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Skype users warned after Microsoft could be “listening” to calls

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A new investigation done by tech website </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Motherboard</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has revealed that Microsoft workers could be “listening in” on your Skype conversations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It has been revealed that some employees occasionally have to review real video chat that has been processed by translation software in order to check the quality of translations, according to </span><em><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/9680295/microsoft-caught-secretly-listening-to-skype-calls/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Microsoft spokesperson told Motherboard that Microsoft collects voice data to improve features on Skype.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They said: “We also put in place several procedures designed to prioritise users’ privacy before sharing this data with our vendors, including de-identifying data, requiring non-disclosure agreements with vendors and their employees, and requiring that vendors meet the high privacy standards set out in European law.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Paul Bischoff, a privacy advocate from Comparitech.com, told </span><em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/security/microsoft-could-be-listening-to-some-skype-calls/news-story/d92ee2c5f713af3a7252be645004a365"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">: “Microsoft clearly states that recordings and transcriptions are analysed to verify accuracy and make corrections.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The fact that humans are performing that analysis might make users uneasy, but I don’t think there’s much risk to end users.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That is, unless a contractor steals recordings and gives them to a Vice reporter. Microsoft ought to take steps to ensure this can’t happen in the future.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I recommend users refrain from revealing any identifying information while using Skype Translation and Cortana. Unless you identify yourself in the recording, there’s almost no way for a human analyst to figure out who you are.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Skype is an online video chat and voice call service that also provides an instant messaging platform.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Javvad Malik, a security awareness advocate at KnowBe4, said: “This latest revelation goes to show more needs to be done to ensure consumer data is being protected when customers use such services.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In this instance, there needs to be a clear level of transparency and honesty about the entire call-recording process to give people a true understanding of what they are signing up for.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There is a fine line between invading someone’s privacy and collecting data for business purposes; a line that if crossed, can lead to serious breaches of data privacy.”</span></p>

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Facebook announces new “dating services” for its 2 billion users

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Facebook has launched a new dating service for singles.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The company announced that Dating, its new matchmaking service, has launched in the US. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Facebook users are able to link their Facebook and Instagram posts and create a separate profile using the Dating feature. This new profile allows them to connect with Facebook’s 2 billion users around the world.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Facebook Dating allows you to match with friends of friends and/or people not in your friend circle,” said a blog post from Nathan Sharp, head of the project.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Facebook Dating won’t match you with friends, unless you choose to use Secret Crush and you both add each other to your list,” Mr Sharp said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Secret Crush, which is one of the features, allows people who are friends to connect if they both secretly express an interest in each other.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’ve been really slow, actually, with this rollout,” Charmaine Hung, a product manager at Dating, told </span><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/09/05/tech/facebook-dating-launches-in-us/index.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>CNN Business</em></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. “We really wanted to make sure we got it right because dating is so personal.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Any Facebook mobile user over the age of 18 is able to take advantage of the service, and Facebook has slowly been rolling it out over the world.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The release in the US marks the 20</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">th</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> country to be given access to the service.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The other 19 countries that it has been released in include Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Laos, Malaysia, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, the Philippines, Singapore, Suriname, Thailand, Uruguay and Vietnam.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is no word yet as to when the service will be launched in Australia and New Zealand.</span></p>

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Keep an ear out for these phone scams

<p>Don’t fall victim to a telephone scam – educate yourself on the latest tricks to get you to part with your money.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/keep-ear-out-these-phone-scams"><strong>Whatsapp scam</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/keep-ear-out-these-phone-scams"> <p><strong>What is it?</strong></p> <p>The Singapore Police Force issued a warning just last month about a scam that causes victims to lose access to their Whatsapp accounts.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>Victims would receive Whatsapp messages from people on their contact list asking for their Whatsapp account verification codes.</p> <p>Once the victims send the codes over, the scammers control of the accounts.</p> <p>They would then use these compromised accounts to con people on the contact list into purchasing gift cards and sending over the passwords for the cards. The cards would then be sold online.</p> <p><strong>How can I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>Don’t entertain unusual requests via Whatsapp, even if they come from someone on your contact list, as the account may have been compromised.</p> <p>Speak with the person to verify their identity.</p> <p>You can also protect your Whatsapp account by enabling the “Two-step Verification” feature.</p> <p><strong>Impersonation scam</strong></p> <p><strong>What is it?</strong></p> <p>There are several variations of this ruse, with the scammers pretending to be all manner of officials, from police officers to bank staff. The latest iteration in Malaysia involves scammer pretending to be postal couriers.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>Scammers will call their victims, impersonating any of the above-mentioned positions.</p> <p>They inform the victims that they have broken the law and will be in trouble if they do not pay a fine, which is to be transferred to an account number they provide.</p> <p>The scammers also tell their victims that the conversation is being recorded and that they must not tell anyone about it or they’ll get in further trouble.</p> <p><strong>How can I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>These scammers use Caller ID spoofing technology to divert the phone numbers from the relevant agencies so it looks like you’re getting a call from the police, for example.</p> <p>But it’s important to note that government agencies will never conduct business in this manner, so this is clearly a scam. Hang up and make a police report.</p> <p><strong>Wangiri scam</strong></p> <p><strong>What is it?</strong></p> <p>This scam has been around for the better part of a decade but it does pop up now and again in a slightly different form, so it’s important to always be alert.</p> <p>Wangiri means “one ring” and “cut” in Japanese, where the victim receives a call from an overseas number that gets cut off after just one ring.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>Getting the call is not the problem, returning the call is. If you return the call, you will likely hear an advertisement for a subscription chat line or internet service, and you will be charged for the call.</p> <p>The latest variation involves receiving a Whatsapp message with a contact attachment – you will be charged for calling the contact.</p> <p><strong>How can I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>Never return the call, especially if you don’t know anyone living in the country from where the call originates. Block the number and Google it to see if there are any reports of scammers using it.</p> <p><strong>Kidnapping scams</strong></p> <p><strong>What is it?</strong></p> <p>This is another scam that’s making its rounds in Singapore again, with local police reporting that they have received numerous reports about it last month.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>Scammers send text messages to victims claiming that they have kidnapped the victims’ loved ones and will harm them if they do not transfer a large amount of money to a bank account.</p> <p><strong>How can I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>Remain calm and contact your loved ones immediately to ensure they are safe. Don’t transfer the money or respond to the text message, and be sure to block the number. Make a police report.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. </em><em>This article first appeared in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/keep-ear-out-these-phone-scams" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="https://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> </div>

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Yes, you can unsend that text and here's how

<p>Oops, wrong number! D’oh, stupid autocorrect! Gah, why did I think texting my ex was a good idea?!</p> <p>We’ve all had our share of cringe-worthy texts that we regret the moment we send them.</p> <p>In the past, you haven’t had too many options: send a quick apology, hope the other person will gloss over your oversight, or block that contact and delete all evidence of your lapse in judgment. Thankfully, that all ends today.</p> <p><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.onsecondthought.co/" target="_blank">On Second Thought</a><span> </span>is an app that lets you take back your texts after hitting send. It syncs with your usual texting program to let you message everyone on your contact list as usual, just in a different app—and with some nifty “unsend” features that prevent endless embarrassment.</p> <p>The app lets you choose a “grace period” of up to 60 seconds after you hit send when you can delete the message. Even if the other person doesn’t have On Second Thought, you can either recall the text to edit it, or delete it completely. Either way, your almost-recipient will be none the wiser, and you get to save face.</p> <p>If you have a habit of sending unfortunate texts that you regret the next day, On Second Thought has another solution. During periods of time when you don’t quite trust yourself to make great texting decisions – say, when grabbing drinks with that pot-stirring friend who always convinces you to call out your ex – the app can set up a “curfew.”</p> <p>Any texts you try to send during that time will be held until morning. In the morning, when your head is clear, you can decide whether you want to follow through with sending them.</p> <p>The unsend app isn’t available on the Apple App Store yet, but you can<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=co.onsecondthought" target="_blank">download it</a><span> </span>from Google Play.</p> <p><em>Written by Marissa LaLiberte. </em><em>This article first appeared in <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/yes-you-can-unsend-text-and-heres-how" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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What to do if your data has been hacked

<p>Unless you’ve been staying offline – in which case you won’t even be reading this piece – chances are you’ve got some information stored online.</p> <p>From basic ones like your name and address to something more personal like your health data, date of birth or credit card details.</p> <p>It’s become so common that we sometimes don’t even think twice about keying in these bits of info whenever we start a new account.</p> <p>Unfortunately, that means there’s a fair bit of data about us that can be stolen online, sometimes through no fault of our own.</p> <p>Take, for example, the recent SingHealth breach in Singapore where the hackers accessed the information of 1.5 million people, including Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.</p> <p>And then there’s the Facebook fiasco earlier this year where the data of 87 million people around the world was improperly shared with British political consulting firm, Cambridge Analytica.</p> <p>Having your data stolen is the digital equivalent of losing your wallet – and will give you an equally big headache.</p> <p>As long as there is information about you available online, you are vulnerable.</p> <p>The concern is, we never quite know in what way our data will be used against us down the road once it gets in the hands of hackers.</p> <p>If you’ve ever had your data stolen, here are 5 things you should immediately do in order to minimise the damage:</p> <p><strong>1. Find out what was stolen</strong></p> <p>You will be informed via email, mail or text message if your data was stolen and what was likely accessed.</p> <p>Is it just your login credentials or did the thieves get away with your credit card and identity card info?</p> <p>Take note, however, that scammers can also take advantage of situations like these and send you a phishing email or text message to try and get your personal information.</p> <p>These can look and sound like they come from the official company but are actually fraudulent.</p> <p>To be safe, don’t clink on any links provided.</p> <p>Just head straight to the company’s website to find out how you can get help.</p> <p><strong>2. Change your login information</strong></p> <p>Change your login credentials, such as your username and password, for the affected site.</p> <p>Then log in to other sites that use the same login information and change those too.</p> <p>Hackers will use the same login information across different websites to try and gain access as many people tend to reuse usernames and passwords.</p> <p><strong>3. Change your security questions</strong></p> <p>If you’ve provided the answers to several security questions, such as your mother’s maiden name, make sure to change these questions and answers as well.</p> <p>If a hacker has access to that compromised information, he can reset your passwords.</p> <p><strong>4. Check your credit card accounts</strong></p> <p>If your credit card information is one of the details that has been stolen, call your bank and let them know.</p> <p>You may want to be safe and ask to cancel the card and get a new one.</p> <p><strong>5. Update all your other online accounts</strong></p> <p>Use this opportunity to update all your logins and passwords for your different accounts. It’s best to use different passwords for different sites and services, so if information on one account has been compromised, it can’t be used to access other services.</p> <p>You don’t have to come up with completely different passwords, just a slight variation. Consider using a passphrase. For example, your password could be “ihtsosin2018”, which stands for “I have to stop online shopping in 2018”<em>.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/what-do-if-your-data-has-been-hacked">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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How to have a healthier relationship with your phone

<p>If you find yourself checking your phone several dozen times a day, don’t worry, it’s not quite your fault.</p> <p>Lots of apps and programs, especially social media apps, have been designed to capture your attention and make it difficult for you to put your phone down.</p> <p>Unfortunately, though, there’s a down side to all this connectivity.</p> <p>A study released last year showed that people with a longer average screen time, and those who used their phones close to bedtime, had poorer sleep quality.</p> <p>Another recent study, released in the journal The Lancet, revealed that the use of your phone in the wee hours of the morning, could increase the chances of developing psychological issues such as depression, bipolar disorder and neuroticism.</p> <p>While the phone is undoubtedly important in our daily lives, we can all agree that we shouldn’t have to pay such a steep price for it in terms of compromising our health. It’s time to take some steps to cultivate a healthier relationship with our phones.</p> <p>Here are a few dos and don’ts:</p> <p><strong>DO: Turn off app notifications</strong></p> <p>Every time a notification goes off, it serves as a trigger for us to immediately pick up our phones.</p> <p>Turning off notifications will ensure that we don’t constantly feel pressured to check what’s going on.</p> <p>If you must, just leave notifications on for chat functions so you don’t miss important messages.</p> <p><strong>DO: Go greyscale</strong></p> <p>Setting your phone to greyscale can help you reduce the number of times you check it.</p> <p>This piece of advice comes from Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist at Google who co-founded The Center for Humane Technology.</p> <p>The reason behind this is that certain colours used by the apps, such as red and bright blue, subconsciously excite us and entice us to check our phones.</p> <p>By going greyscale, you lose such triggers.</p> <p><strong>DO: Leave your phone behind</strong></p> <p>Spend some time physically apart from your phone.</p> <p>Start small by first leaving your phone in your bag when you work out at the gym, and work towards leaving your phone at home when you have a jog around the neighbourhood.</p> <p>After a while, you may get more comfortable with the idea of spending more time apart.</p> <p><strong>DON'T: Charge your device in the bedroom</strong></p> <p>Alternatively, make sure your phone is out of reach or placed at the other end of the room.</p> <p>This makes sure that you don’t check it first thing in the morning before even getting out of bed.</p> <p><strong>DON'T: Place your favourite app shortcuts on your home screen</strong></p> <p>With such quick access to these apps, you’ll be tempted to constantly check in.</p> <p>Instead, keep only important tools on your home screen and relegate the other apps to the back pages.</p> <p>This way, you have to type the app name and do a search whenever you want to launch it, which just might be enough to discourage you from using it.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/have-healthier-relationship-your-phone">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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4 ways your mobile phone affects your body and mind

<p>As mobile phones infiltrate nearly every aspect of our society, it can be easy to get overwhelmed and used to their constant presence. However, there are many ways that the devices impact your body and your mind.</p> <p><strong>1. It messes with your sleep</strong></p> <p>Scanning your phone right before bed can disturb your slumber.</p> <p>The short-wavelength, bright blue light your device emits boosts your 
attention during the day, but at night the light can inhibit the production 
of melatonin, which helps you fall asleep.</p> <p>To avoid that, make a habit of not using your phone for at least 30 minutes before you close your eyes.</p> <p><strong>2. It's not easy to put down</strong></p> <p>It would be easy to avoid 
issues caused by your phone by simply 
putting down your phone. The problem: it isn’t so easy.</p> <p>That twinge of phone separation anxiety is real. In fact, Rosen says, detaching from your phone can cause your brain to release the stress hormone cortisol.</p> <p>Of course, there are many phone apps (with calming names, such as Forest and Mute) to help you control your phone addiction.</p> <p>Or you can just let the battery run down and forget about it!</p> <p><strong>3. It can be a hazard while walking</strong></p> <p>We all know that walking around town with your face 
in your phone can be dangerous, and there are studies that underline the point.</p> <p>City pedestrians using 
their phones looked left and right less often and were more likely 
to be hit by a vehicle, according 
to a review of studies on distracted 
walking in the<span> </span><em>Journal of Traffic 
and Transportation Engineering</em>. 
</p> <p>In another small experiment, 
94 percent of pedestrians who were using mobile phones to talk and text didn’t see free cash hanging from 
a tree. (That’s right, they walked right by a bunch of dollar bills.)</p> <p><strong>4. It hurts your eyes</strong></p> <p>Your phone can do a number on your eyes.</p> <p>A study in the US found that about 60 percent of respondents experience digital 
eye strain symptoms such as dryness, irritation, blurred vision, eye fatigue and headaches.</p> <p>Try blinking often, increasing font size and 
taking a break from screens every 20 minutes.</p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Crouch. </em><em>This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/13-ways-your-mobile-phone-affects-your-body-and-mind">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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7 alarming things a hacker can do when they have your email address

<p><strong>1. Send emails from your address</strong></p> <p>This is probably the most obvious thing hackers can do with your email address, and it’s a nuisance for sure. Once hackers have your email address, they can use it to target more than just you, sending out email blasts to anyone (maybe even everyone!) in your contact list. As Garry Brownrigg, CEO &amp; Founder of <a href="https://www.quicksilk.com/">QuickSilk</a>, explains, “They can ‘spoof’ an email message with a forged sender address – they don’t even need your password for this.” The things they send can be anything from harmful malware to scams and requests for money; either way, you’d certainly rather they didn’t come from your address.</p> <p>And although it’s mostly harmless (most savvy internet users are able to catch on when they receive a scam email from a friend’s address), it could still be a problem in some cases. “If a criminal really wanted to hurt someone, they could use this as a way to hook a romantic partner, hack the victim’s employer, get the person in trouble at work, or cause any number of problems in their personal or professional life by impersonating them online,” says Jason Glassberg, co-founder of <a href="https://www.casaba.com/">Casaba Security</a> and former cybersecurity executive at Ernst &amp; Young and Lehman Brothers.</p> <p><strong>2. Send phishing emails</strong></p> <p>Since there isn’t a lot that hackers can do with just the email address, they’re not going to stop there. “When a hacker knows your email address, they have half of your confidential information – all they need now is the password,” warns Greg Kelley of <a href="https://www.vestigeltd.com/">Vestige Digital Investigations</a>. They employ a few different methods to access it, the most common being the phishing email. This is an email, in the guise of being a legitimate email from a trusted source, designed to trick you into logging in. “They might create a legitimate-sounding email that appears to be sent from a service such as Amazon, eBay, Paypal or any number of other popular services… Links in phishing emails will always direct the user to a purposefully built website that looks identical to the real service,” explains Ray Walsh, a digital privacy expert at <a href="https://proprivacy.com/">ProPrivacy.com</a>. “However, if people use the login on that fake website, the hacker instantly receives the credential and password for the real account.”</p> <p>Another way they can do this, ironically, is by sending you an email saying that your account is compromised or has been accessed from a new device, so you need to change your password for security reasons. (You’ve almost definitely had one of those at one point or another!) When you change your password, then your account really is compromised and the hacker has your password. Once hackers have your password, the range of things they can do becomes much greater.</p> <p><strong>3. Access your online accounts</strong></p> <p>Nowadays, our emails do double duty as our logins for scores of social media sites, in addition to Google Docs, online retailers, and so on. Internet users also have a very understandable tendency to use the same passwords for all of these accounts. And even if you don’t use the same password, the hacker can click the old ‘forgot password’ button and use the resulting email – which comes to your email address, which they do have the password for – to change the password, and voilà. Your accounts are their accounts, and they have access to anything on them that you do.</p> <p><strong>4. Access personal information</strong></p> <p>The things hackers can do with your information seem to be something of a chain reaction. Once a hacker has access to your online accounts, just think about all of the information that is right at their fingertips. Allan Buxton, Director of Forensics at SecureForensics, sums it up: “At a minimum, a search on Facebook can get a public name and, unless privacy protections are in place, the names of friends and possibly pictures,” he says. “Throw that email address into LinkedIn, and they’ll know where you work, who your colleagues are, your responsibilities, plus everywhere you worked or went to school. That’s more than enough to start some real-world stalking. That’s just two sites – we haven’t talked about political views, travel or favourite places they might glean from Twitter or Instagram.”</p> <p>Glassberg admits that such ‘real-world stalking’ is rare, sure, but anything is possible in an era where people document nearly everything online.</p> <p><strong>5. Steal financial information</strong></p> <p>Things start to get really problematic if hackers are able to find your credit or debit card information – which, more likely than not, you’ve sent via email at one point or another. Your online bank accounts can also be a major target for hackers, especially if you use your email address as a login for those, too. And, needless to say, once a hacker has access to those, your money is in serious jeopardy. “This is one of the biggest risks you’ll face from an email hack,” Glassberg says. “Once [hackers] have the email, it’s easy to reset the bank account and begin issuing transactions.” In addition to potentially being devastating of your finances, this can also hurt your credit score, as <a href="https://www.beenverified.com/">BeenVerified</a>’s Chief Communications Officer Justin Lavelle explains: “Cybercriminals can use your credit card details, open bank accounts in your name, and take out loans. It will likely ruin your credit card’s rating and your credit report will take a hit.”</p> <p><strong>6. Blackmail you</strong></p> <p>As if things weren’t scary enough, hackers can use your personal info to ruin, or threaten to ruin, your reputation. This is fairly rare, but it can happen, especially if a hacker finds something that the user wouldn’t want to be seen publicly. “[Hackers] can use this access to spy on you and review your most personal emails,” says Daniel Smith, head of security research at <a href="https://www.radware.com/">Radware</a>. “This kind of information could easily be used to blackmail/extort the victim.”</p> <p><strong>7. Steal your identity</strong></p> <p>This is definitely a worst-case scenario, but “once the hacker has your personally identifiable information, they can steal your identity,” Brownrigg warns. With information like your tax file number and credit card info, identity theft can sadly be well within reach for hackers. So, if you start noticing signs someone just stole your identity, consider that your email address may have been compromised.</p> <p><strong>How you can stay safe from hackers</strong></p> <p>Hopefully, though, you won’t have to encounter any of these problems, and there are some measures you can take to keep your information safe. Avoid using your verbatim email address as a login for other sites, and make sure that your password is strong and difficult to guess. You should also change those passwords every couple of months or so for maximum security. Glassberg also recommends securing your email account with two-factor authentication. This “[requires] a one-time code to be entered alongside the password in order to gain access to the email account,” he told RD. “In most cases, the code will be texted to the person’s phone, but there are also apps you can use, like Google Authenticator.”</p> <p>And, of course, just use common sense. Don’t share information or type in your email password on public WiFi networks, and be smart about the information you share over email.</p> <p><strong>What to do if you think you’ve been hacked</strong></p> <p>Starting to notice some strange online activity? There are a couple of ways you can try to get ahead before it gets too bad. If you hear about spam emails being sent from your address, change your password immediately. You should also tell your contacts so that they know to ignore anything coming from you. Finally, Lavelle offers some other suggestions: “Change your email settings to the highest privacy setting, scan your computer for malware and viruses, and be sure your browsers are updated,” he says.</p> <p><em>Written by Meghan Jones. This article first appeared in </em><em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/7-alarming-things-a-hacker-can-do-when-they-have-your-email-address">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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“Dear tech”: IBM pens open letter to the tech industry

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">IBM is urging the tech sector to use technology for the good of humanity instead of its downfall in an open letter to the industry called “Dear Tech”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the firm, the world needs tech companies that can apply “smart technologies at scale with purpose and expertise — not just for some of us, but for all of us”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the global tech giant held its annual Think summit in Sydney, it showcased the mindboggling ways that artificial intelligence is being used to tackle the world’s biggest problems, according to </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/05/22/ibm-think-summit-2019/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Daily.</span></a></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9">  <iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gNF8ObJR6K8"></iframe></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stefan Harrer says that healthcare is ideal for the use of artificial intelligence (AI).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Ultimately we want to be able to use and develop technology to improve peoples’ lives,” Dr Harrer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We want to build tech that can help improve the lives of people that suffer from a variety of diseases.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That requires that we do cutting-edge research and develop the tech and think hard about how to translate it into trustworthy and impactful solutions.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, as AI becomes more commonplace, it’s more important than ever that there are strict ethics in place around it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s as important to pay enough attention to getting the ethical framework right around AI as it is the technology,” Dr Harrer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This revolution will not look like the information revolution, it’s not move fast and break things.”</span></p>

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New study discovers sleep texting is a reality for users

<p>Sleeping is a time for your body to rest, repair and reprogram itself before the next day. Although for some people it can also be a time to eat, talk, walk and – a new study has discovered – text.</p> <p>The research was published in the <span><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07448481.2018.1499655?journalCode=vach20&amp;"><em>Journal of American College Health</em></a></span>, where 372 students were surveyed at two separate universities in 2013 on their quality of sleep and mobile phone usage as they slept.</p> <p>Researchers asked questions such as “how many hours do you sleep a night?” and “where do you keep your phone?” amongst other things.</p> <p>The results were astounding.</p> <p>More than 25 per cent of people surveyed revealed they texted in their sleep. 72 per cent of those sleep texters had no recollection of having sent the text until they looked at their phone the next day.</p> <p>The people who reported sleep texting were more inclined to say they experienced interrupted sleep and said they kept their phone in bed with them at night.</p> <p>The survey also included an open-ended question where the students could discuss how they coped with sleep texting.</p> <p>One student reported she went to the extreme length of wearing mittens to bed to prevent herself from texting as “moving the phone from being in my bed to next to the bed is not an option, I have to keep my phone with me.”</p> <p>The sleep texters revealed that the quality of their texts are not entirely comprehensible and are often just a bunch of random words with no meaning.</p> <p>The lead author of the study, Elizabeth Dowdell, began the research after several of her undergraduate students spoke about their sleep texting habits.</p> <p>Most of the students who sleep text are female and most check their phones first thing in the morning to see if they had texted in their sleep.</p> <p>“The majority were unwilling to turn off their phone at night,” Dowdell revealed.</p> <p><strong>What is the cause of this strange new sleeping habit?</strong></p> <p>Board-certified sleep medicine researcher and neurologist W. Christopher Winter, MD, of <span><a href="http://www.cvilleneuroandsleep.com/">Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine</a></span> as well as author of the book <em>The Sleep Solution: Why Your Sleep is Broken and How To Fix It</em>, provided insight into the situation during an interview for <span><a href="https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/new-study-claims-sleep-texting-actually-thing-203042694.html">Yahoo Lifestyle</a></span>.</p> <p>“A small percentage of these people probably have a parasomnia, which is an abnormal wakening during deep sleep. But instead of walking or eating things they don’t remember, they’re texting.”</p> <p>Another explanation included the delayed formation of memories once awoken from a deep sleep, “we can have automatic behaviour,” explained Winter, “that’s why you can have a conversation with your partner in the middle of the night, not remember the first part, and wake up when you’re already into the conversation.”</p> <p>Drinking alcohol can also influence the likelihood of sleep texting, Winter adding, “alcohol can absolutely influence both behaviours and having that sort of amnesia for what you’re doing.”</p> <p><strong>How to prevent sleep texting</strong></p> <p>Winter recommended not sleeping with your mobile in your bed and instead keeping it “really out of your proximity.”</p> <p>If you are someone who likes to keep your phone in your room, Winter suggested placing it across the room where you sleep so if you want to answer a text in the middle of the night your body is forced to go through multiple movements that should wake you up.</p> <p>Winter also recommended keeping your phone on silent so it doesn’t wake you with noise, and even getting a phone lock that requires solving a math problem or replicating a pattern which will be hard to accomplish while asleep.</p> <p>“Who controls technology? We control it. We’re the ones who turn it on and we’re the ones who turn it off,” reinforced Dowdell.</p> <p>“If you can’t turn it off, consider putting some boundaries around it like sleep mode or program it so that only certain people can text through at night. Also, don’t sleep with your phone in bed."</p>

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How to stop hackers from attacking your mobile phone while online shopping

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In new research revealed by Norton’s cyber safety insight report, about 30 per cent of shoppers have fallen victim to cybercrime in the past year at a cost of a shocking $1.3 billion.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The report noted that 21 per cent of smartphone users had no idea that their device was able to be hacked.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cybercrime expert Julian Plummer agrees that users are laxer about mobile security compared to their laptops.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“As mobile becomes increasingly de rigueur the security risk to consumers will only rise,” said Mr Plummer, who is the managing director of Midwinter Financial Services in Sydney.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are two ways that your smartphone is able to be hacked, which is phishing and over public wi-fi networks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As hackers are only getting smarter at duping their victims when it comes to phishing, sophisticated criminals are now impersonating big-name brands, including banks and other institutions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It used to be that seeing a padlock in the URL bar meant that the site was safe, but now hackers are ‘securing’ their sites using cheap security certificates to provide a false sense of security,” Mr Plummer warned to </span><a href="https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/tech/2019/05/29/mobile-phone-cybercrime-safety/"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>The New Daily</em></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The second way is via public Wi-Fi networks, which is surprisingly sophisticated.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Hackers use a ‘Wi-Fi pineapple’ to mimic a public wi-fi access point,” he explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Unfortunately, logging on to these malicious wi-fi access points allows hackers to intercept any unencrypted personal data. Always be very wary when connecting to an untrusted wi-fi network – especially overseas.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s easy to protect yourself from hackers though, according to Mr Plummer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The crucial thing for mobile phone users is to stop reusing passwords,” Mr Plummer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“With a major security breach happening almost on a monthly basis, if hackers were to get your password from one shopping website, they then have access to all your online accounts if you re-use your password.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The second way to keep your information safe might be tedious, but it’ll be worth it in the long run. It involves keeping your phone’s operating system up to date.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The main reason manufacturers provide updates is to close off security loopholes within their device,” Mr Plummer said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Hackers are well versed in any security bugs in your mobile device, so make sure you have automatic updates turned on for your mobile phone.”</span></p>

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Prince Andrew’s embarrassing blunder on Princess Beatrice’s birthday tribute

<p>Princess Beatrice turned 31 on August 8 and her family took to social media to wish her well.</p> <p>Her father, Prince Andrew, made a sweet post on Twitter where he shared a collection of photos with his oldest daughter, but fans were quick to notice something embarrassing.</p> <p>In the original tweet that has since been deleted, the doting father had shared a photo of Princess Beatrice’s sister Eugenie on her wedding day instead of the birthday girl.</p> <p>Naturally, the mistake was pointed out and it was swiftly rectified. You can see the updated tweet below.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Happy Birthday Princess Beatrice🎉<br /><br />Thank you everyone for the lovely birthday wishes!<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HappyBirthdayHRH?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HappyBirthdayHRH</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/yorkiebea?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@yorkiebea</a> <a href="https://t.co/WrBBbfaRG2">pic.twitter.com/WrBBbfaRG2</a></p> — The Duke of York (@TheDukeOfYork) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheDukeOfYork/status/1159383428204322817?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">8 August 2019</a></blockquote> <p>There were four photos with the caption, “Happy Birthday Princess Beatrice. Thank you to everyone for the lovely birthday wishes!"</p> <p>Duchess of York and Beatrice’s mother, Sarah Ferguson, wished her a happy birthday via Instagram, sharing photos that many royal fans have not seen before.</p> <p>The tribute read, “Happy birthday dearest Beatrice” and had a variety of photos that showed Beatrice as a child with her mother and father, Beatrice playing in a sandpit as a child, as well as sitting outside with the family’s Norfolk terriers as an adult. The last photo in the Instagram post is a sweet one of the Duchess of York holding Beatrice in the snow.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B05dv09F-3s/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B05dv09F-3s/" target="_blank">Happy Birthday dearest Beatrice 🥳🥳 xx</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sarahferguson15/" target="_blank"> Sarah Ferguson</a> (@sarahferguson15) on Aug 8, 2019 at 2:25am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Not to be outdone, her younger sister Eugenie added six photos of Beatrice and revealed the sweet nickname for her older sister in the caption.</p> <p>"You have been bossing it since before I was born and continue to be the most wonderful person, friend and big sister," she wrote.</p> <p>"Happy Birthday to you Beabea!! Xx"</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B05gM4HlMi1/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B05gM4HlMi1/" target="_blank">You have been bossing it since before I was born and continue to be the most wonderful person, friend and big sister... Happy Birthday to you Beabea!! Xx 😘 🎉🎊🥳</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/princesseugenie/" target="_blank"> Princess Eugenie</a> (@princesseugenie) on Aug 8, 2019 at 2:46am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The photos shared by her immediate family gave royal fans an insight into how Princess Beatrice spends her time as she doesn’t have a public Instagram account.</p> <p>As Beatrice has a unique birth date, as she was born on 8:18 pm on August 8th, 1988 or 8/8/88, many royal fans had remembered the unique date and flooded her family’s social media pages with well wishes.</p> <p>Beatrice was also given a birthday tribute from the official account for the Queen and Prince Philip.</p> <p>The tweet read, "Princess Beatrice is the first child of @hrhthedukeofyork and Sarah, Duchess of York, and fifth grandchild of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh. #HappyBirthdayHRH."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Wishing Princess Beatrice of York a Happy Birthday! 🎂🎉 <br />Her Royal Highness is the first child of <a href="https://twitter.com/TheDukeOfYork?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TheDukeOfYork</a> and Sarah, Duchess of York and fifth grandchild of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HappyBirthdayHRH?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HappyBirthdayHRH</a> <a href="https://t.co/s903A3oW7D">pic.twitter.com/s903A3oW7D</a></p> — The Royal Family (@RoyalFamily) <a href="https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily/status/1159363100967145472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">8 August 2019</a></blockquote>

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"Dangerous": Kmart hack slammed for being an extreme fire hazard

<p>A Facebook group that is known to criticise people for their Kmart “hack” fails has gone into overdrive after the latest “hack” has proven to be an obvious danger.</p> <p>A photo shared on Wednesday showed a weird way a Kmart fan has repurposed the $25 Glass Base Lamp that comes with a white lampshade.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FcleanyourdamnhouseBrenda%2Fphotos%2Fa.356323744881043%2F676242099555871%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="638" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>The glass base lampshade is clearly a hit as Kmart “hackers” have taken to putting plants in the base.</p> <p>The image reads: “Kmart $25 lamps, plants from Bunnings”.</p> <p>Many were quick to point out that the plants inside the base probably won’t survive.</p> <p>“I bet the plant is enjoying the intense light and heat it’s subjected to every time the lamp comes on,” one user wrote.</p> <p>Someone saw the obvious risks with watering the plants and decided to make a pun.</p> <p>“It would be shockingly difficult to water them,” they said.</p> <p>Another user saw the immediate downside to having a plant in the glass base lamp.</p> <p>“Who wouldn’t want a lamp filled up with dirt?” they wrote.</p> <p>Another fan sent through a glass base lamp with a fish inside.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FcleanyourdamnhouseBrenda%2Fphotos%2Fa.356323744881043%2F700397330473681%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="675" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>One fan was quick to point out that the fish is suffering from the risk of electrocution from being in the lamp.</p> <p>“I don’t care about the painting on the lamp or how they decorate their homes, don’t even care if someone is silly enough to mix water and electricity, but if any of the above results in the suffering of a fish or animal then yes it makes me angry.”</p> <p>Another asked if the people who make these designs “have a brain”.</p> <p>“I think I’m about to have a heart attack do these people not have a brain!!”</p>

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5 of the funniest tweets from actor Sam Neill

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Actor and wine maker Sam Neill has taken to Twitter with ease, much to the delight of his fans and other celebrities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jurassic Park</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> actor frequently documents life on his farm with his animals that have names of celebrities as an “insurance policy”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It doesn’t always end well,” he told </span><a href="https://www.vulture.com/2019/07/sam-neill-farm-animals-interview.html">Vulture.</a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Meryl Streep was killed by a ferret recently … Hugo Weaving was another unfortunate end, but he died happy. He was a ram. He was doing what rams do — he fell off the back of a female sheep.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He also shares videos of his grandson, as seen below.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Sam playing with his grandson</strong></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">My grandson . Hilarious . Great kid . Don't worry ...picks himself up, laughs and back into it . <a href="https://t.co/cyuOOHfztO">pic.twitter.com/cyuOOHfztO</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1121741516031057920?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">26 April 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is a popular tweet by fans, but you have to watch until the end to really appreciate it. </span></p> <p><strong>2. Getting angry at James Corden for being a “murderer”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sam Neill played Mr McGreggor in the reboot of </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Peter Rabbit</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, who met an unfortunate end thanks to Peter, who is voiced by Corden.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He let his anger be known in the tweet below, calling Corden a “murderer” and that he has “no idea why HE’S [Peter Rabbit] the hero &amp; not old Mr.McG.”</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Spent this morning listening to the excellent <a href="https://twitter.com/JKCorden?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@JKCorden</a> as Peter, voicing the Badger for <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PeterRabbit2?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#PeterRabbit2</a>. I couldn't be Old Mr. McGregor again because ...well...he died . Peter Rabbit's fault. No idea why HE's the hero &amp; not old Mr.McG. Peter Rabbit MURDERER ! <a href="https://t.co/ubx5jV9U1A">pic.twitter.com/ubx5jV9U1A</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1151684396534996995?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">18 July 2019</a></blockquote> <p><strong>3. This selfie with a “random fan”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Neill makes a point for his twitter feed to be humorous and refreshing as he “enjoys Twitter”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He told </span><a href="https://www.thecut.com/2019/05/sam-neill-interview-about-twitter.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Cut</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about how he got started on the platform.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They [co-workers in Two Paddocks office] told me that social media was important,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’d never heard of it. I started Facebook, but I didn’t like it at all. It filled me with existential dread.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But I found I enjoyed Twitter. The economy of 140 characters was really appealing; every tweet was like a lame haiku”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although he usually posts photos and videos of his farm animals, he made an exception for a selfie with a “random fan”. The fan just so happens to be Chris Hemsworth.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Yours truly plus random fan .<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ThorRagnarok?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#ThorRagnarok</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/TaikaWaititi?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TaikaWaititi</a> took this as best I remember. <a href="https://t.co/aU1nW1B8bI">pic.twitter.com/aU1nW1B8bI</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/917554962997035009?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">10 October 2017</a></blockquote> <p><strong>4. Singing with pigs</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As Neill lives on a farm in Otago, New Zealand, he has “so many free-range animals that they’re almost feral”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He shared with his Twitter followers a “duet” with his pig.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Singing With Pigs. My old pig friend is always up for a duet . Its more his kind of song really . Took me years to learn Pigsong . It's paid off bigtime. <a href="https://t.co/a3mprZ6AMR">pic.twitter.com/a3mprZ6AMR</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1088972409229664256?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">26 January 2019</a></blockquote> <p><strong>5. Getting mistaken for Hugo Weaving</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although people might recognise Sam Neill from somewhere, it’s clear that not many know who he is.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Neill documented an experience with a fan saying that he’s Hugo Weaving.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">LIFE IN THE CITY<br />Coming out of my local with a coffee this morning , a bloke with a dog yells "Are you an Actor ?'<br />"Yes' I say.<br />"Who are you then ? " he says <br />"Hugo Weaving" I reply<br />"That's right..apparently you're good"<br />"Not really" I mutter as I walk away <a href="https://t.co/00lt7jJBA2">pic.twitter.com/00lt7jJBA2</a></p> — Sam Neill (@TwoPaddocks) <a href="https://twitter.com/TwoPaddocks/status/1145886981722820608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">2 July 2019</a></blockquote>

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The new device that charges your phone while you’re on the go

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Researchers from Queen’s University in Canada have developed an energy-harvesting device that exploits the side to side movement of a backpack that will generate electricity while you walk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The trial version would be suitable for people who work or trek to remote areas and the device has enough power to deploy an emergency beacon or a GPS.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The researchers experimented with seven different conditions for energy harvesting and found that a load of nine kilograms generated the optimum amount of power without any extra effort to the wearer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The nine kilograms would be made up of clothes, food, a stove, fuel, a sleeping bag and a tent which was packed for a long trek.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The weight of the device and the backpack adds another five kilos. The setup in total produces about .22 watts of electricity which is enough to power GPS and emergency beacons.</span></p> <p><a href="https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.182021"><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the paper</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the researchers Jean-Paul Martin and Qingguo Li calculate that adding more weight to the backpack will help it generate more power. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Modelling predicts that an increase in electrical power production could be achieved by increasing the weight carried,” they write.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If generating over (one Watt) of electrical power was desired for powering higher demand devices, such as talking or browsing the internet with a cell phone, our model indicates that over 20 kilograms of weight would need to be carried.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In total, you would be carrying 14 kilograms on your back to generate enough power for your GPS or emergency beacon.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although this might seem like too much weight for most people, it’s next to nothing for soldiers who are used to carrying at least 27 kilograms and as much as 45 kilograms on their back for long-haul missions in Iraq and Afghanistan.</span></p>

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Trump’s big blow: Federal appeals court rules in favour of Twitter critics

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A federal appeals court has ruled that US President Donald Trump cannot legally block users on Twitter based on their political differences with him. This affirms a lower court decision.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The three-judge panel agreed with last year’s ruling by a federal judge that Trump was using “viewpoint discrimination”, which is in violation of the constitutional rights of people with opposing views.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/online/social/trump-cant-block-twitter-critics-federal-appeals-court-rules/news-story/fb2294bc60fa3fe2d97378945c2ed8f7"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the court sidestepped the question of the president’s free speech rights under the Constitution's First Amendment on a privately-owned internet platform. However, the court affirmed that Trump has created a public forum for official White House business.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The First Amendment does not permit a public official who utilises a social media account for all manner of official purposes to exclude persons from an otherwise-open online dialogue because they expressed views with which the official disagrees,” the judges wrote in a 29-page opinion.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Trump’s legal response is that he’s not acting in his official capacity when he blocks users, but the court disagreed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The president and multiple members of his administration have described his use of the account as official,” the appeals court ruling said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We conclude that the evidence of the official nature of the account is overwhelming. We also conclude that once the president has chosen a platform and opened up its interactive space to millions of users and participants, he may not selectively exclude those whose views he disagrees with.”</span></p>

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Bill Gates gets candid about rival Steve Jobs: He “cast spells on people”

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Microsoft founder Bill Gates, his rival Apple CEO Steve Jobs “cast spells on people” to keep Apple profitable during the dark days of the company.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Both men are known for creating an intense workplace culture and being tough leaders. Gates realised that Jobs’ leadership style was a good example of “don’t do this at home”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gates spoke to </span><a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/08/tech/bill-gates-on-steve-jobs/index.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Fareed Zakaria from </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">CNN</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about his relationship with Jobs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I have yet to meet any person who in terms of picking talent, hyper-motivating that talent and having a sense of design, of 'this is good, this is not good.' So he brought some incredibly positive things along with that toughness."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gates reflected on Jobs and the way he “cast spells on people”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Steve is really a singular case where the company was on a path to die and it goes and becomes the most valuable company in the world with some products that are really quite amazing. There aren't going to be many stories like that."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gates also admitted that his intense workplace culture went “too far”, especially in the early days of the company.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"We had, to some degree, a self-selected set of people who were mostly males, I'll admit, and yes, we were pretty tough on each other," Gates said. "We counted on each other to work very long hours and I always wanted to set the best example of that. I think that intensity, even though a little bit it went too far, was great for my 20s, 30s, 40s."</span></p>

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The new 5G smartphones causing headaches for Apple

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Telstra has recently launched a 5G network within Australia, which means that Samsung, LG and Oppo have also released their first devices that are capable of handling the new network speeds.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As these brands are all Android phones, Apple should be worried about their market share in Australia as Aussies will want a phone that can handle the faster speeds.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are the top three competitors.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Samsung Galaxy S10 5G</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The S10 5G Samsung device has the largest screen out of the three 5G phones on offer, measuring at 17cms. There are four cameras on the back of the device and two on the front, as well as the device offering a 3D depth feature.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 3D depth feature allows more immersive photography and the two cameras on the front mean that there’s a wider angle for you to get selfies with your grandkids.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The phone also offers a headphone jack, reverse wireless charging and an in-screen fingerprint sensor.</span></p> <p> </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzx1sPLl4cc/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzx1sPLl4cc/" target="_blank">A post shared by Welcome To The Blue Galaxy (@samsungblue_)</a> on Jul 11, 2019 at 6:49am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><strong>2. LG V50 THINQ 5G</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">LG has shaken up the growing trend of newer smartphones coming with a clear case and has added a new case that snaps onto the back of the V50 ThinQ 5G that also contains a front cover with a built in touch-screen.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’re essentially getting two smartphones in one as the dual screen offered allows you to multitask while on the go.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The dual screen is not compatible for all applications. The LG V50 offers three cameras on the back and there are two cameras on the front, which seems to be a growing trend in the smartphone market. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, you have to open the cover each time to take a photo using the front cameras, which might make you want to remove the dual screen entirely, according to </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/gadgets/mobile-phones/5g-smartphones-the-midrange-phones-causing-big-headaches-for-apple/news-story/e3a0f9938976a86248d7134ed6b3b5d6"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><a style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzxVGAMJD44/" data-instgrm-version="12"></a></p> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzxVGAMJD44/" target="_blank">A post shared by 🇰🇷 Ji Yeon 지연 (@bli2s_)</a> on Jul 11, 2019 at 2:04am PDT</p> </div> <p><strong>3. OPPO RENO 5G</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Oppo Reno 5G is the cheapest of all three smartphones on offer. The phone offers a 16.7cm display and the screen is edge-to-edge.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Oppo also offer an invisible front facing 16megapixel camera that pops out of the phone when activated. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are three cameras on the rear of the phone that include a 48-megapixel lens with a 10x hybrid zoom.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The phone comes with 256g of on-board storage, but it lacks water resistance and wireless charging. </span></p> <p> </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxUily-lEZm/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxUily-lEZm/" target="_blank">A post shared by PLANET PONSEL (@planetponsel.id)</a> on May 11, 2019 at 4:42am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote>

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What a treat! Unseen photo of Prince William and Duchess Kate's three children emerges

<p>Over the last week, royal fans have been treated to a flurry of new photographs of the Cambridge children. </p> <p>It is rare supporters are able to get a glimpse into the lives of cheeky Prince George, cutie-pie Princess Charlotte and adorable Prince Louis, however another new unseen picture of the royal family has emerged. </p> <p>Earlier this week, fans of the famous family were treated to three stunning new snaps of Prince George to celebrate his 6th birthday – all taken by his talented mother the Duchess of Cambridge. </p> <p>In the photos, the young royal is seen having a giggle towards the camera in their Kensington Palace home wearing an England FC shirt, and missing a front tooth.</p> <p>In another cheeky snap, he is pictured smiling while on a family holiday – and they were enough to make royal fans as gleeful as the little royal looked. </p> <p>“This is just the greatest picture! Happy Birthday Prince George!!” one comment read by a fan on a post dedicated to the prince. </p> <p>Another added: “Priceless face! So beautiful.”</p> <p>Excitingly enough, another surprise photograph has emerged of Prince George, four-year-old Princess Charlotte and 15-month old Prince Louis with their dad Prince William along with two soldiers. </p> <p>Even better, the adorable family pic that is only missing the Duchess of Cambridge, featured little Princess Charlotte staring longingly at a sizeable Irish Wolfhound in adoration. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The Army In London, including <a href="https://twitter.com/irish_guards?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@irish_guards</a> Wolfhound mascot Domhnall, is wishing HRH Prince George a very happy 6th birthday today. Our Soldiers are always on duty, ready to serve! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PrinceGeorge?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#PrinceGeorge</a> <a href="https://t.co/JKrUja4GNL">pic.twitter.com/JKrUja4GNL</a></p> — The Army in London (@ArmyInLondon) <a href="https://twitter.com/ArmyInLondon/status/1153277213971820544?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 22, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The caption on the gorgeous photograph shared on Twitter read: "The Army In London, including @irish_guards Wolfhound mascot Domhnall, is wishing HRH Prince George a very happy 6th birthday today. Our Soldiers are always on duty, ready to serve! #PrinceGeorge."</p> <p>The picture was taken less than two weeks ago when the Cambridge children and their parents enjoyed a fun day out at the polo where the little ones cheered on Prince William and Prince Harry alongside their newborn cousin, Archie. </p> <p>The Cambridge children are sure to be enjoying their holidays at the moment, where they jetted off to a luxurious and extremely private Caribbean Island for the second year in a row, and where Prince George spent his 6th birthday. </p>

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