occurs less frequently.</p> <p>Dehydration is the loss of water from both the body’s cells and blood vessels. Water is responsible for many of the things that require our bodies to function, such as our circulatory, respiratory, gastrointestinal and neurological systems.</p> <p>If taken too far, volume depletion can result in shock and collapse which, if not resuscitated in time, can be fatal.</p> <p><strong>Signs of dehydration</strong></p> <p>If you weigh 70kg, 40kg of that weight is water. So now that you have an indication of just how much water is stored in our bodies, let’s get into how you can decide whether you need an extra boost of hydration.</p> <p>The symptoms of volume depletion are as follows:</p> <ul> <li>Thirst or a dry mouth</li> <li>Dizziness or low blood pressure</li> <li>If in the critical stages, confusion, due to lack of oxygen reaching the brain</li> <li>Your skin doesn’t bounce back right away when pinched</li> <li>Increased heart rate</li> <li>Weight loss</li> </ul> <p>Those especially vulnerable to dehydration are elderly people as the amount of water our body stores reduces as we age. Combine that with other health problems such as chronic kidney disease, dehydration can pose a serious risk to those in a senior age bracket.</p> <p>In order to remain healthy and hydrated, keep an eye out on your water levels, and if you experience any of the above symptoms, start drinking plenty more water and see your GP if necessary.</p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

How skipping breakfast can help you lose weight

<p>Breakfast, we are told, is the most important meal of the day. Over the last 50 years, we have been bombarded with messages extolling the health benefits of processed cereals and porridge oats. We are told breakfast helps us reduce weight by speeding up our metabolism – this helps us avoid hunger pangs and overeating later in the day.</p> <p>These are not just marketing messages, they are core to nutritional guidelines in developed countries, such as in the US, UK and Australia, prepared by expert scientific panels. These messages are mirrored in the media and websites worldwide. But what if the benefits of breakfast are just another diet myth?</p> <p><strong>No word for breakfast</strong></p> <p>It’s popular these days to follow the nutritional regimes of our ancient ancestors, but no one seems to be studying whether or not they ate breakfast. The Hadza people in Tanzania are the last true hunter-gatherers in East Africa who we believe live much like our ancestors. Living with them, we noticed a definite lack of a breakfast routine. They also have no regular word to describe “breakfast”.</p> <p>After waking up, the men usually leave on a hunting or honey-gathering trip without eating, maybe grabbing some berries a few hours later, en route. If they stay in camp in the morning or even all day, a handful of honey late morning – or even consumed as late as early afternoon – may be all they eat until a larger, evening meal. That said, there is no routine and eating patterns are highly variable, depending on the camp size and season.</p> <p>The women stay close to the camp and on some days make simple food, like baobab porridge, or they eat some stored honey, but rarely before 9-10am, giving them a fasting time since their evening meal of over 15 hours. Lacking a regular breakfast routine has not made them fat or unhealthy and they lack most Western diseases. Perhaps we should take a leaf from their book. At least, that’s what the latest scientific evidence suggests.</p> <p><strong>An honest mistake</strong></p> <p>The health benefit of breakfast has now been completely debunked by a new <a href="http://www.bmj.com/content/364/bmj.l42">systematic review and meta-analysis</a> of 11 randomised trials that investigated the impact of skipping breakfast on weight and metabolic rate.</p> <p>The studies vary widely in duration and quality, and seven looked at changes in weight as well as changes in energy usage. Their conclusion is the same as in <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27292940">recent reviews</a> that have been largely ignored, namely, there is no evidence to support the claim that skipping meals makes you put on weight or adversely reduces your resting metabolic rate.</p> <p>There is now considerable evidence from these studies that skipping breakfast can be an effective way to reduce weight for some people. So why has the field got it so wrong in the past?</p> <p>One reason is the belief in “grazing” rather than “gorging” to avoid “stress” on the body from having to digest large meals, especially later in the day when glucose and insulin peaks are higher and metabolic rate lower. The flawed rationale was based on lab rodents and a few <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Jenkins+DJ+NEJM+1989">short-term human studies</a>. While the concept of over-compensation later in the day was correct – breakfast skippers do eat more lunch and slightly reduce their activity – it is not nearly enough to make up the energy deficit in a real-world setting outside a lab.</p> <p>Scientists were honestly misled in the past by many observational studies showing that obese people skipped meals more often than thin people. This mindset became ingrained in nutritional dogma. But these observational studies were seriously biased. Breakfast skippers were more likely, on average, to be poorer, less educated, less healthy and have a poorer diet. Overweight people were more likely to diet and, after a binge, more likely to feel guilty and skip a meal.</p> <p>Despite these flaws in the science and the steady increase in opposing evidence from randomised controlled trials, the idea that skipping meals is unhealthy has prevailed for decades. It’s still part of current NHS recommendations by Public Health England and one of its eight key <a href="https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/eight-tips-for-healthy-eating/">healthy diet messages</a>, part of <a href="https://www.cnpp.usda.gov/2015-2020-dietary-guidelines-americans">USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans</a>, as well as the <a href="https://nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/australian-dietary-guidelines">Australian Guidelines for Nutrition</a>.</p> <p>Another common pro-breakfast argument is that, as well as reducing obesity, it is essential for the mental well-being and attention span of children, even if well nourished. Again the evidence of over 20 trials, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27184287">when reviewed independently</a>, is at best weak and inconsistent, and probably biased in the same way as for adults.</p> <p>Evidence is also accumulating that restricted eating times and increasing fasting intervals can help some people <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6004924/">lose weight</a>. Some of these recent developments that seem counterintuitive to traditional thinking, make sense when we consider the importance of the gut microbiome on our health and metabolism. The community of 100 trillion gut microbes have a circadian rhythm and vary in composition and function in fasting and fed states. Data suggests microbial communities could benefit from <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1550413114005051">short periods of fasting</a>. They, like us, may need to rest and recuperate.</p> <p>Some of us are programmed to prefer eating food earlier in the day and others later, which may suit our unique personal metabolism. Around a third of people in developed countries regularly skip breakfast while many others enjoy it. This does not mean that everyone overweight would benefit from skipping breakfast. There is no one size fits all, and prescriptive diet guidelines filled with erroneous information look increasingly counterproductive and detract from important health messages.</p> <p>Different populations have their own varied breakfast habits, but before you next go hunting, why not try your own personal breakfast skipping experiments - it may suit you.</p> <p><em>Written by Tim Spector and Jeff Leach. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/skipping-breakfast-may-help-you-lose-weight-what-hunter-gatherers-can-teach-us-109840">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

5 things you might not realise can be signs of depression

<p>We all know about depression. It is a debilitating illness, and while feeling sad and alone are obvious symptoms, many subtle signs are swept under the rug.</p> <p>Whether one of your loved ones have suffered from the illness, or you’ve heard about it through the grapevine, the mental disorder is one that does not discriminate. Regardless of age, gender, class or creed, anyone can suffer from depression.</p> <p>But how do you know if you’re on the road to a depressive disorder? Most people know the obvious signs, such as sleeping too much, losing interest in social gatherings and constantly feeling down, but it’s important to understand the less obvious symptoms.</p> <p>Subtle signs can help you decide whether you need to seek help.</p> <p>There is a big difference between feeling sad – which is a temporary emotion that will subside – and depression. Which carries a number of specific characteristics and can be ongoing.</p> <p>Here are the 5 signs you need to look out for when it comes to your mental health:</p> <p><strong>1. You’re easily irritated</strong></p> <p>You’re becoming easily agitated with friends and family. Things that generally don’t affect you are now causing you to feel rage. Or maybe you’re dealing with sporadic mood swings. Speaking to<em> <span><a href="https://www.buzzfeed.com/stephhallett/things-you-might-not-realize-can-be-signs-of-depression">Buzzfeed</a></span></em>, counsellor Elizabeth Black of the Renfrew Centre said the feeling of constant irritation is an underrated sign of depression.</p> <p>“It can be challenging to have patience or compassion for those who present as irritable and therefore harder to identify when it is a sign of depression,” she said.</p> <p><strong>2. You’re looking back to the “good ol’ days”</strong></p> <p>Everyone has memories that they enjoy revisiting from time to time, but constantly living in the past is a sign of something more serious.</p> <p>“Many people who struggle with depression look back to the good old days as a coping mechanism,” says psychologist Dr. Sal Raichbach to <em>Buzzfeed</em>.</p> <p>“A depressed person might feel great for years but then plunge back into their sadness when a loss or a major life change occurs. Fun times in the past help them feel better temporarily.”</p> <p><strong>3. You’re finding it hard to concentrate</strong></p> <p>According to psychologist Dr. Cindy Graham, the negative thoughts that come with depression makes it harder for those with the illness to concentrate on things such as work. Many times, lack of concentration is misdiagnosed as ADHD, especially when medical professionals are unaware of the negative thoughts clouding your mind.</p> <p><strong>4. You’re finding “me time” to be stressful</strong></p> <p>Many adults look forward to the moment they can get a few hours to themselves, but for someone who is depressed, lack of plans bring about feelings of anxiousness.</p> <p>Speaking to <em>Buzzfeed</em>, Dr. Graham said: “These moments [of downtime] may feel heavenly and highly sought after by some, but for someone struggling with depression, downtime leads to plenty of opportunity for negative thoughts to run unchecked.”</p> <p><strong>5. You’re feeling guilty about everything</strong></p> <p>According to the <span><a href="https://www.apa.org/">American Psychological Association</a></span> (APA) “inappropriate and excessive guilt” is a sign of depression.</p> <p>This can range from feeling bad about something that happened at work which was out of your control, or feeling responsible for something that you had no part in. APA gave this as an example: “A realtor may become preoccupied with self-blame for failing to make sales even when the market has collapsed generally, and other realtors are equally unable to make sales.”</p> <p>While these are only five symptoms of many, if you believe you may have depression be sure to visit your doctor to get a diagnosis.</p> <p><em>If you are troubled by this article, experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide, you can call the Depression Helpline at 0800 111 757 or visit depression.org.nz.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Body language expert's verdict on pregnant Duchess Meghan: “Overly self-aware”

<p>With another public outburst from her father, all eyes were on Duchess Meghan as she stepped out with Prince Harry for a gala performance at the Natural History Museum in London.</p> <p>However, the Duchess was calm and confident as she ditched her usual habits of cradling her baby bump and holding onto Prince Harry’s hand as she walked. She walked several steps ahead of him, appearing confident and calm.</p> <p>The author of the<span> </span><em>Body Language Bible</em><span> </span>and body language expert, Judi James, says there’s more to this display than meets the eye.</p> <p>James explained that Duchess Meghan is more aware of the eyes of the public being on her after the outburst from her father.</p> <p>“'This was the first public appearance since her pregnancy was announced where Meghan didn’t cup, stroke and cradle her bump.</p> <p>“Her decision to drop these rituals looks deliberate. There are a couple of times when we can see her perform a truncated gesture, when her left hand rises towards her bump in a bid to cradle it, but she appears to self-correct and drop her hand down to her side instead.”</p> <p>James also pointed out that the distance between Duchess Meghan and Prince Harry was deliberate as well.</p> <p>“There are some clues that Meghan’s response to the problems with her father is to assert her independence and confidence in her royal role. It could have been easy for her to become visually vulnerable and to lean on or shelter behind her husband for support – but by striding out in the lead she may have wanted to suggest resilience and even a sense of power.”</p> <p>Prince Harry appeared as nervous as ever when he’s near his wife, with the Duke of Sussex displaying anxious body language.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7823606/body-language-harry.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f9d29f252fd74b35b4afbac7edbc8013" /></p> <p>“In contrast Harry appears a lot less masked, with several suggestions of anxiety visible in his facial expression and his body language. He looks tired and at times rather distant and reflective.” James said.</p> <p>“This [behaviour] would be normal for his father Charles but Harry has been the one Windsor male who always appeared jolly and lacking in any self-comfort traits. He begins by buttoning his jacket rather deliberately in two "barrier gestures", then hikes his trousers up from the back.”</p> <p>What do you think? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Katherine Kelly Lang reveals her ageless beauty secrets

<p>Ageing is something we all go through. It’s the body’s natural process, reminding us how long we have roamed the earth.</p> <p>Unless you’re Katherine Kelly Lang, who despite gracing our television screens for over 30 years, hasn’t aged a day.</p> <p><em>The Bold and The Beautiful</em> star is rarely seen with a hair out of place, but only a short while ago, the 57-year-old was forced to appear makeup-free on Australia’s <em>I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here!</em></p> <p>But even then, with the show's less than ideal living arrangements, the actress managed to look picture perfect.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/beauty/ageing/katherine-kelly-lang-plastic-surgery-53743" target="_blank"><em>Now To Love</em></a>, Lang has shared her beauty secrets for infinite youth.</p> <p><strong>1. Cosmetic surgery</strong></p> <p>Remaining as honest as ever, Lang credited a little nip and tuck to her everlasting beauty.</p> <p>“Sometimes I do a little filler, sometimes I do a little Botox. I do all those things, but I try really to stay natural and not do it all the time,” she admitted to <em>Now To Love</em>.</p> <p>Over the years, the star has learnt that less is more when it comes to her face.</p> <p>“Sometimes the doctor does go overboard and I’m like, ‘Well I never want to do that again!’” Lang revealed.</p> <p>“At some point you have to age gracefully, and you have to accept that. You can’t get rid of every line and wrinkle.”</p> <p><strong>2. A good skincare routine</strong></p> <p>When entering the jungle on <em>I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here</em><em>!</em> one of the toughest challenges Lang was faced with was not having access to her favourite skincare products.</p> <p>The TV soap actress said the week she appeared on the reality show took a major hit on her skin, saying it affected her “horribly”.</p> <p>“I kept asking them, ‘Can I have my creams!?’ Where’s my creams!? One of these mornings you’ve got to give me my creams!” she explained.</p> <p>And clearly her disciplined routine is working for her.</p> <p>“I’m so picky about what I put on my face – I need my night serums, I need my under eye cream, I need my heavy duty moisturising night cream. Then when I wake up, I put them on all over again in the morning!</p> <p>“Then I have my daytime creams, I have my lunch creams. Then I have my special shampoo … you know – you get it!”</p> <p><strong>3. Nourish your body inside and out</strong></p> <p>Lang is a strong believer in one thing: Keep everything natural, healthy and organic.</p> <p>“What you eat really plays a big part of [your health], and how much sleep you get,” she said.</p> <p>“I also try to drink lots of water, it helps to keep your skin moist, plumped and nourished.”</p> <p><strong>4. Staying active</strong></p> <p>You don’t need to look far to figure out that Lang is keen on working out, with one look at her Instagram page telling you everything you need to know.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BrtsON3DrSg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BrtsON3DrSg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Katherine Kelly Lang (@katherinekellylang)</a> on Dec 22, 2018 at 6:58pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The actress is a regular when it comes to competing in triathlons and it’s helped her remain active and healthy over the years.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.tvsoap.com.au/" target="_blank"><em>TV Soap</em></a>, Lang said: “I did endurance racing on my horses for 20-plus years … and I loved that and that’s similar to the long-distance triathlons, the Half Ironman or Full Ironman.</p> <p>“I have a trainer … even when you don’t feel like it you really have to push yourself, get out there and follow the schedule. Get the workouts in and get them done.”</p> <p><strong>5. Using a variety of masks</strong></p> <p>Lang is a strong believer in LED masks, which help reverse the signs of ageing with red-light technology.</p> <p>According to the actress, the mask “reduces fine lines and improves skin texture".</p> <p>Taking to Instagram, the star shared a few photos of herself using the strange contraption, writing: "This is a Deesse Pro LED mask that increases the production of collagen, reduces fine lines, improves skin texture, and so much more! 20 minutes a day.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BdUHFcehcDU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BdUHFcehcDU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Dominique (@dom472522)</a> on Dec 29, 2017 at 9:13pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Clearly, it’s working.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Katherine Kelly Lang's transformation over the years.</p> <p>Will you be implementing any of <em>The Bold and The Beautiful </em>star’s beauty and health routine into your own? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Why you should check your nails for signs of cancer

<p>When you think of skin cancer, you probably think of checking for moles. But did you know your nails can also reveal a sign of melanoma?</p> <p>Manicurist Jean Skinner had first-hand experience catching this stealthy symptom. “I had a walk-in nail client a couple weeks ago,” she wrote in an August 2017 Facebook post. “She had a straight dark vertical stripe down her nail. She said as soon as she sat down – I need a colour dark enough to cover this stripe.”</p> <p>Other salons had speculated that the woman’s mysterious line could be due to a calcium deficiency, a blood blister, or a strange hereditary mark. Yet Skinner knew better than that. She immediately told her customer that the dark line was likely a little-known symptom of melanoma. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7823255/melanoma.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a8f20ad60096495a98eedd593cb9ad1b" /></p> <p><strong>Don't brush off this easy-to-ignore symptom.</strong></p> <p>Subungual melanoma (aka nail melanoma) is, as its nickname suggests, a skin cancer that occurs under the nail. It affects <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10642684">0.7 to 3.5 percent</a> of people with melanoma. Rare as it is, it’s important to know about its telltale sign: a dark black or brown line across a finger- or toenail, according to the <a href="https://www.aad.org/media/news-releases/nail-melanoma">American Academy of Dermatology</a> (AAD).</p> <p>Sadly, Skinner’s hunch was correct – and the prognosis wasn’t good. The client called later to tell her she had aggressive melanoma that had spread to her lymph nodes. (Check these <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/cancer/8-ways-get-fitter-after-cancer-treatment">8 ways to get fitter after cancer treatment</a>).</p> <p>A black band isn’t the only skin cancer symptom that could be hiding under your nail polish. Other signs of nail melanoma include darkened skin around the nail, blood, pus and splits in the nail, according to the AAD. Early diagnosis could be crucial, so see your doctor right away if you happen to notice a dark mark under your fingernail or any other suspicious symptoms.</p> <p><em>Written by Brooke Nelson. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/cancer/if-you-have-mark-your-nail-you-should-get-checked-cancer">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>. </em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Duchess Meghan's $4 supermarket beauty secret in your kitchen cupboard

<p>The Duchess of Sussex has the ability to obtain anything with a snap of her fingertips, including a range of expensive beauty products, but the royal is known to use a much more affordable alternative when it comes to her skincare routine.</p> <p>Straying away from pricey potions and creams, Meghan chooses to opt for homemade face masks consisting of breakfast oats which are priced at a cheap $3.50.</p> <p>The concoction is made up of coconut oil, honey and porridge, which helps exfoliate and smooth out the skin. She also reportedly uses turmeric paste to brighten her complexion according to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8341917/meghan-markle-puts-porridge-on-her-face-to-keep-her-young/" target="_blank">The Sun</a>.</em></p> <p>Nichola Joss, skincare guru to the stars and the Duchess commends the 37-year-old for whipping up her own skin remedies at home.</p> <p>“At-home face masks are amazing, and I fully endorse them. They’re easy, free, and you have full control of the ingredients you’re putting on your skin – which is why most of my clients love them,” Joss told<span> </span><em>The Sun</em>.</p> <p>She revealed to the British newspaper that the mask was created using coconut oil “to create a soothing paste-like consistency” and was combined with turmeric to help brighten and even out the skin tone.</p> <p>For a hydrating and exfoliating mask, combining rolled oats and honey makes for an affordable face mask.</p> <p>Do you have any at-home beauty secrets? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Can science explain why we cry?

<p>There’s a lot scientists don’t know – or can’t agree on – about people who cry. Charles Darwin once declared emotional tears “purposeless”, and nearly 150 years later, emotional crying remains one of the human body’s more confounding mysteries. Though some other species shed tears reflexively as a result of pain or irritation, humans are the only creatures whose tears can be triggered by their feelings. But why?</p> <p>Researchers have generally focused their attention more on emotions than on physiological processes that appear to be their by-products. “Scientists are not interested in the butterflies in our stomach, but in love,” writes Ad Vingerhoets, a professor at Tilburg University in the Netherlands and the world’s foremost expert on crying, in his book Why Only Humans Weep.</p> <p>But crying is more than a symptom of sadness, as Vingerhoets and others are showing. It’s triggered by a range of feelings – from empathy and surprise to anger and grief – and unlike those butterflies that flap around invisibly when we’re in love, tears are a signal that others can see. That insight is central to the newest thinking about the science of crying.</p> <p>For centuries, people thought tears originated in the heart. A prevailing theory in the 1600s held that emotions – especially love – heated the heart, which generated water vapour in order to cool itself down. The heart vapour would then rise to the head, condense near the eyes and escape as tears. Finally, in 1662, a Danish scientist named Niels Stensen discovered that the lacrimal gland was the proper origin point of tears. That’s when scientists began to unpack what possible evolutionary benefit could be conferred by fluid that springs from the eye. Stensen’s theory: tears were simply a way to keep the eye moist.</p> <p>In his book, Vingerhoets lists eight competing theories. Some are flat-out ridiculous, like the 1960s view that humans evolved from aquatic apes and tears helped us live in salt water. Other theories persist despite lack of proof, like the idea popularised by biochemist William Frey in 1985 that crying removes toxic substances from the body that build up during times of stress.</p> <p>Evidence is mounting in support of some new, more plausible theories. One such theory is that tears trigger social bonding and human connection. We cry from a very early age in order to bring about a connection with others. Humans come into the world physically unequipped to deal with anything on their own. Even though we get more capable, grown-ups never quite grow out of the occasional bout of helplessness.</p> <p>“Crying signals to yourself and other people that there’s some important problem that is at least temporarily beyond your ability to cope,” says Jonathan Rottenberg, an emotion researcher and professor of psychology at the University of South Florida.</p> <p>New research is also showing that tears appear to elicit a response in other people that mere distress does not. In a study published in February 2016, researchers found that tears activate compassion. When test subjects were shown a photograph of someone visibly crying, compared with the same photo with the tears digitally removed, they were much more likely to want to reach out and reported feeling more connected to that person.</p> <p>Scientists have found some evidence that emotional tears are chemically different from the ones people shed while chopping onions. In addition to the enzymes, lipids, metabolites and electrolytes that make up any tears, emotional tears contain more protein. One hypothesis is that this higher protein content makes emotional tears more viscous, so they stick to the skin more strongly and run down the face more slowly, making them more likely to be seen by others.</p> <p>Tears show others that we’re vulnerable, and vulnerability is critical to human connection. “The same neuronal areas of the brain are activated by seeing someone emotionally aroused as being emotionally aroused oneself,” says Michael Trimble, a behavioural neurologist at University College London. “There must have been some point in time, evolutionarily, when the tear became something that automatically set off empathy and compassion in another.”</p> <p>A less heartwarming theory focuses on crying’s ability to manipulate others. Researchers believe that just as babies use tears as a tool for getting what they need, so do adults – whether they’re aware of it or not. “We learn early on that … crying can neutralise anger very powerfully,” says Rottenberg, which is part of the reason he thinks tears are so integral to fights between lovers – particularly when someone feels guilty and wants the other person’s forgiveness.</p> <p>A small study in the journal Science that was widely cited – and widely hyped by the media – suggested that tears from women contained a substance that inhibited the sexual arousal of men. When 24 men sniffed real tears, they felt less aroused by photos of women’s faces, and when another 50 men sniffed them, they had measurably reduced testosterone levels in their saliva than they did when they sniffed the control saline.</p> <p>The bigger story, believes Noam Sobel, one of the study’s authors and a professor of neurobiology at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, is that tears might be reducing aggression, which the study didn’t look at. Men’s tears may well have the same effect. Sobel and his research group are currently wading through the 160-plus molecules in tears to see if there’s one responsible.</p> <p>But what does all of this mean? It is a question researchers are now turning to.</p> <p>Michael Trimble, one of the world’s leading experts on crying, says, “We don’t know anything about people who don’t cry.”</p> <p>So, the question arises, if tears are so important for human bonding, are people who never cry perhaps less socially connected? That’s exactly what preliminary research is finding, according to clinical psychologist Cord Benecke, a professor at the University of Kassel in Germany. He conducted intimate, therapy-style interviews with 120 individuals and looked to see if people who didn’t cry were different from those who did. He found that they were. “The non-crying people had a tendency to withdraw and described their relationship experiences as less connected,” he says.</p> <p>Tearless people also experienced more negative aggressive feelings, such as rage, anger and disgust, than people who cried. More research is needed to determine whether people who don’t cry really are different from the rest of us, and some is soon to come: Trimble is now conducting the first scientific study of people with such a tendency.</p> <p>So far, though crying appears to have interpersonal benefits, it’s not necessarily unhealthy not to do it. Virtually no evidence exists that crying comes with any positive effects on health. Yet the myth persists that it’s an emotional and physical detox, “like it’s some kind of workout for your body,” Rottenberg says. One analysis looked at articles about crying in the media – 140 years’ worth – and found that 94 per cent described it as good for the mind and body and said holding back tears would result in the opposite. “It’s kind of a fable,” says Rottenberg.</p> <p>Also overblown is the idea that crying is always followed by relief. When researchers show people a sad movie in a laboratory and then measure their mood immediately afterwards, those who cry are in worse moods than those who don’t.</p> <p>But other evidence does back the notion of the so-called good cry that leads to catharsis. One of the most important factors, it seems, is giving the positive effects of crying – the release – enough time to sink in.</p> <p>When Ad Vingerhoets and his colleagues showed people a tearjerker and measured their mood 90 minutes later instead of right after the movie, people who had cried reported being in a better mood than they had been before the film. Once the benefits of crying set in, he explains, it can be an effective way to recover from a strong bout of emotion.</p> <p>Modern crying research is still in its infancy, but the mysteries of tears – and the recent evidence that they’re far more important than scientists once believed – drive Vingerhoets and the small cadre of tear researchers to keep at it.</p> <p>“Tears are of extreme relevance for human nature,” says Vingerhoets. “We cry because we need other people. So Darwin,” he says with a laugh, “was totally wrong.”</p> <p><em>From ‘Why We Cry’ in Time, July 2016 © 2016 by Mandy Oaklander. Published by Time Inc.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Mandy Oaklander. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/mental-health/Why-We-Cry">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

3 tips to healthy long-term weight loss

<p>Many people aim to lose weight. Whether you’re getting ready to walk down the aisle, or you have a personal goal to get your health back into shape, there are plenty of reasons men and women want to slim down.</p> <p>But with so much misinformation out there, how do you know what works and what doesn’t? Also, the most important question of all is, how do you lose weight safely, without compromising your health?</p> <p><span><em><a href="https://www.bodyandsoul.com.au/diet/3-simple-rules-to-healthy-longterm-weight-loss-according-to-an-expert/news-story/990c985e2e3574e2bdd3af2ff4d8994a">Body and Soul</a></em></span> spoke to Dr Rangan Chatterjee for his three secrets on how to keep the weight off.</p> <p><strong>Tip #1: Get enough sleep</strong></p> <p>As you get older, it seems getting enough sleep just gets harder and harder. But according to Dr Chatterjee, it’s an important lifestyle trait that affects how much weight you lose. When we are not fully rested, two crucial hormones that aid with appetite and hunger are affected.</p> <p>These hormones are called leptin and ghrelin. It’s these hormones that let us know when we’re full and when we’re hungry, and if they aren’t working to their full capacity, you can end up overeating.</p> <p>So, make sure you rest up, because overeating and weight loss don’t exactly go hand in hand.</p> <p><strong>Tip #2: Stress less</strong></p> <p>With electronic devices at our fingertips, it can be hard to switch off. Whether you’re constantly checking social media, or your emails have you up at night, it’s important to step away and take a breather.</p> <p>When our bodies are constantly under stress, it starts to think it’s under attack, so as a defence mechanism, it holds onto any excess weight that you may want to be getting rid of.</p> <p>Stress triggers a flight or fight response, causing the release of a number of hormones including cortisol – a hormone that makes us crave unhealthy food.</p> <p>To fight stress, try and allocate 15 minutes of “me time” every day. Whether that’s reading a book or taking a relaxing bath, find an activity that reduces your stress levels and stick to it.</p> <p><strong>Tip #3: Eat food in a 12-hour window</strong></p> <p>According to Dr Chatterjee, we should eat our food in a 12-hour window, a concept that is called Time Restricted Feeding.</p> <p>“We are not evolved to eat food 24/7 and eating in just 12 hours is much more in line with your body’s natural rhythms such as digestion and hormone release,” he says.</p> <p>This routine will not only help you shed the excess kilos, but it also reduces your BMI and glucose levels.</p> <p>Will you be trying out any of these weight loss tips? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Body language expert says Prince Harry is more "anxious"

<p>Despite having been in the limelight of the world since he was born, it appears that Prince Harry has started showing visible signs of anxiety since he met his wife, Duchess Meghan.</p> <p>Body language expert, Judi James, told <a href="https://uk.style.yahoo.com/kate-thornton-presents-yahoo-uks-new-video-series-royal-box-152715457.html?guccounter=2"><em>Yahoo! UK’s The Royal Box</em></a> that showing signs of visible anxiety is common for the Windsor men, and Prince Charles started it off:</p> <p>“Charles, pocket-pat, looks for his wallet that he doesn’t carry, fiddles with his cuff and he will do those rituals quite frequently,” explained James.</p> <p>“William to a certain extent inherited it, but Harry did not have any.</p> <p>“He has now, since he met Meghan. He’s started to look incredibly nervous. Anxious, I think is more the word rather than nervous.”</p> <p>James also explained that the signs of anxiety have come from Prince Harry’s visible shift in responsibilities in his life.</p> <p>“He’s gone from being the eternal son into being the husband and the father-to-be.</p> <p>“As he’s taken on more responsibilities, we’re seeing less of his naughty smile.”</p> <p>James has noticed that Prince Harry is particularly fond of a “paperclip” gesture, which involves the Prince using his hand as a paperclip to hold his jacket together.</p> <p><img style="width: 340.3608911802615px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7823171/gettyimages-1082804516.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/486bacfeef104f9a86d9c5d8c5a060a8" /></p> <p>“That was just a little bit of wanting to create a protective barrier to a certain extent,” she adds.</p> <p>“You can see it in his face quite a lot, he’s smiling less, you see him sucking his lips and you can see him puffing slightly at different events.”</p> <p>It’s clear that the Prince is maturing into his role as a Prince, husband and father-to-be. </p> <p>Do you think he's matured? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

How to manage back pain from sitting

<p>We all know that heavy lifting or a sudden jolt can trigger back issues, but did you know even sedentary behaviour such as watching TV or sitting at the computer can result in chronic back strain? </p> <p>In fact, the number one cause of back pain according to the Australian Rheumatology Association is related to prolonged sitting or standing. </p> <p>We chat to physiotherapist Sharon Richens about how sitting causes back pain, and the specific exercises and stretches that may prevent it altogether. </p> <p><strong>What factors cause lower back strain?</strong><br />Prolonged sitting affects the back because it places increased pressure along the lumbar region, specifically the discs, says Richens. </p> <p>These intervertebral discs are the cushions in our lower back that separate the vertebrae, or bones, of the spine. Normally, the discs protect our spine by absorbing shock and allowing for everyday movement. However, we lose this cushioning if the discs become damaged from certain activities, or lack thereof. </p> <p>This is particularly a concern when you factor in the ageing process, explains Richens. “One of the natural occurrences as people age is that you decrease the fluid that’s in the disc – and combined with accumulative sitting, that’s not a good thing.”</p> <p><strong>Should we simply stand more?</strong><br />Richens says the key is to move more. “People that stand all day, they have achy bodies as well. What our body and our posture really needs is the change from sitting to standing,” she says.</p> <p>“When people are working on decreasing their sitting time, it’s about having short intervals of standing and walking.”</p> <p>She says while standing desks are great, the underlying principle of using these desks is to encourage movement. But what if you don’t have access to a standing desk at work or your home office? </p> <p>“Simple strategies like standing up while talking on the phone, moving the rubbish bin away from your desk so you have to get up when you need to throw something out, or it might be that you move your home laptop to your kitchen bench so that you are standing for 15 minutes instead of sitting.” </p> <p>Sitting affects our core muscles, too. “One of the problems that happens when we’re sitting, especially if we’re sitting poorly or in a slumped position, our core muscles are disengaged or turned off,” says Richens. </p> <p>These core muscles are the muscles in the back and the deep abdominal muscles that protect your back and keep your whole body stable and balanced.</p> <p>That’s why many physiotherapists recommend core-strengthening exercises to ease or prevent lower back strain. Regular stretching and increasing flexibility are also important.</p> <p>“Prolonged sitting causes the muscles in the front of our hips to get very tight, so sometimes people need to learn how to stretch their buttock muscles and the muscles in the front of their hips. And then learn to use their core and abdominal muscles as well.”</p> <p><strong>So, what are the best exercises for this region?</strong> <br />Richens says you should avoid traditional sit-ups or crunches, which can aggravate the back, and instead opt for a series of simple and subtle exercises that build strength and encourage safe movement.</p> <p>The plank exercise is great for the core, however, Richens says many people hold this exercise incorrectly and end up working the exterior abdominal muscles as opposed to the deep core area. She recommends seeing a physiotherapist to learn the correct technique. </p> <p>She also suggests a simple squat, or half squat, exercise that engages your core, your back muscles, your quadriceps and glutes. </p> <p>When performing a half squat, keep your chest and torso upright, gently push your bottom back and knees out into a half squat position. Place your hands on a back of a sturdy chair or bench for support. </p> <p>You can do this from a three-quarter squat position, with your knees slightly less bent. </p> <p>A standing hip flexor stretch, either performed with your front foot up on a small box or stool, or with your back leg bent up behind you, is another useful exercise to counter the strain caused by prolonged sitting or standing.  </p> <p><strong>When to seek advice</strong><br />Richens says if you have persistent pain or are unable to relieve symptoms from walking or changing posture, this is a sign to seek further advice from a GP or physiotherapist. </p> <p>Do you suffer from back pain? Let us know in the comments section below.</p> <p><em>Written by Mahsa Fratantoni. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/exercise/how-to-manage-back-pain-from-sitting.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

The 10,000 step rule might be rubbish

<p>That’s right. The 10,000 step measurement might not be the most accurate way to measure whether or not you’re fit enough.</p> <p>British journalist and physician Dr Michael Mosley pioneered the 5:2 diet and has backed this claim. The 5:2 diet is where you fast for two days, eating 500-600 calories worth of food and then eat normally for the other five days.</p> <p>Dr Mosley has been on this diet himself, and medical journals around the world have claimed the health benefits, which include:</p> <ul> <li>Weight loss</li> <li>Increased metabolism</li> <li>Reversal of type 2 diabetes (which Dr Mosley was diagnosed with)</li> </ul> <p>Dr Mosley was on <em>Studio 10 </em>to promote his new weight loss program the Fast 800 and it was on the show when he disputed the validity of the 10,000 steps method.</p> <p>"It's about activity, not about exercise," he exclaimed.</p> <p>"Finding something you can stick to. It could be dancing or walking up the stairs. And I have to tell you, this 10,000 steps is complete nonsense.”</p> <p>In order to test this theory, Dr Mosley and a group of researchers from Sheffield Hallam University conducted a study. This involved two groups of volunteers, where one took the recommended 10,000 steps a day and the other group took brisk 1 minute walks per day.</p> <p>The study found that the 10,000 group struggled to meet their step count goal and were breaking less of a sweat than the other group.</p> <p>Meanwhile, another expert has come out saying that the 10,000 step method could all be based on a single study. </p> <p>Dr Greg Hager explained: <span>“Some of you might wear Fitbits or something equivalent, and I bet every now and then it gives you that cool little message, 'You did 10,000 steps today,'" Dr Hager told the American Association for the Advancement of Science.</span></p> <p>"Turns out in 1960 in Japan they figured out that the average Japanese man, when he walked 10,000 steps a day, burned something like 3,000 calories and that is what they thought the average person should consume. So they picked 10,000 steps as a number."</p> <p>Do you follow the 10,000 steps a rule day and wear a device to track them? Tell us in the comments below. </p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Does running really work?

<p>As a society we have all been brainwashed when it comes to weight loss into believing it’s just a matter of calories in versus calories out - and that cardio (such as running) burns fat. Well, as a personal trainer, I'm sorry to say that it isn't so!</p> <p>If you’ve been advised lately not to run as you have sore knees, hips or a sore back, don’t despair as this could be one of the best things that’s happened to you as far as building and maintaining a strong and youthful body.</p> <p>It always amazes me how when most people think about losing weight or getting fit they think about cardio alone - and running seems to be the most popular choice! However, there are a much more effective ways to get your body into great shape.</p> <p>Long distance running can take a toll on joints<br />Running (long distances especially) is actually bad for your joints as it puts a lot of extra pressure on your knees, considering the weight translated to your knees during running can actually be three to four times your own body weight!</p> <p>So, if you're overweight this could be a disaster for your joints. When we’re walking, our bodyweight is carried by both legs, but as soon as we start jogging this changes, with all the force being applied to one leg and puts pressure on just one knee at a time.</p> <p>Have you ever heard of a ‘stride fault’? A stride fault occurs when your knees, ankles and hips could be slightly out of alignment. If your knee or foot turns slightly in (or out) so with every step you're adding more pressure to one side of your ankle or knee - which is transferred to your hips, back and through your kinetic chain.</p> <p>Do you remember that song ‘Dem Bones’? “Your anklebone is connected to your knee bone, your knee bone is connected to thigh bone, the thigh bone is connected to the hip bone...” etc.</p> <p>Well this is true and if you're just a tiny bit out of alignment when running (as your foot will hit the ground hundreds of times) you could be causing problems in many areas. It’s almost impossible to notice if your posture is off unless you are running alongside a full-length mirror to check that your ankles, knees, hips are perfectly aligned, thus reducing any long-term injuries.</p> <p>Of course, I know some people really enjoy running, so I don’t want to be negative about the whole experience.</p> <p><strong>Interval training might be a better option</strong><br />Perhaps it’s worth adding a shorter run for a minute or so in the form of interval training, as the best way to go (providing you're injury free of course).</p> <p>This means walking for two minutes, then a little sprint for a minute, returning to a brisk walk and repeating for about 20 minutes. This is known as ‘interval training’ and is a great way to lose weight as your body can’t adapt as it does with running longer distances.</p> <p>Interval training also improves your insulin sensitivity as poor insulin sensitivity is associated with premature ageing - and we don’t want that!</p> <p>I would always suggest a brisk walk for weight loss and fat burning over jogging long distances any day. Jogging long distances also burns muscle, which we need to maintain.</p> <p><strong>Consider weight training</strong><br />If you're really serious about losing weight, adding strength and shape to your body plus boosting your metabolism, consider adding weight training to your exercise regime.</p> <p>When you develop muscle (lean body tissue) you’ll expend kilojoules after you’ve finished training because lean body tissue (muscle) is metabolically active and burns kilojoules for many hours after training.</p> <p>However, if you have a desk job or sit around for most of the day, your metabolic rate will be slow. Weight training will help expand the hours that your body burns calories - and some walking would be great too. Even getting up from your chair and doing some squats while waiting for the kettle to boil could add a few hundred repetitions weekly. Incidental exercise such as taking the stairs where possible should also never be overlooked.</p> <p>On the other hand, running stops burning kilojoules the moment you finish your run, and too much running will burn precious muscle. Muscle gives us a lovely shape plus supports our frame (including our spine). With weight training you are strengthening every part of your body, from your core, back, chest, legs, shoulders and arms.</p> <p>I have noticed many runners who pass me while I’m on my walks and their upper body is very soft - often their triceps are wobbling as they’re running. After all how would running alone strengthen your chest, back and arms? It doesn’t!</p> <p>Ask yourself what you would like to achieve with your exercise. Do you want a lean, strong and balanced body? If you answered yes - then weight training is for you.</p> <p>If you do want to keep running because it’s familiar and what you are comfortable with, you could consider some form of interval training plus weights as a better balance.</p> <p>I can’t stress enough how adding muscle will benefit you in turning back the clock with your body. Muscle increases our HGH (human growth hormone), which your body naturally produces in the pituitary gland - it’s responsible for cell growth and regeneration.</p> <p>By increasing muscle mass you're also increasing your resting metabolic rate, which helps maintain your weight and is a huge factor in slowing down the ageing process. On the ageing side of things, too much cardio can make your body produce free radicals plus increase your cortisol levels, which is ageing too.</p> <p><strong>So, is weight training boring?<br /></strong>I point out that runners only put one foot in front of the other as their only movement- yet in weight training we have many exercises to choose from strengthening and building our whole body from head to foot! What else do you need to know?</p> <p>What’s your favourite form of exercise?</p> <p><em>Written by Lesley Maxwell. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/exercise/does-running-really-work.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

12-year-old girl gives birth at Australian hospital

<p>A 12-year-old girl has given birth at an Australian hospital, authorities confirmed.</p> <p>The girl, whose identity was not revealed, had her baby earlier this month in Perth, Western Australia with the help of the Department of Communities and other agencies.</p> <p>“A co-ordinated response is required from a range of State Government and external support agencies both in the short and long term in order to make a lasting difference to the wellbeing of all affected parties,” said Jackie Tang of the Department of Communities.</p> <p>“The Department of Communities, the WA Police and Department of Health work together intensively in the best interests of all concerned.”</p> <p>According to local reports, the girl became pregnant at the age of 11.</p> <p>“If there are concerns that a child may have been sexually abused or is likely to be sexually abused, Communities undertakes a thorough assessment of the situation,” Tang told <em>Midland Reporter</em>.</p> <p>“Where necessary, the matter will be referred to the WA Police for further investigation and referrals to appropriate supports are provided.”</p> <p>WA Health Department statistics show that there have been 12 registered births to 12-year-old girls since 1980. In 2015, adolescent pregnancies accounted for 2.7 per cent of all pregnancies in Australia.</p> <p>Adolescent pregnancy poses more health risks to women. The World Health Organization said mothers aged 10 to 19 are more likely to deal with eclampsia, infections and puerperal endometritis.</p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Forever young: Can this diet help you live to 110?

<p>Ageing is something that we all have to deal with - most of us don't like it, but unfortunately our bodies don't last forever.</p> <p>Nevertheless, there are ways we can maximise how long our health lasts - this is the fundamental idea behind The Longevity Diet, the new book by Dr Valter Longo, PhD, a professor of biogerontology and Director of the USC Longevity Institute.</p> <p>"This is not really a diet, in the sense that it's not about weight loss. The Longevity Diet is close to 30 years of my work in the field of longevity, looking at how I can make somebody live a long, healthy life," says Dr Longo.</p> <p>Dr Longo has been researching longevity since the 1990s, and his lab has made discoveries relating to PKA gene pathways and their role in accelerated ageing. These discoveries laid the foundation for what would eventually become The Longevity Diet.</p> <p>Another research method that informs the science behind the diet is looking at people with record longevity - living beyond 100 years - around the world. This information is then combined with clinical data and population studies to find common denominators in living longer and healthier.</p> <p>The Longevity Diet is divided into two sections: the "Everyday Diet" and the "Fasting Mimicking Diet" (FMD).</p> <p><strong>The Everyday Diet</strong><br />The Everyday Diet offers advice on what nutritional components you should be adding to your body and in what quantity.</p> <p>For example, a major recommendation is to maintain a low protein diet, as this is a consistent factor among longevity studies. However, it must be sufficient protein - Dr Longo suggests the recommended dietary allowance of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. (It's worth noting that this is the amount of a nutrient needed to meet your basic nutritional requirements - not the specific amount you should eat every day.)</p> <p>If you're over 65, evidence suggests you should increase your protein intake from this level by adding more fish to your diet and introducing animal products like eggs, cheese, and yoghurt to maintain muscle mass.</p> <p>Another perhaps disappointing suggestion of the diet for those of us who love meat is that a pescatarian diet is the most ideal choice for living longer. Pescatarians add fish and seafood to an otherwise vegetarian diet.</p> <p>However, Dr Longo stresses that compromise is an option, and not everyone is going to fully commit to wanting to live to the maximum possible age.</p> <p>"If somebody wants to go for the ideal diet, then the meat should be really minimal. But people have to figure out what they're willing to leave out - some may compromise and say, 'let me reduce it to once a week' which will still help increase your lifespan."</p> <p><strong>Other simple tips from the book include:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Minimising saturated fats while ensuring your diet is rich in unsaturated fats from oily fish, almonds, and walnuts.</li> <li>Eating only twice a day, plus a small snack, to prevent overeating.</li> <li>Restricting all eating to twelve hours per day - this kind of "mini-fasting" has been shown to aid in longevity.</li> </ul> <p><strong>The Fasting Mimicking Diet (FMD)</strong><br />The second section of the book involves what is termed a "Fasting Mimicking Diet" or FMD, which is done periodically and aims to activate the same gene pathways as true fasting, whilst still maintaining nutrition levels.</p> <p>The activation of these gene pathways results in damaged cells being removed and replaced with healthy ones.</p> <p>"I like to use an analogy with a wood-burning train. If you're running out of fuel and won't make it to the next station, you can start burning components of the train itself, for example, the seats and the walls. So you consume your own pieces, and when you get to the next station, you can rebuild the train with new components - the human body does something very similar," says Dr Longo.</p> <p>"The other interesting thing is that, as with the train, you would burn components that were already damaged first. The human body seems to be able to identify damaged cells (e.g. cancerous or autoimmune cells), and destroy those first during the FMD."</p> <p>The FMD was originally tested on mice, where the regenerative effect on cells was first observed. There are now over 25,000 people who have done the FMD throughout the United States, Italy, the UK, and Australia, and it is being used as a standalone method by some doctors to assist their patients with age-related diseases.</p> <p><strong>The diet landscape</strong><br />There are so many popular diets out there (5:2, paleo, Mediterranean - to name a few) that it can be difficult to determine which is best for your personal situation.</p> <p>Of course, a diet book is never going to be a replacement for the advice of a medical practitioner, so if you're unsure of the best way to improve your health, consulting your GP or a nutritionist is always the first step.</p> <p>The Longevity Diet appears to be a good option to try if you're not necessarily aiming to lose weight, but want to improve your general health as you reach the years where your body isn't quite holding up like it used to.</p> <p>"The nutrition and longevity field is extremely complicated because nutrients and the human body are both very complex. Making the human body live to 110 is an extremely difficult task," says Dr Longo.</p> <p>Compromise is always a good start - perhaps try incorporating some of the ideas discussed into your diet and see whether it has a positive impact on your health. You're not going to live forever, but a little longer might just be worth it.</p> <p><em><a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/the-longevity-diet-dr-valter-longo-phd/prod9780143788379.html">The Longevity Diet by Dr. Valter Longo</a>, published by Penguin Random House, RRP $29.99.</em></p> <p>What diet and health changes have you made in an effort to live longer?</p> <p><em>Written by Jamie Feggans. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/forever-young-can-this-diet-help-you-live-to-110.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

5 ways you could be damaging your hearing

<p>Hearing problems are often associated with the natural ageing process, but hearing loss isn’t inevitable and can be avoided if you act early. In fact, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), around one third of hearing loss in adults is preventable, such as that caused by overexposure to loud noises.</p> <p>While some damage is irreversible, early intervention can halt or delay hearing problems from progressing. Yet surprisingly, many adults ignore telltale signs of hearing difficulties, possibly due to busy lifestyles, fear and embarrassment, or not recognising the warning signs.</p> <p>However, recently released data shows that it’s an issue we can no longer ignore. A 2017 Deloitte Access Economics <a href="https://servedby.flashtalking.com/click/7/82556;2820475;369307;211;0/?ft_width=1&amp;ft_height=1&amp;url=16701460">report</a>, commissioned by the Hearing Care Industry Association, found that hearing loss in Australian adults is expected to more than double from 3.6 million to 7.8 million by 2060.</p> <p><strong>How loud noises cause hearing damage</strong><br />Loud noises can damage the inner part of the ear, known as the cochlea, in two ways. Mechanical destructionoccurs when hair cells lose their rigidity and the sensory cells are destroyed over time; or metabolic changes can occur when sensory cells are unable to cope with prolonged, intense sound, which causes raised levels of free radicals in the ear and eventually leads to cell death.</p> <p><strong>How loud is too loud?</strong><br />Well, this depends on the intensity and duration of sound exposure. According to another <a href="https://servedby.flashtalking.com/click/7/82556;2820477;369307;211;0/?ft_width=1&amp;ft_height=1&amp;url=16701462">WHO report</a>, the highest safe exposure level is 85 decibels (dB) for a maximum of eight hours — which is the equivalent of the sound of a lawnmower for an entire day. The US-based <a href="https://servedby.flashtalking.com/click/7/82556;2820478;369307;211;0/?ft_width=1&amp;ft_height=1&amp;url=16701463">CDC recommends</a>, on a daily basis, no longer than 15 minutes of exposure to sounds at 100 dB (hairdryers, subway trains, car horn at five metres), four minutes at 105 dB (music from headphones at maximum volume, chainsaw), and only 28 seconds per day at loud concerts (115 dB).</p> <p>The good news is that there are ways to halt or delay hearing loss from progressing regardless of age.</p> <p><strong>5 common mistakes and how to avoid them<br /><br />Ignoring warning signs<br /></strong>What may seem like a mild or isolated hearing issue can gradually worsen and sneak up on you before you know it. That’s why it’s important to learn how to recognise common warning signs and catch issues early on.<br /><br />Telltale signs include:</p> <ul> <li>Difficulty hearing a conversation in a crowded room</li> <li>Ringing in the ears, known as ‘tinnitus’</li> <li>Speech that sounds increasingly muffled</li> <li>Turning up the TV or radio more than usual, especially when those around you complain the volume is too high</li> <li>Hearing differences between men and women’s voices — if you find it easier to understand men’s voices it could signal a problem with the upper registers of your hearing</li> </ul> <p><strong>Not taking noise breaks or using earplugs</strong><br />Even if you can’t avoid certain noisy situations, small measures such as taking listening breaks or wearing earplugs can make all the difference when it comes to reducing your risk over time. For every hour exposed to loud noises, spend 10 minutes in a quieter environment.</p> <p>Other noise-reducing strategies include using noise-cancelling headphones or earbuds to avoid turning up your device to harmful levels, and limiting headphone use to one hour per day.</p> <p><strong>Staying too close to the noise source</strong><br />It may seem obvious but simply moving a few metres away from the source of noise can reduce the intensity of the sound and its effect on the cochlea. At a concert or noisy venue, move to the back, or take frequent breaks away from the loudspeaker or stage.</p> <p>In general, if someone standing at arm’s length or one metre away has to raise their voice to be heard, the sound is too loud.</p> <p><strong>Delaying medical advice</strong><br />If you notice changes in your hearing, don’t ignore the signs. Visit your GP, who can investigate any undiagnosed or underlying issues such as build up of earwax, infection, recent trauma or injury, or a side effect from some medications.</p> <p>For a full hearing assessment, make an appointment with an audiologist who will assess your hearing ability. You can also take a free <a href="https://www.blameysaunders.com.au/online-hearing-test?utm_source=wyza&amp;utm_medium=paykel&amp;utm_campaign=nov17">online hearing test</a>, available on the Blamey Saunders hears website.</p> <p><strong>Delaying treatment</strong><br />On average, it takes people seven to 10 years from the time they experience hearing loss to getting fitted with a hearing device. Untreated hearing loss can lead to a range of issues including:</p> <ul> <li>Fatigue and embarrassment</li> <li>Irritability and anger</li> <li>Isolation and loneliness</li> <li>Personal safety problems</li> <li>Impaired memory and learning ability</li> <li>Reduced psychological health</li> </ul> <p>Some research has also found a link between hearing loss and serious health conditions such as depression, dementia, and various mental health disorders.</p> <p>People with hearing loss also report higher levels of dissatisfaction when it comes to their financial situations, relationships with family and friends, and their sense of community. Is it time you had your hearing checked?</p> <p>When was the last time you had your hearing checked?</p> <p><em>Written by Mahsa Fratantoni. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/5-ways-you-could-be-damaging-your-hearing.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

10 nutrition myths to ignore

<p>Your nutrition needs change with age, as it becomes critical to incorporate healthy habits to better support your physical and cognitive health.</p> <p>Dietitian Ngaire Hobbins debunks the top myths when it comes to your diet.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">1. Your stomach shrinks as you get older</strong><br />Although your appetite and your capacity to eat may change, your stomach doesn’t shrink as you get older. In fact, not eating well enough only accelerates the ageing process.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">2. Weight loss is healthy</strong><br />Unfortunately, this is not always the case when we are older. Instead, dieting or unintentional weight loss should be avoided in our later years, with any weight loss a natural result of combining good exercise with an eating plan rich in protein.</p> <p>In fact, a bit of extra padding is beneficial to support your body and brain in the years ahead.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">3. You need to eat less as you get older</strong><br />Whilst your metabolism slows and your energy output decreases, food and eating is what protects and fuels you — it is your key to ageing well.</p> <p>As you age, you may need to eat less of some things, and your body will need more of others, particularly foods rich in protein, vitamins, and minerals.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">4. Only eat what you feel like</strong><br />The ageing process can play tricks on our appetite and the triggers that tell us if we are hungry or full. As a result, you might eat less than what your bodies really need. It’s important to realise the vital importance of continuing to eat despite the tricks, so your body gets the energy and nutrients it needs to function.</p> <p>An outright loss of appetite is not normal, and could be symptomatic of an underlying health problem. If you are having trouble eating enough, try to eat small meals regularly throughout the day, even if you don’t always feel like it.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">5. You need a low-fat diet</strong><br />Contrary to deeply entrenched popular opinion, a low-fat diet is not always the best, especially as you get older. Fat is an important source of calories and some people might need to eat a bit extra to maintain weight.</p> <p>For most, however, eating foods that contain mostly unsaturated fats is best for heart, body, and brain health. Fats found in foods such as olive oil, nuts, seeds, avocado, and oily fish are ideal.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">6. Eat more vegetables</strong><br />Whilst nutrient-rich vegetables continue to be essential in your diet, protein needs to be at the centre of your plate, with the vegetables surrounding it from now on. That’s because you need more — not less — protein as you get older.</p> <p><em>Eating protein-rich foods such as meat, eggs and legumes is incredibly important as we age</em></p> <p>Protein keeps our muscles, immune system, organs, and brains — all our systems — working and renewing minute by minute. Vegetables are always important, but if your appetite is small, ensure you get the protein in first, then enjoy the vegetables.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">7. You only need to drink water when you’re thirsty</strong><br />If you feel thirsty, you are already a bit dehydrated. That’s a problem because neither your body nor your brain can function at peak capacity if you are dehydrated. Dehydration can cause confusion and delirium, hampers kidney function, and worsens a multitude of other conditions. As you get older, you may not sense thirst as efficiently, putting them at greater risk of dehydration and making fluid intake an essential element of overall nutrition.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">8. Supplements are sufficient</strong><br />Of course, we can’t live off vitamins and supplement tablets alone. Your body works best when it is working — that means eating and digesting food. What’s more, most supplements promoted to help you live longer, boost memory, fight off dementia and more, fail to live up to their claims.</p> <p>And there’s another problem — many interact with common medications or just don’t work the way they would if you ate them in the foods they are naturally found in.</p> <p>You could spend a lot of money for no gain when you could do better by simply eating. Not only that, but you would miss out on one of life’s greatest pleasures — cooking and eating with family and friends.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">9. You must always eat a "proper meal"</strong><br />Making sure you eat regularly is essential to help you live well and remain independent. However, eating three full meals a day can be a struggle if you have a loss of appetite, or find cooking too difficult or time-consuming.</p> <p>You can opt for prepackaged meals, frozen dinners, or takeaway foods, but some of these don’t contain the protein and other nutrients necessary to support ageing bodies and brains; others are high in sodium or saturated fats. If three good meals are too much of a challenge, five to six small meals or well-chosen snacks can be just as beneficial.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">10. Malnutrition is part of getting older</strong><br />Malnutrition can affect anyone — at any age — and is not a normal part of the ageing process. However, with age comes a greater risk of malnutrition and it’s important that you don’t dismiss the warning signs as being a part of "old age".</p> <p>For more information on healthy habits for eating well, read the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://homeinstead.com.au/resources/nutrition-seniors" target="_blank"><span>full nutrition guide</span></a>.</p> <p>What healthy habits have you tried to incorporate into your life?</p> <p><em>Written by Ngaire Hobbins. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/10-nutrition-myths-to-ignore.aspx"><span>Wyza.com.au</span></a>.</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

Duchess Meghan’s secret to her unbeatable avocado toast recipe

<p>The Duchess of Sussex may have her hands tied as she prepares to welcome her first child, but that doesn’t mean she can’t whip up breakfast fit for a queen when her friends pay a visit.</p> <p>The former actress's makeup artist, Daniel Martin, took to Instagram on Sunday to share exactly what the royal had prepared for him.</p> <p>The 37-year-old made avocado on toast, complete with tea and chocolate truffles.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs2csAnh2NP/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs2csAnh2NP/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Back to our Tig days...❤️ Thank you Meghan for being the consummate hostess this weekend and still being the #avocadotoast whisperer, YUM! 🤷🏻‍♂️ 🥑🍞☕️ #foodie #foodiegram</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/danielmartin/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Daniel Martin</a> (@danielmartin) on Jan 20, 2019 at 1:07am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Back to our Tig days …,” the makeup artist captioned the photo, as he referred to the Duchess’ now defunct blog, <em>The Tig</em>. </p> <p>“Thank you, Meghan, for being the consummate hostess this weekend and still being the #avocadotoast whisperer, YUM!”</p> <p>Alongside the sweet snap, Martin also posted a video of his journey to London, saying, “Weekend in London with my M,” referring to Meghan.</p> <p>Martin is the man behind Meghan’s natural makeup look on her wedding day and has been a close friend of the Duchess for a long time.</p> <p>Known to be a foodie, Meghan helped create a charity cookbook in collaboration with women who survived the Grenfell Tower tragedy. The book – <em>Together: Our Community Cookbook</em> – helped raise money for the Hubb Community Kitchen, where local women gathered to cook fresh meals for their friends and family.</p> <p>The book features a diverse range of recipes from the women of Hubb Community Kitchen with the Duchess claiming the avocado and green chilli dip is her “very favourite”.</p> <p>Try out the recipe below:</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 green chillies, halved and de-seeded</li> <li>25g fresh coriander</li> <li>3 tbsp natural yoghurt</li> <li>Grated zest and juice of 2 lemons</li> <li>4 garlic cloves, peeled</li> <li>Flesh of 1 ripe avocado</li> <li>4 tbsp mayonnaise (optional)</li> <li>Salt and pepper</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method</strong></p> <ol> <li>Put all the ingredients except the mayonnaise into a food processor and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Add mayonnaise (if you wish) and stir to combine, then transfer to a serving bowl. </li> </ol> <p><em>This recipe is from <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.booktopia.com.au/together-the-hubb-community-kitchen/prod9781984824080.html" target="_blank">Together: Our Community Cookbook</a> (Penguin Random House Australia, $22.99).</em></p>

Body

Placeholder Content Image

The accidental vegetarian

<p>“Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” — Michael Pollan,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/in-defense-of-food-michael-pollan/prod9780143114963.html" target="_blank"><span><em>In Defence of Food</em></span></a>.</p> <p>Whether you’re considering a vegetarian diet for health, ethical, environmental, or financial reasons — or a combination — if you’ve always eaten meat, the thought of giving it up entirely can be a little daunting. Abandoning bacon and restocking your pantry with unfamiliar grains and high-protein soy products may seem like too much all at once.</p> <p>Instead, why not ease your way in by cooking and eating vegetarian just one or two days a week? This approach has plenty of advantages:</p> <ul> <li>You don’t have to feel like you’re going cold turkey</li> <li>You don’t have to worry about<span> </span><span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/top-5-protein-substitutes.aspx" target="_blank">getting enough protein</a></span><span> </span>and other nutrients because you’re only skipping meat one or two days a week</li> <li>You get to experiment with vegetarian food at a pace that suits you.</li> </ul> <p>Including more plant-based foods in your diet is never a bad thing — unless, of course, you’re living on hot chips, which we don’t recommend. For a great summary of the benefits — to yourself and the planet — of eating less meat (plus some excellent recipes), check out<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.meatfreemondays.com/" target="_blank"><span>Meat Free Mondays</span></a>.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Eating in: the new vegetarian cooking</strong><br />Anyone who explored vegetarianism in the ‘70s and ‘80s may recall cookbooks like<span> </span><em>Laurel’s Kitchen</em><span> </span>and<span> </span><em>The Moosewood Cookbook</em><span> </span>— full of earnest advice, quirky illustrations, and cheese-heavy recipes. Vegetarian cooking has come a long way since then, with a new focus on delicious, plant-based meals that make no apology for the absence of flesh.</p> <p>If cooking is your thing — or you’d like it to be — invest in a couple of inspiring vegetarian cookbooks, such as Anna Jones'<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/a-modern-way-to-eat-anna-jones/prod9780007516704.html" target="_blank"><span><em>A Modern Way to Eat</em></span></a><span> </span>and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/the-modern-cook-s-year-anna-jones/prod9780008172459.html" target="_blank"><span><em>The Modern Cook’s Year</em></span></a>, Yottam Ottolenghi’s<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/plenty-yotam-ottolenghi/prod9780091933685.html" target="_blank"><span><em>Plenty</em> </span></a>and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/plenty-more-yotam-ottolenghi/prod9780091957155.html" target="_blank"><em><span>Plenty More</span></em></a>,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/leon-henry-dimbleby/prod9781840916102.html" target="_blank"><span><em>Leon Fast Vegetarian</em></span></a><span> </span>by Henry Dimbleby and Jane Baxter, or<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=https://www.booktopia.com.au/the-vegetable-caroline-griffith/prod9781925418538.html" target="_blank"><span><em>The Vegetable</em></span></a><span> </span>by Caroline Griffiths and Vicki Valsamis.</p> <p>Don’t want to spend money on books? You can find any number of fantastic vegetarian recipes online. Websites such as<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/category/vegetarian" target="_blank"><span>BBC goodfood</span></a><span> </span>and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/food-and-drink" target="_blank"><span>The Guardian</span></a><span> </span>have dedicated vegetarian sections, and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.delicious.com.au/search?q=vegetarian" target="_blank"><span>delicious</span></a> and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.taste.com.au/" target="_blank"><span>taste</span></a> make it easy to find veg recipes. There are also plenty of vegetarian food bloggers, including locals<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.mydarlinglemonthyme.com/" target="_blank"><em><span>My Darling Lemon Thyme</span></em></a><span> </span>and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://herestheveg.blogspot.com.au/" target="_blank"><span><em>Where’s the Beef?</em></span></a></p> <p>For those who are used to meal planning around meat, modern meat substitutes are a revelation and can make the transition to vegetarian cooking much simpler — think seitan bolognese, vegan sausages, and even veggie bacon aka “facon" (funny how bacon is the one thing many people struggle to give up). Sydney also boasts its own vegetarian butcher,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ssvb.com.au/" target="_blank"><span>Suzy Spoon’s Vegetarian Butcher</span></a>, offering a range of high protein vegan products.</p> <p><strong class="bigger-text">Eating out — and about</strong><br />Don’t want to cook vegetarian? Don’t worry. There are amazing vegetarian restaurants all across Australia — a simple online search will unearth plenty — and don’t forget that some cuisines, such as Indian and Chinese, have a long tradition of vegetarianism.</p> <p>Even better news is that most restaurants these days offer much more exciting vegetarian options than the ubiquitous pumpkin ravioli or mushroom risotto. Eating out according to your dietary preferences has become pretty standard, so whatever you do decide to exclude from your diet, there’s a good chance you’ll find something delicious on the menu. And it’s not just fine dining that’s got you covered — vegan/vegetarian burgers and<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.doughnuttime.com.au/" target="_blank"><span>vegan doughnuts</span></a><span> </span>are actually a thing.</p> <p>What’s not to enjoy?</p> <p>Have you switched to vegetarian? What advice would you give someone thinking about the change?</p> <p><em>Written by Tiffany Hutton. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/the-accidental-vegetarian.aspx">Wyza.com.au</a>.</em></p>

Body