family & Pets

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Is this Princess Mary’s boldest outfit choice yet?

<p>The Swedish royals have been welcomed by Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary for a state visit to Denmark.</p> <p>The Danish royals hosted Crown  Princess Victoria and her husband, Prince Daniel for a special two-day visit which is aiming to strengthen relations between Denmark and Sweden. </p> <p>The tour has been reciprocated after Aussie-born Princess Mary and her husband went to visit the Swedish royals for a short visit in 2017. </p> <p>The royal couples have looked picture-perfect for chic outings, with  Princess Mary stunning the cameras with one of her boldest, chic look yets by wearing a grey-looking power suit. </p> <p>Showing off her sleek figure, the royal rocked a modern tailored checked jumpsuit by MaxMara, pairing it with patent black leather heels and a matching clutch. </p> <p>The Scandinavian royals were all smiles on their way to attend a meeting at the United Nations. </p> <p>The mother-of-four never disappoints in the fashion department on her outfit on Wednesday was no different as she stepped outside alongside her husband Prince Frederik and Swedish counterparts. </p> <p>She went for her go to hairstyle, paired with a zip up jacket and a stunning white skirt with blocks of warm blues. </p> <p>The royal couples attended a networking event for their first event of the day then later visited the<span> </span>House of Green<span> </span>where they saw a number of innovative solutions for green conservation. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the royal’s beautiful looks. </p>

family & Pets

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5 easy ways to make your garden a great home for your pets

<p>Making your garden pet friendly isn’t as tricky as you think.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Desirable doghouse</strong></li> </ol> <p>Make sure the kennel is large enough for your dog to lie down and sit up comfortably, and small enough for him to keep warm with body heat. Use old towels and blankets for insulation and bedding – they’re easy to wash and keep flea free. Shelter the entrance from wind and raise the floor to prevent dampness.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Fresh repellent</strong></li> </ol> <p>Fed up with a dog repeatedly digging up the same spot in your garden? Keep the dog away by scattering a crumbled cake of toilet freshener over the area – the smell really puts them off.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>Fruitful solution</strong></li> </ol> <p>Cats are repelled by the smell of citrus. To deter the local moggies from digging up young plants, poke pieces of citrus rind into the soil of flower and vegetable beds, then dust lightly with soil. Stockpile peel in the freezer for when the fruit is out of season.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Ants can’t swim</strong></li> </ol> <p>If your dog eats its meals in the garden, stop the ants from taking over by placing the food bowl in a dish filled with water.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>No-tip dish</strong></li> </ol> <p>Put water for your dog in a ring-style cake tin – the type that has a hole in the middle – and place it in a shady spot in the garden. To anchor the tin and prevent spills, drive a stake through the hole into the ground below. No amount of pawing will upturn it.</p> <p><em>Written by Reader’s Digest Editors. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/diy-projects/5-easy-ways-make-your-garden-great-home-your-pets">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

family & Pets

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How to choose the perfect pet for your family

<p>Here are a few steps that you should take before choosing a pet for your family.</p> <p><strong>Talk it over</strong></p> <p>Talk it over with your kids. Find out what your children want from a pet. Stress that animals aren’t toys.</p> <p><strong>Wait</strong></p> <p>Wait a few months to see if the desire was more than just a whim.</p> <p><strong>Set a budget</strong></p> <p>Set a budget. Decide what expenses you can meet.</p> <p><strong>Consider your home</strong></p> <p>Consider your home. A small unit with no access to the outside is usually an unhappy environment for dogs and cats, which, in turn, can be messy and destructive. </p> <p><strong>Consider safety</strong></p> <p>Consider safety. Cats scratch. Dogs bite. Young children can cause injury to fragile creatures.</p> <p><strong>Do extensive homework</strong></p> <p>Do extensive homework. Study animals’ varying needs.</p> <p><strong>Start small</strong></p> <p>Start small. Cats and dogs are demanding of time and money. Lower-maintenance animals can provide a good introduction to caring for a furry friend. Now let’s get into some specifics, beginning with mice…</p> <ul> <li><strong>Mice. </strong>Mice look sweet and are inexpensive, but they require gentle handling and are generally more active at night.</li> <li><strong>Guinea pigs. </strong>Guinea pigs need shelter, hiding places and an exercise area safe from predators. They are lovable and responsive: the more they are handled (gently) from the start, the tamer they become. They are extremely active, will get bored if cooped up and crave company.</li> <li><strong>Rabbits. </strong>Rabbits are cuddly and sociable. They need space and companionship – from humans and other bunnies. They may be kept outdoors with a hutch and an exercise run, or can live indoors and be house trained. Small pets usually have short life spans. Rabbits live 5-10 years; guinea pigs 5-7 years; mice only 2-3 years. For longevity, choose a tortoise – they can live 50-100 years.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Reader’s Digest Editors. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/gardening-tips/everything-you-need-know-about-choosing-pet-your-kids">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

family & Pets

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Royal schoolgirl! Princess Charlotte’s first day of school is here

<p>Princess Charlotte is growing up way too fast, and has started her first day of “big kigs school”. </p> <p>The five-year-old will have her big brother to keep her company however, just like she did when she walked through the gates of St Thomas’ in Battersea in South London. </p> <p>The whole family, apart from baby Prince Louis, were all there for the little royal’s big day as she waved at cameras and shook the hand of her teacher. </p> <p>Kensington Palace Twitter account posted a gorgeous snap of Princess Char, 5, and Prince George, 6, to their Twitter account, stating “The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are very pleased to share a photograph of Prince George and Princess Charlotte at Kensington Palace this morning. The photo was taken shortly before Their Royal Highnesses left for Thomas’s Battersea.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">It’s the first day of school for Britain’s Princess Charlotte, fourth-in-line to the throne <a href="https://t.co/E8oXcAvVu8">pic.twitter.com/E8oXcAvVu8</a></p> — Reuters Top News (@Reuters) <a href="https://twitter.com/Reuters/status/1169721867428671488?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 5, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>It is hard to believe, but just two years ago Prince George, the eldest son of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, walked shyly through the school gate with his father. </p> <p>At the time, Duchess Kate had to miss the royal’s first day as she was experiencing severe morning sickness during her pregnancy with 16-month-old Prince Louis. </p> <p>Luckily for little Char, both parents were able to be apart of her first day - and clutched her mother’s hand tightly while fiddling with her ponytail. </p> <p>The Kensington Palace Instagram page also shared the sweet first moments of the 5-year-old meeting one of her school teachers. </p> <p>St Thomas’s in Battersea has 560 students aged from four to 13 and hold the ethos “be kind”.</p> <p>Headmaster Simon O’Malley said the school the royals are attending, emphasised key values such as “kindness, courtesy, confidence, humility and learning to be givers, not takers”.</p> <p>“We hope that our pupils will leave this school with a strong sense of social responsibility, set on a path to become net contributors to society and to flourish as conscientious and caring citizens of the world,” he said.</p> <p>Just as Prince George did, Princess Charlotte will adopt the same last name “Cambridge” upon entering the school system. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see royal’s first day at big kid school.</p>

family & Pets

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5 everyday habits of great dog owners

<p>These everyday habits of great dog owners are something to aspire to. How many do you do?</p> <p><strong>1. You pick up more than just poop</strong></p> <p>Picking up your dog’s poop is Good Doggie Care 101 but truly great pet owners will be mindful of any mess their animal makes and clean up after them, says<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://drruthpetvet.com/" target="_blank">Ruth MacPete</a>, veterinarian and author of Lisette the Vet. This means not only cleaning up poop piles from the neighbour’s lawn but wiping up pee, drool or other liquids in public places; picking up the pieces when your dog shreds a toy; and making amends if your pup chews someone’s shoe, pees on a rug or otherwise makes a mess.</p> <p><strong>2. You do a daily "snout-to-tail" check</strong></p> <div id="page4" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Great pet owners care deeply about their dog’s wellbeing and spend a few minutes each day giving them a once-over, says<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://sitmeanssit.com/dog-training-mu/fairfield-dog-training/tag/neil-cohen/" target="_blank">Neil Cohen</a>, dog behaviour expert, owner and head trainer at Sit Means Sit. “By touching your dog, from snout to tail (and everywhere in between) you not only teach a dog to accept your touch, should they need it in an emergency, but you also familiarise yourself with their body, enabling you to quickly notice anything that wasn’t there yesterday – like a tick, cut, tumour, etc.,” he explains.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/15-everyday-habits-of-great-dog-owners"><strong>3. You are consistent with the rules</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/15-everyday-habits-of-great-dog-owners"> <p>Great pet owners know that forbidding their dog to eat off the counter one day and then allowing it the next isn’t being kind, it’s just confusing. Dogs thrive with rules, Cohen says. “Maintain regular boundaries, for example, no counter surfing, no nose on the table, no jumping on people,” he says. “Boundaries establish leadership/authority and make your dog more comfortable in your pack.”</p> <p><strong>4. You encourage your dog's natural instincts in a healthy way</strong></p> <p>All dogs are born needing to bite, chew and chase but all too often those instincts get them in trouble in the human world. Great dog owners understand this and give the dog safe ways to express their nature, Benson says. “Give your dogs food puzzles or other games and toys that allow them to practice natural canine behaviours like chewing and ‘hunting’ for their food,” she says.</p> <p><strong>5. You correct your dog with kindness</strong></p> <p>When your dog acts up, you need to bring them back in line. But great dog owners know the difference between correction and punishment, says<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.kristibenson.com/" target="_blank">Kristi Benson</a>, a certified canine therapy trainer and behaviour expert. They use their voice to reassure, comfort and correct their dog – not scare them, she says. “Good owners will not use yelling, swatting, training collars or other physical punishments as they know they are bad for the dog’s welfare,” she explains. “Modern dog training techniques can help you teach your dog to obey without using harsh punishments.”</p> <p><em>Written by Charlotte Hilton Andersen. </em><em>This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/15-everyday-habits-of-great-dog-owners">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

family & Pets

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Keep your home free of animal hair

<p>A common problem with pet owners is the stray hairs their dogs and cats leave around the house on floors, furniture and clothes. As our pets have become important family members, they’ve moved out of the backyard and into the house. This means hair shedding and cleanliness have become more of a concern. Fortunately, there are ways to reduce the impact, explains veterinarian Dr Katrina Warren.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/pets/keep-your-home-free-of-animal-hair"><strong>Look at low-shedding breeds</strong></div> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/pets/keep-your-home-free-of-animal-hair"> <p>All dogs and cats shed hair – some more than others. Choosing a low-shedding breed can make a huge difference. Remember that low-shedding dog breeds require regular clipping, an additional expense to consider. Choosing a smooth or short-coated breed may also reduce the overall volume of shedding.</p> <p><strong>Groom your pet regularly</strong></p> <p>It may sound obvious, but brushing pets regularly will remove loose fur that will otherwise be shed and dropped around the house. Long-haired pets especially should be groomed regularly to keep their coats trim. There are some great de-shedding tools and brushes available that make grooming more effective by reaching through the topcoat to remove loose undercoat hair.</p> <p><strong>Pay attention to couch fabrics</strong></p> <p>Pet hair attaches more to certain furniture fabrics such as wool, velvet and tweed than ones like Ultrasuede and microfibre. Coverings should be selected for their ease of cleaning. Owners of light-coloured pets often choose cream or white slipcovers because they don’t show the hair. Leather or faux leather can also be a good furniture option as it doesn’t hold hair and wipes clean.</p> <p><strong>What flooring is best?</strong></p> <p>Avoid wall-to-wall carpeting as it can quickly entrap pet hair. Tiles and floorboards are more manageable but choose the right colour flooring – dark floorboards will show up light pet hair more than light floorboards.</p> <p><strong>Remove the hair</strong></p> <p>Vacuum regularly to remove hair from your living space and use a sticky roller to remove fur from clothing. If you allow your pets on the furniture, washable slipcovers or throw-rugs can be used to protect furniture and keep it fresh.</p> <p><strong>Pet management</strong></p> <p>Keeping pets off your furniture is the best way to prevent you, your family and visitors being covered in hair. If you’ve got a new puppy or kitten, it’s a good idea to train them to stay off the furniture from the start. Also, consider restricting pets to areas with hard surface flooring.</p> <p><strong>Dr Katrina's tips for the best low-shedding pets</strong></p> <p>These are great choices if you’re looking for a new four-legged friend.</p> <p><strong>Low-shedding</strong><span> </span><strong>Dog Breeds:</strong><span> </span>Bedlington terriers, bichon frise, Maltese dogs, poodles and schnauzers. These breeds all need regular clipping and grooming.</p> <p><strong>Minimal Grooming Dog Breeds:</strong><span> </span>Chinese crested dogs, chihuahuas, whippets, greyhounds and Italian greyhounds. These breeds all shed hair but their fine coats mean less hair and little grooming.</p> <p><strong>Low-shedding Cat Breeds:</strong><span> </span>Devon rex, Cornish rex, Bengal, Russian blue and Siamese.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Dr Katrina Warren. This article first appeared in <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/pets/keep-your-home-free-of-animal-hair">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> </div>

family & Pets

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Serena Williams’ heartwarming tribute to two-year-old daughter

<p>To celebrate two years since their daughter, Alexis was born, Serena has shared a poignant message to her followers. </p> <p>The tennis star took to instagram to post a snap taken the day she was born, with Alxis Olympia on her chest and her husband looking lovingly at both of them. </p> <p>"The last two years have been my greatest accomplishment,” the photograph was captioned with. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B13pSRjnwv0/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B13pSRjnwv0/" target="_blank">The last 2 years have been my greatest accomplishment</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/serenawilliams/" target="_blank"> Serena Williams</a> (@serenawilliams) on Sep 1, 2019 at 5:59am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The image straight away garnered thousands of happy comments from celebrity friends, family and supporters who took turn gushing over the first-time mother’s loving message. </p> <p>"This photo just made me tear up. So beautiful," wrote model Ashley Graham who is currently waiting on the arrival of her first child.</p> <p>"Love you sis," wrote ex-Pussycat Doll Nicole Scherzinger, before finishing with, "Ps. Who looks that GORGEOUS after just giving birth!?!"</p> <p>While pop artist Ciara simply wrote: "Proud of you mama. God is so good."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B133ieNFtE5/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B133ieNFtE5/" target="_blank">A post shared by Alexis Ohanian Sr. (@alexisohanian)</a> on Sep 1, 2019 at 8:03am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Serena’s husband, co-founder of social news site Reddit, Alexis Ohanian, also shared a warm message for his baby girl’s birthday where he wrote:  “How has it already been two years? Happy cake day @olympiaohanian. </p> <p>“Thank you for being the greatest thing we've ever done. And thank you for teaching me that every parent in the US deserves those first months with their newborn. I'm a better business leader because of it.”</p> <p>Ohanian has been championing for the rights of males to receive paid paternity leave since having his first child. </p> <p>Serean and Alexis have previously shared the frightening moments in anticipation of their firstborn’s birth, with the tennis star admitting she “almost died” due to a series of complications.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Serena and Alexis' special moments with their daughter over the last two years. </p>

family & Pets

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Woman dies after being pecked by a rooster

<p>Elders have been warned of the dangers of varicose veins after a woman died from a rooster pecking.</p> <p>The elderly woman, who was not identified, died after being attacked by an “aggressive rooster” while collecting eggs from a chicken coop on her rural South Australian property.</p> <p>The rooster pecked the woman’s lower left leg, puncturing her varicose veins and leading the wound to bleed out.</p> <p>Roger Byard, professor of pathology at the University of Adelaide who studied the woman’s death, said the case highlighted how “vulnerable” elderly people who have varicose veins are.</p> <p>Varicose veins are enlarged, twisted veins which bulge on the skin surface. They commonly appear in the legs and feet.</p> <p><span>“</span>I’ve had a number of cases where people have just been wandering around in their home and just run into furniture which has caused a small injury,” Byard told the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-02/elderly-woman-dies-after-rooster-pecked-varicose-veins/11469394">ABC</a></em>.</p> <p>“They haven’t known what to do and have died from it.”</p> <p>Byard said while rooster attacks were rare, he said the woman’s case showed that small domestic animals can be dangerous. “There have been a couple of cases overseas where children have been pecked by roosters because they have thin skulls and the rooster has actually caused brain damage,” he said.</p> <p>“Older people are also not as good at defending themselves against animal attacks, their balance might not be as good.”</p> <p>The case – which was recently published in the journal of <em>Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology</em> – focused on ways to identify wounds from small animals during an autopsy.</p> <p>Byard said damage to varicose veins can be treated immediately to prevent deaths. “If you knock them, put pressure on the wound, elevate and call for help,” he told <em><a href="https://10daily.com.au/news/australia/a190901yzqfk/woman-killed-by-her-rooster-while-collecting-eggs-20190902">10 daily</a></em>. “Don’t panic.”</p>

family & Pets

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Lifesaving advice that prevented the kidnapping of 4-year-old boy

<p>Children are constantly curious and have the urge to explore. Children can also wander off and get lost from time to time.</p> <p>Almost everyone has experienced the horror of losing sight of a child, although on this family outing, things took a terrifying turn.</p> <p>In June last year a UK woman recalled her actions when her 4-year-old nephew Jake went missing and published them on a now viral blog post.</p> <p>Vicky Hamilton-Ross recounted the events of the day when her sister Lucinda, her nephew Jake and herself attended a beach event in Bournemouth, England.</p> <p>Vicky’s sister Lucinda turned away from her 4-year-old son to pick something up and in less than minutes, Jake had vanished.</p> <p>Army cadets were chaperoning the event and quickly advised Vicky and Lucinda to start yelling descriptions of the boy, what he looked like and what he was wearing.</p> <p>“‘We are looking for a boy. He is four years old, blond and in a red t-shirt. Have you seen him?’ … they repeated this loudly and consistently as they covered areas nearby,” Hamilton-Ross wrote on the blog.</p> <p>After 15 minutes of searching, Jake was found on the beach.</p> <p>Hamilton-Ross explained that by loudly yelling a description, any perpetrator would have been scared off or identified.</p> <p>“It meant the guy couldn’t leave the beach without being spotted, so he just left Jake and walked away,” she explained.</p> <p>It was that advice that saved his life. Once safely reunited with his mother and aunty he told them, “There was a bald man in a white t-shirt, he said he would take me to see a real rocket ship.”</p> <p>Hamilton-Ross further praises the advice she was given.</p> <p>“I would urge every parent to do this immediately, even if you suspect they are just around the corner. What’s the worst that could happen, you are slightly embarrassed because they hadn’t gone anywhere? It’s well worth that risk.”</p>

family & Pets

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How often should you wash your dog?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dog owners either love or hate bath time depending on whether their dog is a fan of water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The question of how often you’ve been washing your dog has probably come up, especially if they tremble at the sight of water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Robert Hilton, a Melbourne-based vet, spoke to </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/life/how-often-should-you-wash-your-dog/10697236"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC Life</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about how often you should wash your dog. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"In general, healthy dogs only need to be bathed if they smell. There's no reason particularly to bath a healthy dog, unless they're dirty," Dr Hilton says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Feral dogs don’t generally bathe, let alone use shampoo, so many wash their pets weekly as to not dirty up their homes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Or some dogs develop a doggy smell and people want to remove that, or they get dusty or dirty," Dr Hilton says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some pet owners are even over-washing their dogs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"In general, dogs are bathed more often than they need to be," Dr Hilton says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, if your dog has a skin condition, it’s important that you speak to your vet before bathing your dog once a week.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The danger is dogs with allergic skin disease commonly have a defect in their skin barrier, which manifests as drying of the skin and that contributes to their misery," he says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"And using harsh shampoos — harsh being anything that strips any further lipid [fatty protective] layer off the skin or damages it — potentially makes the itch worse."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re concerned about how often you should be brushing your dog, it depends on the season and your dog’s fur.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brushing your dog is good for prevention of painful tangles as well as the removal of shedding fur.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"> "It also allows the dog to keep clean areas that it might otherwise struggle to, [such as] the tail and the chest," says Paul McGreevy, a professor of animal behaviour and animal welfare science at the University of Sydney's School of Veterinary Science.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Remaining vigilant about brushing is ideal as the weather warms up.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It happens as the days start to get longer, basically from the footy grand final [in late September] onwards," he says .</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It's a seasonal response to summertime."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brushing also has other benefits as teaching your dog to sit still, but this only works if you’re attentive to your dogs’ behaviour.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The best owners are so attentive to the dog's behaviour that they can tell they're grooming an area that the dog really loves being groomed, and that's often the front of the chest and the tail — those hard-to-reach places."</span></p>

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“He refuses to get out of bed”: Parents fined $230 for not getting their son to school

<p>NZ parents of a 15-year-old boy have been fined under the Education Act and have been forced to pay $50 each as well as cover court costs of $130.</p> <p>They were fined for their failure to make sure their son attended school.</p> <p>Parents Donna Davey and Shane Dryden, who now live apart, appeared in Dunedin District Court, where they each admitted a charge under the Education Act of failing to ensure their child was enrolled in school.</p> <p>Counsel Jo Turner said that the parents were “at a loss” as to what to do with their sleepy son.</p> <p>"[They] have tried everything they can to get him out of bed," she said, according to the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&amp;objectid=12260002" target="_blank"><em>NZ Herald</em></a>.</p> <p>"He refuses to get up in the morning."</p> <p>The boy who lived with Davey was enrolled at Clinton Primary School until the end of 2017 and was then enrolled at South Otago High School up until May this year.</p> <p>The court heard that during those periods of time, the boy was unenrolled at various times due to long spells of non-attendance.</p> <p>At one point in 2018, the teenager had 38 days of unjustified absence and seven days of justified absence out of 62 school days.</p> <p>This means he was off school nearly three-quarters of the time.</p> <p>With every 20 days of unjustified leave, the boy was removed from the school roll.</p> <p>The Ministry of Education sent his parents a letter threatening criminal charges if the boy did not attend school.</p> <p>"Considerable effort has been made by various state agencies to ensure that the defendants enrol [their son] at school and have him attend school regularly," a summary of facts said.</p> <p>Community Magistrate Simon Heale who overlooked the trial accepted that the parents have made considerable effort to get their child to attend school.</p> <p>"I understand teenagers can be very difficult to coax into compliance," he said.</p> <p>"But it is your obligation, till he reaches the age of 16, to have him at school."</p> <p>"While prosecution for non-enrolment is available, prosecuting parents is absolutely a last resort," deputy secretary of sector enablement and support Katrina Casey said.</p> <p>She also said that it was inappropriate to comment on the decision of the court when media questioned whether a $50 fine would deter other parents.</p> <p>The Minister of Education said the prosecution was the first since 2017 and the fourth since 2014.</p>

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What you should do when your dog gets into a fight at the dog park

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Taking your dog to the dog park can be a fun venture, but it’s important to know what to do when something goes wrong.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mitch Watson, AKA the Paw Professor, spoke to </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-26/what-to-do-if-your-dog-gets-into-a-fight-at-a-dog-park/11141714"><span style="font-weight: 400;">the ABC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about what you can do if things turn ugly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Watson is a former police dog handler with more than 10 years of experience and has worked with dogs of all ages and breeds.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Exercise your dog a little before taking them to the park, as it takes a little energy out them," he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"This really helps high-energy dogs."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"If you're worried because your dog has already had a few fights, use a muzzle on the dog while in the park," he told </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/brisbane/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC Radio Brisbane's Rebecca Levingston</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Many people don't like seeing their dog in a park with a muzzle on, but it protects the owners and other dogs."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An interesting point of note is that most of the fights that happen at dog parks is over balls.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"A big reason fights happen, though, is over balls," Mr Watson said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Many people take their dogs to the park to exercise in a legal way without them running off.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"When you're throwing the ball in the park, other dogs can fight over them, creating a barney in the park.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">RSPCA Queensland spokeswoman Alex Hyndman Hill has said that if your dog gets into a fight, you need to take care when separating the dogs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Breaking up a dog fight is always risky, but obviously your instinct will be to protect your dog," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The best way to break up a fight is to grab the back legs of each dog and raise them off the ground — like you would do a wheelbarrow — and walk backwards.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"If you're the only one present, do this to the dog leading the attack — eventually the other dog will try and get away.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Also, carrying an extra lead can also help if you need to clip a dog and pull it away."</span></p> <p>Dog park etiquette</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As many different breeds and ages of dogs head to the dog park, it’s important to know the basic etiquette at the dog park.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Always bring a leash and monitor your dog constantly for signs of aggression or stress during interactions with other dogs," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Be ready to end the outing if your dog isn't enjoying it or is making it a stressful experience for another dog.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Think about whether it's appropriate for your children to be with you and always supervise them if they are."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Watson said another option could be to change the hours you visited the park.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Go to the parks out of peak hours if possible," he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"There are a lot of rescue dogs out there now and high-energy and crowded parks can cause these fights."</span></p>

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How to teach your cat new tricks

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cats are well-known for being aloof and stubborn, but as it turns out, cats just want to interact with their humans as best as they can.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is according to cat behaviourist Regina Hall-Jones, who spoke to </span><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/life/how-to-train-your-cat-teach-tricks/11252426"><span style="font-weight: 400;">the ABC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about the benefits that come with training your cat.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Not only can it be mentally enriching and fun for the both of you, it can also be used to address behaviour issues within your pet.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although it might be tricky as dogs definitely have a head start on cats when it comes to training, it doesn’t mean that training your cat can’t be done.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Cats were only domesticated 2,000 years ago, and even then, humans didn't actively select for certain traits [through breeding] until the 18th century," Bronwyn Orr, veterinarian from Sydney School of Veterinary Science says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"In comparison, dogs have had a significant head start. Having first been domesticated 15,000 years ago, they have co-evolved alongside humans for quite some time."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"> The benefits for training your cat can greatly outweigh the cons, says Hall-Jones.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Enrichment and mental and physical stimulation is so important," Ms Hall-Jones says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Cats who are generally happy and secure, have routine and familiarity … are less likely to have destructive behaviours."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cats who have been trained are also less likely to be surrendered.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Depending on the people, they surrender them or get them euthanased because they can't handle [certain behavioural] issues. I don't think people realise there are people out there who can help with these issues."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Training your cat is easier than you think, says Dr Orr. As long as you’re “establishing trust, motivation and rewards”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Patience and repetition are key,'' she says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Both experts agree to use positive methods and never resort to punishment.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Punishment training methods — for example, yelling at incorrect behaviour — have been shown to be less effective than reward-based methods, and can greatly damage the trust and bond you have with your pet," Dr Orr says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Depending on how old your cat is and what breed they are helps the cat learn quickly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s a lot easier to train a kitten or a younger cat, but according to Hall-Jones, these breeds learn the fastest.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Bengals, domestic shorthairs and Siamese cats tend to learn the quickest."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Food as a reward is usually all you need to begin training.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Always keep training fun. Use short sessions, only try to teach one behaviour at a time, consistently reward good behaviour and try to be as consistent as possible," Dr Orr says.</span></p>

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Sick of your dog shedding? This leotard stops exactly that

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re tired of vacuuming your dog’s fur, the guys at Shed Defender have a solution for you, although your dog is likely to be less than impressed with the outcome.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s a leotard that’s designed to keep your dog from shedding its fur all over the house and you can see it below.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0bAtoklZHT/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0bAtoklZHT/" target="_blank">@meka_the_shepherd is ready to play #sheddefender . . . . . . . . #gsd #germanshepherd #germanshepherdforever #germanshepherd_corner #gsdforever #gsdfamily #gsdlover #gsdfeature #gsdworld #gsddaily #gsdforlife #gsdcorner</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sheddefender/" target="_blank"> ShedDefender</a> (@sheddefender) on Jul 27, 2019 at 6:34am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Shed Defender has a range of purposes that come with also looking slightly dorky, which include acting as a barrier from mud and dirt if your dog decides to roll around in the backyard as well as protecting your pup from fleas.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The leotard can also be used to replace cones around the head if your dog has recently had surgery as they will be unable to lick or bite their new wound.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the leotard is nice and snug against the dog, it’s said to calm down dogs with anxiety and provide them with an easing effect.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re worried that the leotards might be cruel for your dog, it’s made out of breathable, four way stretch eco-friendly mesh fabric and has been approved by vets.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Shed Defender first made its appearance on Shark Tank back in 2018 and since then, the company has seen a 65 per cent growth in revenue.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The idea first came about in 2011 after the founder, Tyson Walters, struggled to find a solution to the shedding of his St. Bernard Harley.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzYKTbCFuOH/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzYKTbCFuOH/" target="_blank">Real Dogs Wear Pink @my_bark_is_bigger_than_yours #sheddefender . . . . . . . . #bigdogs #bigdogsofinstagram #stbernards #bigdog #bigdogclothes</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sheddefender/" target="_blank"> ShedDefender</a> (@sheddefender) on Jul 1, 2019 at 7:29am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There is a varied range of sizing starting from “mini” all the way up to “giant” with prices ranging from $72 up to $112. They ship to Australia too all the way from the US.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hero image credit: www.instagram.com/sheddefender/</span></p>

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NSW breeder sets new world record with 19 Dalmatian puppies born in one litter

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A NSW dalmatian breeder has set a new world record with 19 puppies being born in one litter.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Melissa O’Brien was relieved that all 19 puppies survived.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She told </span><a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6297245/dalmatian-litter-breaks-world-record/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Canberra Times</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about the ordeal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Records aside it is pretty incredible all of them are alive, we had to supplement and bottle feed a few for a while to help mum out," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"But they are six weeks old now and getting their own little personalities."</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">An Albury breeder has broken the world record for the largest Dalmatian litter - 19 puppies! 🐶🐶🐶🐶 <a href="https://twitter.com/bordermail?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@bordermail</a> <a href="https://t.co/V9t4DhcJEW">pic.twitter.com/V9t4DhcJEW</a></p> — Vivienne Jones (@_VivienneJones) <a href="https://twitter.com/_VivienneJones/status/1155325046547595264?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">28 July 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">O’Brien said that despite her dalmatians normally breeding big litters, this was by far the largest.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I normally have big litters, they run in bloodlines, but this is easily the biggest," Ms O'Brien said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"They were born by C-section which I had already elected simply because of the amount of weight she had put on - she gained 15 kilograms.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Her water broke and we had to pretty much take her straight in because if we had waited a few more hours we would have had dead puppies."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With the amount of puppies, you’d forgive O’Brien for getting them mixed up sometimes, but she says she can almost tell them all apart. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"They are all named after Disney movies and they all have distinctive marks and colourings so we do keep track of them," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Livers, or the brown coloured puppies, seem to be harder to sell because everyone sees the movie and wants a black and white one but I prefer the liver ones as I find them softer in nature.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I have had Dalmatians for about 13 years but have been breeding and showing them for just about 10 years."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC Goulburn Murray reported about the incident via their Facebook page.</span></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FABCGoulburnMurray%2Fposts%2F2368044573230758&amp;width=500" width="500" height="738" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There were reportedly eight people there to help the vet deliver the puppies.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, O’Brien says that this is the last of the litters for both mum and dad.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Melody is three and a half and Lukas is seven so this will be both their last litters," she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It is definitely the first and last for Melody, I had already decided to get her desexed before she had the puppies.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The temperaments are bomb-proof. They have to deal with my two-year-old so they are very used to small children and human interaction.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I am going to keep one boy but I haven't decided on which one yet."</span></p>

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How you hold a baby says more about your personality than you think

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A team of psychologists have set out to answer why women default to their left side when cradling an infant.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The team at University G. d’Annunzio of Chieti–Pescara in Italy designed an experiment to test whether women who held their baby on the left side were more likely to display a secure attachment style.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Attachment styles come in two forms: Secure and insecure. People with secure attachment styles have an easier time developing and maintaining close and secure relationships. People with insecure attachment styles find it difficult to maintain healthy interpersonal connections.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The </span><a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1474704919848117"><span style="font-weight: 400;">researchers hypothesised</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that there was an association between left-cradling and secure attachments. Left-cradling promotes a more natural “right brain to right brain communication”, which is important as the right brain seems to be the dominant side for social attachment and connection.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In order to test this hypothesis, researchers recruited 288 females ranging in ages 18 – 38 to take part in a study.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The test subjects were asked to pick up and cradle a life-like doll six times for a period of 10 seconds. The doll was positioned differently each time participants lifted the doll to avoid experimental bias.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After the cradling exercise, participants did two surveys. The first survey is a 50 item scale that measures a person’s perception of their relationship with their parents during their first 16 years of life.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The second survey was about the experience in close relationships scale, which measures attachment security in romantic relationships.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They found that those who cradled on their left side had more positive interpersonal attachments with their mothers and romantic partners compared to those who didn’t.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The researchers write, "Positive attachment styles to the mother or the romantic partner [...] predicted a higher prevalence of left-cradling bias in our sample."    </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The researchers suggested that their results provide confirmation that “left cradling can be considered a typical behaviour in humans and right cradling is a typical behaviour”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They also stated that:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Such preferences might be related to a variety of different factors such as anxiety, stress, depression, and even attachment style. Dysfunctions in socio-emotional states and attachment styles seem to reduce the typical left-cradling bias which is nonetheless the predominant pattern also in women with moderate symptoms, and it is plausible that only when dysfunctions are meaningful is the cradling behaviour significantly influenced."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So, if you cradle a baby on the left side, you’re more likely to have stable relationships with those around you.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you cradle the baby on the right side, you’re displaying “atypical behaviour” and are more likely to be under stress and have an insecure attachment style. </span></p>

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