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Super-recognisers accurately pick out a face in a crowd – but can this skill be taught?

<p>Yenny is 26 years old, lives in Melbourne, and has a very specific talent.</p> <p>One day, she was driving her car when she recognised a man who had been several years below her at high school and whom she hadn’t seen for more than ten years. What makes this particularly impressive is that she recognised him from the briefest glimpse in her rear-view mirror while he was driving the car behind hers.</p> <p>Yenny recounts many such amazing feats of recognition and is one of a very small proportion of the population known as “super-recognisers”. She was the top performer on a<span> </span><a href="https://facetest.psy.unsw.edu.au/">national test of face recognition abilities</a><span> </span>in Australia, coming first out of 20,000 participants.</p> <p>Could you learn to spot a face as well as Yenny? Well … maybe. Our<span> </span><a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211037">new research</a><span> </span>shows that many training courses offered in this field of expertise are ineffective in improving people’s accuracy in face identification.</p> <p>But other ways of learning how to identify faces may work; we’re just not yet sure exactly how.</p> <p><strong>In-demand expertise</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3904192/">Super-recognisers</a><span> </span>are used by police and security agencies to spot targets in crowded train stations, monitor surveillance footage, and track people of interest.</p> <p>During the 2011 London riots, for example, super-recognisers from the Metropolitan Police<span> </span><a href="http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20150611-the-superpower-police-now-use-to-tackle-crime">identified more than 600 people</a><span> </span>from very poor-quality surveillance footage – a task that not even the best facial recognition software can perform reliably.</p> <p>So can anyone become a super-recogniser? Can you make up for a lack of superpowers through training? In our<span> </span><a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211037">paper</a><span> </span>we assessed the effectiveness of training courses given to practitioners who make facial identification decisions for a living.</p> <p>We reviewed 11 training courses that comply with international training standards from Australia, UK, US and Finland.</p> <p>We found that training courses typically teach facial anatomy – focusing on the muscles, bones and shape of the face – and instruct trainees to inspect faces feature by feature. Novices and genuine trainees completed one of four training courses and we tracked their identification accuracy from before to after training.</p> <p>Surprisingly, we found the training courses had almost no effect on people’s accuracy. This was especially surprising to the people who took the training – an astonishing 93% of trainees thought the training had improved their ability to identify faces.</p> <p>Our research shows that even the world’s best available training – used to train police, border control agents, forensic scientists and other security personnel – does not compensate for talent in face recognition.</p> <p>This is consistent with recent research suggesting that our face identification abilities are largely predetermined by<span> </span><a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/107/11/5238.long">genetics</a>.</p> <p><strong>Forensic facial examiners</strong></p> <p>This may come as disappointing news to people who hope to become a super-recogniser. But all is not lost.</p> <p>Scientists have recently discovered that some specialist groups of practitioners show very high levels of accuracy. Forensic facial examiners routinely compare images of faces to turn CCTV images into informative face identification evidence in criminal trials. Recent work shows that they too outperform novices in very<span> </span><a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/115/24/6171">challenging tests</a>.</p> <p>Forensic facial examiners present a paradox for scientists. They perform face identification tasks with a high degree of accuracy, and this ability appears to be acquired through professional experience and training.</p> <p><a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211037">Our study</a><span> </span>suggests there is no benefit of face identification training courses when tested immediately before and after.</p> <p>In addition,<span> </span><a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0103510">previous work</a><span> </span>has suggested that merely performing face-matching tasks in daily work is not sufficient to improve accuracy. Some passport officers have been working for 20 years and perform no better than others who have been working for just a few months.</p> <p>This paradox suggests there is something particular about the type of training and professional experience that forensic facial examiners receive that enables them to develop visual expertise in identifying faces, and which isn’t provided by standard training courses.</p> <p><strong>How do they do it?</strong></p> <p>In our current research we are working closely with government agencies to uncover the basis of forensic facial examiners’ expertise. For example, we now know that part of their expertise comes from using a very particular<span> </span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28045276">comparison strategy</a>, where they break the face down into individual facial features and then slowly and systematically assess the similarity of each feature in turn.</p> <p>Interestingly, the nature of this expertise appears to be qualitatively different to that of super-recognisers – Yenny recognised her old classmate using a quick, intuitive process as she glanced in the rear-view mirror.</p> <p>However, these snap judgements made by super-recognisers may not be suitable for the type of identification evidence that forensic facial examiners give in court, where a careful analysis of facial images is necessary to support identification decisions. Importantly, forensic facial examiners provide detailed reports of the observations used to support their decisions, which can then be cross-examined in court.</p> <p><strong>Trainable vs hardwired</strong></p> <p>Super-recognisers and forensic facial examiners use distinct routes to high performance in face identification.</p> <p>Effective training appears to target the slower, deliberate and analytical visual processing that characterises forensic facial examiners.</p> <p>The faster and more intuitive skill that enabled Yenny to recognise faces of relative strangers in her rear-view mirror is likely to be untrainable, and hard-wired.</p> <p>This raises the question of how to balance these different sources of expertise. It may be that super-recognisers are best suited to surveillance-type roles, such as monitoring CCTV or searching for targets in large crowds.</p> <p>Forensic facial examiners may be better suited to providing identification evidence to the court, which requires thorough explanations of how and why the expert came to their decision.</p> <p>Alternatively, it may be possible to train super-recognisers in the expert skills characterising forensic facial examination, or to form teams that include both types of expert.</p> <p>The aim of our work is to integrate these sources of human expertise with the latest face recognition software to improve the accuracy of face identification evidence. Such a system can make society safer, but also fairer, by reducing the likelihood of wrongful convictions.</p> <p>Can you beat Yenny’s high score of 88% on the super-recogniser test? Find out<span> </span><a href="https://facetest.psy.unsw.edu.au/">here</a>.</p> <p><em>Written by Alice Towler and David White. Republished with permission from <a href="https://theconversation.com/super-recognisers-accurately-pick-out-a-face-in-a-crowd-but-can-this-skill-be-taught-112003">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

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10 mobile phone etiquette rules you should be following – but aren’t

<p>Follow our expert phone etiquette rules to avoid being rude and annoying on your smartphone.</p> <div id="section"><strong>1. Put your phone away at the dinner table</strong></div> <div> <p>This phone etiquette rule may seem obvious because, hello, it’s rude, but being courteous in public to both your dining partner and other diners is important, says Amy Rice, Gadget Expert for <a rel="noopener" href="http://gazelle.com/" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">Gazelle</a>.</p> <p>Parenting, etiquette, and financial expert Brett Graff adds, “If it rings, and you must answer it, explain to your dining companions that your child is home by him or herself or that you’re waiting for a huge business deal to close. Otherwise, ignore it,” she says.</p> <p><strong>2. End phone conversations when paying for purchases</strong></p> <p>Just because you may not know the cashier doesn’t mean you can keep chatting away while they’re helping you.</p> <p>Unless it’s an emergency, it’s just rude to stay on the phone right in their face.</p> <p><strong>3. Never shout when talking on the phone</strong></p> <p>Can you hear me now?</p> <p>If they can’t, maybe you should call them back later.</p> <p>When in public, it’s a good phone etiquette practice to try not to raise your voice while on the phone.</p> <p>No one else needs to be privy to your conversations—or your arguments, says Rice. </p> <p><strong>4. Never text and drive</strong></p> <p>This is an obvious one. Many states have laws in place regarding texting and talking on the phone while driving. Hint: It’s a big no-no.</p> <p><strong>5. Avoid texting in work meetings</strong></p> <p>You don’t want your boss looking up and seeing you texting away and completely ignoring what’s going on.</p> <p>Plus, if you’re the boss, it’s setting a bad example for your workers. </p> <p><strong>6. Turn off the phone in church, temple or theatre</strong></p> <p>Rice says there are no exceptions to this rule.</p> <p>There are just certain places where cell phones should be and often are off-limits.</p> <p>And remember, checking your phone and having it light up in a dark theater - even if you don’t talk, text, or tweet - is just as rude. </p> <p><strong>7. Avoid talking on the phone in a waiting room</strong></p> <p>Waiting rooms can be crowded and noisy—not exactly conducive to a phone call.</p> <p>If you must talk on the phone, Rice suggests leaving the area so as not to disturb your fellow waiting room occupants.</p> <p><strong>8. Avoid using a phone on public transportation</strong></p> <p>On public transportation, people are often stressed, rushing, or exhausted.</p> <p>All they want to do is get where they’re going, not listen to your conversation about your cousin’s new boyfriend’s sister.</p> <p>“Be courteous when you are in public, enjoy the moment and your friends, but above all be smart about your smartphone manners,” says Rice. </p> <p><strong>9. Lower your voice when using your phone in public</strong></p> <p>This phone etiquette guideline is a continuation of never shouting in public.</p> <p>Not only should you not shout, but you should automatically lower your voice.</p> <p>If you don’t want to hear other people’s phone conversations, they definitely don’t want to hear yours either. </p> <p><strong>10. Don't take a call in the middle of a face-to-face chat</strong></p> <p>“Cell phones can destroy all your interpersonal dealings,” says Graff.</p> <p>“You should not even give the screen a glance while you’re speaking to someone at a party or a dinner.”</p> <p>Sometimes it’s best to think of how would you feel if that happened to you?</p> <p>If it would bother you, then you probably shouldn’t do it to someone else.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Felissa Benjamin Allard. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/10-mobile-phone-etiquette-rules-you-should-be-following-but-arent">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p class="p1"><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

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Fingerprint and face scanners aren't as secure as we think they are

<p>Despite what every spy movie in the past 30 years would have you think, fingerprint and face scanners used to unlock your smartphone or other devices aren’t nearly as secure as they’re made out to be.</p> <p>While it’s not great if your password is made public in a data breach, at least you can easily change it. If the scan of your fingerprint or face – known as “biometric template data” – is revealed in the same way, you could be in real trouble. After all, you can’t get a new fingerprint or face.</p> <p>Your biometric template data are<span> </span><a href="https://www.gemalto.com/govt/inspired/biometrics">permanently and uniquely linked to you</a>. The exposure of that data to hackers could<span> </span><a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1387883">seriously compromise user privacy and the security of a biometric system</a>.</p> <p>Current techniques provide effective security from breaches, but advances in artificial intelligence (AI) are rendering these protections obsolete.</p> <p><strong>How biometric data could be breached</strong></p> <p>If a hacker wanted to access a system that was protected by a fingerprint or face scanner, there are a number of ways they could do it:</p> <ol> <li> <p>your fingerprint or face scan (template data) stored in the database could be replaced by a hacker to gain unauthorised access to a system</p> </li> <li> <p>a physical copy or spoof of your fingerprint or face could be created from the stored template data (with<span> </span><a href="http://vkansee.com/this-guy-unlocked-my-iphone-with-play-doh/">play doh</a>, for example) to gain unauthorised access to a system</p> </li> <li> <p>stolen template data could be reused to gain unauthorised access to a system</p> </li> <li> <p>stolen template data could be used by a hacker to unlawfully track an individual from one system to another.</p> </li> </ol> <p><strong>Biometric data needs urgent protection</strong></p> <p>Nowadays, biometric systems are increasingly used in our civil, commercial and national defence applications.</p> <p>Consumer devices equipped with biometric systems are found in everyday electronic devices like<span> </span><a href="http://www.m2sys.com/blog/biometric-resources/biometrics-on-smartphones/">smartphones</a>. MasterCard and Visa both offer<span> </span><a href="https://techcrunch.com/2017/04/20/mastercard-trials-biometric-bankcard-with-embedded-fingerprint-reader/">credit cards with embedded fingerprint scanners</a>. And wearable<span> </span><a href="https://singularityhub.com/2018/01/30/smart-homes-wont-just-automate-your-life-theyll-track-your-health-too/#sm.00001gaw7sovv9frwrel7ol9kfq1j">fitness devices</a><span> </span>are increasingly using biometrics to unlock smart cars and smart homes.</p> <p>So how can we protect raw template data? A range of encryption techniques have been proposed. These fall into<span> </span><a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2073-8994/11/2/141">two categories</a>: cancellable biometrics and biometric cryptosystems.</p> <p>In cancellable biometrics, complex mathematical functions are used to transform the original template data when your fingerprint or face is being scanned. This transformation is non-reversible, meaning there’s no risk of the transformed template data being turned back into your original fingerprint or face scan.</p> <p>In a case where the database holding the transformed template data is breached, the stored records can be deleted. Additionally, when you scan your fingerprint or face again, the scan will result in a new unique template even if you use the same finger or face.</p> <p>In biometric cryptosystems, the original template data are combined with a cryptographic key<span> </span><a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2905118">to generate a “black box”</a>. The cryptographic key is the “secret” and query data are the “key” to unlock the “black box” so that the secret can be retrieved. The cryptographic key is released upon successful authentication.</p> <p><strong>AI is making security harder</strong></p> <p>In recent years, new biometric systems that incorporate<span> </span><a href="https://www.sas.com/en_au/insights/analytics/what-is-artificial-intelligence.html">AI</a><span> </span>have really come to the forefront of consumer electronics. Think: smart cameras with built-in AI capability to recognise and track specific faces.</p> <p>But AI is a double-edged sword. While new developments, such as<span> </span><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nature14539">deep artificial neural networks</a>, have enhanced the performance of biometric systems, potential threats could arise from the integration of AI.</p> <p>For example, researchers at New York University created a tool called<span> </span><a href="https://www.wired.com/story/deepmasterprints-fake-fingerprints-machine-learning/">DeepMasterPrints</a>. It uses deep learning techniques to generate fake fingerprints that can unlock a large number of mobile devices. It’s similar to the way that a master key can unlock every door.</p> <p>Researchers have also demonstrated how deep artificial neural networks can be trained so that the original biometric inputs (such as the image of a person’s face)<span> </span><a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1703.00832">can be obtained from the stored template data</a>.</p> <p><strong>New data protection techniques are needed</strong></p> <p>Thwarting these types of threats is one of the most pressing issues facing designers of secure AI-based biometric recognition systems.</p> <p>Existing encryption techniques designed for non AI-based biometric systems are incompatible with AI-based biometric systems. So new protection techniques are needed.</p> <p>Academic researchers and biometric scanner manufacturers should work together to secure users’ sensitive biometric template data, thus minimising the risk to users’ privacy and identity.</p> <p>In academic research, special focus should be put on two most important aspects: recognition accuracy and security. As this research falls within<span> </span><a href="https://www.industry.gov.au/data-and-publications/science-and-research-priorities">Australia’s science and research priority of cybersecurity</a>, both government and private sectors should provide more resources to the development of this emerging technology.</p> <p><em>Written by Wencheng Yang and Song Wang. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/fingerprint-and-face-scanners-arent-as-secure-as-we-think-they-are-112414">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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“Why wouldn’t everyone in the world have one?”

<p>James Park is the co-founder and CEO of Fitbit, a wearable technology that tracks health statistics, such as the number of steps you take in a day, as well as tracking your quality of sleep.</p> <p>SleepScore is a new feature implemented by Fitbit that gives you a score based on your quality of sleep. Although in beta testing since December, Park is hoping it’ll be available worldwide shortly thanks to the paid service Fitbit plans to launch in the second half of 2019.</p> <p>However, Park is still aware of the challenges that Fitbit faces to get to the number one spot.</p> <p>“For us, our whole strategy is about bringing more people onto Fitbit, and the key theme that you heard in this launch is simplicity and affordability,” Park said.</p> <p>“It’s all about more accessible, affordable devices working in concert with software that knows you and helps guide you and coach you.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BuUZVG7BK-F/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BuUZVG7BK-F/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by fitbit (@fitbit)</a> on Feb 25, 2019 at 12:46pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Park also says that cognitive behaviour therapy is a big reason as to why people aren’t sleeping properly.</p> <p>“There’s a technique called cognitive behavioural therapy, because a lot of the challenges that people face in going to bed is psychological.</p> <p>“Helping people work through those issues through digital therapies is another part of what we’re going to offer,” Park said.</p> <p>“With cognitive behavioural therapy, one part is that when people get into bed they just lie there. But that’s not good. Your brain should think that bed is where you sleep, not where you’re just lounging around.</p> <p>“So, one part of cognitive behavioural therapy is that you should only get into bed when you’re absolutely tired, not when you think you should go to bed.”</p> <p>Do you wear a fitness device to track your steps and other activity? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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Scam alert: Is this happening on your phone or tablet?

<p>You may have noticed a variety of pop up advertisements appearing instead of an Over60 article recently, whenever you click on a link from the Over60 Facebook page. These often appear without an option to close the pop-up and can be very annoying, especially when you’re trying to read a story.</p> <p>Unfortunately, this could be due to malicious software you have picked up from other seemingly safe websites.</p> <p>The Over60 team has worked hard to find a solution to stop this from happening, as it is not something we have any control over, and the ads are not coming from the Over60 website.</p> <p>We have outlined the steps below to follow to help stop the ads popping up on your device.</p> <p><strong>For Apple users (iPhone and iPad)</strong></p> <p>1. Go to the Settings app.</p> <p><img style="width: 230.94688221709006px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7824644/iphone_step_1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d9ccbe9da5724fd989a0abc9c7aafd54" /></p> <p>2. Scroll down and click on the Safari app.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7824645/iphone_step_2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/41ff514462e84150a05cc21185624f1e" /></p> <p>3. Scroll all the way to the bottom and click Advanced.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7824646/iphone_step_3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a4e4b823b9bd47c098b9d97ee5228c6a" /></p> <p>4. Click Website Data.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7824647/iphone_step_4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8f3326f4cda44fe693fc3226448406a1" /></p> <p>5. Scroll all the way to the bottom and click Remove All Website Data.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7824648/iphone_step_5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/92e177380a0c4f0eaf1a6a88d78e0f55" /></p> <p>6. Once nothing appears, you are done.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7824649/iphone_step_6.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1d8b964d533c439494c0246e61f1eb37" /></p> <p>Don’t worry about your saved passwords or website history being removed. That won’t happen. Removing website data doesn’t impact your saved passwords or website history.</p> <p><strong>For Android users</strong></p> <ol> <li>Head to the Settings menu. This can be found by tapping the cog icon in your notifications.</li> <li>Find Apps (or Applications, depending on your device) in the menu and then find your internet browser, this is likely to be Chrome.</li> <li>Tap on Storage and the buttons for clearing the cache and app data will become available.</li> </ol> <p>However, if you don’t want to go through each app and clear out the cache, there’s a simpler way to clear your cache settings for your entire phone. Go to Settings &gt; Storage &gt; Cached Data and then tap OK in the confirmation window to remove all cached data from your phone.</p> <p><strong>Whilst Over60 continually take significant steps to ensure our website is kept safe for our community, we do encourage all of our users to periodically clear their cache to protect themselves from malicious software threats.</strong></p> <p>Did this solution work for you? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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Are your skills in demand?

<p>Current job seekers in the Asia-Pacific region need to gear up for the digital world.</p> <p>According to LinkedIn’s 2018 Emerging Jobs in Singapore report, the in-demand roles are evolved hybrids of traditional roles in the digital sphere.</p> <p>Vice president of talent and learning solutions for APAC at LinkedIn, Feon Ang, says, “While it’s no surprise that the top emerging jobs ... are all related to technology, many of them require management and communications skills, making them hybrids of new and traditional roles – such as user experience designer.”</p> <p>Check out the top 5 emerging jobs in the Asia-Pacific region now, and what skills you need in order to be relevant:</p> <p><strong>1. Data Scientists</strong></p> <p>Data scientists are able to analyse and extract meaning from data in order to offer insights that may be beneficial to a company.</p> <p>Skills needed: data science, machine learning, coding, analytics, big data and data mining.</p> <p><strong>2. Cyber-Security Specialists</strong></p> <p>Given the rise in cyber-crimes, it’s no surprise that cyber security specialists are increasingly in demand.</p> <p>They design systems that can withstand or deal with cyber-attacks. Skills needed: computer security, information security, research, consulting and sales.</p> <p><strong>3. User-Experience Designers</strong></p> <p>These are the people who ensure that your app or website browsing experience is not frustrating, by designing an interface that is easy and intuitive to navigate.</p> <p>Skills needed: coding and prototyping, as well as interface and Web design.</p> <p>Important soft skills include analysis and collaboration.</p> <p><strong>4. Digital Heads</strong></p> <p>This role requires someone who is adept at leading projects in large companies and driving digital transformations, in particular, moving a traditional business into the digital world.</p> <p>Skills needed: digital marketing, experience and knowledge of the digital economy, as well as soft skills such as communication and management.</p> <p><strong>5. Content Specialists</strong></p> <p>Good news if you have a background in journalism or publishing – your skills will serve you well as content specialists, writing content for brands and firms.</p> <p>Skills needed: content marketing, communication, research, messaging and project management. </p> <p>Are your skills in demand? Let us know in the comments.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/are-your-skills-demand">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Never get lost again thanks to Google Maps’ new feature

<p>Google Maps has heard your complaints and listened with an open ear. They’re ensuring that you never walk the wrong way again whilst following their directions.</p> <p>How?</p> <p>This is done via Augmented Reality (AR) to overlay your exact directions onto the world around you.</p> <p>Google made this announcement last year at their Google I/O technology conference, but a select group of users are able to test out the new technology.</p> <p>It was first noticed by a writer at the <em>Wall Street Journal</em>, who is a part of the trial.</p> <p>The instructions seem simple enough.</p> <ul> <li>Press “Start AR”, which will launch the camera on your phone. This will show the view in front of you, with a small map section at the bottom of the screen.</li> <li>You’ll then be instructed to wave your camera around so that Google’s artificial intelligence systems can get an idea of where you are. This is done via roads and buildings.</li> </ul> <p><em>Wall Street Journal</em> have posted a video showing what the technology will be like.</p> <p><iframe width="492" height="302" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QW1QT7DOOdA" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Google are also looking at launching a “For You” tab within Google Maps that offers personalised recommendations that are tailored specifically to you. The system goes off your past likes and reviews, as well as your saved food preferences.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Coming soon, we’re adding a new tab to <a href="https://twitter.com/googlemaps?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@googlemaps</a> called "For you." Designed to tell you what you need to know about the neighborhoods you care about, see new places that are opening or whats trending, personal recommendations and more. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/io18?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#io18</a> <a href="https://t.co/CtqQsWFyot">pic.twitter.com/CtqQsWFyot</a></p> — Google (@Google) <a href="https://twitter.com/Google/status/993919735803842561?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 8, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Will you use this technology? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Technology

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The new innovation that allows visually impaired people to "see"

<p>For a local Sydney woman, she loves reading anything she can get her hands on. At first, she might sound like a bookworm. However, she loves reading simply because she was born completely blind and had no idea what it was like to read junk mail and trawl through the adverts looking for a decent bargain.</p> <p>This changed last September, when she received a small device that clips onto a pair of glasses. The device uses artificial intelligence to recognise faces and read text for her.</p> <p>The device, OrCam MyEye 2.0, has completely changed her life.</p> <p>Lisa Hayes explained to <a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/gadgets/wearables/the-breakthrough-of-the-21st-century-how-this-product-changed-a-blind-womans-life/news-story/74f9881ed0f6f87a8797842bd982d1da">news.com.au</a>:</p> <p>“It has got be the breakthrough of the 21st century as far as I’m concerned.”</p> <p>“It’s one of the best things I’ve ever had.”</p> <p>The tech is designed by an Israeli company called OrCam and the device is designed for the blind and visually impaired.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7824337/picture1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ca47348ee3fc4a22aecf5e25c10ac6fb" /></p> <p><em>What the device looks like. Photo credit: OrCam</em></p> <p>On the front of the device, there’s a small camera with real time visual recognition technology. On the back of the device is a small speaker that relays the information into the ear of the user. It’s available in 23 languages.</p> <p>Miss Hayes is overjoyed with the device.</p> <p>“Being totally blind since birth, I’ve never been able to read a print book,” she said. “I can now actually read. I can read medication boxes, I can pick up junk mail.</p> <p>“I feel like I’m part of the real world.”</p> <p>The device has gotten attention around the globe, with Prince William being shown the technology on a historic visit to Israel.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkkFGF3n-9v/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BkkFGF3n-9v/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">#princewilliam made a historic visit to Israel, meeting with 4 top technology companies. He met with OrCam Technologies and used OrCam MyEye 2, the most advanced assistive wearable technology, that reads text, recognizes faces, and identifies products for the blind, visually impaired, and people with reading difficulties. #assistivetechnology #blindness #lowvision #OrCam #assistivetech #visuallyimpaired #partiallysighted #blind #lifechanging #visualimpairment #wearabletech</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/orcam_technologies/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> OrCam</a> (@orcam_technologies) on Jun 28, 2018 at 2:43am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The royal was thrilled with the technology, <a href="https://www.orcam.com/gb/article/prince-william-experiences-life-changing-device-for-blind-people/">saying</a>:</p> <p>“Wow. That is absolutely incredible.</p> <p>“That will help many people I am sure. What brilliant tech.”</p> <p>Would you use this device? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Technology

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Do you know the warning signs for email scams?

<p>Email scams are getting more and more complicated by the day. They’re not as obvious as they used to be, when it was easy to tell that you didn’t have a Nigerian Prince that your family hadn’t told you about.</p> <p>Google and its sister company Jigsaw has recognised that this is a problem with tech users and has developed a quiz so you can test your skills.</p> <p>In order to be wary of email scams, it’s important to look at a few things:</p> <p><strong>1. Is the email address correct? </strong></p> <p>If you get emails usually from Google, check that the email is correct. If you’re unsure, you can Google it to make sure that it’s legit. Most email addresses from businesses have the business name in the email address. It’s important to note that some emails will use a lookalike email, so it looks similar to the emails you’re used to, but it’s incorrect.</p> <p><strong>2. Check the links</strong></p> <p>Hover over the links if you’re on a desktop computer or press and hold on your phone for the link to come up. If it says it’s a Google Drive link but doesn’t have the correct Google URL, it’s spam. If it ends in tiny.url or something else that just seems odd, don’t follow the links.</p> <p><strong>3. Check the grammar and spelling of the email</strong></p> <p>If the spelling and grammar is a bit all over the place and you’re not expecting an email from an old family friend anytime soon, it’s probably a spam account.</p> <p><strong>4. Don’t open any attachments you’re not expecting</strong></p> <p>PDFs, links to photos and links that take you off the email and onto another website can contain malware that will harm your computer and gain access to your information.</p> <p>Are you ready to test your skills? The quiz doesn’t need any real data, so you’re able to put in a fake name and email. <a href="https://phishingquiz.withgoogle.com/">Take the quiz here</a>.</p>

Technology

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Top 4 ways to protect your money while shopping online

<p>The benefits of doing our shopping online are numerous, especially with the sales. For a start you get to avoid the crush and the rush as people stamp all over each other to get the best bargains. </p> <p>You also don’t have to leave your home, particularly convenient if you’re less able to get on a bus or train into town or just don’t fancy facing the weather.</p> <p>Your purchases also have greater protection, as you can return anything you bought (unless it has been customised) up to 14 days after you receive it. On the street there’s no law saying a shop has to give you a refund.</p> <p>All good so far. But there are also greater opportunities for you to lose your money. These are easily avoidable if you follow a few simple rules.</p> <p><strong>1. Go straight to the website or via a search engine</strong></p> <p>Sometimes fraudsters will send emails with dodgy weblinks.</p> <p>Though the email may look authentic, there are often tell-tale signs not everything is right, including the address the email is sent from.</p> <p>If something doesn’t look right, don’t click on those links.</p> <p>Instead go direct to the website by typing in the address or using a search engine.</p> <p><strong>2. Check the shop is secure</strong></p> <p>You might be sent an offer which seems fantastic, but it’s worth doing a little research on the retailer if you don’t recognise the name of the online shop.</p> <p>Ask friends or family if they’ve used the website in the past.</p> <p>Other checks include looking for a padlock symbol in the address bar or bottom corner of your internet browser window. You want to see a closed padlock.</p> <p>Also check for the letters HTTPS at the start of the website address. This is different to the common HTTP, with the S standing for secure.</p> <p>You can also use services such as PayPal which act as an intermediary between you and the retailer, meaning your payment details don’t go to the website.</p> <p><strong>3. Pay with a credit card</strong></p> <p>You might be of the mind that credit cards aren’t a good way to pay. Well, if you don’t clear the balance in full each month this can be the case. But if you’re spending more than $100, paying by credit card gives you an added protection.</p> <p>The Consumer Credit Act says the credit card company is equally liable for these purchases, so you might be able to get your money back from them if something goes wrong.</p> <p><strong>4. Don't store your details</strong></p> <p>Though you might be the only person using your computer, it’s good practice to not autosave passwords or credit card details.</p> <p>This way there’s little chance someone else could log on and buy using your details without you knowing.</p> <p>Do you have any other tips? Let us know in the comments.</p> <p><em>Written by Reader's Digest UK. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/top-five-ways-protect-your-money-while-shopping-online">Reader’s Digest.</a> </em><em>For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Technology

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How to turn your web browser dark thanks to this handy hack

<p>If you’re browsing late at night on your computer desktop, it can be a bit disconcerting to open up a tab and be blinded by the complete brightness and whiteness of your webpages.</p> <p>Luckily, due to modern technology, there is a web browser extension designed specifically to get rid of this problem.</p> <p>As browsing webpages that are incredibly bright in a darkened room can cause eye strain, this web browser aims to eliminate this issue.</p> <p>It’s called <a href="https://darkreader.org/">Dark Reader</a> and is available for free across a range of web browsers, including Chrome, Firefox and Safari.</p> <p>Dark modes are available across a range of operating systems, apps and websites, so it makes sense that an application would be designed to ease eye strain across all websites.</p> <p>However, be wary of sites loading slower or crashing as the extension processes and changes the sites original colours into dark mode colours.</p> <p> You are able to turn off the Dark Reader extension for specific sites, as well as toggle between light and dark mode.</p> <p>This is how the app looks below on Google Chrome. From this list, you’re able to toggle the extension, as well as change the mode, choose what goes into the site list and change the contrast.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 449.06743185078915px;" src="/media/7823975/dark-reader-app.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0adc60442d6a4758a3412c15ae1a7b32" /></p> <p>However, if you have any questions, the <a href="https://darkreader.org/help/en/#faq">FAQ section</a> is bound to help you out.</p> <p>Are you going to use this handy computer hack? Let us know in the comments.</p>

Technology

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Ewww ― your phone screen is much filthier than you thought

<p>Can you remember the last time you were out in public without your phone in your hand or somewhere on your person?</p> <p>While you’re grabbing lunch you might have it resting on the counter while you search for your credit card in your wallet.</p> <p>Then when you go to the bathroom you might leave it on top of the toilet paper dispenser. And, at the end of the day when you take the train or bus home you switch it from hand to hand as you navigate public transportation while still staying on top of all your notifications.</p> <p>Let’s face it: Your phone is a breeding ground for germs. And what is especially unsanitary about it is how close you put it to your face and mouth on a regular basis.</p> <p>Mashable reported that every square inch of your phone has around <em>25,000 germs</em>. That’s more disgusting than a toilet seat, which contains around 1,200 germs per square inch (if sanitized regularly).</p> <p>Think about that the next time you press your phone up against your face to make a phone call. </p> <p>“Your phone is exposed to everything you touch. What’s on your hands is on your phone. Health-care experts stress that washing your hands frequently with soap and water is the best defense against the spread of germs that cause sicknesses and viruses to spread,” shares Adriana Catinari, Product Manager at Whoosh!.</p> <p>Everyone always remembers to wash his or her hands and body at the end of the day, but many times neglect their phone screen.</p> <p>The reason your phone holds so many germs is because it remains warm throughout the day because of how often we use it.</p> <p>The warm environment allows bacteria to grow very easily and puts you at a greater risk of getting infected.</p> <p>The germs on our phones can also lead to the development of acne and blackheads on your face. When your phone is pressed against your face while you’re on a call the surface of our skin warms up, opening up our pores. The bacterium then gets into your pores causing skin irritation.</p> <p>It’s obviously unrealistic to tell people to give up their phones to stay healthier since most people don’t even know how to function without them.</p> <p>But always keep in mind how many things you touch during the day, and how gross your phone can get as a result of that.</p> <p>Continue to wash your hands frequently throughout the day but also remember to wash your phone screen just as often.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Morgan Cutolo. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/ewww-your-phone-screen-much-filthier-you-thought">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Technology

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5 ways thieves steal your identity

<p>Thieves are getting more and more crafty by the day. Keep an eye out! Here are some ways they are able to steal your identity.</p> <p><strong>1. Watch your back</strong></p> <p>In line at the grocery store, some thieves hold their smartphone like they are looking at the screen and take a photograph of your credit card as you’re using it. Next thing you know they can order things online with your account.</p> <p><strong>2. Watch your bank account</strong></p> <p>Check your bank and credit card balances at least once a week. Identity thieves can do a lot of damage in the 30 days between monthly statements. </p> <p><strong>3. Check out ATMs before you use them</strong></p> <p>If you see something that looks like it doesn’t belong on the ATM or sticks out from the card slot, walk away. Thieves can make and install a 'skimmer' that can be used to capture your ATM card information and PIN.</p> <p><strong>4. Don't use unsecured Wi-Fi</strong></p> <p>Sure, it may be nice not to have to put in your password when you use an unsecured Wi-Fi connection, but thieves have software that can scoop up all the data your computer transmits, including your passwords and other sensitive information.</p> <p><strong>5. Tear up important documents before you throw them away</strong></p> <div class="views-field views-field-field-slides"> <div class="field-content"> <div class="field-collection-view clearfix view-mode-full field-collection-view-final"> <div class="entity entity-field-collection-item field-collection-item-field-slides clearfix"> <div class="content"> <div class="field field-name-field-slide-content field-type-text-long field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even"> <p>Thieves will drive through your neighbourhood at 3 a.m. on garbage day in order to fill their boot with bags of garbage from different houses, and then sort through it later looking for important information.</p> <p class="p1">Written by Michelle Crouch. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/11-ways-thieves-steal-your-identity">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Restaurant’s brilliant response to “rude” customer goes viral

<p>A UK restaurant’s brilliant response to a "rude" customer who described their food and space as "crap" has gone viral on the Internet.</p> <p>By the River Brew Co's Träkol Restaurant in Tyne, England, shared the complaint email from a self-described "wealthy" and "well-educated" customer on their social media account last Monday.</p> <p>The unsatisfied customer wrote in an the email sent to the restaurant, "I am born and bread [sic] in Newcastle … Self employed from a wealthy background and well educated (privately, obviously). I have eaten in the best restaurants of Newcastle, Europe and the Caribbean.</p> <p>"I can honestly say I have never eaten such crap food in crap surroundings and payed [sic] at least four times what the food was worth."</p> <p>The paying patron's protest was also extended to the "salty" shellfish on the Barnsley Chop dish.</p> <p>The customer went on, "As a businessman I would not do you the disservice of putting this on social media, but someone needs to look at your offering."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT... UNLESS THEY ARE VERY VERY RUDE AND VERY VERY WRONG and sometimes, even in hospitality, you just have to say it like it is... x <a href="https://t.co/OJTeO2zYVi">pic.twitter.com/OJTeO2zYVi</a></p> — ByTheRiverBrewCo (@BTRBrewCo) <a href="https://twitter.com/BTRBrewCo/status/1094940228807282690?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">11 February 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The restaurant, which has been featured in the Michelin Guide, clapped back at the harsh review by sharing their brilliant response publicly on Twitter. </p> <p>"The customer is always right… unless they are very very rude and very very wrong," the management wrote in the Twitter caption accompanying a picture of their exchange.</p> <p>In their response to the customer, the restaurant masterfully addressed the customer’s "barbed and rather insulting" complaints.</p> <p>"Thank you for your mail — as a self employed, wealthy, privately educated individual we would have thought you would have understood the difference between bread and bred," they wrote.</p> <p>"Crap food: We are glad you enjoyed the Barnsley Chop … the real surprise is that you would expect crustaceans to be anything but salty given that they live in… the sea.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BtyiKZsgrql/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BtyiKZsgrql/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">CHOP CHOP... Barnsley Chop, Seaweed Butter, Cockles &amp; Sea Vegetables.... DISCLAIMER: Cockles are salty mind ;) x . . . #träkol #foodie #foodporn #foodgasm #foodphotography #foodies #foodblogger #brewing #brewers #beer #craftbeer #beerstagram #beersofinstagram #beergeek #picoftheday #craftbeer #craftbeerporn #cycling #bikestagram #roadcycling #ilovemybike #beerstagram #picoftheday #gateshead #pictureoftheday</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bytheriverbrewco/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> ByTheRiverBrewCo</a> (@bytheriverbrewco) on Feb 12, 2019 at 9:09am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"Crap surroundings: you don’t go into much detail here — and of course this is not the Caribbean at which you have dined in the best restaurants.</p> <p>"Whilst we are always welcoming of comments, critique and well reasoned complaints in this case we must take umbrage to your mail which we feel is simply a personal attack."</p> <p>The sharp-witted Twitter post has received more than 5,000 "likes", with people applauding the restaurant's answer.</p> <p>One of the restaurant’s fans wrote, "I'm sat here shouting far too many four letter words on behalf of you guys... shocking behaviour… please keep smashing out the amazing food and service that you guys do."</p> <p>Another user wrote, "Well, you've just earned yourself more customers the next time we’re down south. Brilliant response to an utterly terrible person."</p> <p>What do you think of the restaurant’s amusing response to the customer's email? Share your thoughts in the comments.</p>

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Good news: Facebook finally lets you ‘unsend’ messages

<p>For those of you who have sent a private message to the wrong person and wished for there to be a way to unsend it, you’re not alone. Facebook has listened to its users and added an ‘unsend’ feature to Messenger.</p> <p><a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/2/5/18211255/facebook-messenger-unsend-delete-feature-sent-mark-zuckerberg">The Verge</a> has reported that if you have the latest version of Messenger for iOs (Apple) and Android, you will be able to delete messages that you were never meant to send. However, you only have 10 minutes to do so after sending the first message, otherwise the feature doesn’t work.</p> <p>The added feature comes after users demanded to have it implemented after seeing CEO Mark Zuckerberg being able to delete a message after sending it out. The feature was originally only for “higher ups” within Facebook, but after multiple sources noted that messages that they received from the CEO had disappeared, that was when news of the ‘unsend’ feature came to light.</p> <p>It took Facebook nine months to implement the ‘unsend’ feature for all users, but it’s finally here. Facebook also said that it would limit Zuckerberg’s use of the feature until everyone was able to use it.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7823677/messenger-unsend.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3205103eaf4249ada947ec6d0fb7c9cc" /></p> <p><em>Source: The Verge</em></p> <p><strong>How to use the feature</strong></p> <ol> <li>Press and hold on the message you want to delete. Note: <strong>Must be done within 10 minutes of sending the first message.</strong></li> <li>Tap ‘Remove’ when Messenger displays the ‘Copy’, ‘Forward’ etc section.</li> <li>You can then choose whether you want to remove for everyone and remove for you. If you choose ‘Remove for everyone, the people in the chat will be notified that you have removed the message.</li> <li>Choose your option and then click on ‘Remove’.</li> <li>It will show that you have removed a message in Messenger.</li> </ol> <p>Will you be using this feature? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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4 ways your computer password will get you hacked

<p>We have the secrets to why your secure account is more hackable than you think.</p> <div id="section"><strong>1. Your password is "password"</strong></div> <div> <p>Amazingly, "password" always ends up in a top spot of the most popular passwords, according to hackers who stole millions of them.</p> <p>Also popular: "123456" and its neighbour "12345678," "welcome," "letmein," and "jesus."</p> <p><strong>2. You didn't check its strength first</strong></p> <p>The <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.passwordmeter.com/" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">Password Metr</a><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.passwordmeter.com/" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">e</a> is a handy resource when setting up new accounts or changing your login info.</p> <p>It plugs your password into a formula and shows you exactly what its greatest strengths are (symbols) and weaknesses (sequential letters), thereby allowing you to tweak it to perfection.</p> <p><strong>3. Your security question is obvious</strong></p> <p>Sites will often ask you to provide a security question and answer for use when you forget your password.</p> <p>Try for something complex or personal so nefarious types can't figure out the answer with a simple Google search—<a rel="noopener" href="https://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/password-day" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">McAfee</a> suggests a question like, "How was your first kiss?" with a quirky answer only you would think of ("Rocked it like a hurricane!").</p> <p><strong>4. You didn't use a mnemonic device</strong></p> <p>Lifehacker <a rel="noopener" href="https://lifehacker.com/four-methods-to-create-a-secure-password-youll-actually-1601854240" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">suggests</a> using the Person-Action-Object (PAO) method to create an unbreakable password.</p> <p>Visualise a famous person doing a random act with a random object (say, Abraham Lincoln surfing with a gallon of milk).</p> <p>Now combine parts of that phrase to make a new word, like AbeLiSurfilk.</p> <p>Not only do you have a word that's too random for any hacker to crack, but you'll be the only person it makes sense to.</p> <p>Plus, our brains remember data better with visual cues (and especially with weird ones), so memorising it will be a cinch.</p> <p>Have you been hacked before? What did you do? Let us know in the comments.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Damon Beres. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/9-ways-your-computer-password-will-get-you-hacked">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

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6 search results that prove Google has a sense of humour

<p>Seems like the brains behind search engine Google have a pretty good sense of humour to include these hidden tricks and japes.</p> <div id="section"><strong>1. It can do a barrel roll!</strong></div> <div> <p>Type "do a barrel roll" into Google, click search, and your browser window will do a 360-degree spin.</p> </div> <div> <p>It's a geeky reference to Nintendo's Star Fox series, in which a wise old rabbit named Peppy (an intergalactic fighter pilot) advises your character to avoid enemy fire by pulling said maneuver.</p> <p>You can get the same fun Google tricks effect by typing "z or r twice" in reference to the controller buttons you'd press in the game. </p> <p><strong>2. It's a word nerd!</strong></p> <p>Google "anagram" and the search engine will suggest "nag a ram."</p> <p>Very cute.</p> <p><strong>3. It can read images!</strong></p> <p>Looking for something specific, but don't have the right keywords to describe it?</p> <p>This is one of the more useful fun Google tricks.</p> <p>You can "<a href="https://support.google.com/images/answer/1325808?p=searchbyimagepage&amp;hl=en" title="" data-original-title="">reverse image search</a>" at <a rel="noopener" href="http://images.google.com/" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">images.google.com</a> by clicking the camera icon, uploading an image, and then getting results of pictures that look similar.</p> <p>(Make sure you're okay with your photos floating around the web first.)</p> <p><strong>4. It speaks secret languages!</strong></p> <p>On the top of your Google homepage, hit the nine squares at the top and go to My Account.</p> <p>Scroll to the bottom to find Language &amp; Input Tools under Account Preferences. </p> <p>You can change your language to fun ways of speaking like Muppets (Bork, bork, bork!), Elmer Fudd (Ewmew Fudd), Klingon, and pirate. For instance, with that last one you'll find "moorr" instead of "more."</p> <p><strong>5. It can boost brainpower!</strong></p> <p>ZDNet offers a handy <a rel="noopener" href="http://www.zdnet.com/photos/10-google-search-secrets_p10/6349203#photo" target="_blank" title="" data-original-title="">tip</a> to sift through university research: first type "site:edu" to limit the query to educational institutions, then try "intitle:" before your topic.</p> <p>For example, site:edu intitle:"American magazines" brings up results from Harvard, the University of Michigan, and more. You can also search get results from a specific website a similar way.</p> <p><strong>6. It likes to get specific!</strong></p> <p>Thought "once in a blue moon" was just a vague expression? Not according to Google.</p> <p>Search that phrase and you'll get a very specific frequency: 1.16699016 × 10-8 hertz.</p> <p>It's a play off the fact that blue moons happen every 2.71 years.</p> <p>Did you know these facts about Google? Let us know in the comments!</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Damon Beres. This article first appeared in <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/humour/19-search-results-prove-google-has-sense-humour">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> </div>

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Fergie opens up about Meghan and Kate ‘feud’ in open letter: “It’s not acceptable”

<p>The Duchess of York has penned an open letter, saying that much of social media, such as Twitter and Instagram, “terrifies” her.</p> <p>Writing in <em><a href="https://www.hellomagazine.com/healthandbeauty/health-and-fitness/2019021167679/sarah-ferguson-online-bullying-hello-to-kindness-exclusive/">Hello!</a> </em>in support of their #HelloToKindness campaign, Sarah Ferguson, 59, explained:</p> <p>“We need to pay more attention than ever to what we're all being exposed to online. It's time to confront head on the fact that much of social media has become a sewer.</p> <p>“I'm on Twitter and Instagram, and I'm grateful for the fact that they allow me to communicate directly with people who are interested, promote my charitable causes and let people read my own words rather than someone else's slant on them.”</p> <p>She then goes onto say:</p> <p>“But the truth is, a lot about these sites terrifies me. I rarely if ever go 'below the line' on social media or news websites and read people's comments.”</p> <p>Fergie was not immune to media comparisons back in the day, with many people pitting her and Princess Diana against each other.</p> <p>“Women, in particular, are constantly pitted against and compared with each other in a way that reminds me of how people tried to portray Diana and I all the time as rivals, which is something neither of us ever really felt.</p> <p>“People feel licensed to say things online that they would never dream of saying to someone's face, and that encourages others to pile in. It's so ubiquitous that we've all become numb to what's going on.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820686/meghan-markle-kate-middleton.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c84b2dd301234839bf81377290f6eefa" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Duchess Meghan and Duchess Kate</em></p> <p>Fergie was previously married to Prince Andrew, and has said that the online harassment has to stop.</p> <p>“I believe that it’s time to take a stand. This isn’t about freedom of speech. The truth is, it’s not acceptable to post abuse or threats on social media or news sites, and it’s not acceptable to harangue other users simply because they disagree with you,” she wrote.</p> <p>“It’s not acceptable to pit women against one another all the time.”</p> <p>The letter and campaign from <em>Hello! </em>comes after reports that Kensington Palace staff have dedicated hours a day to monitoring negative and hateful comments on the Palace Instagram and Twitter pages about Duchess Kate and Duchess Meghan.</p>

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