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“Ugly and repulsive”: Acid attack survivor slams troll after undergoing 400th operation

<p>British TV personality and model Katie Piper has shared the vicious taunt she received from a troll on Instagram, calling out the cruel nature of the comments.</p> <p>The 37-year-old has been the subject of vicious trolling since suffering a horrific acid attack in 2008.</p> <p>The mum was assaulted by an ex-boyfriend while walking in the street in London, and has since undergone almost 400 surgeries to correct the damage that resulted from the attack.</p> <p>Sharing a screenshot of the message she received on her Instagram, the troll wrote: "You're the most repulsive and ugliest thing I've ever seen why even bother with make-up."</p> <p>In response, the TV presenter noted "more work needs to be done" to combat online harassment.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFeJjjvj3lt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFeJjjvj3lt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Morning 🌻🌼 Amongst all this uncertainty the sun and being able to take walks has provided some consistency and peace. What’s providing you with a little escapism and clarity at the moment? Big or small My dress is @ted_baker</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/katiepiper_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> K A T I E P I P E R</a> (@katiepiper_) on Sep 23, 2020 at 12:43am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"I've posted this message from my inbox to show you all the work and conversations around diversity and inclusion, the everyday reality for anyone who is in the minority category," she wrote.</p> <p>"The everyday existence is very different to the positivity campaigns. More work needs to be done."</p> <p>A week before, Piper shared a health update after having an operation on her right eye.</p> <p>The TV personality was left blind in her left eye following the March, 2008 attack.</p> <p>A representative for Piper told the Mail Online she was "being as brave as ever" in the lead up to the procedure and "remains positive about the future."</p> <p>"The operation was a skin graft to her upper eyelid using skin from her left arm. She is currently resting to minimise the threat of infection and to ensure a quick recovery. Katie thanks everyone for their care and warm wishes," they added.</p> <p>Piper sustained the injuries from her ex-boyfriend Daniel Lynch and accomplice Stefan Sylvestre.</p>

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Non-smoking mum reveals symptom she ignored that turned out to be cancer

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A Brisbane mum's lung cancer symptoms were masked by her pregnancy for months and almost was diagnosed too late.</p> <p>However, she's warning other mums to not make the same mistakes she did and get tested early.</p> <p>Samantha Bladwell thought something was wrong as she was 30 weeks pregnant but figured it was to do with the baby.</p> <p>She would be short of breath in weird situations, such as walking up a hill or giving a presentation at work and had decided to take herself to her GP.</p> <p>Her GP wasn't convinced but sent her off for tests anyway.</p> <p>After a CT scan, a biopsy and conversations with specialists, she was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer, which was in her spine, her brain and both of her lungs.</p> <p>“It was very surreal, and all a bit of a blur,” she told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.kidspot.com.au/parenting/real-life/reader-stories/i-thought-i-was-rundown-and-pregnant-but-the-truth-was-so-much-scarier/news-story/c8e65317b91a044635f6e93ea65c3073" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Kidspot.</a></p> <p>“People assume if you’ve got lung cancer, you smoke, so it’s your fault. I’ve never smoked a cigarette in my life,” she said.</p> <p>‘The truth is anyone with lungs can get lung cancer. No-one deserves to have lung cancer, it’s horrible.”</p> <p>She's now urging other mums to get tested as she initially blamed her shortness of breath on the expected baby.</p> <p>The mother-of-two is now undergoing target therapy which works to specifically kill cancer-causing cells.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Kidspot</em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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How to stop your glasses from fogging up while wearing a mask

<p>The COVID-19 pandemic brings with it a problem unique to those who wear glasses: The moment the face mask goes on, those lenses instantly fog up.</p> <p>It’s an annoying quirk that boils down to the difference in temperature between your body and your glasses. When you breathe, the warm air that leaves your mouth and nose escapes through the top of your mask, turns into condensation, and fogs up the cool surface of your lenses.</p> <p>Though foggy glasses are inconvenient, widespread mask-wearing remains one of the most important public health measures we have to protect ourselves against the novel coronavirus, says Dr Anna Banerji, an associate professor at the University of Toronto. Since the virus is airborne, wearing a face covering like a mask creates a physical layer of protection between you and any air droplets from infected people. “And, if you wear a mask properly, it protects someone else because your droplets aren’t going to the nose or mouth of someone and potentially infecting them,” Banerji says.</p> <p>The good news? There are measures you can take to ensure your vision remains crystal clear throughout the pandemic. Here are five tips to help you avoid foggy glasses while wearing a face mask.</p> <p><strong>Use soap and water</strong><br />Banerji suggests washing your glasses with soapy water and then wiping them dry. “There’s a film of soap that’s left over which might reduce the risk of fogging,” she advises. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, glasses get foggy because of the surface tension between the water molecules in your breath. The thin film left behind by the soapy water reduces the surface tension and causes the water molecules to spread out evenly, rather than cluster on your lenses to create fog.</p> <p>It’s best to use dishwashing detergent or a basic hand soap – anything that is for sensitive skin or contains lotion might get stuck to your lenses and smear.</p> <p><strong>Wear your glasses over your mask</strong><br />Changing the position of your glasses might divert the warm air away from your lenses. If you’re finding that your vision gets cloudy with every breath you take, try pulling the top of your mask higher onto your face so that your glasses are sitting on top of the material.</p> <p><strong>Mind the gap</strong><br />You might be having trouble with foggy glasses because your mask doesn’t fit tightly enough. The result is a gap at the top of the mask, by the bridge of your nose, that lets warm air escape behind the lenses of your glasses. Make sure that your mask fits securely over your nose. If you have a mask that has an adjustable nose bridge strip, mould the strip to follow the contours of your nose for a tighter seal.</p> <p><strong>Tape it down</strong><br />Another way to close the gap at the top of a mask is to tape it down across the bridge of your nose. Even before the pandemic, some health care professionals who regularly wear glasses would put a strip of surgical tape along the top of their masks to prevent the warm moist air from escaping. Just make sure you’re using medical tape or sports tape that’s safe for use on skin.</p> <p><strong>Use a tissue</strong><br />If you’re still having problems with your glasses fogging up, try folding a facial tissue horizontally and placing it under the top of your mask at the bridge of your nose. The moisture from your breath should be absorbed by the tissue instead of escaping behind your glasses.</p> <p class="p1">Written by <span>Rebecca Gao</span>. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/how-to-stop-your-glasses-from-fogging-up-while-wearing-a-mask"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</p>

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12-year-old autistic boy "left to die" after drinking bleach

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A 12-year-old boy has been "left to die" after being tricked into drinking something that his mother believes was laced with bleach.</p> <p>Ronnie Phillips was left in an induced coma after sneaking out of the house with his younger brother to meet some other children.</p> <p>It was here that the other children gave Ronnie the drink, which he took as he thought it was alcohol.</p> <p>Ronnie's heartbroken mother Danielle Potter told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.sussexlive.co.uk/news/sussex-news/crawley-boy-12-left-die-4597796" target="_blank">SussexLive</a></em> that her son collapsed and his brother was screaming for help as he thought he died.</p> <p>“I just want to make people realise the dangers of drink, drugs, playing stupid games and running away leaving a child to die,” Danielle told the publication.</p> <p>“Kids will be kids but this sort of stuff is just ridiculous and dangerous”.</p> <p>Sharing her son’s experience online as a warning, Danielle added: “What my 12-year-old thought would be a laugh and a bit of fun with his mates has resulted with him like this in a coma, a machine breathing for him and in ICU.”</p> <p>His grandmother posted an update to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/fq96f-ronnie?utm_source=facebook&amp;utm_medium=social&amp;utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1&amp;fbclid=IwAR2zp7jBuyRAVDGQTn4JQjQaVSkdzDbMpNWqxA83MLKfVKNMLP0Ez1CPW50" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>GoFundMe</em></a> page updating people about Ronnie's condition.</p> <p>“This is my 12 year old grandson who is autistic. On Friday night some older children tricked him into drinking bleach and the result was him having to be put in a induced coma!” Tracey Willmor wrote.</p> <p>“He is now awake but can’t understand why no one likes him and would do this to him when he thought they was his friends! I want to show him that people do care and are not all nasty”</p> <p>Ronnie has since recovered and is due to return home soon.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Mother gives grave warning after daughter loses leg

<p>A mother is urging parents to think again before they let their children near and around adult equipment after her own daughter lost her leg in a horrific lawnmower accident in August.</p> <p>Mum Sarah Reardon said her three-year-old daughter Abigail Reardon, is dealing with her new circumstances “far better than all the adults in her life” after she was reversed over by the mower in Franklin, Massachusetts.</p> <p>The horrifying accident took place on August 22 and resulted in extensive damage to Abigail’s left foot and leg. </p> <p>It left her needing an amputation from her mid-calf.</p> <p>Ms Reardon said the accident happened quickly. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838231/baby-loses-leg-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3ab4b3d15ae448858175ce9b20d1172b" /></p> <p>“She was out playing and the lawnmower was put into reverse and she was there,” the heartbroken mother told Boston 25 News.</p> <p>The driver of the ride-on mower has not been identified because what happened was an accident, she said.</p> <p>Abigail spent 16 days at the Hasbro Children’s Hospital in Providence. </p> <p>The little girl has undergone five surgeries and her mother said more surgeries are likely to come.</p> <p>Ms Reardon aid she had an “amazing, determined, resilient little spirit”.</p> <p>“Abby lost her left foot and leg up to the middle of her calf, endured plastic reconstructive surgery, has significant soft tissue injuries to recover from, and is fighting bacterial and fungal infections from her wounds,” she wrote on a GoFundMe page.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838232/baby-loses-leg-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7f7598eb86a447d78768670d345f38d9" /></p> <p>Her mum also said she faces ongoing issues, including requiring medications, and “will need many prosthetic leg fittings over the course of the next 15+ years, or until she’s done growing”.</p> <p>“As the bones in her amputated leg grow, it’s likely the skin won’t stretch fast enough to keep up, so she’s expected to go through many procedures to ‘shorten the bone’ as she grows.”</p> <p>The mum said the accident was also witnessed by Abigail’s older sister Alexa. </p> <p>She has also expressed she wants said Alexa to begin counselling to help her understand the accident.</p> <p>Ms Reardon said she wants parents to be aware of the dangers of ride-on mowers. </p> <p>“They’re obviously very dangerous machines,” she said. </p> <p>“I’ve learned way more statistics than I wanted to about what happens to over 9000 children a year.”</p> <p>Ms Reardon was citing statistics from the American Academy of Paediatrics. </p> <p>AAoP advises children be kept indoors while ride-on mowers are in use.</p> <p>A GoFundMe page has been set up to help Abigail’s family pay for medical costs.</p>

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10 easy ways to improve gut health

<p><strong>How to improve gut health naturally</strong><br />At any given moment, there are trillions of bacteria living in your gut. Known as a ‘microbiome,’ this culture of microscopic organisms is essential to gut health, playing a role in everything from the digestion of food to the regulation of metabolism. What’s more, research suggests the condition of your microbiome can also impact your mood and your ability to fend of illness.</p> <p>Although the market is saturated with expensive probiotics that can give your microbiome a boost, it turns out you can actually change your internal ecosystem simply by adapting your lifestyle.</p> <p>“The gut microbiota is very dynamic, so if you start taking up healthy food habits, it will respond and will modify very quickly – even within 48 hours,” says assistant professor Corinne Maurice. But to improve gut health in the long-term, you need to stick to those healthy habits, because the benefits can disappear just as quickly. Here’s expert advice on how to improve gut health naturally.</p> <p><strong>Foster gut health by diversifying your diet</strong><br />Maurice explains that most people who are sick with a gut-related disease – or even other conditions, like diabetes and allergies – have one thing in common: a lack of variety in their microbial populations. It’s clear that a healthy gut is a diversely-populated gut, and one of the best ways to build a diverse bacterial community is to eat a wide range of healthy foods.</p> <p><strong>Eat yoghurt and kefir for a healthy gut</strong><br />Consuming cultured dairy products, such as yoghurt and kefir, introduces healthy bacteria into your gut. Those bacteria may not take up permanent residence there, but they can have positive effects even while passing through. A 2011 study found that, when a strain of bacteria that’s common to yoghurt was ingested by mice, it regulated their moods. This has led scientists to believe the bacteria could have the potential to treat depression in humans, too.</p> <p><strong>Don’t give up cheese in the name of gut health</strong><br />Could cheese be good for gut health? It seems increasingly likely. A study conducted by the American Chemical Society found that people who ate cheese had higher levels of a certain by-product of gut bacteria that’s been associated with a reduction in cholesterol. There’s a caveat, however: Maurice says it’s mostly unpasteurised cheeses that have those good-for-you microbes.</p> <p><strong>Be diligent about your dental health</strong><br />It might seem strange to mention oral hygiene when discussing how to improve gut health, but it’s all connected. Multiple studies, including one conducted by the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found that harmful forms of bacteria that grow in the mouth often make their way into the gut or even the bloodstream. Regular brushing can keep those potentially harmful microbes in check-and your gut bacteria in balance.</p> <p><strong>Cook whole grains</strong><br />Whole grains, like quinoa, barley and oats, have dietary fibre that can’t be broken down by your intestines. That means they reach your colon intact, where they become food for the microbes and can help boost their populations. “When we give these [whole grains] to animals or humans, we note an increase in microbial diversity,” says Maurice.</p> <p><strong>Snack on nuts</strong><br />Like grains, nuts are also packed with fibre. In a 2016 study published in the journal Advances in Nutrition, researchers found that mice that were fed walnuts experienced changes in their gut microbes and developed fewer instances of colon cancer.</p> <p><strong>Spice things up</strong><br />Cooking with spices like garlic, ginger and turmeric, doesn’t only make your meals delicious; it can also curb the growth of harmful bacteria in your gut. “These spices actually contain very powerful antibacterial chemicals,” says Maurice. “But they’re not bad for your good bacteria; they’re bad for your bad bacteria.”</p> <p><strong>Indulge in dark chocolate</strong><br />Dark chocolate contains fibre and plant-based molecules called polyphenols. Since both of these compounds are difficult for the intestines to digest, they can travel deep into your gut where they’re fermented and metabolised by microbes. This process in turn releases health-promoting anti-inflammatory chemicals.</p> <p><strong>Sip some polyphenols</strong><br />A 2013 study from the journal Food Research International found that drinking black tea and red wine could improve the bacterial composition in the gut. That’s because, like chocolate, wine and tea contain microbe-feeding polyphenols.</p> <p><strong>Don’t give up on antibiotics</strong><br />Ever heard that taking antibiotics can throw your microbiome out of whack? It’s true to an extent, as antibiotics have a habit of destroying the microbes in your gut indiscriminately; but, as Maurice notes, there’s no other therapeutic alternative at the moment. Instead of avoiding antibiotics altogether (or failing to take the full dose as prescribed by your doctor), she recommends counteracting the effects on your gut by eating a diverse diet or even taking a probiotic temporarily.</p> <p><em>Written by </em><em>Jill Buchner</em><em>. This article first appeared on </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/10-easy-ways-to-improve-gut-health?pages=1"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em><em> </em></p>

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Olivia Newton-John gives sweet update on cancer battle

<p>Olivia Newton-John has been battling breast cancer since 1992 and has given her decades-long friend Richard Wilkins an update on her health.</p> <p>She's also started a new foundation, called the Olivia Newton-John Foundation, which aids the global fight against cancer.</p> <p>The Foundation joins the Olivia Newton-John Centre in Melbourne, which has been helping Australians fight cancer since 2012.</p> <p>"My dream is to find kinder therapies for cancer," Olivia said beaming.</p> <p>"When I was going through chemotherapy, radiation and chemotherapy, as I've done for the past 28 years, I've always dreamt of kinder ways to treat people. I've seen so many go through these processes and I know there are (other) ways we can research.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CF-X2T0DXuk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CF-X2T0DXuk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">I am proud to announce the establishment of the Olivia Newton-John Foundation. With your help, we will realise a world beyond cancer. Please check out and follow my new @onjfoundation. See the full video on the ONJ Foundation website. (Link in Bio.) Love and light, Olivia 🧡 #onjfoundation #beyondcancer</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/therealonj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Olivia Newton-john</a> (@therealonj) on Oct 5, 2020 at 1:03pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"I want to bring the science to different things I have done to still be here. This is my life mission. I have wanted to do this for such a long time.</p> <p>Olivia has also been isolating and taking care of her health in the American countryside.</p> <p>"I feel great and I'm so grateful I'm able to be in the countryside. I feel so much for people stuck in cities or apartments, or alone," she said.</p> <p>"I have my animals and my husband. This has actually been one of the rare times in my whole life where I have been in one place for more than three weeks.</p> <p>"I feel guilty admitting I've enjoyed having the excuse to be home. I can't go anywhere, I'm in that bracket with an underlying condition and have to be careful.</p> <p>"Everybody is going through dreadful times and having to worry about their immune systems and are very conscious of their health. People with cancer have had this concern always.</p> <p>"Cancer was here before COVID and it's going to be here a long time after."</p>

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“Treat yourself”: Rebel Wilson’s offers diet advice to fans

<p>Australian actress Rebel Wilson has shared some health advice with fans while posting more snaps from her recent trip to Monaco.</p> <p>The 40-year-old shared multiple photos to her 8.7 million followers on Instagram on Sunday.</p> <p>The pictures were taken at the end of September when the star took a trip to Monaco, where she attended a charity gala with her rumoured boyfriend, Jacob Busch, and an exhibition at the Nouveau Musee National de Monaco.</p> <p>“Remember though girls, you still gotta treat yourself,” she captioned a photo of herself dressed up on a balcony eating a cake.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CF7zz5-ASpK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CF7zz5-ASpK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Remember though girls, you still gotta treat yourself 😘 🍰 (I just do it with food now only once or twice a week...and substitute bubble baths on alternate nights)</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/rebelwilson/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Rebel Wilson</a> (@rebelwilson) on Oct 4, 2020 at 1:10pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I just do it with food now only once or twice a week... and substitute bubble baths on alternate nights,” she wrote.</p> <p>The actress also updated fans on her health journey progress, after revealing she wants to reach her goal weight of 75kg.</p> <p>“Gearing up for a great week ahead,” she wrote alongside a picture of herself on a hike.</p> <p>“This week was super busy but I got up super early 3 times and went on a hike ... even did a couple of 100m sprints to get the heart rate even higher (although my ‘sprint’ is probably someone else’s ‘slow jog’).</p> <p>“I felt proud of myself and now only 3kg away from my goal weight!”</p>

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Jane Fonda releases new exercise video to encourage voting

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Jane Fonda, well known for her exercise videos which were initially released in 1982, has gotten back into the swing of things and released a new video.</p> <p>In her latest Instagram video, she's teamed up with Register2Vote to lead Exercise That Vote, which is a video promoting voter registration and voting on November 3rd in the US election.</p> <p>"Hello, class, we're bringing back the movement," Fonda says as neon graphics fill the screen and '80s music plays in the background. </p> <p>"We need you to be in shape in the upcoming race. I need you to be strong, I need you to be laser focused, I need you to be fully committed to the task at hand, so let's get ready to exercise our right to vote."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CF-FJGop3lP/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CF-FJGop3lP/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Let’s Get Registered!!!! 💪. We’re getting in shape for the race of our lives this November and it has never been more important to exercise your right to vote. Many states have registration deadlines today so do not wait! Head to the link in my bio and check your registration status now! LET’S DO THIS!!!!! #ExerciseThatVote</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/janefonda/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Jane Fonda</a> (@janefonda) on Oct 5, 2020 at 10:21am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The video features a wide range of celebrities in 1980s workout gear, including Katy Perry, Orlando Bloom, Ken Jeong, Ashley Benson, Kerry Washington, Amy Schumer and Shaquille O'Neal.</p> <p>"Exercise your glutes, exercise your quads and most of all, exercise your right to vote," Fonda says.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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12 bizarre aphrodisiacs from around the world

<p><strong>Fugu<br /></strong>There’s nothing like a near-death experience to get you and your partner in the mood. Handled improperly, fugu (or blowfish) has enough tetrodotoxin to poison you 30 times over! Many people have died from eating fugu, but if prepared the right way, it leaves adventurous eaters with a tingling sensation that is said to be one of the reasons it increases libido. You can safely help yourself to fugu in Japan, as long as the chef who prepares it has the special license and technique to handle it properly.</p> <p><strong>Ambergris</strong><br />Secreted by a sperm whale, ambergris is used both as a food and as an ingredient in some luxury perfumes. Casanova apparently used ambergris-infused perfume to make the ladies swoon, and it has a history in the Middle East of being consumed to increase a man’s virility. One royal family in that region reportedly combines ambergris with milk and honey to create the passion-inducing dish.</p> <p>Ambergris is banned in many countries however, including Australia and the US, because of the endangered status of the sperm whale. But in other countries, including the UK and those in the European Union (EU), it is legal to salvage a lump of ambergris from beaches and sell it. Although all whale and dolphin species are protected under EU law, ambergris is regarded as an excretion, and therefore a benign byproduct.</p> <p><strong>Spanish fly</strong><br />Whale secretions aren’t the only kind on this list. The secretions of the Spanish fly (which is really a type of beetle) are thought to be nature’s Viagra. Consuming it can prepare a man’s body for sex (if you catch our drift), but it can also come with some pretty uncomfortable side effects. Blistering and urinary tract problems can occur as a result of consuming the Spanish fly’s secretions. Still, people buy it all over Europe.</p> <p><strong>Maca root</strong><br />Maca has been used as a libido enhancer for thousands of years, and it has been scientifically proven to increase sperm count and arousal in animals. Whether it does the same job for humans is still up for debate, but that hasn’t stopped people from using maca to increase their sexual desire. Unlike ambergris or Spanish flies, you can easily put maca powder into a smoothie.</p> <p><strong>Cobra blood</strong><br />There is no scientific data supporting the claim that cobra blood increases desire or virility, but many people in Asian countries, including China and Vietnam, believe that drinking a glass of cobra blood heightens a man’s strength and libido. Because the snake is revered by people of these nations, they believe that the strong qualities of the cobra will be transferred to you if you drink its bodily fluids. Some drink it straight, while others mix it in with rice wine for a cocktail. Your average Bloody Mary looks much tamer now, doesn’t it?</p> <p><strong>Bird’s nest soup</strong><br />The can of Campbell’s soup in your cupboard might have cost you a buck or two, but 30 grams of bird’s nest soup costs $100. So, what is so special about this soup that makes it so expensive? Bird spit! This Chinese dish is made from the nests of a type of bird called a swiftlet, which fortifies its nest with its saliva. Harvesters go to great lengths to procure this rare ingredient, as swiftlet nests are found high up in cave walls.</p> <p><strong>Sea cucumbers</strong><br />There are foods that are thought to be aphrodisiacs simply because of their shape. The sea-floor-dwelling cucumber is such one. Its phallic shape is part of the reason people believe it can increase your sex drive. (The power of suggestion, right?) Valued by people from China, it represents a multi-billion-dollar industry. Over 1400 species of sea cucumber are said to exist, but only around 70 of those species are harvested. WARNING: Of these 70 species, 10 per cent are now regarded as endangered, due largely to exploitation.</p> <p><strong>Durian</strong><br />Durian is a very divisive fruit; some people love it, some hate it because of its notoriously foul odour. A study done in India has proved that consumption of the durian fruit increases male sex drive and sperm count. So, if you can make it past the stench, you might be curious to see what it can do for you.</p> <p><strong>Mustard</strong><br />You may not think about it when you’re snagging a sandwich on your lunch break, but mustard is actually a documented aphrodisiac. The Ancient Greeks figured out that mustard seeds improve overall blood flow, which is important for men when it comes to getting it on. The Chinese think it promotes sexual desire because of the spice’s heat factor. It looks like a little spice in your meal can spice up your bedroom!</p> <p><strong>Caterpillar fungus</strong><br />Found only on the Tibetan plateau, caterpillar fungus, Ophiocordyceps sinensis, is the world’s most valuable parasite. A relative of the tropical fungus Ophiocordyceps unilateralis, which turns ants into zombies, caterpillar fungus infects the larvae of ghost moths. Known as “the Viagra of the Himalayas”, it has long been part of traditional Chinese medicine, and in recent decades, demand for it has risen so sharply that it can sell up to three times its weight in gold – around $130,000 a kilo. A Tibetan text from the 1400s describes the fungus as being most helpful in the bedroom, increasing one’s sex drive and overall virility.</p> <p><strong>Leafcutter ants</strong><br />If your in-laws gave you a box of ants as a wedding gift, you’d probably never speak to them again. In South American countries such as Colombia, though, this is a common practice. Leafcutter ants are considered an aphrodisiac in that region and are often sold roasted on the street as on-the-go delicacies.</p> <p><strong>Duck eggs</strong><br />A popular street food in the Philippines and Laos are duck eggs, known as balut. But these aren’t the kind of eggs you keep to fry up at home; these eggs contain a duck fetus that is already a few weeks into its gestation period. It may not sound appetising, but it is filled with nutrients and is said to increase a person’s energy. If you’re lacking energy in the bedroom, this could be the snack you’ve been looking for.</p> <p><em>Written by Taylor Markarian. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/culture/12-bizarre-aphrodisiacs-from-around-the-world?pages=1">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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BREAKING: Donald and Melania Trump test positive for COVID-19

<p class="p1">US President Donald Trump and his Melania have both tested positive for the coronavirus.</p> <p class="p1">Trump took to Twitter to announce the news saying he and the First Lady would begin their quarantine and recovery process immediately.</p> <p class="p1">“We will get through this together,” he said.</p> <p class="p1">Mrs Trump also posted a statement, saying she and her husband were “feeling good”.</p> <p class="p1">“As too many Americans have done this year, POTUS and I are quarantining at home after testing positive for COVID-19,” she said.</p> <p class="p1">“We are feeling good and I have postponed all upcoming engagements. Please be sure you are staying safe and we will all get through this together.”</p> <p class="p1">The President’s physician, Sean Conley, released a letter saying he expected Trump to continue working.</p> <p class="p1">“This evening I received confirmation that both President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have tested positive,” he said.</p> <p class="p1">“The President and First Lady are both well at this time, and they plan to remain at home within the White House during their convalescence.</p> <p class="p1">“The White House medical team and I will maintain a vigilant watch, and I appreciate the support provided by some of our country’s greatest medical professionals and institutions. Rest assured I expect the President to continue carrying out his duties without disruption while recovering, and I will keep you updated on any further developments.”</p>

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“Act immediately”: Mum’s chilling warning after red line discovery

<p>A mum has issued a stark warning to parents after her eight-year-old contracted sepsis after falling at the zoo.</p> <p>The UK woman said she was in “two minds” about whether she should share her son’s story, but later on decided to do so to ensure other parents were aware of the “sign” of a serious infection.</p> <p>"I am sure there are other parents who wouldn't know either," she wrote in her original Facebook post. "The only reason I knew is because it had happened to a friend's son two years ago and she had shared."</p> <p>The mum’s warning was posted alongside a photo of her son’s arm, which was covered in a bandage with a red line merging from it.</p> <p>The original post has since been deleted, but Australian group Tiny Hearts Education, chose to re-share the photo to their social media pages in order to reach as many parents as possible.</p> <p>"A week or so ago the littlest fell over at the zoo," the mum wrote.</p> <p>"He took quite a bashing but once we got home I cleaned him up. I rang school on Farm school day to make sure he washed his hands after digging and I tried hard to ensure it was kept clean (hand and elbow). He's an eight-year-old boy, however.</p> <p>The mum explained that while the wounds didn't look infected or 'gunky', they had gotten bigger. </p> <p>"I wasn't happy as I as I noticed red tracking down his vein," the concerned mum said. "I then checked his elbow - the same."  "I took him down to the out of hours feeling a bit silly but when the doctor saw it he commended me on recognising it and getting down ASAP."</p> <p>The mum then found out that her son had “blood poisoning/sepsis” and he was immediately treated with antibiotics, which fortunately worked on her child.</p> <p>"If you spot this red line running from a wound get your child is seen straight away," she urged. "It isn't something you can 'leave' until Monday when the doctors are back in the office."</p> <p>"Hopefully, my post might help someone the way my friend's post from 2 years ago helped me." </p>

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The missing question from New Zealand’s cannabis debate: what about personal freedom and individual rights?

<p>Much of the debate on New Zealand’s referendum on recreational cannabis legalisation has focused on health, the economy, criminal justice and the uncertainties about the impact on youth and adult use.</p> <p>But one argument is oddly missing from the debate - personal freedom, autonomy and individual rights.</p> <p>This is striking, because the issue of personal liberties has traditionally been at the forefront of cannabis reform activism. At the heart of all public health laws is the conflict between the powers of the state and the individual’s liberty, privacy and autonomy.</p> <p>In the past two years, constitutional courts in several countries have ruled the prohibition of use, possession and private cultivation of cannabis interferes with an individual’s right to privacy. They’ve said protecting public health and security does not justify state punishment.</p> <p>It may come as a surprise, but about half of the countries in Europe do not prohibit the use of drugs (as New Zealand does). Instead, they choose only to ban their possession.</p> <p>The difference is more than academic. Prohibition of consumption may give police extraordinary powers, such as taking biological samples from people as evidence. Drug testing is intrusive and should only be done if there is a significant public interest to protect.</p> <p>Some countries go even further. They ban possession and use of drugs, but only in public spaces, on the understanding that drug laws exist to prevent public nuisance.</p> <p>In Spain, the distinction between use in public and private led to the so-called “cannabis social clubs”. Users grow and share cannabis among club members in private settings.</p> <p><strong>The rights and the risks</strong><br />The fundamental personal right to ingest a substance that has little impact on others has long been argued by cannabis activists such as NORML (National Organisation for the Reform of Marijuana Laws).</p> <p>With this argument largely absent from current debate in New Zealand (as well as many other jurisdictions contemplating reform), debate focuses instead on the potential to create jobs and tax revenue (Colorado), reduce arrests and discrimination (Illinois), address public security and drug-related violence (Uruguay) and restrict youth access to cannabis and enhance public health (Canada).</p> <p>The aim of New Zealand’s proposed Cannabis Legalisation and Control Bill is to apply market controls to reduce harms associated with cannabis and restrict access by young people. But, as we have argued before, the goal of reducing overall use over time will be hard to achieve via a commercial market.</p> <p>The personal rights argument can struggle to win over people concerned about the health and social implications of legalisation, especially given their experience of other public health debates.</p> <p>The alcohol industry, for example, pushed individual rights and consumer responsibility to undermine effective public health measures such as higher taxes and bans on advertising.</p> <p><strong>Personal choice vs public health</strong><br />The assumption all adults can make responsible choices about using psychoactive drugs is also challenged. There are risks of dependency that could interfere with personal autonomy, and the psychological influence of marketing that targets vulnerable groups such as the young and poor.</p> <p>There is a fine line between respecting people’s right to choose and facilitating the normalisation and commercialisation of something that could lead to poor public health.</p> <p>The use of any psychoactive substance carries the potential to harm personal and family relationships, and cause unsafe driving or workplace accidents. This reinforces the argument that some degree of regulation and state intervention will always be necessary.</p> <p>The age-old question is how best to balance the powers of the state with individual rights to privacy and autonomy, while protecting public health and vulnerable groups.</p> <p><strong>The absence of recreational users’ voices</strong><br />Society appears more receptive to the personal right to use medicinal cannabis.</p> <p>Despite the (as yet) limited scientific evidence for the effectiveness of cannabis in medical treatment, greater legal availability of medicinal cannabis attracts good public support. This is largely based on respecting a person’s decisions about how to treat their illness.</p> <p>The right to use cannabis recreationally requires decision makers to consider the benefits people get from its use, such as pleasure or relaxation. But this is often forgotten or avoided in drug reform debates.</p> <p>Medicinal cannabis users have been actively involved in the cannabis law reform debate, with a representative on the Medicinal Cannabis Advisory Group. But recreational cannabis users seem to be largely absent from the public debate.</p> <p>Including more voices from recreational cannabis users could provide new ways of thinking about balancing the powers of the state with individual rights.</p> <p>Given the current uncertainties about the long-term health and social impacts of legalisation, the individual rights issue may actually be among the more convincing arguments for reform.</p> <p><em>Written by </em><em>Marta Rychert</em><em> and </em><em>Chris Wilkins</em><em>. This article first appeared <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-missing-question-from-new-zealands-cannabis-debate-what-about-personal-freedom-and-individual-rights-146304">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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Gender reveal: Bindi shares new details about pregnancy

<p><span>Bindi Irwin has announced the gender of her unborn baby in a beautiful post to social media.</span><br /><br /><span>The 22-year-old and her husband Chandler Powell took to Instagram to share</span><br /><span>A pregnant Bindi Irwin has announced the gender of her unborn baby, in a loving post on social media.</span><br /><br /><span>In the Instagram post, the 22-year-old and husband Chandler Powell shared a sonogram of their baby, as they posed with a tortoise.</span><br />\</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFX1UV5BtHk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFX1UV5BtHk/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin)</a> on Sep 20, 2020 at 1:50pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>“Baby girl, you are our world,” Bindi said in a post on Tuesday.</span><br /><br /><span>“Our beautiful daughter is now about the same size as a hatchling Aldabra tortoise and is as healthy as can be.</span><br /><br /><span>“We can’t wait for her arrival next year.”</span><br /><br /><span>In a comment on the post, Chandler wrote: “I love you and our daughter more than anything”.</span><br /><br /><span>Bindi’s brother Robert added: “I can’t wait to meet my niece!”</span><br /><br /><span>The pair announced they were expecting their first child last month.</span><br /><br /><span>Earlier this month, Bindi said she broke the news of her positive pregnancy test to Chandler, admitting it was a “moment where time stood still”.</span><br /><br /><span>“I took a test and ran into the kitchen where Chandler was making us tea,” she said.</span><br /><br /></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFStD7HhmAn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFStD7HhmAn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Bindi Irwin (@bindisueirwin)</a> on Sep 18, 2020 at 2:02pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span>“He didn’t hear me come in so I speechlessly watched him pouring the water into my most loved hedgehog mug.</span><br /><br /><span>“I started crying tears of pure joy and told my sweetheart husband that my test was positive.</span><br /><br /><span>“In that short span of time the gorgeous baby I’m carrying became the most important part of our lives.</span><br /><br /><span>“Our baby Wildlife Warrior is going to be so very loved by our families and entire Australia Zoo team.”</span><br /><br /><span>The pair tied the knot in a ceremony at Queensland’s Australia Zoo on March 25.</span></p>

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Jacinda Ardern admits mistake after group selfie

<p><span>Jacinda Ardern has admitted she “made a mistake” after she took a selfie with fans, breaching social distancing measures.</span><br /><br /><span>The New Zealand Prime Minister went to Massey University at Palmerston North on Thursday while on the campaign trail.</span><br /><br /><span>Excited students followed her around campus and as she left, the PM was met by a group who wanted to take a photo with her.</span><br /><br /><span>The prime minister reportedly asked the crowd to step back at first, but eventually joined them for the selfie.</span><br /><br /><span>Ardern has admitted her mistake on Monday while announcing the easing of coronavirus restrictions.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837997/jacinda-ardern-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/bcb974e3cf7f40b796fef5218d838935" /></p> <p><em>Image: Twitter</em><br /><br /><span>"All the way through on the campaign trail and even before during alert level settings, I work really hard not to shake people's hands," she said.</span><br /><br /><span>"I sanitise. I wear my mask in Auckland, and I work hard to try to keep my social distance.</span><br /><br /><span>"In that particular photo I did make a mistake. I should have stepped further forward. I should have asked them to step apart from each other, and I acknowledge that."</span><br /><br /><span>New Zealand is set for an election on October 17, which presents a unique challenge for candidates and voters during the COVID pandemic.</span><br /><br /><span>Ardern spoke about the challenges on Monday.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Have I woken up in an alternate reality?<br /><br />Ardern: “I’ve acknowledged it was the wrong thing, I shouldn’t have taken a selfie...I’m sorry for it...I need to take responsibility for it...I should have not done it”<a href="https://twitter.com/TheAMShowNZ?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TheAMShowNZ</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/jacindaardern?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@jacindaardern</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/nzpol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#nzpol</a> <a href="https://t.co/QL0hSZZmfu">pic.twitter.com/QL0hSZZmfu</a></p> — The Orwellian 🇳🇿 (@TheOrwellianNZ) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheOrwellianNZ/status/1308146584517894144?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 21, 2020</a></blockquote> <p><br /><br /><span>She says the country's social distancing restrictions are decided based on health advice and not on campaign needs.</span><br /><br /><span>"None of our decision-making around these alert levels, actually are based on the politics or the campaign," she said.</span><br /><br /><span>Restrictions in New Zealand have now eased, however Auckland still faces tougher rules than the rest of the country.</span><br /><br /><span>"We are in a strong position to make our next move down our alert settings," Ardern said.</span><br /><br /><span>"Auckland needs more time."</span></p>

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Diabetes: what’s new and what’s next

<p>It’s no exaggeration to say that diabetes is an international health emergency. It is estimated that 422 million people are living with diabetes all over the world. Type 1 diabetes, caused by an immune system attack on the pancreas, usually strikes younger people and follows them through their lives. Type 2 is more common and is caused by resistance to the hormone insulin, which tells the body to absorb blood sugar.</p> <p>Worldwide, some 350 million people exhibit signs of prediabetes, which means they have a one-in-ten chance of developing type 2 diabetes if not treated.</p> <p>But here’s the good news: over just the past few years, a remarkable number of diabete treatments, from medications to surgical solutions to high-tech devices, have shown promise. It’s too soon to declare ­victory, but these smart lifestyle tips and medical breakthroughs have given ­people with diabetes winning strategies for today and considerable hope for the future. Separating diabetes myths from truths.</p> <p><strong>For Prediabetes and prevention</strong></p> <p>For those considered to be at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, large-scale randomised control trials have shown that in up to 58 per cent of cases, the condition can be delayed or even prevented through lifestyle changes. Check out these 21 hints and tips for eating well with diabetes.</p> <p><strong>Losing 5-10 per cent of total body weight helps</strong></p> <p>Losing weight: a weight loss of as little as 5-10 per cent of your total body weight can prevent type 2 diabetes in up to nearly 60 per cent of people. Here are the 15 best superfoods to eat if you have diabetes.</p> <p><strong>Not smoking</strong></p> <p>Not smoking: the average smoker is 44 per cent more likely to develop diabetes. It takes 20 years after quitting for your risks of diabetes to reflect that of a non-smoker. Here’s what happens to your body the moment you quit.</p> <p><strong>Regular physical activity</strong></p> <p>Regular physical activity: as little as 30 minutes exercise, such as a walk five times a week, can reduce risks of diabetes by 30 per cent.</p> <p><strong>Make healthy food choices</strong></p> <p>Making healthy food choices: ­following an eating plan that is lower in kilojoules and total fat.According to British diabetes ­expert Dr Stephen Lawrence, managing portion sizes and reducing fat are key – “This involves no medication at all.”</p> <p>Dr David Nathan, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, adds, “Fat cells, particularly at the abdomen, ­release hormones that ­increase risk for diabetes and it takes only a small amount of weight loss to lower risk. We found that dropping just 0.9 kilograms lowers your odds for diabetes over three years by about 16 per cent.”</p> <p><strong>Manage cholesterol levels</strong></p> <p>Managing cholesterol levels: choosing foods that contain less saturated fats; ideally less than 10 per cent of your total energy should come from saturated fats. According to British diabetes ­expert Dr Stephen Lawrence, managing portion sizes and reducing fat are key – “This involves no medication at all.”</p> <p>Dr David Nathan, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, adds, “Fat cells, particularly at the abdomen, ­release hormones that ­increase risk for diabetes and it takes only a small amount of weight loss to lower risk. We found that dropping just 0.9 kilograms lowers your odds for diabetes over three years by about 16 per cent.”</p> <p><strong>How does Metformin work?</strong></p> <p>The drug Metformin has been found to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes among people with impaired glucose tolerance. It’s widely prescribed for people with prediabetes in Australia, New Zealand and parts of Asia such as Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia.</p> <p>How it works Metformin reduces blood sugar by lowering the amount of sugar coming from the liver. A 2017 Georgetown University review showed that it cuts the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 18 per cent over 15 years.</p> <p><strong>For type 2 diabetes: metabolic surgery</strong></p> <p>Rerouting the digestive system with gastric bypass surgery (so-called because it creates a smaller stomach and bypasses part of the small intestine) or with a sleeve gastrectomy (which reduces the size of the stomach by about 80 per cent) is a drastic diabetes solution. After all, it’s major surgery, with small but real risks for such complications as infections, bleeding, and gastrointestinal problems. While available in Australia, New Zealand and Asia, this is not a government-funded procedure for type 2 diabetes and can be costly. It’s also not a stand-alone solution.</p> <p><strong>Reducing the size of the stomach means smaller portions</strong></p> <p>How does it work? Reducing the size of the stomach makes it easier for people to stick with smaller portions – but people are also strongly urged to follow a healthy diet. New research is showing that the surgery produces safe, long-lasting benefits, particularly in people with ­recently diagnosed diabetes, such as John,* 37, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes three years ago. His doctor suggested gastric bypass ­surgery when John weighed 107 kilograms and had high cholesterol and hypertension.</p> <p>“Being fairly young, I was looking at, for the rest of my life, simply being on pills that treated the symptoms but caused problems themselves,” John says. “Even if I kept my sugar down, type 2 diabetes still causes damage and, honestly, would never go away.”</p> <p>Four months after his gastric ­bypass surgery, John has lost 24 kilos and has stopped taking medication for diabetes, cholesterol and blood pressure. His blood-sugar levels are in the healthy range.</p> <p><strong>Surgery increases chance of a complete remission</strong></p> <p>Research has shown that people who have surgery within five years of being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have a 70 to 75 per cent chance of a complete remission.</p> <p>“If you have diabetes for three years, four years, the diabetes can go into remission within some weeks, but if you have ten years of diabetes, the recovery takes more time in the patient and may not happen,” says John’s surgeon, Rudolf Weiner, president of the German Society for Bariatric Surgery, who has performed more than 7500 surgeries since 1993. “People will live longer and have a better quality of life, and they are free from all medications and complications.”</p> <p>In 2016, more than 45 medical organisations endorsed bariatric surgery for people with moderate to severe obesity and diabetes.</p> <p><strong>Double-duty drugs</strong></p> <p>These tablets, which combine two ­diabetes drugs into one medication, have become more commonplace. The availability of particular drugs differs in each country, but a number of combination ­diabetes therapies are widely available in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and Malaysia. The trend gives ­people fewer tablets to swallow at each sitting, making it easier to follow treatment plans.</p> <p>“They can end up with three different diabetes medications,” Dr Lawrence says, “and that’s ­before you’ve considered that they’ll be taking treatment, potentially, for their high blood pressure and their cholesterol level.”</p> <p>How they work Two-in-one treatment is quickly becoming standard for people living with type 2 diabetes. Up to 43 per cent of them now take two or more diabetes drugs, according to a recent international study. They may help diabetes ­patients live healthier lives.</p> <p>“There are well-known studies that show if you can reduce the number of medications that patients have to take, then you improve their adherence,” Dr Lawrence says. What is double diabetes?</p> <p><strong>For type 1 diabetes: the artificial pancreas</strong></p> <p>The so-called artificial pancreas, referred to as a ‘hybrid-closed loop’ system, is a ­device that mimics the blood sugar function of a healthy pancreas. It has three parts: a sensor, placed under the skin, for continuous glucose monitoring; a laptop or smart phone component that receives information from the sensor, performs a series of algorithms to predict glucose levels and directs them to the pump; and the pump, which delivers insulin as required to tissue under the skin. A continuous loop is created without the need for human intervention.</p> <p><strong>Artificial pancreas: how it works</strong></p> <p>How does it work? When Anthony Tudela, 44, does mountain-bike ­racing, he’s no longer concerned that the intense physical exertion will lead to too-low blood sugar, known as ­hypoglycaemia. Since 2017, he’s worn an experimental artificial pancreas known as the Diabeloop DBLG1 ­system, which measures his blood-sugar levels every five minutes and consistently keeps him within target levels. When Tudela plans to physically ­exert himself or eat something, he inputs the data into the Diabeloop interface system on his mobile phone. The artificial pancreas then adjusts his insulin dose accordingly. The complete device checks his blood-sugar levels regularly, so if Tudela over- or under-calculates, the system should be able to adjust to keep ­glucose levels in range.</p> <p><strong>Managing sugar levels</strong></p> <p>“I can take sugar immediately, and 15 minutes later, the sugar level is OK,” says Tudela, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age seven.</p> <p>Before receiving an artificial pancreas, Tudela’s blood-sugar levels were on target only 30 to 40 per cent of the time. His A1C levels hovered between 11 and 12 per cent, and he experienced hypos regularly.</p> <p>With the hybrid-closed loop system, Tudela’s blood-sugar levels are on ­target 76 per cent of the time. His A1C levels have decreased to 7.5 per cent, and he doesn’t have hypos anymore, because the device keeps his blood-sugar levels in range.</p> <p>“With this machine I feel free – I can live as if I wasn’t diabetic,” Tudela says. “But you have to trust the device. For decades, you got accustomed to the idea that you have to control your disease; you are responsible for it. And all of a sudden, the device is responsible. You have to let it go, and it is not so easy.” Check out this extra info on what to eat to feel your best.</p> <p><strong>Next trial studying children</strong></p> <p>You can’t yet buy a hybrid-closed loop system like Tudela’s experimental one, but that could change soon. Diabeloop, a small French company, is in the process of marketing the DBLG1 system, which could become commercially available in the near future.</p> <p>“Insulin pumps have no intelligence; they just deliver insulin, ­according to a programme developed by the endocrinologist,” says Pierre-Yves Benhamou, head of the endocrinology-diabetology department at the Grenoble University Hospital Centre in France, who’s part of the Diabeloop medical development team. “The DBLG1 system is completely different. The quantity of insulin delivered to the patient adapts all the time according to the blood-sugar level of the patient.”</p> <p>All of the clinical trials thus far have been done on adults with type 1 ­diabetes, but the next trial will study children and adolescents. The goal is to eventually decrease the risk of hypoglycaemia in all people with type 1 diabetes.</p> <p><strong>Islet cell transplants</strong></p> <p>Islet cells in the pancreas make insulin. If they are destroyed, type 1 diabetes is diagnosed. So, wouldn’t transplanting healthy new islet cells fix the problem? Islet cell transplants are available in many countries, ­including Australia, Hong Kong, the UK and some European countries.</p> <p>“Islet transplantation is only considered if patients have been tried on optimal conventional treatment first,” says Professor Paul Johnson, director of the islet transplant programme at the University of Oxford. “They need to have been treated with the best possible modern insulins and insulin pumps, and despite that, still be getting hypoglycaemic unawareness.” All you need to know about insulin.</p> <p><strong>A less invasive procedure</strong></p> <p>How do they work? Islet cell transplants aren’t for everyone. “Islet transplantation is only considered if patients have been tried on optimal conventional treatment first,” says Professor Paul Johnson, director of the islet transplant programme at the University of Oxford. “They need to have been treated with the best possible modern insulins and insulin pumps, and despite that, still be getting hypoglycaemic unawareness.”It’s a much less invasive procedure than a whole pancreas transplant: ­islet cells are typically injected into the liver via the ­portal vein where they start to ­function as they would in the pancreas.</p> <p>“It isn’t a major operation,” Prof Johnson says. “It’s like having an ­intravenous drip run through. Nearly all the islet transplants are done in the X-ray department, with the patient still awake, but with a local anaesthetic injection over the liver and some sedation.”</p> <p><strong>Some people can stop taking insulin</strong></p> <p>Most people need two consecutive islet cell transplants to ensure that the procedure is effective and that the ­islets last. (The cells can last for many years but tend to function for three to five years.) Patients who receive islet cell transplants ­need to take anti-­rejection medication (immunosuppression) for the rest of their lives.</p> <p>Many people are able to stop taking insulin for some period of time: In a recent study, when 48 people whose type 1 diabetes was extremely difficult to manage (leading to life-threatening low blood sugar ­episodes/hypoglycaemia), received islet cell transplants, 52 per cent had in range glucose levels one year later without insulin.</p> <p><strong>An islet transplant can be life-saving</strong></p> <p>“Even if they require some insulin, an islet transplant can be life-saving in terms of preventing sudden death of undetected hypos,” Prof Johnson says, “and life-improving by helping to prevent complications such as blindness, ­kidney failure and heart disease ­resulting from high blood sugars.”</p> <p><em>Written by Sari Harrar. Additional reporting by Victoria Polzot. This article appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/diabetes/diabetes-whats-new-and-whats-next?pages=1">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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Clear signs you may suffer from “overactive bladder”

<p><span>What is an overactive bladder? Overactive bladder (OAB) is a very common condition that affects one in three Australians, according to the Continence Foundation of Australia. It causes a combination of symptoms related to involuntary urination. Here are the signs and symptoms you should know.</span></p> <ol> <li><strong><span> You get sudden urges to go</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>One of the classic overactive bladder symptoms is a sudden, uncontrollable urge to go. </span></p> <p><span>“We spend our younger years learning how to have our brains control our bladder, letting us empty our bladders when it is socially acceptable,” says urologist, Dr Aisha Khalali Taylor. “As we age as women, our bladders become defiant and start to want to overrule the brain, causing bladder contractions or spasms at times when it’s not socially acceptable.”</span></p> <p><span>Pregnancy and childbirth, as well as lower levels of oestrogen after menopause, can contribute to OAB in women. And although OAB is more common with age, it should not be considered a “normal” part of ageing.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong><span> You have to go all the time</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>Along with a sudden urge, you may feel like you have to urinate constantly. This happens for one of two reasons, “Either the nerves that provide information about sensation [sensory nerves] receive, or think they receive, information about being full or irritated; or the nerves that send signals to the muscle of the bladder are too active, and the muscle contracts,” explains urogynecologist, Dr W. Thomas Gregory. </span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong><span> You often go only a little bit</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>With overactive bladder, even though you may feel the urge to hit the bathroom all the time, not much comes out. </span></p> <p><span>“Sudden urge to urinate occurs because the muscles of the bladder start to contract involuntarily, even when the amount of urine in the bladder is low,” Dr Taylor says. “This involuntary contraction makes women feel an urgent need to urinate, which signals OAB, as the bladder lining becomes ‘hypersensitive’ to the smallest volumes of urine.” </span></p> <p><span>Note: this particular symptom could also be a symptom of a urinary tract infection (UTI). “The only way to truly tell the difference between a UTI and OAB is to obtain a urine culture to see if bacteria is growing in the urine,” Dr Taylor says. A urine culture is a very easy test that can be done in most labs.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong><span> You feel like you have to go even if you’ve just gone</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>You’ve just used the bathroom, but there it is again – that feeling of “gotta go”, so you turn around and head back in. If that happens to you, it could be OAB. </span></p> <p><span>This constant need for the bathroom can be disruptive, but luckily, there are natural remedies for overactive bladder that can help. </span></p> <p><span>“Sometimes we have to use our brains and emotions to retrain our bladder what is the right amount of urine to hold before going to the bathroom,” Dr Gregory says. </span></p> <p><span>Pelvic floor exercises called Kegels can help you control those muscles, especially if they’re done with a qualified pelvic floor therapist using a device such as InTone, which offers feedback on your progress. Then you can attempt bladder training, which involves “training yourself to delay urination when you feel the urge to urinate,” Dr Taylor says. </span></p> <p><span>“You start with small delays such as five to 10 minutes, and work your way up to three to four hours.”</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong><span> You wake up to go to the bathroom</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>It can be normal to wake up to go at night, but if your sleep is constantly disrupted due to multiple trips to the toilet, it can affect your cognitive function the next day. Disrupted sleep can even lead to depression. You might think not drinking before bed will resolve the problem, but reducing your total fluid intake is a bad idea. That will only make your urine more concentrated, which is irritating and can make overactive bladder symptoms worse. What’s more, “the kidneys produce urine all the time, even if you haven’t had anything to drink. “This is especially true at night when you lay down to go to sleep,” Dr Gregory explains. <br />“Fluid in your body has an easier time getting back to the heart because it doesn’t have to work as hard against gravity.”</span></p> <p><span>High urine output at night could also indicate other conditions such as congestive heart failure, sleep apnoea, diabetes, or poor kidney function, so see a urologist if you’re constantly waking up to pee to make sure it’s not something else.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong><span> You have accidents</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>All of a sudden having to go may mean that you end up going when you don’t want to – even if it’s just a few drops of urine. </span></p> <p><span>“The amount of urine one leaks is not necessarily correlated with severity of OAB,” Dr Taylor says. “What counts the most is the level of bother a patient feels. Some women are comfortable wearing pads and leaking large amounts of urine, while some are very bothered by the slightest drops.” </span></p> <p><span>Triggers for such accidents may be touching or hearing running water, drinking a small amount, or even briefly being in a cold environment, such as reaching into the freezer at the grocery store. </span></p> <p><span>To identify your personal triggers, keep a bladder diary. “If you leak urine, marking down what you were doing and feeling can help you and your provider understand that better,” Dr Gregory says. </span></p> <p><span>Retraining the bladder by scheduling bathroom trips at regular intervals can also help. “As infants we learn to control our bladder and go to the bathroom when it is socially acceptable,” Dr Gregory says, and you may need to do the same thing again now.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong><span> It doesn’t necessarily happen when you cough, sneeze or jump</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>You may think you don’t have OAB because you don’t leak when you sneeze or cough – but that isn’t a symptom of OAB. Instead, “stress incontinence” is actually a different type of bladder issue caused by a weakening of the pelvic floor muscles, according to the Australian Government Department of Health. </span></p> <p><span>“Leaking a few drops at a time can be a sign of stress urinary incontinence, when moving, coughing, sneezing, standing up, jumping and jogging put stress on the bladder to cause the leakage,” Dr Gregory says. </span></p> <p><span>But it’s possible to have both urgency incontinence, a symptom of OAB, and stress incontinence together. “Some women have a disorder called mixed incontinence when leakage occurs with both urge and coughing/straining activity,” Dr Taylor says. “It is important to discuss these concerns with a physician to tease out what is going on.”</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong><span> Certain foods and drinks trigger symptoms</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>Spicy or acidic foods, sugar, alcohol and caffeine can all be irritants, so you might notice your overactive bladder symptoms getting worse after you consume them. </span></p> <p><span>“Alcohol acts as a diuretic, causing more urine to be filtered through the kidneys, increasing subsequent urine production and the feeling of OAB,” Dr Taylor explains. “Caffeine acts as both a diuretic and also makes the bladder more sensitive by lowering the threshold at which a bladder contraction will occur.” </span></p> <p><span>Dr Gregory says that some people just have a lower tolerance for certain foods that irritate the bladder’s lining. “If you have that type of sensitivity, then a good strategy is to identify and avoid your trigger foods,” he says. Culprits often include hot peppers, tomato sauce, wasabi, and even cranberry juice.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="9"> <li><strong><span> You don’t have pain, burning or blood</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>Another way you can tell if it’s OAB or something else is whether you have pain, burning or blood in your urine in addition to your other symptoms. Having to go all the time is a real pain, but it shouldn’t actually hurt. If urinating causes pain, it could be a urinary tract infection, a sexually transmits infection, bladder or kidney stones. If you have any of these symptoms, see your doctor ASAP. If you don’t have these symptoms, it could be OAB.</span></p> <p><span> </span></p> <ol start="10"> <li><strong><span> You’re always scoping out bathrooms</span></strong></li> </ol> <p><span>Studies have shown that overactive bladder symptoms can really affect your quality of life. You may become reluctant to be in public situations where you’re unsure if there will be a bathroom readily available; and when you are out and about, you might find yourself always on the lookout for a restroom. </span></p> <p><span>“If you have any of the quality of life issues – knowing all the bathrooms, afraid to be in social settings – it’s time to talk with a doctor,” Dr Taylor says. </span></p> <p><span>Many OAB sufferers are often embarrassed to bring up the subject, but overactive bladder treatment is available, and there are completely natural remedies such as exercises and bladder retraining. If those don’t work, there are medications and procedures as a next step. </span></p> <p><span>“If you are changing the way you live – not seeing friends or family, not exercising or doing the things you like – then you should seek assistance,” Dr Gregory says. “These problems can often be addressed and improved.” </span></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Tina Donvito</span></em><em>. This article first appeared on <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/10-clear-signs-you-could-have-an-overactive-bladder" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>Image:</strong> Getty Images</p>

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Quaden Bayles undergoes 11th major surgery at nine years old

<p><span>Quaden Bayles made headlines across the world after he was filmed reacting to his bullying experience.</span><br /><br /><span>Now, he is undergoing his 11th surgical procedure in just nine years of life.</span><br /><br /><span>Quaden has gone under the knife to remove eight teeth due to overcrowding, in the Queensland Children’s Hospital in Brisbane on Monday.</span><br /><br /><span>The 9-year-old is expected to return to his Brisbane home on Tuesday.</span><br /><br /><span>In 2013, the young boy had a similar procedure to remove seven teeth as a three year old.</span><br /><br /><span>“We all know Quaden has a big mouth, just not quiet big enough to fit all these teeth in that have been trying to push through,” his mother Yarraka Bayles wrote on Facebook.</span><br /><br /><span>Quaden was born with Achondroplasia, the most common form of dwarfism.</span><br /><br /><span>Unfortunately it has caused numerous health complications for him over the years.</span><br /><br /><span>He also has had major brain and spinal surgeries that have added up over the years.</span><br /><br /><span>Supporters of Quaden have posted their wishes for a speedy recovery on the Facebook page for dwarfism awareness group Stand Tall 4 Dwarfism.</span><br /><br /><span>Seven months ago, Yarraka Bayles shared a video that showed Quaden inconsolable after a bullying incident at school that went viral.</span><br /><br /><span>It sparked an outpouring of support for the nine year old, including from several celebrities, from around the world.</span><br /><br /><span>“I want people to know - parents, educators, teachers - this is the effect that bullying has,” Yarraka says in the video.</span><br /><br /><span>“This is what bullying does.</span><br /><br /><span>“So can you please educate your children, your families, your friends.”</span></p>

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13 medical reasons you’re tired all the time

<p>You feel like you’re always going to bed early, but when your alarm goes off, it’s hard to open your eyes and you’re in a fog all day. You may feel like no matter how much sleep you’re getting, you’re still tired. But how do you know how much sleep you need?</p> <p>How much sleep you need varies by age. While newborns under three-months-old may need up to 19 hours of sleep and adults over 65 may need as little as five hours, most adults need about seven to nine hours of sleep a night. While not getting enough sleep can hurt your health in these sneaky ways, oversleeping and constantly being tired can be a sign of a problem.</p> <p>What’s best, according to Dr Jacob Teitelbaum, who specialises in sleep, fibromyalgia, and pain, is to sleep the amount of time that leaves you feeling the best. “If you are needing more than 10 hours of sleep to feel restored, however, then that suggests that your sleep quality is poor and needs to be addressed,” he says.</p> <p>If you’re getting enough sleep on a good schedule or are even oversleeping and still feel tired, it could be a sign of health problems.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you’re oversleeping on weekends</strong></p> <p>You may think skimping on sleep during the week and oversleeping during the weekends will help you feel well-rested, but it’s actually hurting your sleep. This habit is called “social jetlag” which is brought on by shifts in your sleeping schedule during the week versus on the weekends. “Your body prefers routine, but still appreciates you making up the sleep, so it’s best to find a steady balance you can stick to,” adds Dr Teitelbaum.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you’re anaemic</strong></p> <p>When you visit your doctor and complain of feeling tired all the time, the first things they’ll often check for is anaemia or thyroid disorder because you can detect those with a blood test, says Dr Amy Shah. “When a patient says ‘I’m tired,’ it’s such a broad term and could be so many things, but if someone says ‘I’m tired and feeling a little more short of breath,’ or, ‘I’m having trouble exercising,’ that tends to be anaemia.” Anaemia is when your blood doesn’t carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body and the most common cause of anaemia is iron deficiency. Anaemics may also experience feeling cold, dizzy, irritable, or have headaches in addition to feeling tired.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you have a condition that causes chronic pain</strong></p> <p>People who suffer from conditions, such as fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, hypothyroidism, and anaemia, often require sleep. “For fibromyalgia, the person is not able to go into deep restorative sleep because the sleep centre (the hypothalamus) is not working,” explains Dr Teitelbaum. “For rheumatoid arthritis, the pain often disrupts deep sleep, so it takes more sleep to get the same recharging of your battery.” In hypothyroidism and anaemia, extra sleep over nine hours doesn’t really help.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you have a thyroid problem</strong></p> <p>If you have a thyroid issue, like an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism), in addition to feeling tired, you might also feel like your skin is really dry and you’re constipated a lot, along with the lack of energy, says Dr Shah. Hypothyroidism is a condition that occurs when your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough of certain important hormones. While women are more likely to have hypothyroidism, thyroid function tests can diagnose hypothyroidism easily and if you have an issue, your doctor may prescribe a synthetic thyroid hormone.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because you…may have prediabetes or type 2 diabetes</strong></p> <p>Most people who have high blood sugar due to type 2 diabetes have insulin resistance. “Insulin is the key that opens up our cellular energy furnaces called mitochondria and allows sugar to enter to be burned for fuel,” explains Dr Teitelbaum. “Because this key is not working, sugar cannot get into the furnaces to be turned into energy, leaving people tired.”</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you’re depressed</strong></p> <p>If you feel like you’re tired all the time, don’t want to get out of bed in the morning, and/or have trouble sleeping, you could be suffering from depression. Your primary care physician should do a depression screening during a regular visit, says Dr Shah. Your doctor can use a screening tool to determine if you’re experiencing an ongoing depressive disorder, or whether a life stressor or alcohol affects your emotional state. “Depression, alcohol abuse, and fatigue are very tightly knit,” says Dr Shah. Sometimes people will treat depression with alcohol and then be tired, she says.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you may have gut issues or food sensitivity</strong></p> <p>Your gut is supposed to be a very closed system of cells where nothing from inside of the gut gets into the outside– like a pathway where the body absorbs what it needs without having things enter the rest of the body, says Dr Shah. “If you’re eating poorly, especially a lot of processed foods, the gut cells can become a looser, net-like structure instead of a tight structure and proteins that aren’t supposed to be in our bloodstream leak into our bloodstream, which creates an inflammatory response,” says Dr Shah. The inflammatory response is thought to possibly manifest as bloating, fatigue, moodiness, headaches, or weight gain. Some people call this leaky gut, although this condition hasn’t been clinically proven. If you have food sensitivities (to foods like wheat and dairy) you can feel fatigued, get rashes, and experience bloating or brain fog. “There’s no real good test for food sensitivities,” says Dr Shah. Following an elimination diet of possible food culprits and then slowly introducing them back in may help you identify what you’re sensitive to. If you remove all wheat from your diet and feel great, and then add it back and feel lethargic, that could be a tell-tale sign of a food sensitivity to wheat, Dr Shah says.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you’re suffering from adrenal fatigue</strong></p> <p>“Adrenal fatigue isn’t a Western medicine term, it’s a functional medicine term, and a lot of Western doctors don’t recognise it as a medical [issue],” says Dr Shah. There’s a disconnect because it’s hard to show with lab testing, she says. These hormone imbalances could be brought on by a stressful situation in your life, like family problems, or it could be constant stress at work, lack of sleep, over-exercising, having a poor diet, or drug or alcohol abuse, says Dr Shah. Those circumstances can push your stress hormones high and then eventually leave you exhausted and depleted, like a bank account that you’re overdrawing on and not putting money back into.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you have an infection</strong></p> <p>Doctors will often check for chronic infection as a cause of fatigue due to such infections as the Epstein-Barr virus (mononucleosis) or Lyme disease. Both of these medical issues can present with extreme fatigue.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you have sleep apnea</strong></p> <p>If you have sleep apnea, your throat starts to close when you’re asleep, which is why people with the condition tend to snore. Not getting enough oxygen sounds scary, but your brain won’t let you suffocate. “Sleep apnea prevents you from going into the deep restorative stages of sleep, so people are unable to get rested and fall asleep frequently during the day,” explains Dr Teitelbaum. “Falling asleep easily during the day with a shirt collar size over 42 centimetres, high blood pressure, being overweight and snoring tell you that you should check for sleep apnea.”</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you have heart failure</strong></p> <p>When you have heart failure, your heart can’t keep up with the body’s needs for blood. Your body will start to bring blood away from body tissues so it can keep vital organs fully supplied. With less blood in your leg muscles, even everyday activities can feel exhausting. Plus, fluid gets backed up in your veins leading away from your lungs. This increases pressure and allows fluid to leak into the lungs, making you lose your breath suddenly. When you’re asleep, it could wake you up and make for a restless night.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you have hypersomnia</strong></p> <p>Heneghan says oversleeping may be a sign of hypersomnia, a chronic neurological condition where you’re tired no matter how much sleep you get. According to the US Hypersomnia Foundation, you may have this condition if you’re tired during the day no matter how much sleep you get at night. The condition usually crops up in adolescence or early adulthood and can seriously affect sleep quality, as well as your ability to function during the day.</p> <p><strong>You’re tired because…you have haemochromatosis</strong></p> <p>Nearly 10 per cent of the Caucasian population carries a genetic marker for this condition, which causes the body to store too much iron. In addition to fatigue and weakness, haemochromatosis can also cause joint pain, stomach upset, depression, liver disease, heart trouble, and diabetes. While people are born with the condition, symptoms often don’t become obvious until people reach their 50s and 60s. Doctors can test for the condition using various blood screens; if you have any combination of these signs, talk to your GP about being tested.</p> <p><em>Written by Diana Kelly. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/13-medical-reasons-youre-tired-all-the-time?pages=1">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p>

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