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Duchess Kate is pretty in polka dots on visit to children’s centre

<p>The Duchess of Cambridge has stepped out Autumn ready at a surprise engagement at the Sunshine House Children and Young People’s Health and Development Centre in London.</p> <p>Opting for a long-sleeved polka dot blouse, which she paired with cropped, wide-legged trousers, the mother-of-three looked picture perfect in her chic attire.</p> <p>Her new hair colour, which she debuted earlier this month while dropping Princess Charlotte off on her first day of school, was styled in her signature blowout.</p> <p>According to Kensington Palace, Kate visited Sunshine House to learn more about the Southwark Family Nurse Partnership National unit, a program in which “parents are partnered with a specially trained family nurse, who visits them regularly from early pregnancy until their child is two.”</p> <p>The 37-year-old met with the team at Sunshine House, which supports young mothers and parents. And her visit was specifically to “further her research and engagement with the Early Years sector,” said Kensington Palace.</p> <p>Recently, Kate has started to focus her attention of supporting families, mothers and young children.</p> <p>The Duchess has a “really strong interest therefore in how you can support mothers and fathers in the earliest months of life of a child and during pregnancy in order to make sure that brain architecture was well supported,” Kate Stanley, the Director or Strategy for the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children to<span> </span><em>People<span> </span></em>magazine.</p> <p>“And a real compassion about the challenges of that and desire to understand the experiences of the families that some of the people around the table work with.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Kate’s chic ensemble.</p>

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10 easy steps to improve your health

<p>Congrats on wanting to lead a healthier life. The world is your oyster so why not enjoy it for as long as you possibly can!</p> <p>With so many popular opinions on what a healthy diet is, it can be hard to separate fact from fad. <br />Let’s get down to basics and look at the top 10 tips that will grant you a better quality of life.</p> <p><strong>1. Hydrate</strong><br />Did you know the human body is 80% water? – so it’s no surprise we need to replenish this magical liquid throughout the day. Drink 2-3 Litres a day and even more if it’s hot outside. If you find it difficult to remember to drink then have a big glass immediately when you awake in the morning and carry around a bottle of filtered water with you wherever you go throughout the day.  </p> <p><strong>2. Eat good fats</strong><br />Eating fat won’t make you fat but choose the healthy fats such as egg yolk, avocado, nuts, seeds, <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/healthy-eating-series-the-mediterranean-diet.aspx">cold pressed olive oil</a>, nut butter and coconut oil which is great for cooking too. A good rule of thumb is to never overheat cooking oils and always go for the local pasture-raised chicken eggs. Also, some moderation is required for eating nuts due to their caloric density so settle for a handful of unsalted, unroasted nuts a day if you can. Have you considered <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/healthy-eating-series-why-you-should-eat-like-a-caveman.aspx">eating like a caveman</a>?</p> <p><strong>3. Stay away from soft drinks and sweetened fruit juices</strong><br />The PH value in coke is 3 – not far from the PH value of battery acid which is 0. Therefore, it's no wonder that soft drinks create an acidic environment in your body making it easier for inflammations to set in. Chronic inflammation is the leading cause of many lifestyle diseases of the 21st century. So, think again before reaching for that refreshing beverage.</p> <p><strong>4. Fruit</strong> <br />It's nature’s medicine, full of antioxidants and cleansing for the body. The key to weight management is to go for <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/pick-the-right-fruit-for-better-health.aspx">fruits with a low glycaemic index</a> such as berries, apples, pears and grapefruit. A few serves a day will suffice. Choose organic with fruits that have a large edible surface area then you can be less strict with plants that have inedible skin like bananas and melons. </p> <p><strong>5. Exercise</strong><br />Exercise can transform your life providing a <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/top-tips-for-overcoming-the-blues.aspx">brighter outlook</a> for the future to come. Adults who include at least 150 minutes of physical activity in their routines each week live longer than those who don't. <br />Whether it’s in the gym or a walk along the beach, it all ads sand to the hourglass. Here are some ideas on how to <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/exercise/make-fitness-fun.aspx">make fitness fun</a>. </p> <p><strong>6. Sleep</strong><br />You may not want to sleep your life away but plenty of quality sleep can in fact prolong your life and will add to the quality of your waking hours as well. <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/are-you-cheating-yourself-of-sleep.aspx">A good night’s sleep</a> has a tremendous impact on your overall health and wellbeing. If you are having sleeping difficulties, talk to your GP or pharmacist. There will be a solution for you.</p> <p><strong>7. Vegetables </strong><br />Forget about your meat, potato and peas. Instead, think fresh! Eat a large variety of veggies, either raw or keep the cooking process to a minimum to preserve the life giving nutrients. Consuming vegetables helps promote alkalinity in your body, boosting immune function and reducing inflammation in the body.</p> <p><strong>8. Fun </strong><br />Being social, caring for other humans and having a good old laugh is potion for the soul. <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/work/employment/volunteering-holds-the-key-to-self-fulfillment.aspx">Have you considered volunteering?</a></p> <p><strong>9. Supplements </strong> <br />Are you missing out on crucial nutrients? Due to preferences or intolerences you may be missing out on key vitamins and minerals. Multivitamin, Fish oil, spirulina, pro biotics or protein supplements. Consult your GP or local pharmacist. </p> <p><strong>10. Sensible indulgences </strong> <br />We all strive for balance in our lives and the 80/20 rule may help you. Make superior food choices 80% of the time and enjoy sensible indulgences for the remaining 20. Good quality red wine and <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/flourless-orange-chocolate-cake.aspx">dark chocolate</a> with min 75% cacao offer numerous health benefits, making them superior choices. Best news you’ve heard all day right!<br /><br />Now, go on and use these tips in your daily life and reap the benefits of a more vibrant and vital body.</p> <p><em>Republished by <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/10-steps-to-improve-your-health.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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6 ways to keep your mind sharp

<p>Just like working a muscle in your body, the mind can be trained to work faster, smarter and harder. Here are some fun and easy ways - backed by science - to keep your mind active.</p> <p><strong>1. Salsa, salsa, salsa!</strong></p> <p>We all love a boogie every now and then, but did you know that dancing improves both brain and motor function? In one study examining the role of dance on cognitive ability, researchers found that people who have a history of dancing (16 years or more) have better reaction times, steadiness, posture and balance compared to those who have never danced. But even if it’s been years since you last went dancing it’s not too late to start seeing benefits. Other studies have shown that people who take up dancing for just six months can improve attention, memory and verbal fluency—that is, the ability to process and produce words. <br />Try this: For a dance-inspired workout, try Zumba, a fitness dance program set to a high-energy Latin beat. For group and couples dances classes, enquire at your local community college. Or try Tai Chi, group exercise classes (especially set to music), or simply play your favourite tunes on your iPod next time you go for a walk or light jog.</p> <p><strong>2. Get nutty</strong></p> <p>Nuts are more than just a great protein source. In a study involving more than 7,000 people aged 55-80 years, researchers showed that people who consumed a Mediterranean diet with 30g of mixed nuts per day had improved memory and cognitive function. Consultant dietitian, Dr Kellie Bilinski, says mixed nuts are an ideal source of protein and Omega-3, which is important for brain health. “Almonds and walnuts are ideal, but it’s important to eat nuts as part of a balanced diet,” says Dr Bilinski.</p> <p>Try this: the recommended serving is 30g of nuts, which is around 10 walnuts or almonds, every other day. Dr Bilinski advises to opt for mixed nuts, as each will have varying amounts of Omega-3 and fat content.</p> <p><strong>3. Eat fish twice weekly</strong></p> <p>Regular consumption of fish has long been proven to lower your risk of Alzheimer’s disease and stroke, but it can also slow down the effects of age-related cognitive decline. Dr Bilinski says fish has an anti-inflammatory effect that is linked to improved brain health. According to the Australian Dietary Guidelines, adults should aim to consume 2-2.5 serves of protein per day, which may include fish every other day.</p> <p>Try this: For heart and brain health, try to eat fish, especially salmon or trout, 2-3 times per week. Don’t eat fish? Then try sprinkling a tablespoon of linseed on your salads, breakfast cereals, or look for cereals that include this supplement.</p> <p><strong>4. Play trivia</strong></p> <p>Novel activities like playing trivia or board games are not only simple and fun ways to flex your brain muscles, but they promote the use of executive function skills, which are the mental processes that allow us to focus attention, recall instructions and multi-task successfully. In one study published in the journal Neurology, scientists found that people who play board games, for example, had a lower risk of cognitive impairment. While another study – a meta-analysis published in the journal Ageing Research Reviews – discovered that group activities, as opposed to those performed in individual settings, were more likely to boost memory and subjective cognitive performance.<br /><br />Try this: Grab a few mates and head to your local pub for Trivia Night! Prefer to stay in? Challenge friends and family to a round of scrabble, chess or Trivial Pursuit. Or why not try downloading some multi-player games, like Words with Friends, to play next time you’re with the kids or grandkids?</p> <p><strong>5. Learn a new skill</strong></p> <p>"When you are inside your comfort zone you may be outside of the enhancement zone,” says research scientist, Denise Park. His findings published in the journal Psychological Science revealed that people who learned a high-level skill, such as photography, for a continuous period displayed better cognitive functioning compared to those who took up less demanding or familiar skills, such as listening to classical music. But this doesn’t mean everyday activities like reading and writing should be overlooked. In fact, recent research published in the journal Neurology found that bookworms are better at preserving memory across their lifetime and can reduce the rate of cognitive decline by 32 per cent.</p> <p>Try this: It’s never too late to master a new skill. Flex your brain muscles by learning a new language, practicing your favourite instrument or taking up a photography class. Investigate Open Colleges Australia or SEEK Learning for TAFE courses in your area.</p> <p><strong>6. Stay active</strong></p> <p>After a few weeks of regular physical activity, new cells and blood vessels in the brain start to grow, and inflammation and insulin resistance are reduced. As a result our ability to think, move and retain memory is greatly improved. And according to a group of Canadian research scientists, regular aerobic workouts are more effective in boosting verbal memory and learning than strength, resistance or balance training, While no one knows exactly which aerobic exercise yields the greatest results, experts at Harvard Medical School say walking or any other form of workout that gets your heart pumping is the best way to nourish your body and mind.</p> <p>Try this: Incorporate at least half an hour of moderate intensity exercise, such as a brisk walking, swimming, stair climbing or dancing, most days of the week.</p> <p><em>Written by Mahsa Fratantoni. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/six-ways-to-keep-your-mind-sharp.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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"Racism is taught": Heartwarming video of toddlers hugging each other goes viral

<p>A video of two toddlers running down the street to give each other a hug has gone viral, garnering headlines across the globe.</p> <p>The video, posted by Michael Cisneros to social media last week, shows his two-year-old son Maxwell running towards and hugging his best friend Finnegan after unexpectedly spotting him on the New York street.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FMichaelDCisnerosNYC%2Fvideos%2F10217659556234176%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>Cisneros told <em>CBSN New York</em> that the two boys hug every time they see each other.</p> <p>The father said the video has attracted thousands of views and shares online because of the growing racial tensions in the US and around the world.</p> <p>“Honestly, I think it has gotten so big because of the race issue in our country and also around the world,” Cisneros said.</p> <p>“Racism is taught. Hatred is taught. These two boys don’t see anything different within each other. They love each other for who they are and that’s exactly how it should be.</p> <p>“We just want to raise loving, caring boys, and I think the world likes to see a little bit of hope.”</p> <p>Cisneros said Maxwell and Finnegan first became friends when their parents met at a restaurant a year ago.</p> <p>He added that today the toddlers celebrate their birthdays together and are always “super excited to see each other, even if they’ve only been apart for a day or two”.</p>

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10 conversation starters that make you instantly interesting

<p><strong>1.Perfect conversation starters</strong></p> <p>Whether you’re working up the courage to talk to an attractive stranger of feeling awkward at a social or business event, the conversation topics will get you off to a winning start</p> <p><strong>2.Conversation Topic: Ask for a helping hand</strong></p> <p> “Helping questions are great conversation starters because when a person helps you it forms natural bonds. When you help another person to figure what an item is on the buffet or locate the bathroom, it lowers your defences. For example, if you’re at the supermarket, ask ‘Do you know how to tell if this fruit is ripe?’ It makes you look open to learning more and will help the conversation flow naturally.” – Dawn Maslar, MS, author of <em>Men Chase, Women Choose: The Neuroscience of Meeting, Dating, Losing Your Mind, and Finding True Love</em>.</p> <p><strong>3.Conversation Topic: Compliment something other than someone’s looks</strong></p> <p> “Instead of complimenting something generic like their eyes, highlight something that shows their personality, like their purse or a book. This is simple, elegant and great if you are interested in someone or anytime you want to boost their likeability toward you for business or social reasons.” – Paul DePompo, PsyD, ABPP, psychologist</p> <p><strong>4.Conversation Topic: Bring up a shared interest</strong></p> <p> “Many people think they have nothing in common with a stranger but if someone is at a supermarket, restaurant or bar they are there for a reason – one which is likely similar to yours. You’re both there so you both share a common interest. Ask questions to find out what that interest is. For instance, ask about what their experience at that venue has been like or why they chose it.” – Shannon Battle, licensed professional counsellor</p> <p><strong>5.Conversation Topic: Go simple… yet bold</strong></p> <p> “Give a genuine smile and say, ‘Hi.’ It sounds too simple but people are so used to other people staring at their phones that a simple smile and hello can be a very bold move. It shows the other person that you’ve noticed them and you’re interested in getting to know them better. And you’ll almost always get a hello back. (If you don’t, let it go. You don’t want to date a rude person anyway.)” – Suzanne Casamento, dating expert and the creator of Fantasy Dating</p> <p><strong>6.Conversation Topic: Ask for their honest opinion</strong></p> <p> “Asking ‘I’ve been really thinking deeply about something and wondering if I can share it, and get your feedback?’ shows your interest in the other person and solicits new and interesting information that is fun to discuss. Pretty much anyone will want to share their opinions with an interested party and they will think you are nice and fun to be with, as well.” – Melissa Orlov, therapist and author of <em>The Couple’s Guide to Thriving With ADHD</em>.</p> <p><strong>7.Conversation Topic: Tell a bonding joke</strong></p> <p> “Jokes work well because they are disarming and work on a biological level. If a woman laughs at a man’s joke, he feels assured that she has a level of comfort with him. For her, laughing releases oxytocin, the ‘bonding hormone.’ These two things together create an opening for more conversation.” – Dawn Maslar</p> <p><strong>8.Conversation Topic: Give an out-of-the-blue compliment</strong></p> <p> “I always tell my clients to try out a compliment. It breaks the ice and these days it’s completely unexpected! You can test out doing this by just giving people walking down the street a compliment and see their reaction, most times people will give you a smile and possibly engage in more conversation. After all, who doesn’t like to be complimented?” – Stef Safran, a matchmaking and dating expert in Chicago and owner of Stef and the City.</p> <p><strong>9.Conversation Topic: Get (pop) cultured</strong></p> <p> “Make a comment or joke about something big in pop culture that most people would be familiar with – something light, NOT political. If you need ideas look at what’s trending or are hot topics on Twitter or Facebook.” – Stef Safran.</p> <p><strong>10.Conversation Topic: Ask a fake favour</strong></p> <p> “People love to help so asking for a small favour is a great conversation starter. If you don’t have a favour to ask for, just make one up. Ask the person you find attractive to help you reach something on a high shelf or hold something while you look through your wallet. At the very least you’ll end up with a fun story to tell your friends.” – Suzanne Casamento</p> <p><em>Written </em>by <em>Charlotte Hilton Andersen.</em> This<em> article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/relationships/37-conversation-starters-that-make-you-instantly-interesting/"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Ellen DeGeneres reveals fascinating new details about baby Archie

<p>Since he was born in May and made headlines around the world for being the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's first child, the public hasn’t been able to see much of baby Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor. </p> <p>While we have seen a few portraits of the family, both Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan have been particular about what information and photographs to share with the world. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxNGOrbAldR/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BxNGOrbAldR/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by 𝐀𝐫𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐌𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 🇬🇧 (@babysusexroyal)</a> on May 8, 2019 at 7:19am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Well, we’ve just gotten our rare dose of baby Archie from none other than TV show host Ellen DeGeneres. </p> <p>On the latest episode of <em>The Ellen Show, </em>the host revealed she and wife Portia de Rossi got some cuddle time with Archie while on a trip to Europe and the UK. </p> <p>"I just want to say, it was an honour for them to meet me," DeGeneres joked.</p> <p>"Seriously, they are so amazing."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">This summer I got to meet Prince Harry and Meghan’s son Archie in England. Would you like to see the picture? <a href="https://t.co/gdNpYwrsXv">pic.twitter.com/gdNpYwrsXv</a></p> — Ellen DeGeneres (@TheEllenShow) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheEllenShow/status/1171116512108670976?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 9, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The couples both divulged into an in depth conversation about wildlife conservation and the work Duchess Meghan and hubby Prince Harry had been undertaking in Botswana and Rwanda. </p> <p>“They were the most down-to-earth, compassionate people. Imagine being attacked for everything you do, when all you’re trying to do is make the world better,” she added. </p> <p>Ellen made clear it wasn’t the only topic they talked about however. </p> <p>The 61-year-old admitted she didn’t feel right asking the couple for a picture of little Archie, so instead took to drawing him. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 280.87986463620985px;" src="/media/7830577/image.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4818a677ba884bbe881f92a6c8e08ef8" /></p> <p>"I can't tell you how sweet [Harry and Meghan] are, but the most important thing is I got to hold little Archie. I fed Archie, I held Archie," DeGeneres said.</p> <p>"He does have a body, but I just did the face for y'all. He has a perfectly circular head," she joked. </p> <p>"He looks just like Harry, and he had more hair than I did at the time."</p> <p> </p>

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“This is childhood cancer”: Mum pens powerful post about the realities of deadly illness

<p>A US mum has been praised for her candid post about the realities of living with a member who has childhood cancer.</p> <p>Her son has been diagnosed with leukaemia and has opened up on the ways that the diagnosis in 2015 has impacted the whole family.</p> <p>Kaitlin Burge has documented her son Beckett’s cancer experience on Facebook and has shared a heartbreaking image of her other child Aubrey comforting Beckett during a bout of nausea.</p> <p>"My two kids, 15 months apart, went from playing in school and at home together to sitting in a cold hospital room together," the mum writes.</p> <p>"My then four-year-old watched her brother go from an ambulance to the ICU.</p> <p>"She watched a dozen doctors throw a mask over his face, poke and prod him with needles, pump a dozen medications through his body, all while he laid there helplessly.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbeatitlikebeckett%2Fposts%2F3305533652820876&amp;width=500" width="500" height="764" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Kaitlin explained that her daughter Aubrey struggled to understand what was happening to her brother.</p> <p>"She wasn't sure what was happening. All she knew was that something was wrong with her brother, her best friend."</p> <p>"He never wanted to play. She didn't understand how he was able to walk before this, but now he can't even stand unassisted," the post continues.</p> <p>"Why couldn't they go to their favourite trampoline park anymore? ... Why didn't he have to go back to school, but she did?"</p> <p>Kaitlin said that Aubrey never left her brothers side, which is something that Kaitlin strongly supported.</p> <p>"She spent a fair amount of time, by his side in the bathroom, while he got sick. She stuck by him," she continues.</p> <p>"She supported him and she took care of him, regardless of the situation. To this day, they are closer. She always takes care of him.</p> <p>"Vomiting between play sessions. Waking up to throw up. Standing by her brother's side and rubbing his back while he gets sick ... This is childhood cancer. Take it or leave it."</p> <p>The comment section was flooded with supportive messages from other families who praised Kaitlin for shining a light on childhood cancer.</p> <p>"You are highlighting an often overlooked fact that cancer affects the entire family, especially childhood cancer," one writes.</p> <p>"Your daughter has a loving and compassionate heart and is showing that by the way she is helping her brother."</p> <p>"My other two children are much older but they break down watching their sister go through the motions. I can definitely relate," another says.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Beckett and his sister on his journey through childhood cancer. </p>

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Smart things healthy people do before 10 am

<p>Try these expert tips on how to enjoy a healthier start to every morning.</p> <p><strong>Start your day right with these tips</strong></p> <p>Early birds get the worm. You know how the old adage, but do you know how to put it into practice? Here, experts share what healthy people do before 10 am… every single day.</p> <p><strong>They meditate</strong></p> <p>Before you roll your eyes at the thought, remember that meditation doesn’t have to be a lengthy, drawn-out process to be effective. As Dr Lillie Rosenthal, explains, setting your intention for your day helps you connect your mind and body, allowing you to reset and reboot your central nervous system. “Upon opening your eyes in the morning, instead of racing to put on the coffee, take a brief pause,” she recommends. “Do some gentle breathing, breathing in for four counts in and breathing out for eight counts, taking in the ‘good’ and letting out ‘negative’ feelings.”</p> <p><strong>They take a break from their phones</strong></p> <p>It’s not enough to pause before hopping out of bed. Bryce Kennedy, life coach, says the healthiest of people avoid their phone as long as possible. In fact, prioritizing your time without distractions is essential. “Nothing or no one is allowed to enter that space. It is a time for reflection, writing, brainstorming, and flow. It is a small window that is open and needs to be caught in order to be used. Once the phone is turned on, emails checked, news read, texts replied to, etc. the window is closed,” Kennedy says.</p> <p><strong>They take a shower</strong></p> <p>Bad news if you prefer to rinse off before you go to bed at night, according to immunologist Dr Tania Elliott, it’s a healthier tactic to hop in the shower in the a.m. Not only does it help you feel extra alert and more awake, but when you add eucalyptus or peppermint you help stimulate your level of concentration via your nasal passages. (Add a drop of an essential oil to a diffuser near your tub.) Clean and ready to impress your boss? Yes, please!</p> <p><strong>They read something inspiring</strong></p> <p>Consider the last book you read or article you clicked on via Facebook that left you smiling once you paged through it. Life coach Dr Cali Estes says healthy people continuously seek sources of inspiration to keep them in the right frame of mind. “Spend ten minutes reading any article that will help you obtain your goals. This can be business, personal, self esteem-related or anything that will give you tips and tricks you can apply throughout the day,” she suggests.</p> <p><strong>They connect with others</strong></p> <p>While having “you” time is necessary to regenerate and refocus, Jeana Anderson Cohen, founder and CEO of the wellness and fitness media company A Sweat Life says spending time with others – especially those who lift you up and support you – is essential to your daily health. “Your family, your friends, your children, the groups you dedicate your time to – those connections are shown to be the greatest determinant of happiness. And happiness is not so surprisingly tied to your health. Try sending a text or an email to one person you miss in the morning with the intention to join them for a coffee or lunch in the near future,” she says.</p> <p><strong>They stay positive</strong></p> <p>Did your mother ever nudge you to talk to yourself as you would to your best friend? Probably so – and it’s worth applying that logic as an adult. Sonia Satra, life coach, says many people harp on the reasons they’re not measuring up, from not sleeping enough to contributing enough and the list goes on. “The best way to combat those ‘not-enough’s’ is to shift your focus by asking questions that will give you helpful, powerful answers,” she suggests. For example, ask yourself: What do I have enough time for? What am I already doing well? What am I grateful for? What do I want today to look like?</p> <p><strong>They practice gratitude</strong></p> <p>Even though the practice of gratitude is something that’s been trendy lately, Kien Vuu, MD and motivational speaker, says the benefits of being thankful are timeless. That’s why starting each day focusing on your blessings maintains your health in a long-term way. “Writing down things you are grateful for every morning releases feel-good hormones that prime your body for health and wellness. The emotion of gratitude cancels out fear and stress as well as reduces the production of cortisol, aka the stress hormone. This is a great emotional priming technique that allows you to better handle any stressors that may arise during the day,” he says.</p> <p><strong>They exercise</strong></p> <p>While hitting snooze once (or twice or three times) is a tempting prospect when you didn’t catch quite enough Zzzs, Dr Rosenthal says starting your day with movement does wonders for your health. “It gets you out of your heads and into your body. It stimulates the neurotransmitters in the brain and keeps you physiologically younger and more agile,” she notes. When you put a good workout on your priority list, you strengthen your cardiovascular health, curb your appetite, increase your consciousness, build muscle, and boost your overall happiness.</p> <p><strong>They eat breakfast at 10 am</strong></p> <p>Believe it or not, there’s a big benefit to fasting, according to Dr Rosenthal. When you go without food for ten or more hours, your blood sugar normalizes and your metabolism is restarted. This is why the healthiest of people wait to eat breakfast until 10 am, when enough time has passed from their midnight snack. A doughnut, of course, won’t do your body good though, which is why Dr Rosenthal recommends focusing on nutritious options, including unprocessed foods, such as oatmeal or a homemade smoothie with fruit and vegetables.</p> <p><strong>They hydrate</strong></p> <p>Considering our bodies are mostly made of water, it’s likely no surprise that continuously chugging this natural wonder is a must for a long life. Dr Rosenthal says the majority of us wait to chug water until we feel thirsty, and by then, it’s too late. She recommends drinking at least 350 to 475 millilitres of water right after you wake up and drinking a minimum of two litres total throughout the course of your day. “Try adding lemon to water which is alkaline and adds a favourable PH balance to the body. Do your best to avoid sugary drinks and diet drinks which are heavy on artificial sweeteners and chemical additives which the body processes as sugar anyway,” she adds.</p> <p><strong>They keep their space clean</strong></p> <p>Technically this is a task that should be completed before you tuck yourself in for the night, but Kennedy stresses it’s a must in order to start off your day on the right foot. Clearing off your workspace might not seem like such a big deal, after all, it’s just a few papers and a coffee cup, but it’s more about the mental message it sends your brain and confidence. “When the mind sees clutter, it elicits shame, guilt, and anxiety, creating confusion and chaos,” he explains. “If your desk is clean and you sit down to that first thing in the morning – Wow! – a completely different feeling. There is a sense of empowerment, a clean slate, and a new beginning.” He suggests removing papers, pictures, office supplies, corporate nonsense, books, and whatever else you may store to make room for more creativity.</p> <p><em>Written by Lindsay Tigar. This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/smart-things-healthy-people-do-before-10-am"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em><em><u> </u></em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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How can we protect our grandchildren to be safe from online predators?

<p>Many teenagers use mobile phones and social media <a href="https://www.pewinternet.org/2015/04/09/teens-social-media-technology-2015/">almost constantly</a>. And children are <a href="https://www.pewinternet.org/2010/12/01/is-the-age-at-which-kids-get-cell-phones-getting-younger/">gaining access</a> to these devices and platforms at increasingly younger ages.</p> <p>This is a challenge for grandparents who need to keep up with their children’s use, the evolution of devices, and how this changes how they have to parent.</p> <p><a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2818048.2819928">Studies show</a> carers feel anxious and lack sufficient knowledge about their children’s use of devices.</p> <p>They’re worried about their children being exposed to <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">sexual images</a> and messages online. They’re anxious their children could provide <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S074756321630824X">personal information</a> to a stranger or, worse, <a href="https://d1e2bohyu2u2w9.cloudfront.net/education/sites/default/files/tlr_component/common_sense_education_digital_citizenship_research_backgrounder.pdf">develop a relationship with a stranger online</a> whom they might meet in person.</p> <p>When grandparents try to restrict their children’s online interactions, children usually find a way around it. Instead, we should have conversations with children from a young age about cybersecurity. This will help them develop the skills they need to be safe online.</p> <p><strong>What are children exposed to?</strong></p> <p>Social networking – which includes interactions through gaming, as well as texting and social media – brings with it exciting opportunities and unique risks.</p> <p><a href="https://variety.com/2018/gaming/news/roblox-little-girl-avatar-raped-1202865698/">Online gaming</a> presents unique dangers because user-generated games (where content is developed by gamers on platforms such as <a href="https://www.roblox.com/">Roblox</a>) are not regulated. This means children can be exposed to inappropriate sexualised and violent content.</p> <p><a href="https://www.stopbullying.gov/cyberbullying/kids-on-social-media-and-gaming/index.html">Children</a> are vulnerable when they interact with other users on social media, in chat rooms and within gaming. This could involve <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022427815599426">grooming</a>by a sexual predator either to meet in person or send <a href="https://esafety.gov.au/parents/big-issues/unwanted-contact">sexually explicit images</a>.</p> <p>A report, <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/-/media/cesc/esafety-corporate/research/esafetyresearchparentingdigitalage.pdf">Latest Research: Parenting in the Digital Age</a> by the <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/about-the-office/research-library">Office of the eSafety Commissioner</a>, found 24% of 8-17-year-olds met someone in real life after initial online encounters.</p> <p>While the study by the eSafety Commissioner found children and teenagers usually attempted to assess the danger of meeting someone unknown face-to-face, such as by looking for similar interests and ensuring there was no sexual content in the online communication, sexual predators use deceptive tactics to lure their victims into meeting in person.</p> <p>Another <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/-/media/cesc/documents/corporate-office/youth_and_gaming_doc.docx">Australian study</a> found half of children played online games with someone they didn’t know. Boys were more likely to do so than girls.</p> <p><strong>How do children deal with online situations?</strong></p> <p>Research has been mixed on how young people manage cybersecurity risks.</p> <p>One <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00909882.2016.1248465">study</a> found that children who are at least 11 years old seem to have some awareness of the consequences of online interactions. They use safety measures including removing comments, tags and images and blocking and deleting content when interacting online. They also rarely use photos of themselves and disable their geolocations to protect their identities.</p> <p>But children also engage in risky behaviours such as <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/state-of-play-social-media-usage">sharing passwords</a>and contacting strangers. <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0144929X.2016.1181210">Some findings indicated</a> the more teens use social media sites, the more they tend to disclose personal information.</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/26273881">one US study</a>, researchers asked nearly 600 students aged 11-13 about cybersafety. The results indicated 40% accepted friend requests from people they do not know, and they were more concerned with protecting their personal information from grandparents than strangers online.</p> <p>Several studies found children think parental restrictions are <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369118X.2016.1261169">intrusive</a>and invade their privacy. This includes teens feeling <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-030-21905-5_1">disrespected</a> and even stalked by their parents, which leads to a loss of trust.</p> <p><strong>What can we do?</strong></p> <p>Restricting children’s online use is unhelpful. Parents should talk to their children about healthy and age-appropriate online interactions.</p> <p>This includes avoiding disclosing personal information (real name, date of birth, phone number, address, school, or pictures that reveal such information). Parents should provide guidance and explain the consequences of online dangers to their children in a way that does not instil fear but explains their concern.</p> <p>Parents should talk to their children about online risk and safety behaviours from a <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">young age</a>, as soon as they start using online games and engaging on social media sites, to help them build a stronger foundation for their <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">transition to adolescence</a>.</p> <p>They’re worried about their children being exposed to <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">sexual images</a> and messages online. They’re anxious their children could provide <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S074756321630824X">personal information</a> to a stranger or, worse, <a href="https://d1e2bohyu2u2w9.cloudfront.net/education/sites/default/files/tlr_component/common_sense_education_digital_citizenship_research_backgrounder.pdf">develop a relationship with a stranger online</a> whom they might meet in person.</p> <p>When parents try to restrict their children’s online interactions, children usually find a way around it. Instead, parents should have conversations with children from a young age about cybersecurity. This will help them develop the skills they need to be safe online.</p> <p><strong>What are children exposed to?</strong></p> <p>Social networking – which includes interactions through gaming, as well as texting and social media – brings with it exciting opportunities and unique risks.</p> <p><a href="https://variety.com/2018/gaming/news/roblox-little-girl-avatar-raped-1202865698/">Online gaming</a> presents unique dangers because user-generated games (where content is developed by gamers on platforms such as <a href="https://www.roblox.com/">Roblox</a>) are not regulated. This means children can be exposed to inappropriate sexualised and violent content.</p> <p><a href="https://www.stopbullying.gov/cyberbullying/kids-on-social-media-and-gaming/index.html">Children</a> are vulnerable when they interact with other users on social media, in chat rooms and within gaming. This could involve <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0022427815599426">grooming</a>by a sexual predator either to meet in person or send <a href="https://esafety.gov.au/parents/big-issues/unwanted-contact">sexually explicit images</a>.</p> <p>A report, <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/-/media/cesc/esafety-corporate/research/esafetyresearchparentingdigitalage.pdf">Latest Research: Parenting in the Digital Age</a> by the <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/about-the-office/research-library">Office of the eSafety Commissioner</a>, found 24% of 8-17-year-olds met someone in real life after initial online encounters.</p> <p>While the study by the eSafety Commissioner found children and teenagers usually attempted to assess the danger of meeting someone unknown face-to-face, such as by looking for similar interests and ensuring there was no sexual content in the online communication, sexual predators use deceptive tactics to lure their victims into meeting in person.</p> <p>Another <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/-/media/cesc/documents/corporate-office/youth_and_gaming_doc.docx">Australian study</a> found half of children played online games with someone they didn’t know. Boys were more likely to do so than girls.</p> <p><strong>How do children deal with online situations?</strong></p> <p>Research has been mixed on how young people manage cybersecurity risks.</p> <p>One <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00909882.2016.1248465">study</a> found that children who are at least 11 years old seem to have some awareness of the consequences of online interactions. They use safety measures including removing comments, tags and images and blocking and deleting content when interacting online. They also rarely use photos of themselves and disable their geolocations to protect their identities.</p> <p>But children also engage in risky behaviours such as <a href="https://www.esafety.gov.au/state-of-play-social-media-usage">sharing passwords</a>and contacting strangers. <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0144929X.2016.1181210">Some findings indicated</a> the more teens use social media sites, the more they tend to disclose personal information.</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/26273881">one US study</a>, researchers asked nearly 600 students aged 11-13 about cybersafety. The results indicated 40% accepted friend requests from people they do not know, and they were more concerned with protecting their personal information from parents than strangers online.</p> <p>Several studies found children think parental restrictions are <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369118X.2016.1261169">intrusive</a>and invade their privacy. This includes teens feeling <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-030-21905-5_1">disrespected</a> and even stalked by their parents, which leads to a loss of trust.</p> <p><strong>What can parents do?</strong></p> <p>Restricting children’s online use is unhelpful. Parents should talk to their children about healthy and age-appropriate online interactions.</p> <p>This includes avoiding disclosing personal information (real name, date of birth, phone number, address, school, or pictures that reveal such information). Parents should provide guidance and explain the consequences of online dangers to their children in a way that does not instil fear but explains their concern.</p> <p>Parents should talk to their children about online risk and safety behaviours from a <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">young age</a>, as soon as they start using online games and engaging on social media sites, to help them build a stronger foundation for their <a href="https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3171581.3134699">transition to adolescence</a>.</p> <p><em>Written by Marika Guggisberg. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/children-can-be-exposed-to-sexual-predators-online-so-how-can-parents-teach-them-to-be-safe-120661">The Conversation.</a> </em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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Why do we cry?

<p>As you know, crying is something everyone does sometimes. Sometimes we get teary because our bodies are trying to clean a bit of dirt out of our eyes. But that’s not really crying, is it? Crying has something to do with our emotions.</p> <p>There’s a connection between the part of our brain that feels emotions, and the ducts in our eyes where tears come out - so when we have a big feeling, <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17363076">we cry</a>.</p> <p>Doctors of medicine could tell you more about that. But I’m a doctor of another subject – the history of emotions. I learn about why people cry for different reasons, and it’s my job to compare today with a long time ago.</p> <p>In Australia today, most kids cry when they’re feeling sad, whether they’re boys or girls. But once those kids become teenagers, boys <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/per.386">seem to cry less</a> often than girls do. This isn’t because boys have different brains or tear ducts than girls. It’s mostly because many Australian boys think crying is a bit embarrassing.</p> <p>Maybe they’ve been told boys don’t cry, or <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1080/01650250143000058">teased by their friends</a> if they cry at school.</p> <p>In fact, it is very normal for boys to cry. And crying hasn’t always been seen as embarrassing or uncool.</p> <p><strong>The history of crying</strong></p> <p>About 500 years ago in England, crying was seen as really cool! One of the most famous stories at the time was about <a href="http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1251">King Arthur</a>.</p> <p>He was a great hero, and a lot of boys wanted to be like him. According to books and poems written at the time, <a href="https://www.historyextra.com/period/medieval/heavenly-dew-crying-in-the-middle-ages/">King Arthur cried a <em>lot</em>.</a> Crying showed everybody he had very strong, true feelings. Back then, people thought this made him a great man, and the lords and ladies in his court cried in public too.</p> <p><strong>Crying around the world</strong></p> <p>Why we cry can also depend on <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1069397111404519">where we live</a>, and what our family is like.</p> <p>If you live in a country where it’s normal to express a lot of feelings in public, such as America, you are more likely to cry about things.</p> <p>If you live in a country where people don’t usually make a big show of how they feel, you probably won’t cry as much, even if you’re feeling sad on the inside.</p> <p>For example, in Japan, for a long time people tried not to cry. But lately in Japan, people are <a href="https://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570240.001.0001/acprof-9780198570240">changing their minds</a> about crying. Books and movies that are very sad are becoming popular. There are even <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/05/crying-it-out-in-japan/389528/">crying clubs</a>, where you can watch a sad movie with other people, have a good cry, and go home feeling better because you let out a lot of big feelings!</p> <p>The same goes for <a href="https://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198570240.001.0001/acprof-9780198570240">families</a>: if everyone at your house likes to share how they’re feeling, and isn’t embarrassed about crying or laughing or shouting or dancing, then you’ll probably cry whenever you feel like it.</p> <p>But if the people in your family don’t usually show how they feel, then you will also learn to keep your feelings inside and not let them show by crying.</p> <p><strong>We cry to show our feelings</strong></p> <p>As you can see in these examples, crying isn’t just something we do by ourselves. Quite often, crying is a way for us to show other people how we feel.</p> <p>When you cry, your parents, teachers or friends know that you’re having a big feeling. Then they can help you feel better with a hug, or a talk about your feelings.</p> <p>So why do we cry?</p> <p>Well, partly because our bodies are made that way. But also because crying is how people around us show their feelings, and we learn to show our feelings the same way. Crying helps us share and care.</p> <p>And I think that’s a wonderful thing.</p> <p><em>Written by Carly Osborn. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-do-we-cry-119814"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

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Mick Schumacher hugs F2 driver Anthoine Hubert’s family after tragic death

<p>Motorsport is mourning the death of Formula Two driver Anthoine Hubert, who was killed in a heavy crash during a race at the Belgian Grand Prix on Saturday.</p> <p>Drivers observed a minute’s silence in memory of Hubert alongside the late French racer’s mother and brother with heads bowed in the Spa-Francorchamps paddock on Sunday.</p> <p>Mick Schumacher, son of F1 legend Michael Schumacher, embraced Hubert’s family before they stood in silence to honour the young sportsman.</p> <p>Schumacher was taking part in the same F2 qualifying session when Hubert’s collision occurred. He joined other racing drivers in paying their respects to the Frenchman.</p> <p>“Fate is brutal. The loss is endless. Anthoine, we miss you already,” Schumacher wrote on Twitter.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Fate is brutal. The loss is endless. Anthoine, we miss you already.</p> — Mick Schumacher (@SchumacherMick) <a href="https://twitter.com/SchumacherMick/status/1167870176613715969?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 31, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Mick Schumacher, Anthoine Hubert family, Belgian Grand Prix tragedy <a href="https://t.co/zBtkn8YR7P">https://t.co/zBtkn8YR7P</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/sports?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#sports</a></p> — THE PRESS (@pres5ar) <a href="https://twitter.com/pres5ar/status/1168150008069316608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 1, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Five-time Formula One world champion Lewis Hamilton, who led a minute’s silence ahead of the Grand Prix, shared a tribute on his Instagram account.</p> <p>“Yesterday a great young talent passed away here. Let’s remember him today,” he wrote on Sunday. “Rest in peace Anthoine Hubert.”</p> <p>Ferrari F1 driver Charles Leclerc said Hubert’s death was “a big shock”. “We lose someone on track, a track where you need to race the day after. It’s obviously quite challenging to then close the visor and go through the exact same corner [where the crash happened].”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B11gQn0oWAI/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B11gQn0oWAI/" target="_blank">I can't believe it. Rest in peace.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/charles_leclerc/" target="_blank"> CHARLES LECLERC</a> (@charles_leclerc) on Aug 31, 2019 at 10:01am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Hubert died at the age of 22 after his car collided with 20-year-old US driver Juan Manuel Correa’s car at an estimated speed of 160mph (257kph).</p> <p>Correa suffered fractures to both his legs and a minor spinal injury, and is recovering in intensive care at the CHU Liege hospital.</p>

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Cat makes incredible transformation after heartbreaking abuse

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">WARNING: Disturbing images</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Little Muffin, who was found just moments from death has made an incredible transformation. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The cat, who was too weak to fight any resistance, was gently picked up by a kind Samaritans when they noticed his back legs were completely “dead” because whipper snipper cords had been tied around his legs and had since cut off circulation. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7830123/eg-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6e3518b1e8d7486cb65e7c3e6570a52c" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Muffin also had burns on his tummy that vets suspected to be cigarette burns. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Alexus, the man who found the feline, said there is no doubt in his mind Muffin had been tortured. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This was a serial killer or sociopath in the making,” Mr De Latora told </span><a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/cat-found-near-death-after-being-tortured-in-western-sydney-125250392.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo News Australia. </span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“[It was] evil beyond evil”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After Muffin was rushed to a nearby vet in Western Sydney, images captured of the suffering animal was widely shared across social media. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7830124/eg-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7fd9d7b0080940d8b4a83c0e9120a6d1" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The young cat’s leg has since been amputated and was handed to a Sydney-based pet rescue, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cat Rescue 901. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">His vet bills were covered by the help of wonderful donors. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite the heartbreaking torture Muffin faced, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cat Rescue 901’s </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">co</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">-</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">founder Jenny Storaker said the cat has a sweet demeanour. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Muffin is absolutely divine and such a perfect pet,” she told </span><a href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/amazing-recovery-of-cat-who-lost-leg-after-being-tortured-104728538.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yahoo News Australia. </span></a></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“[He’s] super-duper affectionate. [All he wants is] to sleep in someone’s arms.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Muffin has since been adopted into a loving home where he is spoilt “silly.”</span></p>

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Engagement ring sparks fury: Too small or just right?

<p>For many years, there has been debate surrounding the importance of an engagement ring’s size and value. </p> <p>While some are adamant they would prefer to choose their own ring, others believe it doesn’t have as much importance as many would think.</p> <p>One bride-to-be took to social media to slam her fiance for proposing with a “tiny” engagement ring, and since then the post has gone viral. </p> <p>The anonymous woman shared a snap of the band online and asked if she was being “shady” and “materialistic” for not wanting to wear a ring with a “little a**” jewel. </p> <p>“We been together for eight years and talking about getting married for almost three,” the bride-to-be wrote. </p> <p>“This the ring he said he saved up to buy me. Am I being shady or materialistic if I tell this mf I don’t want this little a** ring? [sic].”</p> <p>The photo showed a delicate gold band with a small diamond attached. </p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7830112/jackie-o-home-8.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9e33f73d409e48949349363abceaff68" /></p> <p>A screenshot of the post has since attracted thousands of comments and reactions, with mixed opinions. </p> <p>One user agreed with the woman’s stance, writing: “I’m not materialistic when it comes to things like this but if my man proposed with THAT I would be full on insulted.</p> <p>“He went out of his way to find the cheapest possible option; which to me says that he’s probably like that in every aspect of the relationship and will probably be like that in every aspect of their marriage.”</p> <p>Another added: “Honestly, I’m with her on this. You can get affordable rings that don’t look like they came out of the little dispenser machine next to the stickers and gumballs at Cici’s Pizza.</p> <p>“Even with a small budget he could have gotten something that won’t immediately snap if it gets snagged, and I wouldn’t trust that jewel setting to last more than a week with everyday wear.”</p> <p>However, a few came to the boyfriend’s defence and thought the woman was being harsh. </p> <p>“I’d much rather have just a plain band than the diamond chip,” one person argued. “Because what I care about is him wanting to spend his life with me, not a diamond.”</p> <p>“I kinda like her ring. It's very modern and sleek looking. I'd wear that in a heartbeat,” another added.</p> <p>The minimalist style ring has become an increasingly popular option for those looking for delicate additions to their wardrobe, albeit not for engagement rings. </p>

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Prince William sends thank-you notes to fans who wished him a happy 37th birthday

<p>Prince William is never off the clock, even as he’s holidaying with Queen Elizabeth in Scotland’s Balmoral Castle.</p> <p>Royal fans will be pleased to know that Prince William is continuing to participate in a key royal tradition, which is responding to old-fashioned mail.</p> <p>Especially when the letter in question is a congratulatory letter.</p> <p>Despite Prince William celebrating his 37th birthday in June, he is just getting back to fans who have sent him well-wishes by mail.</p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="http://gertsroyalreplies.blogspot.com/2019/08/prince-william-birthday-reply-2019.html" target="_blank">Gert’s Royal Replies</a></em>, a royal blog, explained that they had received a reply from the Prince.</p> <p>Gert’s also pointed out that the photo card that was sent was used on Prince William’s 2017 and 2018 birthday replies.</p> <p>According to the site, “it is quite typical for Clarence House to reuse photos for multiple events, especially the adult's birthdays.”</p> <p>The message on the back of the card reads:</p> <p>“The Duke of Cambridge is most grateful to you for writing as you did on the occasion of his 37th birthday.</p> <p>“It really was most thoughtful of you and His Royal Highness sends you his warmest thanks and best wishes.”</p> <p>Prince William isn’t the only one to send out thank you cards to those who send them letters. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex as well as Princess Eugenie and other members of the British royal family send them out after special events.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see some letters from the British royal family.</p>

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Seconds before heartache: Heroic neighbour rescues boy from danger

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A family has been left counting their blessings after security footage revealed the seconds disaster struck for a 6-year-old boy playing with two other children. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video shows three children playing at the bottom of a driveway in Texas, US, when one of the boys bent down to greet a dog that wandered over. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, when the young child leaned over, the dog launched and knocked him over before climbing on top of him. </span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">PITBULL ATTACK: A teenager in Conroe, Texas, helped save his 6-year-old neighbor from a pitbull attack, drawing the animal away and allowing the boy to run for safety; both suffered bite wounds and the dog was reportedly taken by animal control. <a href="https://t.co/OFdgEGuLb9">https://t.co/OFdgEGuLb9</a> <a href="https://t.co/uc7sHT4poE">pic.twitter.com/uc7sHT4poE</a></p> — World News Tonight (@ABCWorldNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/ABCWorldNews/status/1154783435585654784?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 26, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The two other children ran towards their homes as the six-year-old struggled to overpower the dog – until thankfully, a neighbour intervened. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Springing into action, the dog lost interest in the boy and instead chases the man who successfully distracted hm. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Local news station </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">KHOU11 </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">identified the neighbour as Grant Brown, who suffered cuts to his hand in the ordeal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The dog ran away and the young victim was recorded running to safety in his home. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The canine was reportedly handed over to the city’s County Animal Control. </span></p>

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Why you need to worry about hand sanitiser

<p><strong>How safe are hand sanitisers?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’ve heard the advice since you were young – wash your hands to avoid getting sick. And now hand sanitiser has swooped in as a way to keep our hands clean, even when we’re on the go. It comes in appealing scents, fun squeeze bottles, and it’s often marketed toward kids. But is hand sanitiser safe to use? Here’s what you need to know.</span></p> <p><strong>Are all hand sanitisers the same?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many people might not know that not all hand sanitisers are created equal. According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), it’s important to use a hand sanitiser that contains at least 60 percent alcohol. This type of sanitiser not only is more effective at killing germs, but non-alcohol based sanitisers can actually be harmful and can cause germs to develop resistance to sanitising.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s especially important to avoid hand sanitisers that contain triclosan, a synthetic ingredient added to many antibacterial products. The FDA warns that “high doses of triclosan is associated with a decrease in the levels of some thyroid hormones [and may contribute to] making bacteria resistant to antibiotics.”</span></p> <p><strong>Does hand sanitiser prevent illness?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hand sanitiser can’t rid your hands of bacteria if you’re not using it correctly. Remember to use the proper amount of sanitiser, to rub it over all surfaces of your hands, and to let the product dry. Also, don’t wipe your hands or rinse them after applying. When used correctly, alcohol-based hand sanitisers kill at least 99.9 percent of viruses, fungi and bacteria. So after you touch that public stair railing or shopping cart handle, using hand sanitiser can help you avoid a cold or flu virus. But keep in mind, people often pick up a virus after inhaling droplets in the air, and unfortunately, hand sanitiser can’t help you with that.</span></p> <p><strong>Which is more effective – a hand sanitiser or soap and water?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although that tingling feeling of a hand sanitiser may feel like the best and most effective way to cleanse your hands, the reality is, nothing beats plain old soap and water. The CDC says the best way to prevent the spread of infections and decrease the risk of getting sick is to regularly wash your hands, whenever possible. Try to only use hand sanitiser if soap and water are not accessible, like when you’re in the car, when you’re shopping or at a movie or concert. Also remember that hand sanitisers should not be used after handling chemicals or when hands are visibly dirty, in those cases use soap and water.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Erica Young. This article first appeared in </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/why-you-need-to-worry-about-hand-sanitiser?slide=all"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our best subscription offer.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The ultimate equation that proves how many calories you should be eating

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Everyone has been told that calorie-counting is the most effective way of lowering the scale and cutting the kilos.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An average woman is said to require about 2000 calories per day to maintain a certain weight, and 1500 calories to lose almost half a kilo of weight per week. The average male is similar, but slightly raised: he needs 2500 calories to maintain, and 2000 to lose that half-kilo of weight per week. The general rule of thumb deemed by society is to exercise more and eat less.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the math is not quite that simple. These rough estimations don’t consider numerous factors that would significantly sway the numbers: age, height, weight or activity levels. While you may think that frequent exercise is the best way to lose weight, it is not a transmutable technique for eating smart.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Fortunately, calorie counting doesn’t have to be a total guessing game. Instead of using exercise as a mere safety net for your eating habits, use this elementary equation to pinpoint exactly how many calories you need per day.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The calculation is called the Mifflin-St Jeor equation, a formula that has been shown to be the most accurate way of estimating calorie needs in numerous studies by the ADA (American Dietetic Association).</span></p> <p>Getting an idea of your basal metabolic rate (BMR)</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Begin by getting an idea of your basal metabolic rate (BMR).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your body must breathe, blink, grow cells and keep your heart beating on a daily basis.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Staying alive isn’t an easy task, and it needs calories to do so. This number reflects an estimate of how many calories you would burn if you were to be hypothetically resting in a sedentary state for 24 hours.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In other words, it represents the minimum amount of energy mandated to keep your body barely functioning, i.e. breathing and pumping blood.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For men, the equation is as follows: 10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (y) + 5. The equation is slightly different for women: 10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (y) – 161.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For example, if you were a 63kg, 30-year-old, 167cm woman, your BMR calculation would look like this: 10 x (63.5) + 6.25 x (167.6) – 5 x (30) – 161 = 1,371.5.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Use this BMR number as the foundational reference point for safe weight loss. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, your calories should never dip below 1,200. Doing so could mean your muscle mass starts decreasing, which means you won’t have enough energy to fuel daily activities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now that we’ve figured out the bare minimum of calories your body demands, we can’t forget to account for the actual things you do throughout the day that burn these calories; walking to work, playing sports, doing yoga, or even watching TV all strip away those units of energy you consume.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An easy way to do so is via this interactive calculator from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that incorporates your activity level and BMR to give you an estimate of how much you should eat in order to maintain your current weight.</span></p> <p>The BMR rule of thumb</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you want to do it yourself, here is a general map to follow. The final number is the recommended calorie consumption per day – tailored just for you:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">BMR x 1.2 for low intensity activities and leisure activities (primarily sedentary)</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">BMR x 1.375 for light exercise (leisurely walking for 30-50 minutes 3-4 days/week, golfing, house chores)</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">BMR x 1.55 for moderate exercise 3-5 days per week (60-70% MHR for 30-60 minutes/session)</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">BMR x 1.725 for active individuals (exercising 6-7 days/week at moderate to high intensity (70-85% MHR) for 45-60 minutes/session)</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">BMR x 1.9 for the extremely active individuals (engaged in heavy/intense exercise like heavy manual labor, heavy lifting, endurance athletes, and competitive team sports athletes 6-7 days/week for 90 + minutes/session)</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After all that, it’s important to note that this number isn’t necessarily something you should streamline your collective focus into. Although this does stand as the ideal formula to use as a guideline, weight loss boils down to more than just a number. Living your healthiest life doesn’t equate to shedding kilos, and obsessively counting calories can spiral one into an overly compulsive diet with dangerous downfalls.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The induced stress can actually raise your cortisol levels, making it even harder for you to lose weight.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In essence, be conscious of your healthy caloric intake, but it’s wiser to concentrate on what you’re eating than how much. Also, don’t forget the huge impact that WHEN you eat can have on your waistline.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your body knows best what it wants, so if it’s asking for fuel, indulge it, don’t spoil it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Hana Hong. This article first appeared in </span><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/diet/equation-proves-how-many-calories-you-should-be-eating?slide=all"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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