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Get your grandkids involved in the war on waste!

<p> Food waste is a global challenge that has economic, social and environmental impacts. Did you know that 39-45 per cent of all the waste you throw away is organic and recyclable? There is a common misconception that when your household organic food waste goes to landfill, it will break down naturally and return nutrients back into the Earth. Unfortunately, that’s not the case!</p> <p>Organic waste in landfill is compacted and becomes anaerobic to produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas. It also contributes to landfill leachate which can cause water pollution. This organic waste can be diverted from landfill, by recycling it at home in a Worm Farm.</p> <p>By putting worms to work in your own, easy-care Worm Farm, you will be converting your household food waste into nutrient rich, 100 per cent organic fertiliser that your potted plants, garden and vegetables will love.</p> <p>The War on Waste and sustainability in the home has been an important topic of recent discussion, and it’s so easy to reduce your household’s carbon footprint by diverting your food waste from landfill.</p> <p>Worms are Mother Nature’s unique natural recyclers, these living fertilizer tubes are full of countless beneficial bacteria and enzymes that help sustain the life and fertility of our horticultural and agricultural systems. In a worm farm, worms can process up to 4kg of kitchen scraps a week.</p> <p>This includes vegetable peelings, green leafy vegetables, fruit scraps, tea bags and coffee grounds, egg shells, paper and newspaper scraps and even small amounts of citrus and onion. The Can-O-</p> <p>Worms is a worm farm composting system that’s perfect for small to medium households, enabling families to convert their kitchen food waste into a rich fertiliser in an easy, hands-on and satisfying way. Kids of all ages get to handle dirt, hold worms, set up and explore a worm farm and in the process, they discover a new appreciation for the way nature recycles its resources while developing an interest in caring for their community – and best of all, it’s fun!</p> <p>The world’s bestselling worm farm has been designed with built in mounds to encourage worms to move from collector trays to working trays, a unique flow through ventilation to maximise performance and no mess extras like well-designed legs and a drip free tap.</p> <p>The Can-O-Worms is a user-friendly design and can be left on a balcony or in a laundry for apartment dwellers, in a shed or in a shaded location for those with a yard.</p> <p>It is important that you place them somewhere that avoids afternoon sun, and in a convenient spot so that it makes it easy for you to use.</p> <p>At Tumbleweed, we’re committed to educating young New Zealanders to ensure they understand the importance of protecting the environment and showing them how much fun recycling can be.</p> <p>Tumbleweed manufactures Australian designed worm farms and compost bins, from 100 per cent recycled plastic, giving waste materials a new long term second life.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.handyman.net.au/get-your-kids-involved-war-waste">Handyman.net.au</a></em></p>

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The royal baby names Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan may opt for

<p>The first child of Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan is expected to arrive within the next two months, and fans are already making predictions for the royal baby’s name.</p> <p>Many observers believe the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will give a nod to monarchs of previous generations as per tradition – for example, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge gave the middle names Elizabeth and Diana for Princess Charlotte. However, others believe that with Duchess Meghan’s tendency to bend the rules, the newborn may receive a completely unique name.</p> <p>Here are some of the leading predictions.</p> <p><strong>If it’s a girl</strong></p> <p>One of the most likely options among bookies is Diana, after the Duke’s late mother. Other classic royal names such as Victoria, Elizabeth and Mary are also among the front runners.</p> <p>The less conventional contenders include Alice and Grace, as are Rachel and Alexandra.</p> <p><strong>If it’s a boy</strong></p> <p>Some traditional regal names lead the list, including Arthur, Albert, Philip and James. Some have also tried betting on <a rel="noopener" href="https://news.ladbrokes.com/novelty/royal-family/victoria-albert-and-arthur-head-likeliest-names-for-2019-royal-baby.html" target="_blank">out-of-left-field options</a> such as baby Brexit (with 500/1 odds) and Thanos (301/1).</p> <p>Shane may also be in the running, as Prince Charles previously hinted. "Incidentally, ladies and gentlemen, my son Harry tells me that during their recent tour of Australia, he and his wife were offered countless thoughtful suggestions for the naming of their forthcoming baby," the Prince said.</p> <p>"Just between us, I suspect that Kylie and Shane may possibly make the shortlist."</p> <p>What name do you think the royal baby should have? Let us know your ideas in the comments.</p>

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12 ways to get a great night’s sleep

<p>Good sleeping habits will benefit you with more energy, a better mood, boosted immune system and better performance at work, sport and study.</p> <p>Chilly mornings make it all too tempting to hit the snooze button and roll over for extra zzzzz’s. But did you know that too much sleep can affect our mood and motivation? Ironically it can also make us feel more tired. We all know too well that too little sleep is a major issue too. The trick is to aim for a consistent sleep pattern and focus on the quality of sleep as well as the quantity.</p> <p><strong>Here are 12 great tips to help get you back on track tonight.</strong></p> <p>1. A healthy target is to aim for 7-9 hours each night and aim to keep a consistent bedtime. Try to also wake at a regular time. Aim to maintain a consistent sleep schedule. Go to sleep and wake up at the same time each day, even on the weekends.</p> <p>2. Get out into natural sunlight. Lack of light can affect our mood. Don’t underestimate the power of this simple step. What a great excuse to read outside with a cup of tea and a great book!</p> <p>3. Consider adjusting medication timings if they have sleep related side effects. Always speak to your health professional for personal advice before altering any medication.</p> <p>4. Avoid stimulants such as caffeine, chocolate, sugary foods or drinks in the evening. Give yourself a ‘cut off’ time and ensure it is a few hours before you plan to sleep.</p> <p>5. Limit alcohol to one or two standard drinks, as studies have shown drinking more reduces sleep quality. Drinking alcohol has been shown to reduce REM sleep, which kicks in roughly 90 minutes after falling asleep. The problem is REM sleep is considered to be the most restorative. Alcohol can also suppress breathing and encourage sleep apnoea.</p> <p>6. Ensure you are comfortable. Consider treating yourself and updating your bed, sheets and pillows.</p> <p>7. Control the climate and lighting within your bedroom. Try thick curtains to help block early morning sunlight.</p> <p>8. Avoid over-stimulation from the computer or TV and aim to always have a few hours free of technology before sleeping. Even charging your phone or laptop in your bedroom could be enough to interfere with your quality sleep as the blue light emitted by your latest favourite piece of technology harms the production of the ‘sleep hormone’ melatonin. A recent survey showed 45% of us are taking a laptop or electronic device to bed with us or are watching TV whilst in bed!</p> <p>9. Try not to over eat at night or go to bed too hungry or too full.</p> <p>10. If you find you are sleeping too much during the day and not enough at night, then slowly cut back on afternoon naps.</p> <p>11. Try to incorporate exercise into your daily routine and increase your physical activity. A pre-breakfast walk will stimulate the senses and improve your motivation for the rest of the day. While an after-dinner walk is also a great idea, stick to a familiar routine in the evening to help your mind and body wind down naturally.  </p> <p>12. Keep a sleep diary. This is a useful way to monitor your sleeping habits and find out more about the ways in which you sleep. Common observations, times and total sleep hours should be recorded. Or if you are into technology then try experimenting with a sleep cycle app such as the <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/sleep-cycle-alarm-clock/id320606217?mt=8">sleep cycle alarm clock</a>. Most importantly, know when to get help. If problems persist, pay a visit to your local GP and find out more about your condition and ask for a referral to a specialist. If you're dealing with a sleeping disorder, then don’t despair because help is at hand. To download a free sleep diary <a href="http://www.sleephealthfoundation.org.au/pdfs/sleep-week/SleepDiary-0615_Final.pdf">click here. </a></p> <p><em>This article was republished with permission of <a href="/This%20article%20was%20republished%20with%20permission%20of%20Wyza.com.au.">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Social media: 6 steps to take back control

<p>We’ve heard a lot in recent months about the dark side of social media: excessive use to the point of addiction, lack of privacy, and data capture without informed consent. But in all of this melee, now is the time to remember that the way we use social medial is up to us. In other words, it may be convenient to believe that social media applications are thrust upon us and we don’t have much choice in the matter – but that is not entirely true.</p> <p>It is time we remembered why we use these applications in the first place – to enrich our relationships – and not to have them take over our lives in a dysfunctional way. So, here are some tips for taking back control</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>1. Be selective in your responses</strong></p> <p><a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057%2Fejis.2014.3">Research shows</a> that social overload – where your friends frequently ask you for advice on things such as restaurants in a new city, prom dresses for their kids, birthday cake recipes (pretty much anything really) – is stressful. Be selective about the posts you respond to. If a friend is posting 100 times a day you don’t have to respond to all or any of them. Trust me, they won’t mind, because anyone who is doing that amount of posting is not keeping tabs on who is responding anyway.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>2. Stop worrying about missing out</strong></p> <p>You have no control over what gets displayed on your screen and when. The social media provider decides that. Which means you have no control over what you don’t see either. Checking frequently is not going to change that – of all of the thousands of things your friends post, you have no idea what you will see and what you won’t – so FOMO (fear of missing out) is pointless. There will always be things you’ll miss no matter how frequently you check.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>3. Don’t let it be a distraction</strong></p> <p>Don’t let interruptions in the form of social media updates distract you. Though this can be easier said than done – because updates can happen anytime, while you are working, playing with your kids or, worse, driving. The <a href="https://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/the-dark-side-of-information-technology/">dangers of such interruptions</a> are well known – reduced attention, productivity and effectiveness at tasks. So make a choice, either don’t let the notifications disrupt you or if you can’t do that, turn them off.</p> <p><br /><strong>4. Don’t be fooled</strong></p> <p>Don’t take everything you see on social media at face value. <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/facebook-social-media-make-unhappy-jealous-people-particularly-sad-copenhagen-university-study-a7490816.html">Research shows</a> that people might experience all sorts of negative emotions – envy, worry, depression – when they see friends post pictures of where they’ve travelled, new houses they’ve bought and how well their children are doing. But it’s important to understand that posts can be misleading because they present only partial views of other peoples’ lives. Don’t compare your “behind-the-scenes” with everyone else’s “highlight reel”.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>5. Set limits</strong></p> <p>Set time limits for how long you’ll spend on your laptop, tablet or phone – even if you are doing other things on that device and are not using social media. While working on these devices, it is natural to take a break, but if you don’t actually step away physically, then your break might consist of browsing social media and getting stuck in an endless cycle between work and social media.</p> <p>Discipline yourself to get up every time you hit your limit, walk around, stretch, talk to someone, go into another room to see what the kids are doing, go to the office water cooler to get a drink – anything. This not only gives you a break from whatever you were doing to replenish your energy, it also prevents you from looking at your social media applications as the predominant alternative to work-related tasks.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>6. Remember reality</strong></p> <p>Finally, actively seek ways to interact with your friends away from social media – meet up in person or call them. Social media is fine for sharing pictures and brief updates, but when you want to share the really important things in your life with those you care about, there is hardly a substitute for hearing their voice or looking into their eyes.</p> <p>Human empathy – the kind that forms the bulwark of a meaningful social life – is very hard to convey through mass posts and text-based responses. A lot is lost between you and your friends when social media is the primary or only means of communication. Going for a walk or a run, having a meal, watching a movie, talking about your job and your kids, seeking support in difficult life situations – all of these things (and more) are what make your friendships warm and alive and real.</p> <p><em>Written by Monideepa Tarafdar. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://theconversation.com/social-media-six-steps-to-take-back-control-95814">The Conversation.</a></span> </em></p>

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Is it really possible to find friends and love online?

<p>Social interaction is a crucial component of our human psyche. We need other people to share experiences with, to discuss what is going on in our lives and in the world around us. Travel buddies, sports mates and close friends are a necessary part of our lives. Looking for new people and experiences to spice up your life?</p> <p><strong>Don’t count the days. Make the days count.<br /></strong>One of the best ways to meet like-minded people is to engage in social groups and activities. Join sports clubs, gaming groups, participate in a new class, or take up a hobby which will allow you to meet people with similar interests. Whether it is a language class, dancing lessons or a chess group, there is a never-ending array of opportunities for you to activate your brain and body, instil meaning into your daily life and meet people in your area with similar tastes and opinions. What’s not to love about that?</p> <p><strong>Why?</strong> Online forums and websites allow you to sift through multitudes of people to fairy quickly find individuals that fit your specific criteria. Here are four of the latest and most popular online resources that might help you meet your next partner, travel companion or activity buddy. Let us know what happens!</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.stitch.net/">Stitch</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Aim:</strong> To help mature adults find companionship<br /><strong>Use it if:</strong> You want to try a new and all-inclusive way of meeting like-minded people<br /><strong>Cost:</strong> Free starter plan, range of costs depending on your level of interaction (up to $29 a month for gold membership).</p> <p>Stitch helps you to find a companion for every aspect of your life, whether you are looking for someone for travel, events and activities, love and romance or friendship. Australian entrepreneur, Andrew Dowling, created Stitch to help over 50s combat social isolation and find companions for friendship or love.</p> <p>“When you’re younger, you have opportunities (to meet people) like going to uni, having kids, then when you get to a certain age your friends start to move away, you retire, you get divorced,” says Dowling. </p> <p>After launching Stitch in San Francisco in 2015, it grew to more than 3000 members in the first six months. This rapid success, combined with constant interest from his home country, meant that he knew it was time to bring the site to Australia. The site has launched in Sydney and now people from all over Australia can sign up.</p> <p>Robin Miller from Sydney’s North Shore is a single mother who says she finds the prospect of meeting people ‘daunting’. She wants to connect with people who have similar hobbies and travel interests, yet she has found that dating sites want too much information. “One of the things about Stitch that I like is it’s aimed at older people,” she says. Then adds, the process is comfortable. “It’s not rushed, quite secure and I’m not competing with people half my age.” She says that Stitch’s group events take away the anxiety of one-on-ones and are based around an activity, so you already know you have a common interest. </p> <p><a href="http://www.stitch.net/">Stitch</a> prides itself on its steadfast commitment to safety, guaranteeing users that no scammers or con-artists will be able to infiltrate the site. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.elitesingles.com.au/">Elite Singles</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Aim:</strong> To help you find ‘the one', not just anyone<br /><strong>Use it if:</strong> You are looking for a serious relationship<br /><strong>Cost:</strong> Free and premium service (from $22.95 per month)</p> <p>Elite Singles caters to those who are serious about finding a someone special and genuine. They say they utilise a smart profiling system to assess members based on their personal characteristic and partner criteria to guarantee more compatible matches. Their aim is to match members with singles that suit each other’s values, interests and lifestyle, thus abiding by their mantra of 'quality over quantity'. The site caters to people from all walks of life, including options for professional dating, single-parent dating, over-50 dating, gay dating or Christian dating.</p> <p>Elite Single’s staff say they manually check every user to ensure that every account is legitimate and safe. However, still please be aware that you must always be careful when meeting new people regardless of the circumstances. The site gets 18,000 new members every week and has a presence all over Australia and the rest of the world, with a global reputation for pairing compatible 'elites'.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.seniorsholidaytravel.com.au/">Seniors Holiday Travel</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Aim:</strong> To provide a free travel club with no minimum age requirement<br /><strong>Use it if:</strong> You want to explore the world with like-minded travellers<br /><strong>Cost:</strong> Free</p> <p>Often one of the greatest barriers to travel is finding a travel buddy to accompany you. Although solo travel is often a cathartic and enlightening experience, sometimes it is fun to experience the journey with a friend.</p> <p>Seniors Holiday Travel is a club for older travellers covering every aspect of trips. They provide travel agents with your specific needs in mind, a suite of deals, tips and promotions as well as a means for you to meet other like-minded travellers.</p> <p>The site has a 'solo traveller club' with a co-ordinator who organises regular meetings and outings that allow club members to meet other travellers and find a suitable companion. If you have a destination in mind and are looking for someone with whom you can share the experience, simply notify the co-ordinator of your intended destination and they can match you up with another - or a few other - solo travellers.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.companions.com.au/">Companions</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Aim:</strong> Make friends, share interests, and meet new local people<br /><strong>Use it if:</strong> You want to find a new friend<br /><strong>Cost:</strong> Free</p> <p>Whether you are in search of a tennis opponent, a confidante for your morning coffees, a fellow movie buff to take to the cinema or a like-minded person to discuss news and politics with, Companions will help you find a suitable compadre. </p> <p><a href="http://www.companions.com.au/">Companions</a> allows you to identify your interests, which can be as diverse as ‘Tarantino movies’, ‘intelligent conversation’, ‘ballroom dancing’ or anything in between. Joining is free and only takes a couple of minutes, plus members can search profiles, message, chat and discuss topics on forums at no extra cost.</p> <p>Meeting truly compatible people often takes a lot of chance and circumstance, even if you have similar interests and live in close proximity. So why not take a chance to be proactive and make new friends with similar interests today?</p> <p>What have your experiences been connecting with other people online? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/is-it-really-possible-to-find-friends-and-love-online.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a> </em></p>

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Why Olivia Newton-John hid her third cancer diagnosis from fans

<p>Olivia Newton-John said she is grateful for the "gift of extra time" as she continues to battle cancer.</p> <p>In a new interview with America's <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.today.com/health/olivia-newton-john-opens-about-deathbed-rumors-winning-over-cancer-t150031" target="_blank"><em>TODAY</em></a> show, Newton-John revealed that she had been hiding a third cancer diagnosis in 2013 from fans. The 70-year-old singer and actress previously went public with her first breast cancer diagnosis in 1992 and her last in 2018.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">“I just decided I wanted to go through it myself.” <a href="https://twitter.com/olivianj?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@olivianj</a> explains to <a href="https://twitter.com/NMoralesNBC?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@nmoralesnbc</a> why she chose to keep her third time fighting cancer to herself and the treatments she’s using to manage her cancer <a href="https://t.co/bZo0hEvJvz">pic.twitter.com/bZo0hEvJvz</a></p> — TODAY (@TODAYshow) <a href="https://twitter.com/TODAYshow/status/1104001911706009600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">8 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p>"Because of the speculation," Newton-John said. "I just decided I wanted to go through it myself. I don't know, it was just a decision that I'd keep it to myself that time."</p> <p>Earlier this year, Newton-John took to social media to address the rumours about her health, which emerged after her latest cancer diagnosis was announced. In a video, she said, "Rumours of my death have been greatly exaggerated."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Happy New Year! Here’s to a wonderful 2019! Love &amp; light, Olivia <a href="https://t.co/1Nd2jIcRb1">pic.twitter.com/1Nd2jIcRb1</a></p> — Olivia Newton-John (@olivianj) <a href="https://twitter.com/olivianj/status/1080621049123868673?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">3 January 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The <em>Grease</em> star said of the video, "They were telling me I was dying, and I thought, 'I don't feel like it, I'm feeling pretty good'.</p> <p>"But you know, rumours start, then it gets out of control and I decided, 'No, I'm going to come out and talk about it', because I have many friends and family around the world and I can’t call everyone, so I need to let them know that I'm OK."</p> <p>Despite having three cancer diagnoses within the past three decades, Newton-John has remained optimistic.</p> <p>"We're all going to die," she said. "I mean, that's probably the hardest thing to accept as a human being, that we know that. So I kind of consider I've had a gift of extra time. I've lost people younger than me, so I'm very grateful. I'm 70, and I've had the most amazing life."</p> <p>In an interview with Channel Seven’s <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&amp;v=4HhcbZEzZnM" target="_blank"><em>Sunday Night</em></a> <span>last year, the four-time Grammy award winner revealed that she used to be “scared” about her health issues.</span></p> <p>"I'd be lying if I said I never go there," said Newton-John. "There are moments, I'm human. If I allowed myself to go there, I could easily create that big fear. But my husband's always there, and he's there to support me.</p> <p>"I believe I will win over it … That's my goal."</p>

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6 marriage tips from grandmas you’d be a fool not to follow

<p><strong>Be careful what you look for because you might just find it</strong></p> <p>“My great grandmother always told me to be careful what you go fishing for because you may come out with snakes. As a therapist, I share this with my clients when they are suspicious of what their partner are doing. They may think they want to know everything but are the results worth the fallout from that information? Often we tend to think we are ready to know all the dirty details only to realize we were better off before.” —<em><a href="http://www.shannonbattle.com/"><strong>Shannon Battle</strong></a>, licensed professional counsellor</em></p> <p><strong>Saying no has a price</strong></p> <p>“My grandmother told me, ‘What you won’t do for your man, another woman will.’ As a married woman, I’m finally beginning to understand the wisdom in her advice. Sometimes we get comfortable and think our spouse will never look elsewhere. Marriage can get stale so it’s important to be open to making adjustments as we go through different experience, age, or change.” —<em>Shannon Battle </em></p> <p><strong>It’s not what you say, it’s how you say it</strong></p> <p>“As a child, my Southern grandmother taught me that successful relationships were more a result of character than content. As such, her favourite saying was ‘You catch more flies with honey than vinegar.’ Now that I work as a marriage counsellor I see how true that is. It’s important to always speak kindly even in tense situations as kind words help couples establish and maintain habits of fair and equitable collaboration that creates a stronger bond.” —Bill Benson, licensed marriage and family therapist and clinical counsellor at The Mental Gym</p> <p><strong>Let him (or her) win</strong></p> <p>“When I first got married my grandma told me to ‘always let him win.’ At the time, I didn’t like this advice because I didn’t think it was fair. Why should I always let him win? As I got older and more mature, I see her point and see why this is such an amazing way to be in a relationship. It’s not that we get taken advantage of, or let ourselves be used or abused, but it’s about letting your partner win with the small things. It’s about compromising for the sake of a peaceful marriage. You give in to smaller conflicts for the good of the whole, and for a more peaceful union.” —<em><a href="http://www.karennaalexander.com/"><strong>Karenna Alexander</strong></a>, dating and relationship coach, based in Connecticut and New York City</em></p> <p><strong>Have a hot meal ready</strong></p> <p>“My grandma always had a delicious meal waiting for my grandfather and told me to do the same. At first when I heard her saying this it seemed outdated and even a little silly. I figured a guy should love me for me, not for my cooking skills. And it’s true, if you have a good guy, you aren’t going to lose him if you are a bad cook. But that said, cooking a meal for someone you love is a way of showing them love and that a you are there for them every day. It’s a form of communication, even on days when you both are exhausted and have nothing left. It’s a way of communicating love and creativity and caring, even when words aren’t spoken.” —<em>Karenna Alexander</em></p> <p><strong>Pretend you can’t open the pickle jar</strong></p> <p>“My grandparents were married for 41 years and my grandma told me her secret: ‘Sometimes you have to let the other person feel needed, even if they aren’t.’ She explained how she would have my grandfather do little things like filing papers, or opening jars for her. She knew how to open a tight jar herself but she would still leave the tight jars until he came home from work. ‘Nobody wants to feel like you don’t need them to do nothing!’ she’d tell me. I understood later in life that even though I can change my own tire, my significant other wants to feel like he is the only one who can do it. And I am okay with that.” —<em>Whitney Tillery, relationship coach and blogger at <a href="http://shewriteablog.com/"><strong>shewriteablog.com</strong></a> </em>(Here are <a href="https://www.rd.com/advice/relationships/happy-marriage-feel-loved/1"><strong>12 other tiny ways to make your spouse feel loved</strong></a>.)</p> <p><em>Written by Charlotte Hilton Andersen. This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.rd.com/advice/relationships/marriage-tips-from-grandmas-youd-be-a-fool-not-to-follow/"><span><em>Reader’s Digest</em></span></a><em><a href="https://www.rd.com/advice/relationships/marriage-tips-from-grandmas-youd-be-a-fool-not-to-follow/">. </a>For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><span><em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></span></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Olivia Newton-John reveals new health setback

<p>After a number of health complications, Olivia Newton-John is on the road to recovery as she battles stage 4 breast cancer.</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://people.com/music/olivia-newton-john-on-health-scare-cancer-exclusive/?did=348625-20190306&amp;utm_campaign=people-news_newsletter&amp;utm_source=people.com&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=030619&amp;cid=348625&amp;mid=19092272842" target="_blank">People</a> </em>magazine in a new interview, the 70-year-old has revealed how she has spent the last six months recovering from a fractured pelvis due to cancer weakening her bones.</p> <p>Newton-John only discovered the fracture in September, after she felt excruciating pain during a cancer walk for her Olivia Newton-John Cancer and Wellness Centre in Melbourne, which is where she received treatment.</p> <p>The <em>Grease </em>star was forced to celebrate her 70th birthday in hospital rather than the extravagant party that was originally planned in Los Angeles.</p> <p>“There were all these things I was going to do for my birthday,” the actress and singer admitted. “But God had other plans.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BSWZ9iwDDoX/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BSWZ9iwDDoX/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Olivia Newton-john (@therealonj)</a> on Apr 1, 2017 at 9:51am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>However, despite the drastic change of plans, the Australian-born star was surrounded by her family and friends as they held an intimate dinner in the hospital ward.</p> <p>These challenges are enough to make anyone feel defeated, but Newton-John still remains positive.</p> <p>“I never say, ‘Why me.’ I was like, ‘Wow, I’m in my hospital that I’d dreamt of building for people to have rest and peace and there I was getting the best care,’” she said. “It was quite magical.”</p> <p>This is Newton-John’s third battle with cancer, with the deadly disease spreading to her sacrum. Her first diagnosis was in 1992 and then in 2013.</p> <p>She has chosen to take the natural route when it comes to treatment, as she uses a combination of herbs, oral medication prescribed by her oncologist, and medical cannabis.</p> <p>Despite these trying times, she revealed to the magazine that it’s her support system – comprised of her daughter Chloe Lattanzi, family and friends – that have helped provide her with the strength to push through it.</p> <p>In January, Newton-John was in the centre of a tabloid frenzy as certain publications reported that she was dying and only had a few “weeks” to live.</p> <p>The four-time Grammy award winner addressed the morbid rumours through a video where she revealed that she was doing just fine.</p> <p>But speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://people.com/music/olivia-newton-john-on-health-scare-cancer-exclusive/?did=348625-20190306&amp;utm_campaign=people-news_newsletter&amp;utm_source=people.com&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=030619&amp;cid=348625&amp;mid=19092272842" target="_blank"><em>People</em></a>, Newton-John said the entire ordeal was hard on her loved ones.</p> <p>“My friends were calling and believing this stuff. I had to say, ‘You really think if it was that bad you wouldn’t know?’”</p> <p>And progress is being made, as once upon a time the star would be forced to use a walker to get from A to B, then a cane, and now “nothing”.</p> <p>Opening up on the status of her current health, the triple threat star said: “I’m feeling good, just getting stronger.”</p>

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Detecting strokes: Here’s what you need to know

<p>After news broke of actor Luke Perry’s death following a “massive stroke” it’s important to understand the signs and symptoms.</p> <p>The 52-year-old <em>Riverdale</em> and <em>Beverly Hills, 90210</em> star passed away on March 4, after suffering a massive stroke late last week.</p> <p>The much loved actor died while surrounded by family and friends. He leaves behind two children, 21-year-old Jack and 18-year-old Sophie, and his fiancé Wendy Madison Bauer.</p> <p>Celebrities and those close to the actor took to Twitter to share their thoughts and well wishes.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">My heart is broken. I will miss you so much Luke Perry. Sending all my love to your family. ❤️ <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LukePerry?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#LukePerry</a></p> — Molly Ringwald (@MollyRingwald) <a href="https://twitter.com/MollyRingwald/status/1102631945819713538?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">4 March 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">As a young girl from Hamilton Ontario coming onto the biggest show in the world mid stream, Luke welcomed me from day one. My heart breaks. ❤️ <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/lukeperry?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#lukeperry</a> #90210 <a href="https://t.co/8QA4SEipqB">pic.twitter.com/8QA4SEipqB</a></p> — kathleen robertson (@kathleenrobert7) <a href="https://twitter.com/kathleenrobert7/status/1102640120539176960?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">4 March 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Luke Perry... you were a joyful and vibrant soul. You will be missed but most certainly your legacy will be remembered forever. Rest in love and peace, friend. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Riverdale?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Riverdale</a></p> — Riverdale Writers Room (@RiverdaleWriter) <a href="https://twitter.com/RiverdaleWriter/status/1102634825880547328?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">4 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p><strong>What is a stroke?</strong></p> <p>According to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/docs/ConsumerEd_Stroke.pdf" target="_blank">Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)</a><span>, strokes are caused by lack of blood supply to the brain. This can be due to the blood flow being blocked by a clot (ischemic stroke) or when the vessels in the brain burst (haemorrhagic stroke).</span></p> <p>Other incidents are classified as “brain attacks”, which happen when people suffer from a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or otherwise known as “mini strokes”.</p> <p>These occur when there is a blockage of blood flow to the brain. But despite these short incidents only occurring for five minutes, they should be taken seriously as they are indicators for future strokes.</p> <p>When the brain fails to receive an adequate amount of blood flow or oxygen, it can result in permanent disability or death.</p> <p><strong>What are the major symptoms of stroke?</strong></p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://strokefoundation.org.au/About-Stroke/Stroke-symptoms" target="_blank">The Stroke Foundation</a> urges everyone to brush up on F.A.S.T.</p> <p>The F.A.S.T test is a simple acronym that helps people understand the symptoms of stroke, and could be the difference between life or death.</p> <p><strong>F:</strong> <strong>Facial drooping or numbness.</strong><span> </span>Ask the person to smile and check for any asymmetries.</p> <p><strong>A:</strong> <strong>Arm weakness.</strong><span> </span>If the person is suffering from a stroke, they may find it difficult to move their arms. Ask them to raise both their arms to see any irregularities.</p> <p><strong>S:</strong> <strong>Slurred Speech.</strong><span> </span>A common symptom of a stroke is slurring of the speech. People may either be talking extremely slow or it may be difficult to understand what they’re saying. Ask the person to repeat phrases several times, but even if their speech returns to normal, be sure to call a doctor regardless.</p> <p><strong>T:</strong><strong> Time to call 000.<span> </span></strong>If the person has any of the above symptoms, then call emergency services immediately.</p> <p><strong>Other symptoms to look out for</strong></p> <p>While F.A.S.T is important to be on top of, there are other symptoms also linked to strokes, such as walking difficulties or understanding conversations.</p> <p>Those who suffer from severe headaches, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination, all come under signs of a stroke and should be looked at by a doctor immediately.</p> <p><strong>Who is at risk?</strong></p> <p>Strokes do not discriminate and can happen to anyone at any age, but there are certain factors that make some people more susceptible to the condition than others. People who excessively smoke or consume alcohol, live sedentary lifestyles, have high cholesterol, blood pressure or diabetes have a much higher risk of suffering from a stroke. </p>

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Luke Perry’s daughter breaks her silence on actor’s shock death

<p>Luke Perry’s daughter has broken her silence on the actor’s shock death.</p> <p>Sophie Perry, 18, was travelling in Malawi on a charity trip when her father fell ill last week. She returned to Los Angeles before Luke’s devastating death on Monday.</p> <p>The <em>Beverly Hills, 90210</em> star suffered a massive stroke on Wednesday, February 27 and died five days later at the age of 52.</p> <p>Sophie, the daughter of Luke and ex-wife Rachel "Minnie" Sharp, shared a picture of her and her father on Instagram. Alongside the photograph, Sophie wrote: "A lot has happened in this past week for me. Everything is happening so fast. I made it back from Malawi just in time to be here with my family."</p> <p>She thanked those who reached out to her with condolences. </p> <p>"I cannot individually respond to the hundreds of beautiful and heartfelt messages, but I see them, and appreciate you all for sending positivity to my family and I.</p> <p>"I'm not really sure what to say or do in this situation, it’s something you aren’t ever given a lesson on how to handle, especially when it's all happening in the public eye. So bear with me and know that I am grateful for all the love. Just, being grateful quietly."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Buo6FIuAhfB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Buo6FIuAhfB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">A lot has happened in this past week for me. Everything is happening so fast. I made it back from Malawi just in time to be here with my family, And in the past 24 hours I have received an overwhelming amount of love and support. I cannot individually respond to the hundreds of beautiful and heartfelt messages, but I see them, and appreciate you all for sending positivity to my family and I. I’m not really sure what to say or do in this situation, it’s something you aren’t ever given a lesson on how to handle, especially when it’s all happening in the public eye. So bear with me and know that I am grateful for all the love. Just, being grateful quietly.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/lemonperry/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> Sophie Perry</a> (@lemonperry) on Mar 5, 2019 at 11:57am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>According to a publicist, Luke was surrounded by friends and family, including ex-wife Sharp, Sophie and her 21-year-old brother Jack, and fiancée Wendy Madison Bauer.</p> <p><img style="width: 222px; height: 280px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7824452/perryss.jpg" alt="Luke Perry with Sophie and Jack" data-udi="umb://media/edd2cfd7c238433aa4c802ae93621a8a" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Luke Perry with daughter Sophie and son Jack at the 2004 Target A Time for Heroes Celebrity Carnival</em></p> <p>Luke's co-stars Shannen Doherty and Molly Ringwald have also taken to social media to pay tribute to the late actor. </p> <p>"I'm struggling with this loss and am having a hard time with my thoughts," Doherty, who starred opposite Luke on <em>Beverly Hills, 90210,</em> posted on Instagram. "Processing this is impossible right now."</p> <p>Ringwald, who played Luke’s wife on <em>Riverdale</em>, shared on Twitter: "My heart is broken. I will miss you so much Luke Perry."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BuokFQVgoUz/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BuokFQVgoUz/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank">Yesterday morning I got a phone call that devastated me. I’m struggling with this loss and am having a hard time with my thoughts. But, my heart goes out to his family and friends who were blessed by his light in their (and mine) lives. Processing this is impossible right now.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/theshando/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_medium=loading" target="_blank"> ShannenDoherty</a> (@theshando) on Mar 5, 2019 at 8:45am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">My heart is broken. I will miss you so much Luke Perry. Sending all my love to your family. ❤️ <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LukePerry?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#LukePerry</a></p> — Molly Ringwald (@MollyRingwald) <a href="https://twitter.com/MollyRingwald/status/1102631945819713538?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">4 March 2019</a></blockquote> <p>In a 2017 interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://celebrity.nine.com.au/2019/03/06/11/14/luke-perry-death-daughter-breaks-silence" target="_blank"><em>Us Weekly</em></a>, Luke said he related to his character Fred Andrews in ongoing TV show <em>Riverdale</em> because they were both fathers.</p> <p>"My personal family is really all I care about and I think everyone can relate to that," he said. "You love your family and you care about them, that's the main thing about [Fred] that I connect to.</p> <p>"It's hard to tell people how to raise their kids, and I'm certainly no authority on raising children, but love them as much as you can and talk to them as much as you can, make time for them."</p> <p>To learn more about detecting strokes, click <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/health/caring/detecting-strokes-here-s-what-you-need-to-know/" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>

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Coping methods to help heal from loss

<p>Although the experience of losing someone is a factor everyone will have to face one day, or may have already, it doesn’t mean we can escape the feeling that comes along with this loss.</p> <p>Loss takes on various shapes and forms, whether it is a relationship that has ended, a loved one moving away, someone dying or a transition of some sort.</p> <p>When a feeling of loss comes, it can cause an individual to feel confused, alone and initiate a grieving process that is hard to pull yourself out of.</p> <p>It is important when moving forward from loss and growing from it that one approaches methods to bounce back and have awareness, experts claim.</p> <p>Here are a few general laws to follow when dealing with loss so you can bounce back and be a better, stronger version of you.</p> <p><strong>Acknowledge and accept your feelings </strong></p> <p><span><a href="http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/type_d_personality">Research</a></span> shows many people who neglect their emotions in an unhealthy way tend to have more psychological and physiological problems.</p> <p>Emotions including anger, sadness, confusion, loneliness, fear and many others may come forward when you are hit with a loss. In moments like these it is important to find comfort and solace in support groups, friends, counsellors or ever a good book on the subject.</p> <p>Finding what works for you to help you deal with your emotions will allow you to heal and grow properly.</p> <p><strong>Replace the negative feelings with positive ones</strong></p> <p>Sit down and write a list of the good things that exist within your life and practice self-reflection. <span><a href="http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/type_d_personality">Experts say</a></span> awareness of self is one of the best ways to learn more about yourself and grow accordingly.</p> <p>What are methods you can practice growing forward as an individual? Perhaps taking up activities such as yoga or reading self-help books could be the way you learn more about yourself and expand your mindset.</p> <p><strong>Feel liberated and move forward</strong></p> <p>When you lose something of value to you, whether that is a person, home, the feeling of comfort or a relationship, it can be important to understand and accept this loss. It is also important to modify your relationship with what you lose. Experts believe the way to do this is by forming a detachment towards what is causing the feeling of loss.</p> <p>Although this change may development may take time, you will know you are at a place to move forward when you are able to cherish the good moments and release the painful ones and cut the chord once and for all.</p> <p>How do you deal with loss? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p> </p>

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10 more facts you believe that aren't actually true

<p>We Showed you some of the most <a href="http://www.readersdigest.co.nz/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/51-favourite-facts-youve-always-believed-are-actually?items_per_page=All">believed 'facts' that are actually not true at all.</a> Here's ten new facts that are actually false.</p> <p><strong>1. Sugar = Hyperactivity</strong></p> <p>Studies have disproved this. Poor or rowdy behaviours still occur in children with sugar-free diets.</p> <p><strong>2. Bulls hate red</strong></p> <p>Bulls are colour-blind. They actually perceive the motions of the bullfighter’s cloth as a threat.</p> <p><strong>3. Your hair and nails keep growing after death</strong></p> <p>Wrong – but your skin tissue does recede, making them appear longer.</p> <p><strong>4. Celebrities die in threes</strong></p> <p>Of the celebs who have died since 1990, only in seven cases did three die in the same five-day period, according to data from the New York Times.</p> <p><strong>5. Bananas grow on trees</strong></p> <p>Actually, they grow on massive herbs that just resemble trees.</p> <p><strong>6. Bagpipes are Scottish</strong></p> <p>Sorry, <em>Braveheart</em> fans: they were prevalent in the Middle East centuries before Western Europe.</p> <p><strong>7. Adam and Eve ate an apple</strong></p> <p>They ate the forbidden “fruit” of the tree of knowledge – nowhere in Genesis does it say it was an apple.</p> <p><strong>8. Sleepers swallow eight spiders per year</strong></p> <p>Spiders usually don’t crawl into beds during night-time wanderings because they offer no prey. You probably swallow zero spiders per year.</p> <p><strong>9. All your fingernails grow at the same rate</strong></p> <p>Because blood flow stimulates nail growth, the nails on your dominant hand actually grow faster.</p> <p><strong>10. <span>Van Gogh cut off his ear for a lover</span></strong></p> <p><span>It was just a small piece of lobe, and he did it during a violent spat with Pat Gauguin. Whether Van Gogh then gave it to a local girl remains unknown.</span></p> <p><em>Written by</em> <em>David McCandless and Brandon Specktor. This article first appeared in </em><span><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.co.nz/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/51-favourite-facts-youve-always-believed-are-actually">Reader’s Digest.</a></em></span><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><span><em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Dark bruising sparks concerns for the Queen’s health

<p>Concerns over the Queen’s health have been raised after fans spotted deep bruising on the 92-year-old’s hands in a recent photograph.</p> <p>During a meeting with the King and Queen of Jordan, the monarch revealed purple-pink blemishes sparking speculation over her wellbeing.</p> <p>The Palace refused to comment on the reason behind the marks.</p> <p>The bruising could have been caused by a medical condition called peripheral cyanosis, which occurs when there are low oxygen levels in the red blood cells.</p> <p>But the discolouration could also be a sign of an underlying condition.</p> <p>Bruising can be caused by a multitude of things such as artery problems, beta blockers, blood pressure medicine or blood clots restricting the blood supply.</p> <p>While the bruising may be due to cold temperatures, that seems unlikely as the area has recently seen a bout of warm weather.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Today The Queen, with The Princess Royal, hosted Their Majesties The King and Queen of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, <a href="https://twitter.com/KingAbdullahII?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@KingAbdullahII</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/QueenRania?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@QueenRania</a>, and their son The Crown Prince at Buckingham Palace. <a href="https://t.co/jMjdm5na8h">pic.twitter.com/jMjdm5na8h</a></p> — The Royal Family (@RoyalFamily) <a href="https://twitter.com/RoyalFamily/status/1101127897014849536?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">28 February 2019</a></blockquote> <p>It could be that the Queen has always had the marks, but as she wears gloves during public appearances, it hasn’t been noticed until now.</p> <p>But Twitter went into a frenzy after the photograph was revealed, with many noticing the blemishes right away.</p> <p>“I love keeping up with Queen Elizabeth II but I’m concerned,” said one user. “Why does she have such a terrible bruise on her left hand?”</p> <p>Another user was the voice of reason, saying “the lady is 92” and that “at that age any little knock unfortunately turns into what can look like severe bruises".</p> <p>Speaking to the<em> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/auhome/index.html" target="_blank">Daily Mail</a>,</em> medical expert Emma Hammett said that it’s possible “this serious looking bruise resulted from a relatively minor injury".</p> <p>Ms Hammett said that older people are susceptible to bruising as the tissue underneath their already-thin skin is fragile.</p>

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Here's how you can get help if you are struggling.

<p>There is a growing trend towards grandparents becoming primary caregivers of children. One reason is because of a growing preference for kinship care. Many more grandparents act in this capacity than it is acknowledged.</p> <p>In 2011, the <em>Australian Bureau of Statistics</em> reported up to 16,000 families where the grandparent provided primary care to a child or children aged between 0 and 17 years. If these numbers seem a little low, it’s because we all know they don't reflect the actual number of grandparents providing primary care. Indeed, a large portion of cases go unreported due to cultural issues. This is particularly prevalent in indigenous communities for example where grandparents are simply expected to provide care.</p> <p>Caring for your grandchildren can be an exceedingly rewarding experience. However, it comes with its own set of challenges and hurdles. Many grandparents fear they no longer possess the boundless energy essential for raising happy and well-adjusted children. However, remember, you do have the wisdom that first-time parents can only dream of.</p> <p>In fact, grandparents have more to offer than they might imagine.</p> <p>There are a number of other factors to contend with. The age of the child/children, temperament and societal/background issues are just a few. At times, the role of caregiver can be overwhelming, but the good news is, there are services available to help.</p> <p>In terms of government support, a number of options can be accessed.</p> <p><strong>Government support groups</strong></p> <p><span><strong><a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/services/centrelink/child-care-benefit">Child Care Benefit</a></strong></span> <br />CCB assists primary caregivers with the costs associated with childcare, which covers what is referred to as ‘informal childcare provided by grandparents, relatives, friends, neighbours or nannies. <br /><br /><span><strong><a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/services/centrelink/child-care-benefit">Grandparent Child Care Benefit</a></strong></span><br />This fiscal arrangement pays for the full amount of approved childcare up to 50 hours per child every week. Great-grandparents, in addition to ex-partners of grandparents who supplied primary care to their grandchildren, are permitted to access this service. However, you must first apply for, and successfully claim, the <span><a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/services/centrelink/child-care-benefit">Child Care Benefit</a></span>. </p> <p><span><strong><a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/services/centrelink/child-care-rebate">Child Care Rebate</a></strong></span><br />Half of all out of pocket expenses are covered (within annual limits). A work, training and study test is a prerequisite, and looks at your work-related commitments (paid or otherwise). </p> <p><span><strong><a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/services/centrelink/family-tax-benefit-part-a-part-b">Family Tax Benefit</a></strong></span><br />Aiding the cost of raising the grandchild/grandchildren. An income test must be undertaken before this benefit can be released, and the grandparent must provide care for at least 35% of the time. However, if your grandchild is receiving Youth Allowance, you will not be entitled to this payment.</p> <p>Are you a grandparent caring for your grandchildren? We’d love to hear your thoughts and experiences. Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Louise Smithers. Republished with permission of <span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/are-you-a-grandparent-caring-for-your-grandchildren.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></span></em></p>

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Michael Schumacher “spotted” in Majorca for first time since 2013

<p>Formula One legend Michael Schumacher has been spotted recovering from his devastating skiing injury in his holiday home in Majorca.</p> <p>Schumacher has not been seen in public since 2013, after a horrific skiing accident left him in a coma for five years.</p> <p>The Formula One legend had people thinking he was being taken care of in his home in Switzerland ahead of a permanent move to Majorca, but it appears he’s spent the holidays at the luxury villa he owns before heading back to his home in Lake Geneva.</p> <p>Schumacher spent Christmas, New Year's and his milestone 50th birthday in Majorca.</p> <p>He was spotted arriving on a helicopter at Port D'Andratx in Majorca, German magazine <a href="https://www.bunte.de/stars/star-life/schicksalsgeschichten-der-stars/michael-schumacher-verrat-corinna.html">Bunte</a> reported.</p> <p>The villa that Schumacher was taken to in the Spanish island’s mountains features two swimming pools, a large garden and a helipad.</p> <p>Schumacher’s family have dismissed suggestions he’s relocating to the island and have said that they’ve bought the home as a holiday home.</p> <p>A German archbishop last month had seen the Formula One legend, saying that he looked the same, but his face had “become a little fuller”.</p> <p>He also approved of the family’s tenacity to keep Schumacher out of the eyes of the public.</p> <p>Georg Ganswein told <a href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1093841/michael-schumacher-latest-news-majorca-holiday-villa-formula-one-f1">The Express</a> that Schumacher himself “senses that loving people are around him, caring for him and keeping the overly curious public away”.</p> <p>His family have kept his health battle extremely private and have said repeatedly that it is not a matter for the public.</p>

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“5 obvious signs of dementia I missed in my own mother”

<p>What makes this epidemic even scarier is that despite plenty of theories about dementia, no one really knows what causes it. Alzheimer’s is the most common type – according to the Alzheimer’s Association, it accounts for up to 80 percent of cases – including my mother’s.<br />In a twist that’s hard to fathom, my mother’s Alzheimer’s disease was not diagnosed until she had reached the final stages. Part of this was due to her age; she’s only 68.<br />A mere five per cent of Alzheimer’s patients experience early onset, which is defined as dementia that strikes before age 65.<br />I never suspected my mother was one of them, and that the disease had taken root years before our family noticed it.<br /><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/mental-health/Life-Beyond-Dementia">After speaking with doctors and reading up on dementia, </a>I now realise there were some early signs that my mother’s mind was in trouble.<br />But most of the symptoms were things we chalked up to age or and dismissed as goofy parts of her personality. <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/mental-health/Caring-for-Someone-With-Dementia">Little annoyances we brushed off</a>.<br />Looking back, these seem to have been my mother’s earliest and most deceptive Alzheimer’s symptoms.</p> <p><strong>1. Constantly misplacing her keys and phone</strong></p> <p>It was a running joke in our family, but in the context of dementia, this kind of chronic absent-mindedness was probably more than a bad habit.</p> <p>Misplacing things is one of the earliest signs of dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.</p> <p>Of course, everyone loses their phone, keys, or <a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/7-things-you-should-do-asap-if-your-wallet-lost-or-stolen">wallet</a> from time to time, but when the frequency is almost daily, it could be a sign of a bigger problem.</p> <p><strong>2. Asking for the same information repeatedly</strong></p> <p>If I were coming to visit my mother in a week, I’d have to field the same questions daily leading up to my trip.</p> <p>One of them would inevitably be, “Which train are you taking?”</p> <p>This unrelenting line of questioning was frustrating, of course, but it should have been alarming.</p> <p>According to the Alzheimer’s Association, chronic forgetfulness and asking for the same information over and over is a warning sign.</p> <p>Forgetting conversations is another, according to <a href="https://helpguide.org/">Helpguide.org</a>.</p> <p>Requiring the same information a few times can be attributed to normal aging, but when the information won’t stick on a daily basis, it could be more serious.</p> <p>However, if you are worried about forgetting things, you may be merely a victim of a phenomenon known as ‘digital amnesia’ – a phrase coined to describe forgetting information that you trust a digital device to store and remember for you.</p> <p><strong>3. Avoiding social interactions</strong></p> <p>My mother has been outgoing her entire life and has numerous close friends.</p> <p>When she moved out of state with my father 10 years ago, she began avoiding social situations, though, especially if it meant meeting new people.</p> <p>As we later learned, social isolation is an early sign of dementia.</p> <p><strong>4. Never getting the lay of the land</strong></p> <p>When my mother moved from the place she’d lived her whole life to the new town, she never quite figured out how to get around – and she loved to be out and about.</p> <p>According to the Alzheimer’s Association, having trouble driving to a familiar location is an early symptom of dementia.</p> <p>If my mother’s disease had taken root around the time she relocated, it makes sense that she would have trouble retaining this new information.</p> <p>There are various strategies that can help you keep your brain active and your memory sharp into old age. </p> <p><strong>5. Unexplained weight loss</strong></p> <p>My mother had always been a petite woman. But in the past handful of years, she seemed to keep shrinking.</p> <p>By the time she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, she weighed less than 45 kilograms</p> <p>According to a report published by the American Academy of Neurology in 2009, “Women who will go on to develop dementia begin to lose weight at least ten years before diagnosis. Another report, in 2010, linked unintended weight loss with Alzheimer’s – and, specifically, with the rapid progression of the disease.</p> <p>My mother has cycled through the last three stages of Alzheimer’s in about two years.</p> <p>If you suspect a loved one might be experiencing the early signs of dementia, experts recommend trying to persuade that person to see a doctor right away.</p> <p>According to the US-based Alzheimer’s Association, medications and treatments are available to slow the progression of the disease when addressed early.</p> <p><em>Written by Kristine Solomon. This article first appeared in </em><span><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/5-obvious-signs-dementia-i-missed-my-own-mother">Reader’s Digest</a></em></span><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><span><em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></em></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Why a pet might be good for your health

<p>Who doesn’t love a cute and cuddly dog or cat to play with? The pet industry is thriving with adorable and sometimes odd-looking pets, and they remain some of the most beloved beings in the world. However, being beautiful or unusual looking and providing companionship aren’t the only things our beloved pets can do for us. They can also make you healthier!</p> <p><strong>Dogs make you exercise more – or at all </strong></p> <p>If you have ever had the pleasure of owning a dog, then it might not come as a surprise to you to learn that owners of these creatures tend to get more exercise then those who don’t own dogs.</p> <p>According to research, dog owners spend up to three to four hours a week taking their animal on walks.</p> <p>These people are more likely to meet government recommendations for physical activity over other people without dogs.</p> <p>Dogs, fortunately for us, require physical activity to maintain their health – and although humans are much the same, we tend to ignore the rules ourselves. With a cute canine, you don’t get to make excuses!  </p> <p><strong>Playing with a pet makes love hormones</strong></p> <p>If you’re living alone, pets can be a great emotional support, not just for their companionship but the emotions they make a pet owner feel as well.</p> <p><span><a href="http://science.sciencemag.org/content/348/6232/333">Research in Japan</a></span> found the more time people spent staring into their dogs’ eyes, the more oxytocin they released.</p> <p>Oxytocin is a ‘feel-good’ chemical that our bodies create and release when we love others.</p> <p>So, not only can you find solace in knowing you always have a friend with you, but you can rest assured in knowing they will always make you feel love</p> <p><strong>You will feel safer </strong></p> <p>Dogs provide emotional comfort, health benefits and can also contribute to you feeling safer. No burglar alarm is better than a dog at home.</p> <p>Do you have a pet, or do you want one? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

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The deeply upsetting way Fergie learnt of her father’s passing

<p>Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, was used to being in the news.</p> <p>After all, divorcing from Price Andrew, who’s the Queen’s son, will throw you under the media spotlight.</p> <p>However, she had gotten her life on track post divorce, landing an ambassador deal with Weight Watchers.</p> <p>In 2003, she was travelling to Australia to promote Weight Watchers when she landed to some horrific news.</p> <p>Her father, Major Ronald Ferguson, aged 61, had passed away due to a heart attack.</p> <p>As Fergie was travelling to Australia, she didn’t hear the news until she was on her way to a scheduled appointment with the<span> </span><em>Today</em><span> </span>show. </p> <p>The news spread across the country and fans were wondering whether or not the Duchess of York would still appear on the show due to the heartbreaking news.</p> <p>To their surprise, she did.</p> <p>During the interview, Fergie admitted that the reason she was there was for her father.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7823740/fergie-and-father-embed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8d2b735d414a4ce2aaebc036c8cf8036" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Sarah Ferguson and her father Major Ronald Ferguson</em></p> <p>“Sitting there sobbing, my father would have said, ‘What are you doing? You have your obligations.’”</p> <p>“Now is the time he needs me to go out there and honour my commitments.”</p> <p>As she was on a tight schedule, many more appearances were booked for Fergie and she honoured them all.</p> <p>“He always brought me up to put on the stiff upper lip and get on with it,” Sarah explained of her father.</p> <p>Despite being in Australia, Fergie ensured she was a part of the funeral planning process for her father, even though her sister and stepmother were at home in the UK.</p>

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Parenting adult children: The new dynamic

<p>&lt;p&gt;Parents can be protective of children and often have dreams and aspirations for them that children don’t always agree with. On the other hand, a parent’s best intentions can be misconstrued by their children.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Sometimes we don’t even know these conflicts exist or we know that challenging the status quo would be futile.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;But when we do confront these issues, they quite often reveal secrets, insecurities, fears and belief systems that we’ve carried with us our whole lives and kept hidden from our loved ones out of fear of hurting them.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Media personality and presenter Jane Caro delved deep into this realm of human experience to reveal the inner machinations of parent-child relationships in the four-part Compass series &lt;em&gt;Mum’s Boy, Dad’s Girl. &lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;The show followed five brave families as they let Caro into their homes and lives to reveal what makes their relationships tick. It’s a fascinating, sometimes shocking and mostly heart-warming insight into the lives of contemporary Australians.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;In the first episode that aired, we met 58-year-old Melanie who has fought a lifelong rebellion against her 88-year-old father Warwick who she says she has always seen as “an authoritarian figure”. We also meet Warwick and hear all about his own difficultly trying to raise his rebellious only daughter in a family of four children.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Then there’s 65-year-old Helen and her son Brett, aged 34. In later episodes we find out how Brett struggled with his sexuality as a teenager and on coming out to Helen, was surprised to learn that she too had a secret that would rock Brett’s world. It’s a volatile relationship but one that was brought closer when Brett’s father left.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Jason, 46, is a seemingly normal father of 18-year-old Patty – protective and concerned, but his experience being a father is changed by his disability. In this story we learn about the challenges he has had to overcome to care for Patty by being a hands-on dad. On the flipside we learn about Patty’s own protectiveness of her dad and the unique friendship between father and daughter forged by overcoming adversity, but increasingly strained by her own search for independence.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Denise, 64, and Alex, 31, from Melbourne are hoping the experience of being on the show will help bring them closer together. Denise has found it difficult to make a connection with her son Alex, while Alex has had his own challenges in trying to make his mum be more authentic in their relationship and having to cope with his own mental illness.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;One of the most gripping stories is that of Val, 49, and James, 29, who have suffered great loss and suffering following the death of Val’s husband and James’ father. We learn about Val’s struggle to raise two children alone, her protectiveness of the family now and her struggle to keep her family together after the tragedy.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Caro says while these stories are all unique and different and explore individual relationships on the personal level of each family, they also penetrate into a core experience that is universal in Australian families everywhere.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;“The feelings that people have towards one another, the uncertainties, the delights, the fears, the conflicts – people are going to want to identify with that very much,” she says. “The triggers to those are unique to all of us but the responses are the things that we all have in common.”&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;While she expected the participants to reveal a lot, Caro was overwhelmed by just how much they revealed during the filming – something which she insists was the result of careful casting and the way in which the participants were interviewed.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Despite admitting she “really didn’t know what to expect before making the show” the veteran presenter says she has learned more about parent-child relationships than she ever thought possible.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;On the list of things, she’s learnt is how strong and the unique the bond between a parent and child can be. “I’ve learnt how powerful that relationship is and how there is an enormous sense of protection from parent to child and child to parent,” says Caro.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;“One of the big things I picked up from doing the show is that nobody is ordinary, no one is normal or average. Everybody has things to tell you. There is no right or wrong way to do things, there is just your way,” she says.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Caro says this rings true as she reflects on her own experience parenting her two daughters. While she says she may not have got everything right as a parent, she is thankful that her daughters, now aged 25 and 28 years old, have turned out to be wonderful people.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;“I can see the mistakes I made, they weren’t the obvious ones, but I can also see that my daughters have turned out to be lovely people and it’s a delight to be around them,” Caro says. “They probably turned out that way in spite of me rather than because of me.”&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Caro was amazed by how each party responded to the revelations that were made during filming. “There are so many things that I never expected to experience, to be witness to, that came up,” she says.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;But while the show reveals the conflicts, insecurities and tensions, we also get to discover the positive interactions and sense of family belonging that make relationships worthwhile says Caro.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;“You will see many of the relationships evolve, particularly in the case of Warwick and Mel. There is a sense of them really making peace with each other. Melanie is looking after him now, so the power balance has changed and to Warwick’s eternal credit he has the humility and wit to accept that and enjoy it and be proud of Melanie,” she says.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;One concept that Caro particularly wanted to explore was the idea that different parents respond differently to children of the opposite gender. As the mother of two daughters Caro has often wondered what it would be like to parent a boy – something that she may well get to discover after becoming a grandmother to little Alfie just six months ago.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;“I’ve always wondered what it would be like to parent a boy. I haven’t noticed any differences in how Alfie is to how my daughters were when they were that age, but he’s only a baby so the verdict is still out on that one. He’s got a strong personality, but so did my daughters when they were that age,” she says.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;“But from the show what was interesting was how the two father groups were so protective of their daughters, while mothers weren’t so protective. In fact, they wanted desperately for their sons to have a partner, which I found very interesting, “ says Caro.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;So, what did Caro learn about how life events shape our relationships? She says that James and Val’s tragic loss of a loved one made her realise how bereavement would have an undeniable impact on a family. “Death is a very dramatic event, like a birth of a child and it puts us on the metal and shows us where the cracks are,” says Caro.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;But as to whether the generation we are born in influences our family relationships, Caro is more sceptical. “I would say after watching how the relationships changed over time that it’s not the times that change us, it’s us that change over time. So I actually think the idea that each generation is different from the proceeding one is rubbish,” she says.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;“I truly believe that my children have taught me more than I have ever taught them,” she says.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;So how do we push through these conflicts and have harmonious parent-child relationships? Caro says it’s mainly about forgiveness.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;“It’s by the ability to forgive one another and oneself and the ability to maintain the relationship – that is the test of it,” she says. And it’s that kind of advice that only a mother could give.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;Did you watch this hit show? Let us know in the comments below.&lt;/p&gt;<br />&lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;Written by Dominic Bayley. Republished with permission by &lt;a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/parenting-adult-children-the-new-dynamic.aspx"&gt;Wyza.com.au.&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</p>

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<p>You are the kind of parent who, in order to help your adult children, get ahead in life and pay off a large mortgage, are chipping in to babysit grandchildren to ease the burden of childcare costs.</p> <p>The amount of caring you are doing may vary from a few hours a week to multiple days per week.<br />In doing so you are also contributing significantly to the nation’s coffers. Research shows that $5.54 billion is added to the Australian economy by unpaid carers and $1.26 billion from unpaid childcare provided by the over 50s.</p> <p>It is a very natural, altruistic and noble intention to want to help your children in this way and research published in May this year by the University of Melbourne revealed that it can be good for you. The study found postmenopausal women who took care of their grandchildren one day a week had better memory and faster cognitive speed than those who didn’t.</p> <p><strong>Balancing yours and your children’s needs</strong><br />The researchers however carry a warning about over-using the generous nature of grandparents noting that women who cared for grandchildren five or more days a week had significantly slower processing speed and planning scores, possibly because they felt exhausted and stressed.</p> <p>National Seniors CEO, Michael O’Neill says it’s important for grandparents to aim for a balance in enjoying their retirement years and providing support to their children.</p> <p>“It’s about balance and not giving up on your dreams, expectations and goals to achieve. Those goals shouldn’t be subsumed by the demands of a younger generation".</p> <p>However, the economic reality is that there is an increasing reliance on grandparents for childcare assistance in dual income families and so here are some good ideas for negotiating the babysitting/caring parameters successfully:</p> <p><br /><strong>Tips for setting babysitting boundaries</strong><br />Set limits early on – you might even like to start the conversation with your adult child before your grandchild is born</p> <ul> <li>Consider how far in advance of sitting time you'd like to be approached. If you prefer a week’s notice and not same-day requests </li> <li>Let your children know in advance if you are okay with taking grandchildren to doctor’s appointments or something similar.</li> <li>Let your children know if you are comfortable with supervising homework/study.</li> <li>Set time parameters around drop-off and pick-up </li> <li>School holiday arrangements need to be set early and be clear about school holiday activities i.e. signing grandkids up to camps/classes etc.</li> <li>Will you have grandchildren for sleepovers or not?</li> <li>Will playdates need to be arranged?</li> </ul> <p><strong>More ideas for stress-free babysitting</strong></p> <ul> <li>If you have a skill or hobby that you are talented at share this with your grandkids where appropriate</li> <li>Decide if and/or how you will deliver discipline. You are not obligated to share this role, but it will help your child and grandchild if you have a plan in place</li> <li>Let your household standards slip a bit and put away the precious ornaments while grandkids are around, as this can save heartache for them and you</li> <li>Discuss food and nutrition issues with your child as they may have strong views on this</li> <li>Discuss sleep pattern and arrangements i.e. will the grandchild be required to nap during the day or not</li> <li>Discuss appropriateness of certain movies, books and video games with your child ahead of the sitting/caring time</li> <li>The key thing to remember is to have open, honest communication about babysitting with your children early to avoid unrealistic expectations. You shouldn’t have to do anything you are uncomfortable with so you should try not to be a ‘yes’ man or woman to your children all the time, or your generosity could be taken for granted and lead to stress for both you and your children.</li> </ul> <p>What are some of your tips? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Written by Danielle Cesta. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/the-granny-nanny-trend.aspx">Wyza.com.au. </a></em></p>

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