Technology

Placeholder Content Image

What a treat! Unseen photo of Prince William and Duchess Kate's three children emerges

<p>Over the last week, royal fans have been treated to a flurry of new photographs of the Cambridge children. </p> <p>It is rare supporters are able to get a glimpse into the lives of cheeky Prince George, cutie-pie Princess Charlotte and adorable Prince Louis, however another new unseen picture of the royal family has emerged. </p> <p>Earlier this week, fans of the famous family were treated to three stunning new snaps of Prince George to celebrate his 6th birthday – all taken by his talented mother the Duchess of Cambridge. </p> <p>In the photos, the young royal is seen having a giggle towards the camera in their Kensington Palace home wearing an England FC shirt, and missing a front tooth.</p> <p>In another cheeky snap, he is pictured smiling while on a family holiday – and they were enough to make royal fans as gleeful as the little royal looked. </p> <p>“This is just the greatest picture! Happy Birthday Prince George!!” one comment read by a fan on a post dedicated to the prince. </p> <p>Another added: “Priceless face! So beautiful.”</p> <p>Excitingly enough, another surprise photograph has emerged of Prince George, four-year-old Princess Charlotte and 15-month old Prince Louis with their dad Prince William along with two soldiers. </p> <p>Even better, the adorable family pic that is only missing the Duchess of Cambridge, featured little Princess Charlotte staring longingly at a sizeable Irish Wolfhound in adoration. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The Army In London, including <a href="https://twitter.com/irish_guards?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@irish_guards</a> Wolfhound mascot Domhnall, is wishing HRH Prince George a very happy 6th birthday today. Our Soldiers are always on duty, ready to serve! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PrinceGeorge?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#PrinceGeorge</a> <a href="https://t.co/JKrUja4GNL">pic.twitter.com/JKrUja4GNL</a></p> — The Army in London (@ArmyInLondon) <a href="https://twitter.com/ArmyInLondon/status/1153277213971820544?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 22, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The caption on the gorgeous photograph shared on Twitter read: "The Army In London, including @irish_guards Wolfhound mascot Domhnall, is wishing HRH Prince George a very happy 6th birthday today. Our Soldiers are always on duty, ready to serve! #PrinceGeorge."</p> <p>The picture was taken less than two weeks ago when the Cambridge children and their parents enjoyed a fun day out at the polo where the little ones cheered on Prince William and Prince Harry alongside their newborn cousin, Archie. </p> <p>The Cambridge children are sure to be enjoying their holidays at the moment, where they jetted off to a luxurious and extremely private Caribbean Island for the second year in a row, and where Prince George spent his 6th birthday. </p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

How the royals will age: See what they will look like in 40 years

<p>The British royal family has been hit with the latest craze on social media known as FaceApp. The new app shows users what they'll look like as they get older, as the app ages skin, darkens teeth and lightens hair.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/gallery/what-meghan-markle-kate-middleton-18327910" target="_blank"><em>The Mirror</em></a> put select members of the British royal family through the app, including Duchess Meghan and Princess Eugenie.</p> <p>Many users of the app have suggested that they will age remarkably well, whereas others are unhappy with their results.</p> <p>The photos have quickly gone viral as Prince Harry and Prince William look like their grandfather Prince Philip in the photos. The royal siblings both sport deep-set wrinkles, larger ears and in Harry’s case, a white head of hair and a matching beard.</p> <p>Duchess Meghan, Prince Harry and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge look very different after using the app, but how accurate do you think they are?</p> <p>Fans were quick to compare them to other celebrities and members of the royal family.</p> <p>One Twitter user wrote: "Harry looks like John McEnroe and yes I'm serious :)."</p> <p>Another added: "Tindall looks like Uncle Albert?!!"</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see what the royal family looks like using the filter.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: The Mirror  </em></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

How the new Google Maps update could save lives during natural disasters

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google Maps is useful for providing directions to places you’ve never been before, whether it’s the petrol station around the corner or a new and exciting adventure to a city.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The app has since announced big changes, which include the ability to potentially save your life during a natural disaster.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google Maps has recently announced its SOS alerts were being updated to include real-time visual information as well as a navigation warning system in times of crisis. This is to help users better understand what they need to do to stay safe.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The SOS alerts were introduced two years ago, but these changes are sure to be helpful, the </span><a href="https://nypost.com/2019/06/07/google-maps-update-could-save-your-life-during-a-natural-disaster/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">New York Post</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> reports.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The latest updates include “detailed visualisations about hurricanes, earthquakes and floods”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In the days leading up to a hurricane, you’ll see a crisis notification card on Google Maps that automatically appears if you’re near the impacted area,” Hannah Stulberg, product manager of Google Maps, explains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This card will direct you to a hurricane forecast cone, which shows the prediction of the storm’s trajectory along with information about what time it’s likely to hit certain areas, so you can use this information to plan how to react.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google Maps also follows a similar process for earthquakes, where it will show earthquake shakemaps following the strike. Users are also able to see where the epicentre of the earthquake was, the quakes magnitude and how much it impacted the surrounding areas.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The flood forecasts will be able to show you where flooding is likely to occur as well as how severe the flooding will be.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hurricane forecast cones and earthquake shakemaps will be rolled out on iOS, Android, desktop and the mobile web worldwide in coming weeks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Navigation warnings are set to hit iOS and Android soon as well.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

The way technology has influenced the way you buy cars

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New research from </span><a href="https://boyleconsulting.com.au/news/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Boyle Consulting</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has shown that the reason you bought your latest car isn’t for the reasons you think.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are a variety of things that influence you into finding your ideal vehicle.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The most important research methods that were helpful to research participants were:</span></p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Visiting a dealership (91 per cent)</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dealership test drives (77 per cent)</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Online reviews (75 per cent)</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Manufacturer website (69 per cent)</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dealership website (66 per cent)</span></li> </ol> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With 75 per cent of research participants using online reviews to gauge whether or not their new car might be for them, it’s clear that technology has had a large impact on the way that people not only research about new cars but use the information available to make a new decision.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The bottom answers in the top five were the manufacturer website and the dealership website, which was used as a research tool for those who are looking to buy a car.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Younger drivers found that the opinions of their friends and family impacted them a lot, with 76 per cent of young people using them to make a final decision. This is a 27 per cent increase of Baby Boomers who were asked the same question. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another surprising finding is that buyers visit just two dealerships on average. More than 40 per cent of buyers are just happy to visit one.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This shows that buyers are potentially missing out on big discounts as they don’t look at more than two dealerships.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once buyers have made a decision, they will generally purchase the vehicle within two days.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Coping with loss: When should you unfriend the dead?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Grieving in the digital age has become trickier as our lives are more intertwined with social media.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With 60 per cent of Australians on Facebook, people will have had a digital interaction with a loved one who has passed away.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Psychology academic Jessica Blower from the University of the Sunshine Coast said that her research has found higher levels of anxiety and stress among people who interact with their deceased loved ones on Facebook. She told </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-22/knowing-when-to-unfriend-the-dead-on-facebook/11210666"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ABC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"What we are hearing now anecdotally is because of Facebook currently capitalising on nostalgia," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Individuals are feeling more and more that they need to defriend the dead, or at least deactivate the follow functions, so they are not getting some of these reminders."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She said she wouldn’t go as far to tell people not to share their grief online, but has suggested that people ask themselves beforehand: What do they hope to get out of it?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Then use that information to reflect, if they can, on whether what they're doing is best for them in the moment — a very hard ask during a time of bereavement."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Kerry Gruber Vella has said that she has increasingly witnessed the effects of people managing Facebook accounts after their loved one has passed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The sad thing is that for some of those people hosting those pages, it's part of their process for managing their own grief," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"You might be looking at Facebook for five minutes when you have a break at work, not thinking that you're going to look at that [grief-related] content, and then it comes up and you're flooded with difficult emotions but you have to go back to work."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One suggestion from Dr Gruber Vella is that you limit the accounts’ posts from appearing on your feed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"One of the things you can choose to do is go to your friend's Facebook page and look at it when you choose to," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"If you do that and you can look at the comments, it can help you cope with that experience and process."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tama Leaver has said that Facebook has responded to criticism about the unwanted posts and notifications from deceased Facebook friends.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"There were quite a number of people who had passed away and their algorithms started recommending people become friends with deceased people, which of course was very unsettling," he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"They've extended that to include a legacy account, where you can nominate someone to have limited access to edit your account after you pass away," Dr Leaver said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, Dr Leaver says that there are “a lot of issues to be considered” surrounding death and Facebook.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"If I am posting things to my friends, should I be reminiscing about something we did years ago, and how much detail should I share?”</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Why we are fearful of facial recognition technology

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although many people are up in arms about a recent </span><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/04/16/opinion/facial-recognition-new-york-city.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">New York Times</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> piece where journalists went out and identified random pedestrians as they walked past in the street using commercially available facial recognition software, the use of facial recognition software in the public eye raises more questions than answers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Why are people up in arms about it now? Facial recognition isn’t fundamentally new. It’s widely accepted across Western society that there are surveillance cameras everywhere and anywhere you could possibly think of. People are also okay with police officers scanning hours of surveillance camera footage to track a suspect’s location.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s not clear what makes people uneasy about facial recognition software. </span><a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/geek-heretic/201906/why-we-fear-face-recognition-technology"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Psychology Today</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> have suggested that there are three main emotional components to the problem which explain why people aren’t fans of it. It comes down to a lack of privacy, anonymity and uneasiness at being followed.</span></p> <p><strong>The concept of being “followed around”</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">People are complex. For many, the idea that their whereabouts could be tracked by an unknown third party, even if it’s a machine, is enough to make them feel uneasy.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s likened to seeing a police officer on the street and then having them follow your every move. It’s not the issue of having your location known, it’s being followed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">People liken being followed to being stalked, and stalking takes a heavy emotional toll.</span></p> <p><strong>People enjoy being anonymous</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There’s a reason actors now go to extensive lengths to not be recognised once they’re at the height of their fame. They miss being anonymous in a large crowd of people.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Anonymity permits a certain kind of freedom, whether it be from nosy neighbours, judgement or adoring fans.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The use of facial recognition removes the anonymity that comes with being hidden.</span></p> <p><strong>Being watched alters your behaviour</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The sense of being watched ensures that the person being watched is on their best behaviour. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For many, being stared at is worse than being eavesdropped on. People are more sensitive to visual invasions of privacy instead of audio ones, which would explain the discomfort that people feel.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

The scary new way hackers can find out your passwords

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New research from the University of Cambridge in England as well as Sweden’s Linköping University has explained that malware is now capable of accurately guessing your passwords by listening to the sound of your fingers tapping the screen.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The hackers use the malware to listen via the microphone of your smartphone and use technology that can accurately guess where you’re touching the screen to get every password you use on the smartphone device. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We showed that the attack can successfully recover PIN codes, individual letters and whole words,” researchers wrote in the paper, according to </span><a href="https://www.9news.com.au/technology/iphone-android-hackers-can-find-out-your-passwords-by-hearing-how-you-type/bf7c66ce-0d49-4c26-8be2-1dd5c6196d30"><span style="font-weight: 400;">9News</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We have shown a new acoustic side-channel attack on smartphones and tablets.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Research showed that during testing, the machine learning software correctly guessed a four-digit passcode 73 per cent of the time after ten tries.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The software was also able to identify 30 per cent of passwords that ranged from seven to 13 characters in length after 20 tries.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The malware is reliant on machine learning to predict which key a user has tapped by tracking which sound the microphone heard first. This is a detail that is picked up in a matter of seconds.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Never get ripped off by a taxi again: Google Maps’ clever new alert

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google Maps is testing a new feature in India that allows you to be warned if a taxi driver is taking you off your intended course to increase your taxi fare.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These new “off-route alerts” will send a notification to your phone every time you get side-tracked from the intended course by 500 metres.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The feature has been developed by XDA-Developers and was designed to help ensure drivers do not stray too far from the route. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You simply choose the “stay safer” button that’s located at the bottom of the screen on Google Maps where you would enter your destination for directions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After you’ve selected the button, Google Maps offers the ability to “share live progress with friends” as well as offering the “off-route alerts”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to </span><a href="https://www.9news.com.au/technology/google-maps-feature-will-alert-you-if-a-taxi-is-taking-you-offroute-to-increase-the-fare/b2993178-88c3-494f-b8ab-f99b6665c231"><span style="font-weight: 400;">9News</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, the feature isn’t yet available in Australia or New Zealand as it is only being tested in India at the moment.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google Maps is also aiming to introduce speed limit indicators as well as speed camera locations to its navigation technology. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The maps app will warn you when you approach a fixed speed camera location as well as allow you to submit the location of mobile speed cameras to alert other drivers.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Scam alert: “Large volume of emails” pretending to be from Amazon

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Large volumes of scam emails pretending to be from Amazon have been sent out and flooding inboxes across the country. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Email security company MailGuard have alerted people to the scam by providing images of the scam emails.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Your recent order on AMAZON.COM has been cancelled due to fraudulent activity detected,” the body of the email reads, before providing a link for the victim to click.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Other emails sent by the scammers say that a recent order was unable to be delivered due to a wrong address.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once victims click on the “verify email” button in the message, hackers are able to get your private details.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Once the link is clicked, users are redirected to a page that initially asks them to enter their username and password,” explained MailGuard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The site presents a message advising the recipient that Microsoft has detected suspicious activity on their computer.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mailguard said that the ultimate goal of the phishing/scare site is to “trick the user into entering their username and password”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Amazon explained to </span><a href="https://www.9news.com.au/technology/amazon-email-scam-large-volume-of-phishing-emails-flooding-inboxes-australia/8639641d-d266-4b6f-a241-7505d67e61dd"><span style="font-weight: 400;">9News</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that they would never send unsolicited emails that ask to provide sensitive personal information.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Go to Your Orders to see if there is an order that matches the details in the email. If it doesn't match an order in Your Account, the message isn't from Amazon,” the company explained.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

No privacy: Strangers could have been watching your home security camera

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’ve purchased one of Google’s Nest Cams second-hand, the previous owner might have been watching your movements for months.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New claims have found that previous owners of the camera could still use an app to look at footage from the device even after a factory reset had been used.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nest Indoor Cameras linked with the Wink hub device were vulnerable to this issue, with the flaw first raised in Facebook groups for Wink products.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New York Times</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> company Wirecutter did its own testing of the flaw and discovered that the decommissioned Nest Cam Indoor was still viewable via a previously linked Wink hub account.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Instead of a video stream, it was a series of still images snapped every several seconds,” the report read.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google were quick to issue a fix to the devices.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We were recently made aware of an issue affecting some Nest cameras connected to third-party partner services via Works with Nest,” the company said in a statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’ve since rolled out a fix for this issue that will update automatically, so if you own a Nest camera, there’s no need to take any action.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, it is still unclear how many people were impacted by the breach. This also raises questions as to whether or not Nest Cam streams are vulnerable to other third-party smart home hubs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is also no data as to how long the bug has been impacting Nest Cam devices.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

New “human on a chip” technology could change drug testing as we know it

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">New technology has allowed researchers to revolutionise drug and cosmetic testing. The technology, which is one of a kind and known as “human on a chip” biotechnology was developed in Florida.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The chip was developed by Hesperos Inc, pharmaceutical giant Roche, the University of Central Florida as well as L’Oréal research.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The findings were published in the </span><a href="https://stm.sciencemag.org/content/11/497/eaav1386"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Science Translation Medicine</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> journal. </span></p> <p><strong>How it works</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scientists are using human cells that are generally sourced from induced stem cells.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scientists are then using the cells to build different organ components and then connect them on a single transparent chip, which emulates how the organs connect in the body.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They “treat each compartment as a chemical reactor, absorber, or what’s called a ‘holding tank’ in chemical engineering,” Michael Shuler, Hesperos co-founder, chief executive officer, and president who is also a professor emeritus at Cornell University in New York, told </span><a href="https://www.healthline.com/health-news/human-on-a-chip-technology-can-test-cancer-treatments#How-%E2%80%98human-on-a-chip%E2%80%99-works"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Healthline</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We can sample from reservoirs in the system just like you would take a blood sample from your body and run it through an analytical procedure,” explains Shuler.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The chip monitors and assesses acute drug treatments which can span from a few hours to days. It can also monitor chronic drug treatments for up to 28 days.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The chip also can test cancer treatments, which was the whole idea.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The whole idea is ‘Can we do this in a way which makes the drug development process more effective and cost-effective?’” Shuler said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our ability to do clinical trials is more or less fixed, so anytime we run clinical trials and compounds fail, it means there’s a compound that may have succeeded that didn’t get a chance to go into clinical trials,” says Shuler.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This [technology] helps to make a better argument or guess about which compounds will be more effective in clinical trials,” he added.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It pays, more importantly, dividends to society because … you get more useful drugs for society with the same investment.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, there are concerns. Despite the “human on a chip” technology being progressive, there are questions as to how much longer outcomes will take to be assessed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr. Razelle Kurzrock, chief of the division of Hematology and Oncology at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and director of the Center for Personalized Cancer Therapy and Moores Cancer Center’s Clinical Trials Office told </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Healthline</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> her concerns.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The extent to which the company can produce custom models for individual patients is crucial,” Kurzrock explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If [human on a chip] could be done for individual patients, which I see as significantly more challenging, that could be genuinely transformative if prediction of toxicity and efficacy were accurate.”</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

"Mick in miniature": Mick Jagger's partner shares new pic of son Deveraux

<p>Mick Jagger’s partner Melanie Hamrick has shared a picture of their two-year-old son Deveraux – and fans were quick to spot his striking resemblance to the Rolling Stones’ singer.</p> <p>In the photo posted on the 32-year-old ballet dancer’s Instagram account, Deveraux could be seen standing on stage looking off-camera.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzN2xLnnPOb/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzN2xLnnPOb/" target="_blank">❤️🕺🏼✨</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/melhamrick/" target="_blank"> Melanie Hamrick</a> (@melhamrick) on Jun 27, 2019 at 7:26am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>People on the comments section pointed out how the toddler is the spitting image of his 75-year-old father.</p> <p>“He looks so much like his dad,” one wrote.</p> <p>“Adorable! Mick in miniature, sorry mama,” another commented.</p> <p>“No denying that’s a Jagger! What a doll,” one added.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BrHSo7gghn1/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BrHSo7gghn1/" target="_blank">A post shared by Melanie Hamrick (@melhamrick)</a> on Dec 7, 2018 at 9:03pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Deveraux Octavian Basil Jagger, born on December 8, 2016, is the rocker’s eighth child.</p> <p>Jagger also shares daughter Karis, 48, with Marsha Hunt; Jade, 47, with ex-wife Bianca Jagger; Elizabeth, 35, and Georgia, 27, and sons James, 33, and Gabriel, 21, with ex Jerry Hall; and son Lucas, 19, with Luciana Gimenez Morad.</p> <p>Jagger has returned to the road for a US tour with the Rolling Stones after undergoing heart surgery in April.</p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Watch out! Scammers are now targeting you using Google Calendar

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Experts from international security firm Kaspersky have discovered calendar apps are being targeting in a new type of phishing scam.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A phishing scam is one that attempts to trick you into giving out your personal information, which includes your bank account numbers, passwords and credit card numbers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The new scam exploits a default feature which gives the ability to add invitations and events automatically to calendar apps unless it is turned off manually.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kaspersky security researcher Maria Vergelis said scammers hope the “calendar phishing” technique will catch unsuspecting victims off guard, according to </span><a href="https://finance.nine.com.au/personal-finance/google-calendar-scam-google-calendar-scam-kaspersky-discover-new-phishing-attack/0d3e39a1-4132-4dd4-90da-30c4a3b2977d"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nine Finance</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The ‘calendar scam’ is a very effective scheme as currently people have more or less gotten used to receiving spam messages from emails or messengers and do not immediately trust them,” she explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This may not be the case when it comes to the Calendar app, which has a main purpose to organise information rather than transfer it.”</span></p> <p><strong>How the scam works</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The scam sends a pop-up notification of an invitation to the victim’s smartphone and the recipient is encouraged to click on a link.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once the user clicks on the link, it redirects you to a website that features a simple questionnaire with prize money on offer. In order to receive the prize, they are asked to enter personal information, such as credit card number, name, phone number and address.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This information goes straight to the scammers who exploit this information for money. </span></p> <p>How to disable automatic invites</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“So far, the sample we’ve seen contains text displaying an obviously weird offer, but as It happens, every simple scheme becomes more elaborate and trickier with time,” Vergelis warned.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The good news is one also doesn’t need any sophisticated precautions to avoid such scam - the feature that enables it can be easily turned off in the calendar settings.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Disabling the “automatic invites” feature is easy enough.</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Open Google Calendar</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click the settings Gear Icon</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click “Event Settings”</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Click on the drop-down menu and select: “No, only show invitations to which I've responded”</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google are well aware of this scam, but stopping all spam is not an easy task.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Combating spam is a never-ending battle, and while we've made great progress, sometimes spam gets through,” Google said in a statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We remain deeply committed to protecting all of our users from spam: We scan content on Photos for spam and provide users the ability to report spam in Calendar, Forms, Google Drive, and Google Photos, as well as block spammers from contacting them on Hangouts.”</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

How technology can aggravate your brain

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s rare to come across someone who hasn’t experienced a headache in their lifetime. However, those who experience chronic headaches are often left unheard, despite it impacting at least 10 per cent of the population.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Richard Sullivan, who is a Melbourne-based pain medicine specialist who regularly sees patients for headache conditions, said such patients often see him "when they suffer headaches for more days than they don't."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He spoke to </span><a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6220933/how-technology-might-be-aggravating-your-brain-pain/?cs=14259"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Canberra Times</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about how technology is impacting migraines. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Sullivan, it’s debatable whether or not technology has a large impact on headaches.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The issue of whether technology itself is responsible for increasing headache prevalence, in my opinion, remains a debatable point. At this stage we don't have any strong evidence that changes in IT directly increase chronic headaches. But from the anecdotal perspective from those working in clinical practice, we do seem to see more and more people coming in complaining of headaches and its impact on their health and wellbeing is a growing concern," said Dr Sullivan.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"There is a continuum from mild, moderate to the more severe headaches like migraine. Chronic headache can be caused by other medical problems. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Cervicogenic headache for example is caused by problems in the neck, and the aspects of a modern lifestyle where we are generally more sedentary, our recreational activities are focused around passive forms of entertainment and we have largely desk-based jobs with a greater reliance on the use of technology, we have seen an increase in people with neck and shoulder problems - and that might be an associated cause of the observed increase in chronic headaches."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, there are lifestyle changes you can make in order to reduce your headaches. Dr Sullivan’s tips include:</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ensure your workstation is set up ergonomically</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">take regular breaks from your work - change tasks, stretch, go for a walk</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ensure adequate sleep, nutrition and exercise (ideally between 100-200 mins per week)</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"These relatively simple things make the biggest difference in terms of the impact of pain in people's lives," said Dr Sullivan.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chronic headaches are more commonplace, but due to a better understanding of the issue, they are taken more seriously within the medical world. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Now that we have a better understanding of the causes of chronic headache, and the treatment options have been refined and improved, a lot of sufferers have come forward wanting treatment for a problem that's been affecting them for a long time. So we've seen a potential increase in the presentation of chronic headaches that relate simply to the fact that we're talking more about it, and taking things more seriously," said Dr Sullivan.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Research has revealed that technology is a literal pain in the neck

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Researchers have revealed that technology is changing the bones in our necks and skulls, which is setting people up for a lifetime of pain.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This comes from device overuse, as it can cause posture problems.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Researchers at the University of the Sunshine Coast have found something unusual that tends to go unnoticed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They used a sample of more than 1,200 people aged between 18 and 30. They discovered that 41 percent of the participants had grown a bony lump on the back of their skull.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The horn-like spurs were between 10 to 30 millimetres thick.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We suspect the reason for this bone spur formation is because they carry their head forward,” University of the Sunshine Coast’s David Shahar said to </span><a href="https://thewest.com.au/news/health/researchers-reveal-technology-is-proving-a-pain-in-the-neck-ng-b881234805z"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The West.</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The sustained stress on the skull is creating bone de-position which usually takes years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The simple solution? Lift your head.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Bringing the weight of the head back to rest on the bones and not on the muscles,” Dr Shahar said. </span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Call for independent watchdog to monitor NZ government use of artificial intelligence

<p>New Zealand is a leader in government use of artificial intelligence (AI). It is part of a<span> </span><a href="https://www.digital.govt.nz/digital-government/international-partnerships/the-digital-9/">global network of countries</a><span> </span>that use predictive algorithms in government decision making, for anything from the optimal scheduling of public hospital beds to whether an offender should be released from prison, based on their likelihood of reoffending, or the<span> </span><a href="https://www.acc.co.nz/about-us/news-media/latest-news/acc-speeds-up-claims-approval/">efficient processing of simple insurance claims</a>.</p> <p>But the official use of AI algorithms in government has been<span> </span><a href="https://www.data.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Algorithm-Assessment-Report-Oct-2018.pdf">in the spotlight in recent years</a>. On the plus side, AI can enhance the accuracy, efficiency and fairness of day-to-day decision making. But concerns have also been expressed regarding transparency, meaningful human control, data protection and bias.</p> <p>In a<span> </span><a href="https://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/research/ai/AI-Law/NZLF%20report.pdf">report</a><span> </span>released, we recommend New Zealand establish a new independent regulator to monitor and address the risks associated with these digital technologies.</p> <p><strong>AI and transparency</strong></p> <p>There are three important issues regarding transparency.</p> <p>One relates to the inspectability of algorithms. Some aspects of New Zealand government practice are reassuring. Unlike some countries that use commercial AI products, New Zealand has tended to build government AI tools in-house. This means that we know how the tools work.</p> <p>But intelligibility is another issue. Knowing how an AI system works<span> </span><a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13347-018-0330-6">doesn’t guarantee</a><span> </span>the decisions it reaches will be understood by the people affected. The best performing AI systems are often extremely complex.</p> <p>To make explanations intelligible, additional technology is required. A decision-making system can be supplemented with an “explanation system”. These are additional algorithms “bolted on” to the main algorithm we seek to understand. Their job is to construct simpler models of how the underlying algorithms work – simple enough to be understandable to people. We believe explanation systems will be increasingly important as AI technology advances.</p> <p>A final type of transparency relates to public access to information about the AI systems used in government. The public should know what AI systems their government uses as well as how well they perform. Systems should be regularly evaluated and summary results made available to the public in a systematic format.</p> <p><strong>New Zealand’s law and transparency</strong></p> <p>Our<span> </span><a href="https://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/research/ai/AI-Law/NZLF%20report.pdf">report</a><span> </span>takes a detailed look at how well New Zealand law currently handles these transparency issues.</p> <p>New Zealand doesn’t have laws specifically tailored towards algorithms, but some are relevant in this context. For instance, New Zealand’s Official Information Act (<a href="http://legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1982/0156/107.0/DLM65628.html">OIA</a>) provides a right to reasons for decisions by official agencies, and this is likely to apply to algorithmic decisions just as much as human ones. This is in<span> </span><a href="http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/SydLawRw/2015/22.html">notable contrast to Australia</a>, which doesn’t impose a general duty on public officials to provide reasons for their decisions.</p> <p>But even the OIA would come up short where decisions are made or supported by opaque decision systems. That is why we recommend that predictive algorithms used by government, whether developed commercially or in-house, must feature in a public register, must be publicly inspectable, and (if necessary) must be supplemented with explanation systems.</p> <p><strong>Human control and data protection</strong></p> <p>Another issue relates to human control. Some of the concerns around algorithmic decision-making are best addressed by making sure there is a “human in the loop,” with a human having final sign off on any important decision. However, we don’t think this is likely to be an adequate solution in the most important cases.</p> <p>A persistent theme of research in industrial psychology is that humans become overly trusting and uncritical of automated systems, especially when those systems are reliable most of the time. Just adding a human “in the loop” will not always produce better outcomes. Indeed in certain contexts, human collaboration will offer false reassurance, rendering AI-assisted decisions<span> </span><a href="https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/publications/effective-forecasting-and-judgmental-adjustments-an-empirical-eva">less accurate</a>.</p> <p>With respect to data protection, we flag the problem of “inferred data”. This is data inferred about people rather than supplied by them directly (just as when Amazon infers that you might like a certain book on the basis of books it knows you have purchased). Among other recommendations, our report calls for New Zealand to consider the legal status of inferred data, and whether it should be treated the same way as primary data.</p> <p><strong>Bias and discrimination</strong></p> <p>A final area of concern is bias. Computer systems might look unbiased, but if they are relying on “dirty data” from previous decisions, they could have the effect of “baking in” discriminatory assumptions and practices. New Zealand’s anti-discrimination laws are likely to apply to algorithmic decisions, but making sure discrimination doesn’t creep back in will require ongoing monitoring.</p> <p>The report also notes that while “individual rights” — for example, against discrimination — are important, we<span> </span><a href="https://scholarship.law.duke.edu/dltr/vol16/iss1/2/">can’t entirely rely on them</a><span> </span>to guard against all of these risks. For one thing, affected people will often be those with the least economic or political power. So while they may have the “right” not to be discriminated against, it will be cold comfort to them if they have no way of enforcing it.</p> <p>There is also the danger that they won’t be able to see the whole picture, to know whether an algorithm’s decisions are affecting different sections of the community differently. To enable a broader discussion about bias, public evaluation of AI tools should arguably include results for specific sub-populations, as well as for the whole population.</p> <p>A new independent body will be essential if New Zealand wants to harness the benefits of algorithmic tools while avoiding or minimising their risks to the public.</p> <p><em>Alistair Knott, James Maclaurin and Joy Liddicoat, collaborators on the<span> </span><a href="https://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/research/ai/AI-Law/">AI and Law in New Zealand</a>project, have contributed to the writing of this piece.</em></p> <p><em>Written by John Zerilli and Colin Gavaghan. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/call-for-independent-watchdog-to-monitor-nz-government-use-of-artificial-intelligence-117589">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

“Criminal”: Apple faces backlash after unveiling $1,400 computer stand and $7,000 screen

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Apple has been slammed as “criminal” and “flat-out delusional” for announcing a computer screen stand that costs $1,400.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They showed off the stand at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2019 keynote, as well as unveiling the new Mac Pro.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The new Mac has been dubbed the “most powerful Mac Ever” and starts at $8,570. It can be purchased alongside a new high-spec computer monitor, which will set consumers back an additional $7,140.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To top off the purchase, you can purchase a new aluminium “stand” for the monitor, which is an extra $1,426.</span></p> <p><a href="https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2019/6/3/18651208/apple-mac-pro-how-much-top-spec-price-estimate-ballpark"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Verge</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has estimated that a top spec Mac Pro could cost $48,187 all up.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">There was an audible reaction in the whole audience when <a href="https://twitter.com/Apple?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Apple</a> announced that they are charging $999 for the Mac Pro Display “stand”....like not including that for $4999 is just criminal. 😒<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AppleKeynote?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AppleKeynote</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WWD2019?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#WWD2019</a></p> — Jean François Loza (@GlitchComputer) <a href="https://twitter.com/GlitchComputer/status/1135809665084809216?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">4 June 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Twitter user, @John_nguyen0 said: “Can’t tell if Apple is trolling people with the $US1,000 monitor stand or are just flat out delusional.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">@MOTE_Games said: “If Apple wants to sell me a stand for $US999 it damn better be able to stop time or something.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It's unclear why Apple are charging this much for a computer stand, which can often be found for as little as $36 online.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, if you do purchase the new Mac Pro, you’re unable to use a third party stand unless you purchase a VESA Mount Adapter, which is conveniently offered by Apple for $284.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

The new smartphone app that has the ability to diagnose respiratory diseases

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A new smartphone app that was developed by University of Queensland researchers has the ability to analyse a person’s cough. This could help diagnose respiratory disorders quickly and easily in patients who lack access to doctors.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">UQ biomedical engineer Associate Professor Udantha Abeyratne and his team have developed the diagnostic technology that uses smartphones to instantly identify common respiratory diseases.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These include asthma, croup, pneumonia, lower respiratory tract disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and bronchiolitis.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Abeyratne said that respiratory disease was the third leading cause of death, which means that the potential global health and economic impact of this technology is phenomenal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Coughs can be described as wet or dry, brassy or raspy, ringing or barking; they can whistle, whoop or wheeze; but experts cannot always agree on the description or how to use cough sounds for diagnosis,” Dr Abeyratne said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our approach is to introduce signal processing, and machine classification and learning technologies to extract useful diagnostic characteristics from coughs, removing the subjective elements for characterising them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"> “We believe the technology can lead to earlier diagnosis and better patient outcomes throughout the world, including in remote locations with limited access to doctors.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A clinical study on childhood respiratory diseases found that the technology has an accuracy between 81 and 97 percent.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Corresponding author, Paediatrician Dr Paul Porter from Joondalup Health Campus in Western Australia has said that it could be difficult to differentiate between respiratory disorders in children. This is the case for even experienced doctors in modern hospital facilities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This study demonstrates how new technology, mathematical concepts, machine learning and clinical medicine can be successfully combined to produce completely new diagnostic tests using the expertise of several disciplines,” Dr Porter said.</span></p> <p>How the technology was developed</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The technology was developed by UQ researchers using trained algorithms to recognise features of coughs which are characteristic of five different respiratory diseases.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The technology also allows users to report other noticeable systems to ensure that the diagnosis was as accurate as possible.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The researchers the categorised the coughs of 585 children aged between 29 days and 12 years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The accuracy of the analyser was determined by comparing its diagnosis to one that was reached by a panel of paediatricians that had reviewed hospital charts and conducted all available clinical investigations.</span></p>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

The “criminal” Android apps that are draining your battery

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Researchers from security firm Sophos have found 22 apps that drain your battery life and could land you with a big phone bill.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The “click fraud” apps pretend to be normal apps on the Google Play Store but secretly perform criminal actions out of sight.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 22 apps have been collectively downloaded over 22 million times.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One app includes an illicit flashlight app that racked up one million downloads – before being taken down from Google’s Play Store.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The apps create invisible ads and trick advertisers into thinking that users are clicking on them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ads never actually appear for the user and appear in a hidden browser window instead.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The malware then stimulates a user interacting with the ad, which tricks the ad into thinking the interaction is legitimate.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite it sounding like a bad deal for the advertisers who have spent money on the advertisements, it’s also bad news for the users as well.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The researchers explained to </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/gadgets/mobile-phones/22-criminal-android-apps-draining-your-battery/news-story/2c90a4a58991118d37d53208d251a26d"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“From the user’s perspective, these apps drain their phone’s battery and may cause data overawes as the apps are constantly running and communicating with servers in the background.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Normal users without technical knowledge would be hard-pressed to find out whether or not the apps were amiss.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The warning signs would be increased data usage and fast-draining battery life but pinning this on the apps alone would be hard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">User reviews gave nothing away either. Many of the dodgy apps had any negative comments as they didn’t know anything was wrong. This means that many are more likely to download the app in future as many users use app reviews to decide whether an app is worth downloading or not.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The only affects a user might notice is that the apps would use a significantly greater amount of data, at all times, and consume the phone’s battery power at a more rapid rate than the phone would otherwise require,” researchers explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Because consumers would not be able to correlate these effects to the apps themselves, their Play Market reviews for these apps showed few negative comments.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The dodgy apps have since been removed from the Google Play Store, but they can still operate if you’ve got them installed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A list of the apps can be seen below.</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sparkle FlashLight – com.sparkle.flashlight</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Snake Attack – com.mobilebt.snakefight</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Math Solver – com.mobilebt.mathsolver</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ShapeSorter – com.mobilebt.shapesorter</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tak A Trip – com.takatrip.android</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Magnifeye – com.magnifeye.android</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Join Up – com.pesrepi.joinup</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Zombie Killer – com.pesrepi.zombiekiller</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Space Rocket – com.pesrepi.spacerocket</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Neon Pong – com.pesrepi.neonpong</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Just Flashlight – app.mobile.justflashlight</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Table Soccer – com.mobile.tablesoccer</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cliff Diver – com.mobile.cliffdiver</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Box Stack – com.mobile.boxstack</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jelly Slice – net.kanmobi.jellyslice</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">AK Blackjack – com.maragona.akblackjack</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Color Tiles – com.maragona.colortiles</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Animal Match – com.beacon.animalmatch</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Roulette Mania – com.beacon.roulettemania</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">HexaFall – com.atry.hexafall</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">HexaBlocks – com.atry.hexablocks</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">PairZap – com.atry.pairzap</span></li> </ul>

Technology

Placeholder Content Image

Donald Trump mocked over embarrassing gaffe about Prince Charles

<p>Last year, Donald Trump made headlines for <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/president-trump-committed-a-royal-faux-pas-during-his-visit-with-the-queen/" target="_blank">his gaffe when visiting Queen Elizabeth II</a> at Windsor Castle.</p> <p>Now the US president has made another faux pas with a British royal.</p> <p>Trump misspelt Prince Charles’s official title in a Twitter post on Thursday, calling him the “Prince of Whales”. He mentioned Charles and the Queen as part of his argument that he should not be obliged to divulge details of discussions with foreign parties to the FBI.</p> <p>“I meet and talk to ‘foreign governments’ every day. I just met with the Queen of England (U.K.), the Prince of Whales, the P.M. of the United Kingdom, the P.M. of Ireland, the President of France and the President of Poland. We talked about ‘Everything!’” he wrote.</p> <p>“Should I immediately call the FBI about these calls and meetings? How ridiculous!”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The Internet remembers things better than you do. <a href="https://t.co/P9hb3bOYwq">pic.twitter.com/P9hb3bOYwq</a></p> — Doktor Zoom (@DoktorZoom) <a href="https://twitter.com/DoktorZoom/status/1139161824161517568?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The president immediately removed the post and replaced it with the correct spelling, but Twitter users had caught wind of the typo.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">The Prince of Whales, pictured earlier today <a href="https://t.co/GmnAiQuzwx">pic.twitter.com/GmnAiQuzwx</a></p> — Graeme Demianyk (@GraemeDemianyk) <a href="https://twitter.com/GraemeDemianyk/status/1139158896789065729?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">😂 <a href="https://t.co/qGtuHxddSh">pic.twitter.com/qGtuHxddSh</a></p> — Sven Henrich (@NorthmanTrader) <a href="https://twitter.com/NorthmanTrader/status/1139157866252787712?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">"I DEMAND TO SPEAK TO THE PRINCE OF WHALES!" <a href="https://t.co/gGrXNF6wa1">pic.twitter.com/gGrXNF6wa1</a></p> — Born Miserable (@bornmiserable) <a href="https://twitter.com/bornmiserable/status/1139227322773463040?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 13, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Trump’s Twitter post came after his interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://redirect.viglink.com/?format=go&amp;jsonp=vglnk_156047124889410&amp;key=a426d7531bff1ca375d5930dea560b93&amp;libId=jwvc0jue0102i8oq000DLbltkki33&amp;loc=https%3A%2F%2Fedition.cnn.com%2F2019%2F06%2F12%2Fpolitics%2Fdonald-trump-abc-political-dirt-foreign-country-rivals%2Findex.html&amp;v=1&amp;out=https%3A%2F%2Fabcnews.go.com%2FPolitics%2Fid-exclusive-interview-trump-listen-foreigners-offered-dirt%2Fstory%3Fid%3D63669304%26cid%3Dclicksource_4380645_null&amp;ref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F&amp;title=ABC%20interview%3A%20Trump%20says%20he%20would%20accept%20foreign%20dirt%20on%20rivals%20-%20CNNPolitics&amp;txt=Trump%20said%20in%20an%20interview%20with%20ABC%20News" target="_blank">ABC News</a>, where he said he would accept damaging information on a political rival from a foreign government.</p> <p>“I think you might want to listen, there isn’t anything wrong with listening,” said Trump. “If somebody called from a country, Norway, [and said] ‘we have information on your opponent’, I think I’d want to hear it.”</p> <p>He denied that such foreign assistance would amount to election interference. </p> <p>“It’s not an interference, they have information – I think I'd take it," Trump said. </p> <p>“If I thought there was something wrong, I’d go maybe to the FBI.”</p> <p>The current <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-is-open-to-accepting-dirt-on-his-opponents-from-foreign-governments-is-that-against-the-law/" target="_blank">US campaign finance law</a> prohibits political candidates from receiving campaign contributions from another country, which may include sensitive information “of value”.</p> <p>Trump’s statement has been criticised by politicians across the board.</p> <p>“Foreign influence in our elections is growing, not lessening, and we don’t want to send a signal to encourage it,” said Republican Senator Lindsey Graham.</p> <p>“Donald Trump has made it clear that he will engage in any action, no matter how unethical or unpatriotic, that he will go right up to the line of what’s legal and indeed it looks like he crossed that line many times,” said House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff.</p>

Technology