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Why this mum isn’t going to tell her kids it’s Christmas Eve

<p>A mother has faced scrutiny over her controversial decision to not tell her children it’s Christmas Eve.</p> <p>Posting under the username “Mama Hechtick”, the mum asked for people’s opinions on parenting forum Mumsnet, as she explained that her reasoning behind not telling her children it’s Christmas Eve is, so they could have a good night’s sleep.</p> <p>“I have this idea, that for this year we won’t tell DC [Dear Children] it’s Christmas Eve,” wrote the mum. “We don’t do Christmas Eve boxes and they are usually disinterested in their advent calendars by mid-December so don’t really countdown as such.”</p> <p>According to the mum, her children, who are aged five and six, are unable to rest before Christmas day due to the sheer excitement. She plans to hide the fact that it’s Christmas Eve and wake them up early the next day and tell them it’s Christmas, as she believes that is more exciting.</p> <p>“I’m thinking that waking them up early and telling them it’s Christmas morning will be a far bigger and exciting surprise,” she explains.</p> <p>“Would I be unreasonable or mean for doing this,” she asks.</p> <p>“I think it’s the only year we’d get away with it. We don’t have any plans for Christmas Eve except a fairly quiet day with just us at home. Friends I’ve briefly discussed this with seem a bit off with it.”</p> <p>But her question had many parents disagreeing with the decision.</p> <p>“I wouldn’t,” said one mum. “The build-up is so exciting for children, don’t take that away from them.”</p> <p>“Waiting for Santa is half the fun,” says another. “I think it seems a bit mean.”</p> <p>“Don’t you put out milk and biscuits for Santa and a carrot for the reindeer, or track Santa online, watch a Christmas movie or read the night before Christmas?” asked one mum. “It’s not something I would miss out on but if you don’t do anything at all then why not?”</p> <p>“You can’t do that,” said another. “When I was a kid, I was so excited for Christmas Eve. Trying to stay awake to see Santa, the excitement of the next day, don’t take that away from them just so they get a good night sleep.</p> <p>“Kids aren’t kids for long, let them enjoy the build-up and don’t suck the fun out of it.”</p> <p>What do you think? Do you think the mum should keep Christmas Eve from her kids? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Internet is divided after woman claims it’s “too early” to celebrate Christmas

<p>A blogger has caused an uproar after she claimed that it was too early for Christmas decorations, as it’s only November.</p> <p>Beauty YouTuber Niomi Smart tweeted to her thousands of followers that it was too early to get into the festive spirit after she spotted a Christmas tree in someone’s window.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Just spotted a Christmas tree in someone’s window... a little early, no? 🎄</p> — Niomi Smart (@niomismart) <a href="https://twitter.com/niomismart/status/1060163205178245120?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">7 November 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The tweet has garnered over 2,100 favourites and 96 retweets but not everyone was supportive, as many disagreed with the popular blogger.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Never too early! Lol <a href="https://t.co/fOkAGszowk">pic.twitter.com/fOkAGszowk</a></p> — MacNC45 (@angelaraynell) <a href="https://twitter.com/angelaraynell/status/1060165920876847105?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">7 November 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Clearly outraged, a few users claimed it is “never too early” to get into the Christmas spirit.</p> <p>“Not early at all. My decorations are going up this weekend,” said one user.</p> <p>“Just put mine up today! Season goes by too fast. It makes me happy,” wrote another.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Noooo never too early! Just done mine <a href="https://t.co/GDeZudgwr9">pic.twitter.com/GDeZudgwr9</a></p> — Clarey (@Clarey_82) <a href="https://twitter.com/Clarey_82/status/1061362344650006528?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">10 November 2018</a></blockquote> <p>But despite the controversial claim, there were a few that agreed with Ms Smart.</p> <p>“Mine goes up the week before Christmas, and comes down on the Twelfth Night,” said a follower.</p> <p>One person said: “Agreed! In Canada, most of us wait until after Remembrance Day for any kind of decorations.”</p> <p>When do you start putting up Christmas decorations in your house? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Woman's ridiculous list of rules for husband

<p>One wife is receiving backlash after sharing the list of rules she expects her husband to follow.</p> <p>Writing on the Facebook group “Get It Off Your Chest”, the woman by the name of “Rosiee” explained that she wanted feedback on the list of rules she wrote for her partner.</p> <p>Admitting that she re-drafted the rules because she was told the first lot were a bit “harsh”, she asked for “honest opinions” from online users.</p> <p>Rosiee shared the 10 commandments for her man, which included “no female friends”, “no social media” and “must work minimum 50 hours a week”.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 373.2612055641422px;" src="/media/7821932/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ca3850b4f57a43519afb00f137b48a67" /></p> <p>The wife also believes her husband should keep the house clean at all times and not go out without her present.</p> <p>Since sharing her rules, Rosiee has been flooded with criticism for her extreme policing of her husband.</p> <p>“You should just get a dog,” wrote one Facebook user.</p> <p>“This is your husband right?” asked another. “I don’t think he agreed to be your slave when you married him.”</p> <p>“I have guy friends that are married,” wrote one woman. “It’s no problem. My boyfriend has great female friends. Again, no problem. If you have mutual respect and true love, you don’t need these rules.”</p> <p>While the users don’t know Rosiee personally, they suggested that the strict rules were a reflection of her “insecurities” and fears that her partner would cheat.</p> <p>According to therapist Shannon Thomas, partners who are controlling develop into “toxic people”.</p> <p>Speaking to <u><a href="https://www.whimn.com.au/"><strong>whimn.com.au</strong></a>,</u> Thomas said: “Toxic people have the ability to affect all areas of our lives, and we are often blind to this.”</p> <p>“We make excuses for them. We believe and internalise the lies they feed us. And, in turn, that affects how we view ourselves and our worth. Toxic people receive pleasure from taking joy away from the things we once loved, such as work, friendships, hobbies, and even our love for ourselves.”</p> <p>Thomas said the best way to gauge if you are in a toxic relationship is to reflect on how they make you feel after spending time with them.</p> <p>“The best gauge is to see how you feel after interacting with someone – our physical and emotional reactions to people are our best indicators.”</p> <p>Many commenters on Rosiee’s post suggested that her husband should respond to her list of rules by doing one thing: “Run!”</p> <p>Have you ever been in a controlling relationship? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Bride receives upsetting "accidental" text from mother-in-law

<p>A bride-to-be was left speechless after being on the receiving end of a rather nasty text from her future mother-in-law that was supposed to be sent to someone else.</p> <p>Posting under the screen name Bamboo2u, the distressed woman took to internet forum Reddit as she sought advice for how to handle her future mother-in-law who was caught “talking sh*t” about her mum after a day spent wedding dress shopping.</p> <p>The woman recounted the day's events and claimed that during the hunt for a wedding dress, her mum suggested to keep her maiden name for work but take her husband's name for everything else. To which her mother-in-law agreed as she does the same.</p> <p>According to the poster, the day went smoothly, and her mother-in-law has never shown any hostility towards the bride’s mother before.</p> <p>“So later that night after we all parted ways, I get a text message that was ‘accidentally’ sent to me. It was from my fiancé’s mother. I made the mistake of reading it from my car with my fiancé in the car,” she wrote.</p> <p>“The text said the whole day was a sh*t show and that my mum advised me to not take my fiance’s name for career reasons.”</p> <p>The woman was “hurt and pissed” that her mother-in-law was talking badly about her mum behind her back and that she was concerned over what she has said about her to other people in the family.</p> <p>The mother-in-law also refused to issue an apology and wouldn’t look at her when they met after the incident.</p> <p>Most users on the popular forum sided with the bride, as they considered the mother-in-law to be out of line, with many saying she should be excluded from the rest of the wedding planning.</p> <p>“I think it’s hypocritical that she is passing judgement on your mum for the very thing she does,” said one user.</p> <p>Do you agree with the bride being upset with her mother-in-law? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Can you see what’s wrong with this photo of a crow?

<p>A photo of a crow is making users on social media do a double take as all is not what it seems.</p> <p>Originally posted on <a rel="noopener" href="https://imgur.com/JAW80Ee" target="_blank">Imgur</a> and <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.reddit.com/r/confusing_perspective/comments/9rsqo3/cat_shapes_like_a_bird/" target="_blank">Reddit</a>, the photo shows a black bird standing on its side on a tiled surface, but on closer inspection, you realise you’ve been fooled.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7821788/cat.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6e0da6ec94074e8a8a7180490c13aa40" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Photo: <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/confusing_perspective/comments/9rsqo3/cat_shapes_like_a_bird/">Reddit </a></em></p> <p>Have you noticed it yet?</p> <p>The big reveal sent Twitter into a meltdown after it was revealed that the crow isn’t actually a crow, but it’s a black cat with his head tilted.</p> <p>The “bird’s” beak is the cat’s ear, and if you look closely, you’ll notice the cat’s second eye is on what is supposed to be the crow’s neck.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://t.co/5iragBms6W">pic.twitter.com/5iragBms6W</a></p> — Robert Maguire (@RobertMaguire_) <a href="https://twitter.com/RobertMaguire_/status/1056368608031444992?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">28 October 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://t.co/X2ktE7Qr86">pic.twitter.com/X2ktE7Qr86</a></p> — 🔊AudiO∇Owl 🦉 (@pheealzabub) <a href="https://twitter.com/pheealzabub/status/1056375861820166145?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">28 October 2018</a></blockquote> <p>After people realised they were tricked, a few hilarious reactions ensued.</p> <p>One person posted, “Damn kitty you got me there,” while another said, “Holy crap, totally got me.”</p> <p>“Usually, once you see it, you can’t unsee it. But every time I look at it, I still see the bird,” wrote one user.</p> <p>How long did it take you to figure it out? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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CHOICE reveals: How long your appliances should really last

<p>As consumers we’re lucky that we have an abundance of appliance choices to choose from to suit every budget. With toasters starting at $20 reaching all the way up to $150, there is something out there for everyone.</p> <p>But just how long should you expect an affordable appliance to last in comparison to its higher-end counterpart? <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.choice.com.au/" target="_blank">Choice</a></em> has released new guidelines, showcasing the “reasonable” life expectancy of household appliances.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fchoiceaustralia%2Fposts%2F10156656490116163&amp;width=500" width="500" height="669" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>According to the consumer group, while your cheap toaster could die out within two years, you can expect your expensive fridge to last over 10 years.</p> <p>The results of the research were based around 1000 people who took part in the survey, along with in-house product testing and manufacturer feedback.</p> <p>“In most cases the lifetime for electrical appliances should go way beyond the one-to-two-year manufacturer’s warranty,” said spokeswoman for Choice, Nicky Breen.</p> <p>If a product turns out to be faulty, shoppers have the right to a full refund or replacement under New Zealand Consumer Protection. The rule applies regardless of the consumer being within the official warranty period.</p> <p>But according to Ms Breen, it isn’t that simple as consumer guarantees tend to be a “little confusing”.</p> <p>“The law says you’re entitled to a remedy if a fault develops within a reasonable amount of time, but it’s not clear what that reasonable time is,” she said</p> <p>“You may buy a TV or fridge and it develops a fault within a year or two, you take it back to the retailer and there’s an impasse. What we’re doing is urging people to use these guidelines.”</p> <p>According to the results of the survey, a fridge should last around six to 13 years, while washing machines and dishwashers have a lifespan of five to 11 years. A laptop will give you four to eight years depending on how expensive it is, and a smartphone should last between three to six years.</p> <p>“Someone should start a GoFundMe to put this on billboards outside of Harvey Norman and The Good Guys,” said Facebook user, Kristen Hall.</p> <p>Others compared appliances today to the ones sold in the past. “Washing machines, the prehistoric ones, lasted and lasted, 25-plus years and still working,” said Helen Valen.</p> <p>“Had to replace them just because we got sick of waiting for them to fail and they didn’t look their best anymore. Same with stoves. So, it’s not the technology, it’s the design for failure/obsolescence business model."</p> <p>Naomi Agar pointed out that her mum’s fridge had to be replaced last year, after 47 years. “My microwave purchased in “’88 is still going”, she said.</p> <p>But not everyone was convinced as some pointed out the discrepancies in the survey results. “The mobile phone one is a joke,” Karla McClelland said. “The latest Samsung and Apple phones don’t last more than two years before something stuffs up.”</p> <p>Adam Scott questioned the life expectancy of a laptop saying, “Where did you get that figure? The life expectancy of a spinning drive is two years, three maximum,” he said.</p> <p>“The heat paste on the CPU will be chalk after a few years, leading to the CPU and GPU overheating. That’s if the power brick hasn’t died by then. Oh, and the battery will have well and truly died by then.” </p> <p>Do you agree with these results? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Buckingham Palace left red-faced after Princess Eugenie blunder

<p>On Friday, Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank said “I do” in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle.</p> <p>While the wedding was quickly overshadowed with the announcement that Prince Harry and Meghan are expecting their first child, a mistake by Buckingham Palace has added to the insult.</p> <p>The official Instagram account of The Royal Family made one disastrous blunder while announcing the sale of commemorative mugs marking last Friday’s nuptials.</p> <p>The post, which informed followers that the limited edition mugs were available “only till Saturday”, mistakenly referred to Princess Beatrice, rather than Eugenie.</p> <p>“This exclusive mug issued in commemoration of the wedding of HRH Princess Beatrice of York and Mr Jack Brooksbank is now available for purchase by following the link in the description,” the caption said.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 313px; height: 418px;" src="/media/7821438/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e5e178aa9c1e4366a095fb6c1e229f37" /></p> <p>Princess Beatrice is Eugenie’s older sister and was chosen to be her maid of honour on her wedding day.</p> <p>The post was quickly deleted and has been uploaded again with the correct details.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpBd3i5DdWB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BpBd3i5DdWB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Available only till Saturday! This exclusive mug issued in commemoration of the Wedding of HRH Princess Eugenie of York and Mr. Jack Brooksbank is now available for purchase by following the link in the description! #RoyalWedding Purchase yours today!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/buckinghamroyal/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> The Royal Family</a> (@buckinghamroyal) on Oct 16, 2018 at 10:43pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote>

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How to check if your Facebook account has been hacked

<p>Between September 14-27, 30 million Facebook accounts were hacked, and now the social media juggernaut has unveiled a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/help/securitynotice?ref=sec" target="_blank">website</a> that will help you determine if your account has been compromised.</p> <p>“We're very sorry this happened,” it said of the incident. “Your privacy is incredibly important to us, and we want to update you on what we've learned from our ongoing investigation, including which Facebook accounts are impacted, what information was accessed and what Facebook users can do about this.”</p> <p>Facebook has made a move to assure its users, which according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/264810/number-of-monthly-active-facebook-users-worldwide/" target="_blank">Statista</a></em> amount to over 2.2 billion monthly active users worldwide, <span>that sensitive information like passwords and financial information were not accessed by hackers.</span></p> <p>“There's no need for anyone to change their passwords,” said the company.</p> <p>But other information was hacked, reported <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/can-check-facebook-account-hacked-042356675.html" target="_blank">7News</a></em>, such as phone numbers and email addresses, and in the case of 14 million accounts, the type of information that you can see on your friends’ accounts such as location, birthdate and relationship status.</p> <p>You can find out simply if your Facebook account has been hacked. On the Facebook advice website, scroll about halfway down to the question, “Is my Facebook account impacted by this security issue?” and you’ll have a notification there, specific to your account, if you have been affected.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 123.021px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7821357/facebook-notice.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/94961eb42d334a35a773be434fdab00b" /></p> <p>You’ll also be provided with account-specific information if you are logged in to Facebook.</p> <p>One expert argues that in light of the hacks, Facebook should be offering users free “credit monitoring” in case sensitive financial information may be accessed.</p> <p>“Those personal details could very easily be used for identity theft to sign up for credit cards, get a loan, get your banking password, et cetera,” said Patrick Moorhead, founder of Moor Insights &amp; Strategy.</p> <p>“Facebook should provide all those customers free credit monitoring to make sure the damage is minimised.”</p> <p>Facebook has declined to say where the effected users are located, only saying the breaches were “fairly broad”. The company says it will contact those account holders who have been hacked.</p> <p>According Facebook, the hacks are currently being investigated by the FBI, but the Bureau requested it didn’t discuss the culprits behind it.</p> <p>You can find more information at the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/help/securitynotice?ref=sec" target="_blank">Facebook advice site</a>.</p> <p>Did you find the Facebook advice helpful? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p> </p>

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The palace bungles Princess Eugenie wedding tweet – can you spot the blunder?

<p>The official Royal Family twitter account was forced to delete one tweet about Princess Eugenie’s upcoming wedding because of a glaring error.</p> <p>The Queen’s granddaughter is set to say “I do” to her fiancé later today in St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle – the same location as Prince Harry and Meghan’s wedding earlier this year.</p> <p>Although it is the second royal wedding of the year, the error in the tweet led fans to question whether less attention is being given to Eugenie’s nuptials.</p> <p>Can you spot the mistake in this tweet?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 275.97402597402595px;" src="/media/7821307/2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a6f0971ae6f14875a778ebcfa720ace4" /></p> <p>The tweet bungled the name of Eugenie’s partner, referring to him as Mr Jacksbrook rather than his correct surname, Mr Brooksbank.</p> <p>The account, which has 3.81 million followers, quickly received backlash for the typo.</p> <p>One person replied: “I believe “Bank Jacksbrook” is his super secret spy name.”</p> <p>Another said: “It’s Jack Brooksbank, or Jacksbrook to his rapper crew.”</p> <p>The tweet stayed on the account for 40 minutes until someone alerted the Royals to the error.</p> <p>The tweet was later reposted with the correct spelling.</p> <p>Eugenie, 28, will have a traditional church service which will be followed by the newlyweds embarking on a carriage ride through the streets of Windsor.</p> <p>Guests will then move to the Queen’s residence for an afternoon reception at Windsor Castle.</p> <p>In the evening, there will be a formal sit-down dinner at the Royal Lodge in Windsor, the residence of her parents Andrew and Sarah Ferguson.</p> <p>The following day, the newlyweds and their friends and family will be enjoying a festival-themed afternoon party.</p> <p>Princess Eugenie first met Jack when she was 20 years old while at a Swiss holiday resort in Verbier.</p> <p>Will you be tuning in to watch Princess Eugenie’s wedding tonight? Let us know in the comments. </p>

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Warning: WhatsApp voicemail scam gives hackers access to your account

<p>A worrying new WhatsApp hack allows cyber criminals to access victim’s accounts via their voicemail inbox.</p> <p>According to <a href="https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2018/10/08/attackers-use-voicemail-hack-to-steal-whatsapp-accounts/"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Naked Security</u></em></strong></a>, a blog run by British security company Sophos, scammers are attempting the attacks at night so they can take advantage of the app’s six-digit verification code.</p> <p>The attacks have become so prevalent that Israel’s National Cyber Security Authority issued a nationwide warning.</p> <p>Hackers start the scam by installing WhatsApp on their own phone using a legitimate user’s phone number.</p> <p>To verify the login attempt, WhatsApp sends a six-digit verification code via text message to the victim’s telephone.</p> <p>However, hackers are carrying out this scam at night, so victims are most likely sleeping rather than checking their phones.</p> <p>WhatsApp then allows the hacker to send the six-digit verification code via phone call with an automated message.</p> <p>As the victim is not on their phone, the message ideally goes to voicemail.</p> <p>The cyber criminal then exploits a security flaw in many telecommunication networks which allows customers to use a generic phone number to call and retrieve their voicemails.</p> <p>For many mobile phone owners, only a four-digit pin is required to access their voicemails – which if they haven’t changed is commonly 0000 or 1234 by default.</p> <p>Hackers will then enter the password and gain access to the victim’s voicemail inbox, allowing them to retrieve the WhatsApp message containing the six-digit code.</p> <p>Once the scammer enters the code into their own phone, they have complete access to the victim’s WhatsApp account.</p> <p>To avoid being hacked, it is recommended that users turn on two-factor authentication on their account, adding an extra layer of security.</p> <p>“Using application-based 2FA ... mitigates a lot of the risk, because these mobile authentication apps don’t rely on communications tied to phone numbers,” Sophos researchers explained. </p> <p>This can be done by navigating to Settings in WhatsApp, then tapping ‘Account’.</p> <p>Users must then press on ‘Two-step verification’ and tap ‘Enable’.</p> <p>Experts also encourage users to have a strong PIN on their voicemail inbox.</p> <p>Have you encountered this WhatsApp scam? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Barack Obama’s heartfelt tribute to Michelle on 26th wedding anniversary

<p>Barack and Michelle Obama have been known to inspire couples around the world with their love and appreciation for each other.</p> <p>And on Wednesday, the pair celebrated their 26th wedding anniversary by taking to social media and sharing a heartfelt message for one another.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Happy Anniversary, <a href="https://twitter.com/MichelleObama?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@MichelleObama</a>. For 26 years, you’ve been an extraordinary partner, someone who can always make me laugh, and my favorite person to see the world with. <a href="https://t.co/s8xoZ9j2YR">pic.twitter.com/s8xoZ9j2YR</a></p> — Barack Obama (@BarackObama) <a href="https://twitter.com/BarackObama/status/1047564181266939905?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">3 October 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Posting on Twitter, the former US President shared a photo of Michelle and captioned it: “For 26 years, you’ve been an extraordinary partner, someone who can always make me laugh, and my favourite person to see the world with.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Thank you <a href="https://twitter.com/BarackObama?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@barackobama</a> for 26+ years of love, trust, and respect - for being a man who always lifts up and honors me and our wonderful girls. Each day I’m with you, I’m reminded of what a treasure you truly are to us all. <a href="https://t.co/dfgJRMyWJj">https://t.co/dfgJRMyWJj</a></p> — Michelle Obama (@MichelleObama) <a href="https://twitter.com/MichelleObama/status/1047567519370956800?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">3 October 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Michelle then replied to the tweet with a message of her own, saying, “Thank you @barackobama for 26+ years of love, trust and respect – for being a man who always lifts up and honors me and our wonderful girls.</p> <p>“Each day I’m with you, I’m reminded of what a treasure you truly are to us all.”</p> <p>The duo formed a bond in 1989, after Barack was mentored by Michelle at Chicago law firm Sidley Austin.</p> <p>But despite their loving relationship now, Michelle says she wasn’t fond of Barack at first.</p> <p>“Barack about a month in, asked me out, and I thought, ‘No way. This is completely tacky,’” she told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://abcnews.go.com/" target="_blank">ABC News</a>.</em></p> <p>But she later gave in and agreed to go on a date to the Art Institute of Chicago and later watched the 1989 Spike Lee film <em>Do the Right Thing</em>.</p> <p>“He showed all the sides – he was hip, cutting edge, cultural, sensitive. The fountain – nice touch. The walk – patient,” Michelle revealed to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/" target="_blank">The Telegraph</a>.</em></p> <p>The power couple decided to tie the knot after three years of dating on October 3, 1992.</p> <p>Taking to her Instagram earlier in the year, Michelle shared a rare photo of the two from their wedding day, giving an inside look into their relationship.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BjHhl_lgrQN/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">You can’t tell it from this photo, but Barack woke up on our wedding day in October, 1992 with a nasty head cold. Somehow, by the time I met him at the altar, it had miraculously disappeared and we ended up dancing almost all night. Twenty five years later, we’re still having fun, while also doing the hard work to build our partnership and support each other as individuals. I can’t imagine going on this wild ride with anybody else.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/michelleobama/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Michelle Obama</a> (@michelleobama) on May 23, 2018 at 4:03am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“You can’t tell it from this photo, but Barack woke up on our wedding day in October 1992 with a nasty head cold,” she wrote in the caption.</p> <p>“Somehow, by the time I met him at the altar, it had miraculously disappeared, and we ended up dancing almost all night.</p> <p>“Twenty-five years later, we’re still having fun, while also doing the hard work to build our partnership and support each other as individuals. I can’t imagine going on this wild ride with anybody else.”</p>

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8 Facebook scams you need to avoid getting tricked into

<p>You might just use Facebook for watching funny cat videos, but crooks use it to steal your money and information.</p> <p><strong>1. Taking quizzes</strong></p> <p>Your friend just found out what ‘80s pop star is their spirit animal and now you can’t wait to find out either.</p> <p>Don’t let your curiosity get the better of you, though.</p> <p>Some Facebook quizzes will ask for access to your profile, and others will even go a step further by throwing certain questions into the quiz itself, says Adam Levin, founder of global identity protection and data risk services firm CyberScout and author of <em>Swiped</em>.</p> <p>“They’re purely to gather information because … they could be the answers to security questions,” he says.  </p> <p>Only take quizzes on sites you know and trust and create fake answers for password recovery questions so they’re hard to crack, says Levin.</p> <p>It might be easy enough for Facebook scams to figure out your mother’s maiden name, so leave an easy-to-remember lie instead. </p> <p><strong>2. Insane giveaways</strong></p> <p>Free iPad giveaway? Sign me up! But wait – before you click that sweepstakes link, ask yourself whether it seems real, says Eva Velasquez, CEO and president of Identity Theft Resource Centre.</p> <p>“Yes, there are legitimate sweepstakes and raffles and giveaways, but there’s usually an end goal there,” she says.</p> <p>Most companies are hoping the promise of a free iPad (or flight or jewellery) will entice you enough to, say, sign up for a newsletter or buy a product.</p> <p>Before you give any personal information to a company, weigh the chances of winning with what you'll lose giving up personal information.</p> <p><strong>3. The “new” old friend</strong></p> <p>Be sceptical if you receive a friend request from someone you could have sworn already had a Facebook page.</p> <p>Sure, some people like to clean house by ditching their old profiles, but other friend requests aren’t so innocent.</p> <p>Scammers will clone a person’s entire Facebook profile, creating a fake profile of a real person. From your “friend’s” page, the hacker could send a link for a get-rich-quick scheme or a cute quote.</p> <p>It’s the kind of thing you’d ignore from an anonymous e-mail message, but not from a loyal friend.</p> <p>“They’re banking on the fact that you will trust the message,” says Levin.</p> <p>The problem is, clicking that link could add malware to your computer.</p> <p>Before you accept a weird friend request, shoot over a text or call the person to confirm it’s not a fake account.</p> <p><strong>4. A friend’s strange request</strong></p> <p>Even if you haven’t received a new request, don’t immediately trust a message from a friend you can’t see face-to-face.</p> <p>Hackers can find a person’s password and break into their account, then message their friends. The person might claim to have lost their wallet in Europe and ask you to send money. It might sound obvious enough now that it’s a scam, but those messages could tap into your fear, so you don’t think straight.</p> <p>If you’re wondering if your “friend” is who you think it is, get in touch on a platform other than Facebook. Ringtones sound different in other countries, so you’ll be able to figure out if your friend is travelling, even if they don’t pick up the phone, says Levin.</p> <p>Still not sure? Again, get in touch off of Facebook to find out what’s going on. </p> <p><strong>5. Gossipmongers</strong></p> <p>Whether you know the person who posted it or not, you might go into panic mode when someone leaves you a message warning, “OMG look what they’re saying about you” and click the link to find out what’s going on.</p> <p>“It’s really about engaging your curiosity and getting your curious nature to say, ‘I want to know,’” says Velasquez. But don’t click!</p> <p>A vague message (“Did you see this picture of you?” vs “LOL at your face eating cake at Sam’s party last weekend”) is suspect, and clicking it could load malware onto your computer, says Velasquez.</p> <p>Text your friend to confirm the link is real.</p> <p><strong>6. Coupon codes</strong></p> <p>Liking a store or restaurant’s fan page – or even keeping an eye on the ads – can be a great way to stay in the loop when there’s a sale. </p> <p>If a post shows a promo code and it works, lucky you! You just saved some cash.</p> <p>But be sceptical if you need to give personal information or create an account to unlock the savings.</p> <p>In some Facebook scams, a site poses as a real store but is phishing information.</p> <p>“Open a new browser tab and Google it,” says Velasquez. “Go to the source and see what’s going on.”</p> <p>If there’s a genuine promotion, you can bet the store’s official site will let you know. </p> <p><strong>7. Fundraisers</strong></p> <p>Particularly after a major tragedy, you’ll see plenty of ads and posts from charities offering to help the victims.</p> <p>While some of those fundraisers really will go to the people who need it, others could just be scammers preying on your caring spirit, says Levin.</p> <p>For one thing, clicking a link from those schemers could put malware on the computer. Worse? Your money won’t go to victims of the tragedy, but straight in the pocket of a crook.</p> <p>To keep your money safe, do a Google search of the site instead of clicking the Facebook post link, says Levin. </p> <p>Seek out a trusted charity instead of donating to the first you see advertised.</p> <p><strong>8. Secret Santa</strong></p> <p>It sounds like a great idea: some stranger is setting up a “Secret Santa,” where you send one person a $10 gift, and three other people will send you one, too.</p> <p>But like those old snail mail lottery ticket chains, there’s no guarantee you’ll get your money back in these Facebook scams.</p> <p>If no one else follows through sending your gift, you might not get anything in return.</p> <p>“You just gave your home address to a stranger with a list of stuff you like,” says Velasquez.</p> <p>“Is the return really worth the investment?” </p> <p><em>Written by Marissa LaLiberte. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/8-facebook-scams-you-need-avoid-getting-tricked?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img src="/media/7820640/1.png" style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;"/></p>

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Newly single mum divides the internet over changing her baby's surname

<p>Most people generally have their future children’s name thought of before the test of time. And once a couple find out they are pregnant, that’s one of the main topics of discussion to make sure both parties agree with what the child will go by for the rest of their life.</p> <p>But that’s just the first name – what about the baby’s surname?</p> <p>A mother looking for advice turned to parenting forum<em> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/am_i_being_unreasonable/3371050-to-want-daughter-to-change-name?pg=1" target="_blank">Mumsnet</a></em>, asking whether she should change her one-year-old baby’s surname – and it has the internet divided.</p> <p>Posting on the forum, the confused mother wrote, “I’m just about to get divorced and my 1yr DD [darling daughter] has his surname,” she wrote.</p> <p>The woman went on to clarify that she will be changing her surname back to her maiden name and doesn’t want her daughter to carry a different name due to the father’s choice of walking out on them because they’re “too much hassle".</p> <p>“He said to me he finds being a dad stressful and he wants to focus on himself,” she continued.</p> <p>She said she knows that he won’t be fond of the decision, and she is aware that she will need his permission to have it changed.</p> <p>She has asked the internet if it would be unreasonable to change both hers and her daughter's to a double-barrelled surname, combining both his and her names.</p> <p>“I know its just semantics, but I always dreamed of having a child and I love being a mum and I don’t see why I have to lose our family name connection because I married the wrong man.”</p> <p>Her post gathered mixed responses as some people felt it wasn’t important to have matching names, suggesting the woman simply keep her married name to match her daughter.</p> <p>“What’s in a name?” asked another, who said she should ask her dad’s permission, but then “if he says no then that’s that isn’t it? It won’t really affect her life so don’t let this upset you too much.”</p> <p>A few wise posters advised the mother to focus on the future:</p> <p>“If you were to marry again in the future would you take your new spouse’s name? Would any of the children of that marriage take your ‘maiden’ name or their father’s name. Your dd [darling daughter] could turn out to be the only one with your ‘family name connection’.”</p> <p>They then went on to suggest that the mum just leave it as it is for now and allow her daughter to make her own decision in the future.</p> <p>Others mentioned that the father, who is no longer in the picture, shouldn’t have a say in what their child is called.</p> <p>“If he’s really said he wants out because he wants ‘Me Time’ and you’ll be the main carer of DD [darling daughter] then yeah why shouldn’t she have your last name?” replied one person.</p> <p>Another user questioned as to why he would “really give a sh*t what her name is” if he didn’t want to be a dad. “Just tell him you’d like her to have the same surname as you and to sign here please.”</p> <p>And one poster responded bluntly, writing, “I would change it. Why does your name trump his? Because he cannot be bothered to be part of your family so why should he have the family name.</p> <p>“Just because he’s the biological father didn’t mean he’s the proper dad. You and your dd [darling daughter] will have a bright future without this deadweight. Sorry he turned out to be such an arse.”</p> <p>Do you think the newly single mum should change her child's surname to her own? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

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Widower’s advice to woman goes viral

<p>No one wants to be stuck in a relationship with an unsupportive partner. Whether you’re trying to lose weight, reach a career milestone or start a new hobby, the support of the people you love is important.</p> <p>Earlier this week a young woman took to the internet to ask for advice on how to deal with her boyfriend making comments about the way she looks.</p> <p>“Advice needed: I’m losing weight, but my partner is still giving me a hard time about my appearance,” the 21-year-old wrote on <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/loseit/comments/9g5jk5/advice_needed_im_losing_weight_but_my_partner_is/"><em>Reddit</em></a>.</p> <p>“We were going swimming the other day and I commented that the water was cold. I was met with the response ‘trust me you have more than enough insulation,’” she continued, now in the deleted post.</p> <p>While many responded with outrage at the woman’s boyfriend’s attitude, it was the reply from a widower about his regret for not being more supportive of his wife’s body image that really struck a chord with readers.</p> <p>“This is extremely blunt, but there is a lot of wisdom behind this,” he started his response.</p> <p>“I am an old man now, and my wife is gone. She was the most beautiful woman I have ever known, inside and out, … but she often struggled to see that.”</p> <p>The man looked back at the time his wife “started dieting and working out extensively” and because he was busy with his own commitments and was “absorbed” in his work he didn’t really notice.</p> <p>It started an argument where the man’s wife asked whether he didn’t find her attractive anymore because of her weight.</p> <p>“One of my biggest regrets that still haunts me to this day is that I ever made her feel less than beautiful,” he continued.</p> <p>“It still hurts me to think of the days and months where she was eating less in the hopes that I’d love her more. It makes me angry at myself.”</p> <p>The man then went on to offer some advice to the original poster about her relationship and how she was being treated by her boyfriend.</p> <p>“As the user I’m replying to said, the weight you need to lose is not from yourself,” he wrote.</p> <p>“I am sure that your partner has benevolent feelings towards you, but he is behaving in a fundamentally unloving way to you. He’s giving you unhealthy food for your soul.”</p> <p>He also advised the young girl to speak to her boyfriend about how his treatment was making her feel.</p> <p>“If he loves you, I think he would be horrified to realise what his words do to you. If he does not realise that, you need to feed your soul a better diet,” he finished his post.</p> <p>The widower’s heartfelt response received a metaphorical round of applause from the forum with many praising him for his thoughtful and enlightening reply.</p> <p>“Everyone is human, and no one is perfect, especially in a relationship. You realised that inadvertently hurt her and changed course. That’s what a kind, loving person does,” one user responded.</p> <p>“Your post is incredibly valuable for women whose partners disrespect them in the way OP’s (original poster) partner does, because it helps them realise that there are people out there that care and want their partners to feel good.”</p> <p>Many thanked the poster as it allowed them to realise the mistakes they were making in their own relationships.</p> <p>“I think your post also helped a lot of people that read it too. It reminded us to make sure we stay supportive and attentive to our partners. Reckonings are never easy, but they can be cleansing,” another user said.</p>

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Have a healthier relationship with your phone

<p>If you find yourself checking your phone several dozen times a day, don’t worry, it’s not quite your fault.</p> <p>Lots of apps and programs, especially social media apps, have been designed to capture your attention and make it difficult for you to put your phone down.</p> <p>Unfortunately, though, there’s a down side to all this connectivity.</p> <p>A study released last year showed that people with a longer average screen time, and those who used their phones close to bedtime, had poorer sleep quality.</p> <p>Another recent study, released in the journal The Lancet, revealed that the use of your phone in the wee hours of the morning could increase the chances of developing psychological issues such as depression, bipolar disorder and neuroticism.</p> <p>While the phone is undoubtedly important in our daily lives, we can all agree that we shouldn’t have to pay such a steep price for it in terms of compromising our health. It’s time to take some steps to cultivate a healthier relationship with our phones.</p> <p>Here are a few dos and don’ts: </p> <p><strong>DO</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Turn off app notifications</strong></li> </ul> <p>Every time a notification goes off, it serves as a trigger for us to immediately pick up our phones.</p> <p>Turning off notifications will ensure that we don’t constantly feel pressured to check what’s going on.</p> <p>If you must, just leave notifications on for chat functions so you don’t miss important messages.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Go grayscale</strong></li> </ul> <p>Setting your phone to grayscale can help you reduce the number of times you check it.</p> <p>This piece of advice comes from Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist at Google who co-founded The Center for Humane Technology.</p> <p>The reason behind this is that certain colours used by the apps, such as red and bright blue, subconsciously excite us and entice us to check our phones.</p> <p>By going grayscale, you lose such triggers.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Leave your phone behind</strong></li> </ul> <p>Spend some time physically apart from your phone.</p> <p>Start small by first leaving your phone in your bag when you work out at the gym, and work towards leaving your phone at home when you have a jog around the neighbourhood.</p> <p>After a while, you may get more comfortable with the idea of spending more time apart.</p> <p><strong>DON'T</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Charge your device in the bedroom</strong></li> </ul> <p>Alternatively, make sure your phone is out of reach or placed at the other end of the room.</p> <p>This makes sure that you don’t check it first thing in the morning before even getting out of bed.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Place your favourite app shortcuts on your home screen</strong></li> </ul> <p>With such quick access to these apps, you’ll be tempted to constantly check in.</p> <p>Instead, keep only important tools on your home screen and relegate the other apps to the back pages.</p> <p>This way, you have to type the app name and do a search whenever you want to launch it, which just might be enough to discourage you from using it.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/have-healthier-relationship-your-phone?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img src="/media/7820640/1.png" style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;"/></p>

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Lotto “winner” who claimed $5 million jackpot is exposed for using fake ticket

<p>A British man has been charged with lottery fraud after nearly a decade for using an alleged fake ticket to claim a $5 million jackpot.</p> <p>Hertfordshire Police said 53-year-old Edward Putman had been charged with fraud by false representation after an investigation into the incident that occurred in 2009.</p> <p>The winning numbers 6, 9, 20, 21, 31, 34 were drawn on March 11 and matched a ticket bought in Worcestershire, about two hours way from where Mr Putman was living at the time.</p> <p>When no one came forward to claim the prize, Mr Putman saw it as an opportunity to take the jackpot for himself. The £2.5 million ($5 million) was paid out by National Lottery operator Camelot, even though the ticket Mr Putman provided did not have a working barcode.</p> <p>“In 2015 an investigation was opened by Hertfordshire Constabulary’s Serious Fraud and Cyber Unit, after evidence came to light that the claim was not genuine,” police said in a statement.</p> <p>As reported by <em><a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/09/11/lotto-winner-charged-fraud-claiming-25m-jackpot-almost-10-years/">The Telegraph</a></em>, at the time of the incident, Mr Putman asked for “no publicity” after winning the jackpot. With the money he obtained, he went on to purchase two homes in the village of Kings Langley – one for £600,000 ($1.2 million) and another for £400,000 ($800,000). He also went and bought over a dozen cars.</p> <p>The issue is said to have been “immediately brought to the attention of the Commission and police” and after conducting an in-depth investigation, the UK Gambling Commission fined Camelot £3 million ($6 million).</p> <p>Mr Putman was reportedly arrested in 2015 but released without charge.</p> <p>The investigation conducted by the Commission concluded that, “whilst it could not be certain a fraud had taken place, it was more likely than not that a fraudulent prize claim had been made and paid out” on a “deliberately damaged ticket.”</p> <p>“The Gambling Commission’s chief concern is to ensure the National Lottery is run with integrity and that player interests are protected,” Commission chief executive Sarah Harrison said in a statement at the time.</p> <p>“Camelot’s failures in this case are serious and the penalty package reflects this. Importantly, the package also ensures that good causes will not lose out as a result of Camelot’s licence breach.</p> <p>“Lottery players can feel reassured that our investigations have found no evidence of similar events happening and that controls are in place today to mitigate against future prize payout failings of this type.”</p> <p>Mr Putman was released on bail to appear at St Albans Magistrates Court on October 16.</p>

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Why seniors should embrace the internet

<p><strong>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</strong></p> <p>Our news age… Seniors online! Yes, we have embraced digital technology, the internet and all its benefits. Otherwise, we would not be reading this website for baby boomers. This is a growing trend, expanding and educating retired people in the uses of the digital world of the 21st century.</p> <p>Anyone can buy a computer in any format, to learn to acquire basic mastery of the necessary skills. Genius! We have turned on the internet! Great, we now have a portal to a whole world of opportunities.</p> <p>Is there a health condition in the household? Browse, and learn reliable information about the condition, treatments and their side-effects. Online support groups are available.</p> <p>Need to do banking or financial transactions? Yes, we can handle them online.</p> <p>Housebound? Online, we can find cyber buddies, social media, chat rooms, and websites for likeminded people, new friends anywhere in the world.</p> <p>Want to contact family and friends far away? There is Skype, and Facebook, and other social media. We can make cyber pen pals, to create bridges across the globe, and make new friendships, with email buddies.</p> <p>Can’t travel? Digital travelogues are very popular.</p> <p>Retired, and no longer in the rat race? Well, there are employment opportunities online, to work at home. Or we can seek employment opportunities by browsing.</p> <p>Want to fulfil dreams of exploring old and new hobbies? A whole world of websites and free informational emails await, with tips. YouTube has coaching in refreshing old skills, or learning new hobbies.</p> <p>Or do we want to play music of view movies? Online is answer!</p> <p>Maybe we want the latest news, and to read the daily newspapers online, and read news for around the whole wide world. Or we can browse for general information of interest, and even study courses online.</p> <p>Maybe we need a larger font, that is all. So, scroll and click, and we can increase the print size.</p> <p>Want new ways to spend money? Online shopping is the solution!</p> <p>But, if we have technology issues, geeks are available. Our server can assist, or we can hire a local computer expert. Or we can ask some young acquaintance, as millennial hi-tech savvies are groomed in the digital world, they can often solve issues in a flash. Here is a sensible tip: ask the problem solver to write it all down, then practise.</p> <p>Never be afraid to ask questions, we are all like Neanderthals to these young ones. But our retirement brains can embrace these changes in a positive way. How do you enjoy the internet today?</p>

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How to mass delete emails on your smartphone

<p>The iPhone is one of the most successful smartphones in the world, with over 700 million iPhone’s in use in the year 2017, it’s easy to see why people love the nifty device so much. Thanks to Apple, you’re able to have the entire world in the palm of your hand. Whether you want to take an instant photo, or you want to cruise the web, the possibilities are endless.</p> <p>But every once and a while, there are features you come across that make you question why you own one in the first place. One of those features is the email system. For the longest time, Apple has made it unnecessarily difficult to delete mass messages in its Mail app.</p> <p>If you’re someone who is the recipient of spam emails, or pointless messages that clutter your inbox, then keep reading as there is a way to organise your inbox and quickly delete unwanted messages.</p> <p><img width="498" height="290" src="/media/7820166/trash_498x290.jpg" alt="Trash"/></p> <ol> <li>Open the Mail app and click on inbox.</li> <li>Once you’re in your inbox, tap the “Edit” button in the top right corner.</li> <li>Now select any message to put a checkmark next to it.</li> <li>With one finger, hold the “Move” button that’s found at the bottom of the screen, and with the other finger tap on the message you previously marked to unmark it.</li> <li>You will now be presented a new screen with the “Trash” option.</li> <li>Select “Trash” and all your unwanted messages will disappear from your inbox!</li> </ol> <p>While it can be a little tricky to wrap your head around, once you get the hang of it, it’ll become second nature. Also, it stops you from having to manually select each message and delete it one by one.</p> <p>Did you find this helpful? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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5 ways to declutter your devices

<p>With spring right around the corner, you may have already set your clean-out schedule. Whether that’s throwing away old clothes, going through cupboards that you haven’t rummaged through in a while, or making donation bags of things you don’t need.</p> <p>But have you ever stopped to think that with the amount of time we spend on our digital devices, that they’d need a clean-out too? Luckily, the tech experts at <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.asus.com/au/" target="_blank">ASUS</a></em> have shared a few tips and tricks to organise your digital life and get rid of clutter.</p> <p><strong>Laptops and Desktops:</strong></p> <p><strong>1. Declutter your desktop</strong></p> <p>If your desktop is looking manic and in need of some organisation, then it’s time to decide what you need to keep and what you want to part ways with. For files that you don’t need anymore, hold CTRL (for Windows) or Command (for Apple iOS) and click on all the files that you want to delete. This allows you to select multiple files at once. Then lastly, drag and drop them into the recycle bin and you’ve successfully cleared your desktop.</p> <p>For files that you need, make separate folders and categorise them so you know what goes where. For example, have all your finances in one folder and your to-do lists in the other. To do this, right-click on your desktop, select New from the drop-down menu and then choose Folder. Label the folder and then drag your files into it and it’s as easy as that.</p> <p><strong>2. Erase old downloads</strong></p> <p>With the introduction of streaming services such as Netflix and Spotify, there’s simply no need to keep a large number of files on your device. Not only do they take up space, but they can slow down your laptop or computer as well. So, if you have old movies, music or videos that you know you don’t need to hang onto, throw them in the recycling bin and your device will thank you.</p> <p><strong>3. Try the in-built cleaner</strong></p> <p>If your laptop is constantly showing messages for low storage capacity, then it may be the number of unnecessary files on your device. If you’re on a Windows device, then search for “Disk Clean-up”, follow the prompts and then allow the cleaner to get rid of any unnecessary files.</p> <p><strong>Tablets and Phones:</strong></p> <p><strong>4. Categorise your applications</strong></p> <p>Categorising applications will make sure your phone screen always remains neat and organised. The best way to do this is to leave your four most used apps on the home screen, and the remainders in their respective folders such as social media, shopping, games, photos etc.</p> <p><strong>5. Back up photos</strong></p> <p>Some of us can have over 1000 photos on our phones, and while they bring back many memories, chances are you hardly go back and look at them. Which is why, instead of letting them sit on your phone, back them up on an external hard drive. Not only will it free up space, but your photos will be kept safe also.</p>

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Donald Trump accused of sharing ‘fake’ tribute to John McCain

<p>US President Donald Trump has been slammed for his condolence message to Republican Senator John McCain, who died over the weekend after a battle with brain cancer.</p> <p>Trump took to social media to offer his sympathies to the McCain family, writing: “My deepest sympathies and respect go out to the family of senator John McCain. Our hearts and prayers are with you!”</p> <p>However, Trump’s decision to share an image of himself alongside his condolence message angered many.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 50.0% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bm7HFb3gMOc/?utm_source=ig_embed" target="_blank">My deepest sympathies and respect go out to the family of Senator John McCain. Our hearts and prayers are with you!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/realdonaldtrump/?utm_source=ig_embed" target="_blank"> President Donald J. Trump</a> (@realdonaldtrump) on Aug 25, 2018 at 6:26pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Actress Mia Farrow was one of the many to slam Trump’s social media post.</p> <p>“While he was ill, you mocked him cruelly. Just as you fail to see what makes America great, you will never understand why John McCain was a great man,” she tweeted.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">While he was ill, you mocked him cruely. Just as you fail to see what makes America great, you will never understand why John McCain was a great man.</p> — Mia Farrow (@MiaFarrow) <a href="https://twitter.com/MiaFarrow/status/1033700079499194368?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 26, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Many others on social media criticised Trump’s post as “fake condolences”, with many questioning his sincerity.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">FAKE CONDOLENCES. Here's the truth: <a href="https://t.co/oQMWwcQpg4">pic.twitter.com/oQMWwcQpg4</a></p> — Ron Kurtz (@theRDKX259) <a href="https://twitter.com/theRDKX259/status/1033795570387824648?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 26, 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">You sent fake sympathy on Instagram with your own picture. Shameless. <a href="https://t.co/xXIhcYgQb5">pic.twitter.com/xXIhcYgQb5</a></p> — Bros4America (@Bros4America) <a href="https://twitter.com/Bros4America/status/1033540064561623040?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 26, 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The rest of the world is paying tribute to true American hero John McCain, and you’re paying tribute to yourself by retweeting old tweets and posting a picture of yourself on Instagram. You are the epitome of a sick narcissistic animal. Shame.</p> — Tim Silver 🌊 (@simtilver) <a href="https://twitter.com/simtilver/status/1033725243649601536?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 26, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Trump came under fire in 2015 for attacking McCain – a Vietnam vet who was captured in 1967 as a prisoner of war – on the campaign trail by claiming he was not a war hero.</p> <p>“He’s a war hero because he was captured. I like people that weren’t captured,” he said at the time.</p> <p>McCain, who died aged 81, had been a fierce critic of Trump in his final years.</p>

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