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Mack Horton’s controversial refusal to share podium with "drug cheat" causes furore

<p>Mack Horton has received a flurry of criticism online through his social media platforms from furious Chinese swimming fans.</p> <p>The Australian swimmer sparked a heated debate after refusing to stand on the podium next to his Chinese rival "drug cheat" Sun Yang at the swimming championships on Sunday night.</p> <p>The bold move of refusing to stand next to Yang by Horton made international headlines.</p> <p>Sun underwent a three-month doping suspension in 2014 and is now being investigated again finishing first in the 400m freestyle – beating Horton by 0.73 of a second.</p> <p>The Australian Olympian made his anger apparent by snubbing the medal podium where he would stand next to Yang – a clear protest to show he was unhappy with the Chinese swimmer being allowed to compete in the eight-day championship.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828825/new-project.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9c9a3591c0ac4d3b90f22c561d1ca172" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Silver medalist Mack Horton of Australia, gold medalist Sun Yang of China and bronze medalist Gabriele Detti of Italy.</em></p> <p>The incredible move and bitter rivalry between the two has sparked an intense international debate after Yang accused Horton of disrespecting China.</p> <p>“I was aware that the Australian athlete had dissatisfaction and personal feelings towards me,” Yang said via an interpreter.</p> <p>“But it was unfortunate because disrespecting me is okay but disrespecting China was very unfortunate and I felt sorry about that.</p> <p>“I’m aware of the rumours (about his alleged hammer attack). (But) I think this has been the greatest achievement in history for the Chinese (swimming) team.”</p> <p>10-time world champion Yang is accused of smashing vials of his blood during a clash with drug testers last year, however, he was allowed to compete in the eight-day swimming event while he awaits a Court of Arbitration for Sport hearing in September.</p> <p>Horton has not been shy of his feelings on Yang, suggesting <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/aussie-team-stands-by-mack-horton-in-china-swimming-feud" target="_blank">he was a “drug cheat” at the 2016 Rio Olympics.</a></p> <p>The Olympian admitted on Sunday he was unhappy with the results of the race.</p> <p>“Frustration is probably it,” Horton said after the race.</p> <p>“I think you know in what respect.”</p> <p>Andrew Horton, father of the swimmer, told 3AW Radio their family have a “huge respect” for China.</p> <p>“There’s a lot of commentary about China. We have huge respect for China. This is about ensuring that there are systems and processes in the sport that keep the sport clean,” he said.</p>

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Australian tennis legend passes away aged 64

<p>Former Australian Davis Cup tennis star Peter McNamara has died aged 64.</p> <p>“Macca,” who reached a career-high number seven in the world in 1983, left a memorable mark when he beat two all-time greats Jimmy Connors and Ivan Lendl to win two of his five singles titles.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.39400921658984px;" src="/media/7828812/eacpdumueaiyi11-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8fca7dad11f949949a1e0a3f6767101c" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Peter McNamara, 2014. </em></p> <p>However, what the tennis star was perhaps most highly regarded for was his doubles partnership with Paul McNamee – the duo went on to win Wimbledon twice in 1980 and 1982 as well as the Australian Open in 1979.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Hard to believe that after 50 years of friendship Macca is gone... you lived life to the full mate and will be missed by your loved ones and many more...a toast to the great times mate <a href="https://t.co/0RVbCD6ZRd">pic.twitter.com/0RVbCD6ZRd</a></p> — Paul McNamee (@PaulFMcNamee) <a href="https://twitter.com/PaulFMcNamee/status/1153066090760511490?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Melbourne-born McNamara retired in 1987 and enjoyed a successful coaching career.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">So saddened to wake up to the news of Peter McNamara’s passing overnight. A great player, great coach that improved every player he worked with, and gun of a person. Big hugs to his family, friends and of course, his great mate <a href="https://twitter.com/PaulFMcNamee?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@PaulFMcNamee</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> 😔 <a href="https://t.co/CeFBai2jYI">pic.twitter.com/CeFBai2jYI</a></p> — Darren Cahill (@darren_cahill) <a href="https://twitter.com/darren_cahill/status/1153063153724354560?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>He coached Mark Philippoussis and guided Grigor Dimitrov in his formative years. More recently, he coached Matt Ebden and Wang Qiang.</p> <p>Until February, McNamara worked with Qiang and helped her to reach the world’s top 20 in their four-year partnership.</p> <p>The Aussie legend died peacefully at his home in Germany on Saturday night after a long and brave battle with prostate cancer.</p> <p>David Law, commentator and long-time friend of the tennis star and coach said McNamara went on to compete in exhibition matches and coach throughout his illness without many people ever knowing about his personal health issues.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">So sad to wake up &amp; hear the news of Peter McNamara’s passing 😢 he was always one of the coaches I could sit down with on tour &amp; be able to have a great chat with. Mostly about life &amp; our kids. I will never forgot him telling me to live my life &amp; be happy with who I am <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a></p> — Casey Dellacqua OLY (@caseydellacqua) <a href="https://twitter.com/caseydellacqua/status/1153042613152337920?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>McNamara is survived by his wife Petra, his children and grandchildren.</p> <p>The tennis world took to social media to voice their love and admiration of the late tennis legend.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">When you represent Australia.. you get the chance of meeting so many good people. One of them was Australian tennis legend Peter McNamara. Ripper bloke and will sadly be missed. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/tennis?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#tennis</a> 😪</p> — Dean Jones (@ProfDeano) <a href="https://twitter.com/ProfDeano/status/1153074719203233795?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Peter McNamara was one of the greats, a great person. He gave his all to everything he did, respected life &amp; always had a smile &amp; time for you. He’s someone you wanted to be in the trenches with. He fought in silence and now he can rest peacefully . <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a></p> — roger rasheed (@roger_rasheed) <a href="https://twitter.com/roger_rasheed/status/1153038830552772608?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">One of the greats 🇦🇺 🙏<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/RIPMacca?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#RIPMacca</a> <a href="https://t.co/iYJvS3qDBq">pic.twitter.com/iYJvS3qDBq</a></p> — TennisAustralia (@TennisAustralia) <a href="https://twitter.com/TennisAustralia/status/1153078863129264128?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2019</a></blockquote>

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Living fabulously after separation or divorce

<p>Living fabulously after separation/divorce requires us to take time to not only grieve the ending of the relationship but also the breakdown of many of the other important life structures. For example; we may need to re-establish parenting arrangements, restructure our financial responsibilities, work obligations, move house, develop new friendships and establish new boundaries in our personal and work relationships.<span> </span><br /><br />Most people don’t get married thinking that they will one day be attending to a separation/divorce. Even if you were the one who instigated the divorce, the split still represents a loss that carries long-term life changing implications in many areas of your life. The time needed to grieve and re-establish balance again will vary for each person and it is important not to move quickly through the grieving phase or we may miss the opportunity to build a strong foundation for establishing our new identity and a new life that has both meaning and purpose.<span> </span><br /><br />The first step to living fabulously after separation/divorce requires you to form a new identity as a single person. This can be a harrowing task as it first requires us to breakdown our old partnership attachment identity and then to define new values, beliefs and thinking patterns aligned to your new goals as a single person.<span> </span><br /><br />Living fabulously after separation/divorce is not about becoming a better person but about becoming brand new; reinventing yourself from the inside out. This requires you to begin to make conscious choices about remaking yourself in a different form. It means intentionally doing things differently. This stage of life presents a wonderful opportunity to create a new future for yourself and a life that will allow you to express who you really are. Important considerations to assist you with this include pondering the following; How did I get to this place? What do I now want my life to look and feel like as a newly single person? What steps are now required of me to begin moving in my new direction?</p> <p><strong>Steps to Living Fabulously include:</strong></p> <p>1. Allow time to grieve the past. Find ways to work through the lingering emotions from the demise of your partnership. This is essential if you are to successfully wrap up the past, make peace with it and move on to create a brand new you. There is now an empty space in your life and you want to ensure you fill it with people and activities that will be aligned to your new single status. You may want to engage a suitable therapist and/or coach to assist you.</p> <p>2. Learn to LOVE YOU! It’s now ME TIME. Regardless of your other responsibilities ensure you set aside time to begin to envision the life you would like to attract for yourself. Think about what your new future self looks and feels like. Where will you be living? What will you be wearing? What changes would you like to see occur in the future? This is a great time to engage in a fitness program, engage a stylist, change your look!</p> <p>3. Change your vibe by experimenting with a new attitude. How do you want the world to see you? Make time to go through your cupboards and decide what needs to go. Make your motto; “Ta, ta to the old, and hello to the new!” </p> <p>Be authentic, find your passion and your inner calling. You now have a blank canvas in front of you and the power to choose the colours and landscape of your new fabulous life.<span> </span><br />Remember happiness is contagious; live fabulously and become someone people want to catch! </p> <p><span>To find out more about Marina’s services and products and dating and relationship tips visit: </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.modernlovesolutions.com/" target="_blank">modernlovesolutions.com</a></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Marina Bakker. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/living-fabulously-after-separation-or-divorce.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></span></em></p>

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Why are friends so important?

<p>In this thoughtful book extract from <a href="http://www.exislepublishing.com.au/Mary-and-Me.html">Mary &amp; Me: A Lasting Link Through Ink</a> Kathy Jindra says she survived the happiest and hardest years of her life with a little help from her friends.</p> <p>Sometimes I ask myself: how did we get by without the Internet?</p> <p>We relied a lot on our friends—that’s how.</p> <p>It was 1982. I had just moved into a new neighbourhood with my husband, Gary, two-and-a-half-year-old son, Justin, and six-month-old daughter, Sarah. It was exciting to upgrade from a two-bedroom apartment into this beautiful three-bedroom house with a yard. The only problem? I knew no one.</p> <p>One morning, the doorbell rang. There stood a smiling lady with two children. She told me about a babysitting co-op and asked if I would like to come to their next meeting. Little did either of us know that my door- bell ringing would be the beginning of many new friendships, and that thirty-two years later, the babysitting co-op would still be going strong.</p> <p>I attended that first gathering and was given my forty now-obsolete computer punch cards. That was the group’s form of money. Each card was worth half an hour of babysitting. We took turns hosting evening meetings for the mothers as a way to get acquainted, so we could feel comfortable leaving our children with each other. But they turned into so much more.</p> <p>My husband, Gary, knew he had to be home on time on the co-op evenings, because he was in charge of the kids. I looked forward to those meetings when we would sit, laughing and talking. Before we knew it, it would be midnight (and some nights, 1:00 a.m.). When it was my turn, I learned to host it in the family room instead of the living room, which was at the bottom of the stairs leading up to the bedrooms. It’s amazing how loud ten to fifteen women were once they all started laughing.</p> <p>Our husbands wondered what we could possibly talk about until midnight. Since it would be a month between meetings, there were all kinds of things to catch up on. We shared suggestions and ideas about potty training, how to get rid of the dummy, good preschools, ballet teachers, and teenage babysitters (although if you found a good one, it was really, really hard to give out her name for fear she would then always be busy). We set up playgroups and carpools. We talked about family trips. We discussed the kids riding the bus to school, the good and bad teachers they shared, when our kids would be old enough to walk or ride their bikes to high-school, taking our fifteen-year-olds out driving once they earned their driver’s permit, sports, curfews, dating, university choices, and much, much more.</p> <p>And, yes, there was even some talk about husbands, but we can’t ever let them know. It was such a good place to vent and discover there probably isn’t a perfect husband out there. Like us, they all have their little quirks, but we are blessed to have them.</p> <p>Each month, we paid two dollars in dues into a kitty to be used to send flowers when a new baby was born. I had my third child, Bethany, two years after joining, and received one of those bouquets at the hospital. There were many babies born, which gave us even more to talk about.</p> <p>Now we are all in our fifties and sixties. Fifteen years ago, we looked at each other, laughing, realising we hadn’t used each other to watch our kids in years. We can’t give up our monthly meetings, but it seems silly to keep calling ourselves “the babysitting co-op.” So we are now just “the co-op.” Friends have moved, but there are still ten women in our group. One dear friend passed away, but her memory will always be with us. We no longer spend our kitty to send flowers for new babies, but for our own surgeries and illnesses.</p> <p>It took our husbands years to finally realise there were no kids to watch when we had our gatherings. Now, on the evenings we meet, they go out to dinner together. At least twice a year, we combine our groups and let them take us out. Our conversations have turned to our parents’ health and nursing homes, our health and surgeries (cancer, knee replacements, heart attacks, and pacemakers, to name a few), vacations, retirement, our children’s weddings, and most fun of all: our grandchildren.</p> <p>Moving to this neighbourhood thirty-two years ago and having that doorbell ring was such a blessing. The friendships I have gained from the co-op fill me with happiness.</p> <p><em>Written by Kathy Jindra. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/why-are-friends-so-important.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a> </em></p>

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Roger Federer's touching Aussie ritual that will warm your heart: "I hope he would be proud"

<p>Since he began his professional tennis career in 1998, Roger Federer has competed in various tournaments across the world.</p> <p>But only at the Australian Open does he have a special ritual.</p> <p>Since 2005, an elderly couple has accompanied the world number three player and his team every year at the Melbourne event.</p> <p>The pair are Bob and Diana Carter, parents of Federer’s first international coach, Peter Carter.</p> <p>Federer was just nine years old when Carter took him under his wing. The Australian coach helped Federer develop his signature technique of a one-handed backhand.</p> <p>“I think if I can say thank you for my technique today, it’s to Peter,” Federer told <a rel="noopener" href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/01/07/tennis/federer-carter-emotion-tennis-spt-intl/index.html" target="_blank"><em>CNN Sport</em></a> in January.</p> <p>Carter died aged just 37 in 2002 in a car accident while honeymooning in South Africa.</p> <p>According to <em>The Australian</em>, the then-20-year-old Federer “ran through the streets bawling” upon hearing the news.</p> <p>David Law, a former communications manager at the Association of Tennis Professionals, said on his <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/tennis/the-tragic-accident-that-changed-the-trajectory-of-roger-federers-career/news-story/a08ac4e47b64c643c4a62569d3814482">podcast</a> that the incident prompted Federer to leave behind his temperamental attitude. </p> <p>“That made Federer grow up incredibly quickly because I don’t think he’d ever had to think about mortality before,” said Law.</p> <p>“This is someone he knew well, who he saw every day, who he travelled everywhere with.</p> <p>“It hit Federer incredibly hard and I think that – and this is a feature of Federer as a boy becoming a man – is that at every stage of his life, whatever has happened, he’s digested what has happened and he’s learnt from it.”</p> <p>Federer said of Carter, “I guess he didn’t want me to be a wasted talent, so I guess it was somewhat of a wake-up call for me when he passed away and I really started to train hard.”</p> <p>When asked what Carter would think of his 20 grand slams record, Federer said, “I still miss him so much. I hope he would be proud.”</p> <p>In tribute to the late coach, Federer has reached out to Carter's parents every year since 2005.</p> <p>Every December, Federer’s team would send an all-expenses paid itinerary to the Adelaide-based couple, including flights and accommodation details and Australian Open tournament tickets.</p> <p>The Carters can usually be spotted sitting behind Federer’s coach in Rod Laver arena.</p> <p>This year, Federer finished in the fourth round of the Australian Open after losing to Greece’s Stefanos Tsitsipas.</p>

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"Greatest sporting finale in my lifetime": The gracious moment that left fans in awe at Cricket World Cup

<p>As England celebrated their victory in the Cricket World Cup after an intense, nail-biting final, the emotions on the other end of the spectrum could not have been more different.</p> <p>Martin Guptill is New Zealand’s fastest player, but his efforts weren’t enough to help him score a second run on the final ball of the match. The difference came down to a metre as the Black Caps saw their dream slip away from their hands when Guptill was caught short of his ground to give England its first ever World Cup title.</p> <p>As Lords erupted in cheers for the host country, the heartbreak on Guptill’s face is one that cricket fans around the world will never forget.</p> <p>The 32-year-old sunk to his haunches after an electrifying ending, the look of devastation evident on his face. Needing two runs off the final ball to take home the trophy, Guptill was shattered that he couldn’t get his side home.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">This picture. The Freddie Flintoff/Brett Lee moment 14 years on. Sums up everything we love about sport. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/cwc19?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#cwc19</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/englandcricket?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@englandcricket</a> <a href="https://t.co/xoCTZfqE5h">pic.twitter.com/xoCTZfqE5h</a></p> — Eleanor Oldroyd (@EllyOldroyd) <a href="https://twitter.com/EllyOldroyd/status/1150688116879089664?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 15, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>But in one of the classiest moves of sportsmanship the game has seen, England seamer Chris Woakes approached the batsmen and his partner Jimmy Neesham to offer his condolences.</p> <p>Rooted to the spot, Guptill was inconsolable, and instead of celebrating his victory, Woakes chose to show an act of sportsmanship by offering his support to the opposition.</p> <p>The historical match is one that will be remembered, a rare game where neither side deserved to lose. But the image of Woakes standing by his crushed rivals will forever stand the test of time and act as a reminder that the spirit of cricket is more than a wicket or a trophy.</p> <p>The classy gesture was reminiscent of one from the past, between Brett Lee and England’s Andrew Flintoff in the 2005 Ashes series.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828649/brett.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3499a5ca552d41619fc237388472ed1a" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Andrew Flintoff and Brett Lee - 2005 Ashes series</em></p> <p>After England won a thrilling Test by two runs at Edgbaston, as they battled it out against Australia who delivered a stunning fight, Flintoff showed his true spirit by comforting a fallen Brett Lee, who similar to Guptill, was struggling with heartbreak.</p> <p>Fans took to Twitter to react to the exciting end to the tournament, commending both sides for their perseverance and hard work in hoping to obtain the World Cup with one claiming that it was “the most exciting game of cricket ever seen.”</p> <p>“I can state without a doubt that it was the greatest final of sport in my lifetime,” wrote one user.</p> <p>“We should have won it comfortably, but New Zealand played a superb match,” said a British fan.</p> <p>“This game really showed sportsmen at the top of their game,” said another.</p>

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Are you cheating yourself of sleep?

<p>We all know that sleep patterns can change with age. Quality and quantity of sleep can sometimes deteriorate and studies are now pointing toward this having adverse health impacts.</p> <p>Perhaps the importance of good sleeping patterns has been downplayed in our modern culture, but the potential health benefits make it worthwhile to identify ways you can improve this vital ‘biological downtime’.</p> <p><strong>Poor sleep linked to cognitive function<br /></strong>Studies have pointed toward a link between poor sleep and cognitive performance. A University of Oregon-led study examined around 30,000 adults over age 50 in six nations. Their findings were a real eye-opener (pardon the pun) with suggestions that both lack of sleep and too much sleep can both have adverse effects. Tests revealed that those with less than six hours, and more than nine hours sleep, revealed that cognitive functions such as memory, recall, and verbal fluency had reduced performance. </p> <p>Another study even pointed toward poor sleep creating brain imaging patterns akin to someone with Alzheimer's. While much more research needs to be done to give conclusive proof, the indications are that it is worth taking a closer look at your sleep in order to be at your best later in life. <u><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/7-ways-to-improve-your-brain-health.aspx">Read more tips on improving your brain health</a></u>. </p> <p><strong>What can you do about it?<br /></strong>Many over 50s report an increase in interruptions during sleep and this can mean a loss of the valuable periods of deep sleep, where the body and mind achieve the greatest restorative benefits. The objective, therefore, is to work on techniques to reduce broken sleep patterns.</p> <p><strong>Re-set your body clock (and nap less)<br /></strong>The occasional nap during the day may well boost your daytime stamina and may be something you increasingly look forward to, but if it is affecting the quality of night time sleeping then it is best to limit naps to no more than 30 minutes. It also helps to get your biological clock into a rhythm by having set times for when you go to bed and when you wake up, and maintaining a regular pattern.</p> <p><strong>Move more!<br /></strong>Exercise is important too for burning off energy and encouraging your body to get some solid rest. Aim for at least 30 minute sessions at least three days a week. It doesn’t need to be intense; even <u><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/exercise/walk-your-way-to-better-health.aspx">a brisk walk</a></u> will create the desired effect, but make sure you don’t do it too close to bedtime.</p> <p>An added benefit of doing something active outdoors is the fresh air and daylight that you are exposed to, which can improve sleep too. There are plenty of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/exercise/get-fit-no-gym-required.aspx">simple ways to make fitness fun</a>.</p> <p><strong>Think about what you are consuming (and when)<br /></strong>Drugs and stimulants need to be controlled, so watch the timing of any caffeine, chocolate and sugar intake, and check your medications to see if they are causing sleeplessness if taken too late in the day. Dietary patterns can aid sleep too. Reduce alcohol and other liquids close to bedtime and don’t go to sleep either too full or too hungry.</p> <p>Good deep sleep can be an integral part of better health management, so assess the above issues in your daily routine and gain greater benefits from a quality night's rest.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/are-you-cheating-yourself-of-sleep.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Duchess Meghan fans bite back at mum shamers: “She was doting on him”

<p>The Duchess of Sussex appears to be loving life as a new mum and on Wednesday, the royal <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/archie-s-first-official-outing-the-royal-babies-steal-the-spotlight-from-their-dads" target="_blank">had her first public outing with two-month-old Archie</a> along with his big cousins, Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.</p> <p>The family watched on as Prince Harry and brother-in-law Prince William went head to head in a charity polo match, and photographs released of the fun day out showed the Duchess doting on her new bundle of joy.</p> <p>“She was doting on him, there’s no doubt about that,” an onlooker told <a rel="noopener" href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-doting-archie-first-outing-polo-match/" target="_blank"><em>PEOPLE</em></a>. “She was kissing and stroking him and bouncing him up and down.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7828528/new-project-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b884ffd34799433082c2ecc88832bd1c" /></p> <p>Critics, however, took to social media to share their distaste for the way the Duchess was holding her son in a way that made him look like he was about to fall out of her arms.</p> <p>“Meghan looks like she’s about to drop him” one comment read.</p> <p>“She is also not able to hold the baby.”</p> <p>Another cruel comment said: “You can tell she doesn’t even take care of her own kid. What kind of mother holds their baby like that.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7828527/new-project-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/efa965cbca524521bd9ddcc4613fc90b" /></p> <p>However, royal supporters hit back at the cruel criticisms, writing: “She’s still new to it and we’ve all held our babies awkwardly.”</p> <p>Another said: “She’s a brand-new mother. Stop the damn mum-shaming! Jesus!”</p> <p>Maternity nurse and author Lisa Clegg told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/" target="_blank">Fabulous Digital</a> </em>she didn’t see any issue with the way the Duchess was holding baby Archie.</p> <p>“To me, her body language looks like she’s holding him in a very protective way, by supporting his bottom and the top of his back, so she’s ready to catch that inevitable head flip they sometimes do, until they learn better head and neck control.</p> <p>“Is it surprising that she’s holding him very close and in such a protective nature, when she has the world looking at her?”</p> <p>Along with baby Archie and the Duchess of Sussex was the Duchess of Cambridge who was also doting on her youngest son, 15-month-old Prince Louis.</p> <p>Wednesday’s royal outing was part of a charity scheme which saw Prince Harry and Prince William battle it out for a charity polo game in honour of Leicester City Football Club owner, who tragically died in a helicopter crash last year.</p>

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How a hobby can enhance your life and health

<p>Ever heard of healing with hobbies? Here's how the hidden power of hobbies can help relieve the symptoms of stress, grief and more.</p> <p>Coping with the stresses of life or coming to terms with grief and loss can be overwhelming and sometimes debilitating. While the cliché of ‘time healing all wounds’ does hold some truth, it is important to know there are pro-active strategies for overcoming challenging times and getting your life back on track.</p> <p><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/10-steps-to-improve-your-health.aspx">Healthy diet</a>, regular exercise, <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/are-you-cheating-yourself-of-sleep.aspx">proper sleep</a> and stimulating social connections are all important, but another beneficial approach is to engage in a hobby. Our ancestors enjoyed the healing value of creative pursuits, because activities such as sewing, knitting and woodwork were more of a necessity than a pastime.</p> <p>Nowadays computers and televisions dominate our leisure time and their passive and sedentary nature can be a hindrance to our mental wellbeing. Taking up a craft or hobby can be a very practical and positive way to restore balance to our lives.</p> <p><strong>Can hobbies induce positive physiological changes?<br /></strong>Performing a task that engages the mind in a focused and creative way may naturally seem like it would induce a beneficial response, but is there any hard evidence for this assumption? One study quoted in the Journal of the American Medical Association analysed 30 women who sewed as a hobby.</p> <p>Their stress responses, such as blood pressure, heart rate, perspiration rate and skin temperature were measured before and after various leisure activities. The results, when they were sewing, produced measurable improvements in the stress indicators, compared with increased stress responses when they engaged in other pastimes, such as playing cards or video games.</p> <p>One theory is that hobbies and crafts – especially those which require repetitive and rhythmic activities - can actually induce a relaxation response that improves psychological and physical wellbeing.</p> <p>Perhaps this is due to the ‘grounding’ effect they have on us. Regularly performing something that engages our creativity and concentration can bring our minds into the present and reduce the tendency to project negatively into the future or dwell on painful past events.</p> <p><strong>A healing and wholesome therapy<br /></strong>While the hustle and bustle of modern life may have typecast some hobbies and crafts as simply being a last resort for boredom or an unnecessary time-waster, the reality is that they may well be a primary vehicle for reclaiming a sense of purpose, wellness and recovery from life’s traumas.</p> <p>Rather than marginalising it, why not make the time and space in your life to dedicate to a craft as a way of restoring balance and contentment. Take a course at a community centre or join a craft club can be a great way to get you kickstarted. Make sure you then have a regular time set aside at home, (daily if possible), and have a set space devoted to your craft or hobby. Open your mind to the possibilities and you too can reap the benefits of healing with hobbies. </p> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/how-to-heal-with-hobbies.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p> <p> </p>

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Easy ways to reinvigorate your relationship

<p>As couples grow and age together, so to do their level of comfort and familiarity. However, with heightened intimacy also comes greater difficulty in keeping the flame of romance alive.</p> <p>Whether a relationship is long-term or new-found, it is essential to put in effort to maintain the often elusive ‘spark’. </p> <p>Here are a few simple ways to re-invigorate your relationship and keep the flame burning bright!</p> <p><strong>Set a Date Night<br /></strong>With kids, work and other stresses cluttering your life, it is essential to occasionally remove yourself from life’s many obligations and simply be together. As a couple, you’ll benefit from the private dates, which will help strengthen your relationship in every way. Dating will give you something to look forward to, a shared passion that can help re-ignite your tired minds and bodies. So set a ‘date night’ and remind yourselves of the pleasures of spending precious alone time together.</p> <p><strong>Get Active!<br /></strong>Physical activity is a great way to relieve relationship stress, while simultaneously working out the kinks. Teamwork is also the best way to re-establish effective communication with your partner, offering both parties the opportunity to grow and learn. Enjoying each other’s company is an essential element of staying happy; so don’t underestimate the simple joys of getting out and about together. Couples can book weekend or mid-week retreats and adventures, or sign up to a new exercise class together. Popular activities include canoeing, sailing, tandem-bike riding, bush walking or yoga.</p> <p><strong>Surprise Each Other<br /></strong>When a relationship is blossoming, it’s possible to surprise each other each and every day. But as time passes, it becomes easy to fall into the traps of routine and predictability. So shake off the schedule and make time for life’s many wonderful surprises. The surprise could be as simple as an unexpected bouquet of flowers or a trip to a local wine bar. Regardless of the size of the gesture, spontaneity and unpredictability are vital to keeping a relationship alive and fresh.</p> <p><strong>Show Your Partner You Care<br /></strong>A relationship thrives on intimacy and honesty. But often couples fall into monotonous routines that make statements of love seem like the response on an answering machine and acts of intimacy the work of a robot. When you ask how your partner’s day was, for example, really listen and care about the answer. When you part in the morning, look at them and kiss them goodbye with meaning. Studies have even shown that kissing for over five seconds at least once a day can work wonders in revitalising intimacy. Focus on staying in tune with your partner’s frame of mind and be there for them in times of stress or adversity. When you communicate openly and with candour, you unlock the true potential of your relationship. Re-establish a bridge of communication by paying attention, and showing legitimate and honest care for your significant other.</p> <p><strong>Go Travelling Together<br /></strong>Travelling allows couples to bond and find out more about each other. The process of seeing and experiencing new things together will re-invigorate your minds and your understanding of one another. By embarking on a shared experience, it’s easy to work through the rust and get back to having good old-fashioned fun! Cruises and other more leisurely options will do the trick, but travelling to new places and getting out of your respective comfort zones will also lead to an undeniable blossoming of romance.</p> <p>There’s more to any relationship than a few banner days and predictable celebrations, so make sure you’re always trying your best to make your partner feel your love. With the right amount of attention and patience, you really can re-ignite the passion for eachother keep the steady flame of romance burning bright.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/easy-ways-to-reinvigorate-your-relationship.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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How to flirt safely with online dating

<p>Online dating has revolutionised the way we meet people and more and more over 50s are joining this burgeoning online community. However there are some pitfalls you need to be aware of before you go looking for love online in order to avoid flirting with danger.</p> <p>By and large, these dating sites provide the perfect environment to meet interesting, like-minded people as friends or for potential long term or casual relationships.</p> <p>If you aren’t particularly drawn to bars, clubs or hobby or interest groups, it can be difficult to meet people. Online dating sites allow you to be discerning and select people who match your set of interests and philosophies on life. It’s convenient and can be successful, when done safely. And nowadays there are growing number of sites targeted specifically to Baby Boomers.</p> <p><strong>Beware the scammers!</strong></p> <p>Online dating is still a relatively new and modern concept, so you may already be aware that people have been known to encounter some bad experiences online, including in some cases losing significant sums of money as well as their self-confidence and self-esteem.</p> <p>Last year there were 2,770 reports of Dating and Romance scams - a 13.6% increase on the previous year. 43% of Australians who came into contact with dating and romance scams lost over $25 million collectively. You should approach these sites with a healthy mix of enthusiasm and caution.</p> <p>A few of the cardinal rules for those new to online dating are; never organise a date with someone unless it’s in a busy setting with other people around; Do not give away your personal details until you are completely confident about the other party and definitely do not part with any money for a site or person that you don’t know is a completely bona fide entity.</p> <p><strong>Things to watch out for:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Listen to your gut instinct if something doesn’t feel right</li> <li>Do not give out personal info too early</li> <li>Do a background check on the person</li> <li>Beware of people who pressure you to meet up instantly</li> <li>Look out for inconsistencies in the person’s profile compared to what they say about themselves when you actually talk to them</li> </ul> <p><strong>Great tips for online flirting:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Try to have light, general conversations online initially – humour is always a good start (always keep it tasteful!)</li> <li>Always compliment your date</li> <li>Avoid being overly suggestive and using sexual innuendo</li> <li>Don’t feel pressured to meet with someone you are uncertain about</li> <li>If you are a male Baby Boomer, it is always polite to offer to pay for the female date on initial outings</li> <li>It sounds obvious, but don’t drink too much alcohol</li> <li>Initially go for a shorter date for a first meeting, in case there is no chemistry or common ground</li> <li>It’s never makes a good impression to talk about your ex-partners on the first couple of dates</li> <li>Don’t go on about yourself for too long, remember to also be a good listener</li> <li>It’s ok to kiss on a first date nowadays – but just a peck on the cheek!</li> <li>Appropriate dressing – ladies, don’t wear something too provocative, nor too frumpy and shapeless. Go for smart, confident and slightly on trend. (the latter applies to men also)</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Danielle Cesta. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/how-to-flirt-safely-with-online-dating.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Feel great about your life ahead

<p>Today over 85 per cent of the male population reaches retirement age and the average time in retirement has increased to more than 19 years.</p> <p><strong>The benefits of working longer</strong><br />The old delineation between work and retirement is being blurred and the notion of having a fixed retirement age and a sudden change of life is becoming less relevant for many. While some may be happy to jump into retirement as soon as possible, others may be equally happy to carry on a productive and happy working life – and why shouldn’t we? Technology is making work options more flexible and the shift in the economy away from manufacturing and toward service industries means that it is feasible in many occupations to continue working well beyond age 65.</p> <p>While no one likes to see their entitlements curtailed, the value of staying employed (at least part-time) in later life can be a real positive. Why surrender to a norm that says you should retire if you don’t want or choose to? Your talents and ability don’t magically disappear at any prescribed age. in fact, the more experience and knowledge you have, the more valuable you are.</p> <p>After all many of those who retire on the dot of age 65 will end up longing for the social interaction, fulfilment and mental stimulation that their work provided.</p> <p><strong>More time to enjoy life</strong><br />The other dynamic at play in the retirement formula is that life expectancy is still creeping higher. Even though retirement age is going up, the length of retirement is actually getting longer. The real question is not so much how long we will be retired, but what is the quality of life will we enjoy in retirement and what can we do to enhance it.</p> <p>Will you stay fit and active? Maintain independence? Will you be engaged in activities and relationships that will stimulate and enrich your life?</p> <p>At a broader level, the government has an important role to play in facilitating quality of life through the health system. While focus seems to be on the retirement age issue, the projected growth in health costs is a much bigger budgetary problem for the country. Perhaps all the angst over changes to retirement ages would be better directed at asking governments to ensure they adequately fund quality health care instead.</p> <p>Governments can only do so much, however, and it is at the personal level that we each must make our own decisions and nurture our own attitudes about living a full and productive life as we get older.</p> <p><strong>Ready to start today?</strong><br />While some physical differences are inevitable, it is our approach to the years passing and our ability to embrace it that can make such a positive difference. We can’t always prevent the stiffer joints and greyer hair, but we can take action to enjoy and appreciate life more fully.</p> <p><strong>These ideas will help:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Pursue vitality: Focus on staying healthy, strong and fit. Set exercise goals that are achievable yet challenging. Make an effort to be more proactive and informed on making food choices too – it is never too late.</li> <li>Engage in the present: Rediscover the simple pleasures of life. Stop and appreciate your environment, your partner, your family and friends. Be thankful and live in the moment, rather than worrying about the future or regretting the past.</li> <li>Appreciate yourself: Don’t obsess about your body, but do take care of your body better to improve self-esteem. It is never too late to shake off bad habits that limit your enjoyment of life and your ability to love yourself.</li> <li>Nurture creativity: Rediscover your creative self. When we were children we loved making things with our own hands. A life of work may have made it difficult to spend time on creative pursuits, so why not rediscover your inner child and rekindle an old skill or learn a new one.</li> <li>Foster relationships: Make the effort to look outside of yourself by remaining as socially active as possible, rather than dwelling in your own world. Meaningful contact with family, friends, ex-workmates, neighbours, club associates or church acquaintances helps to keep your mind stimulated and positive and keeps you as a participant in life instead of a spectator.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Tom Raeside. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/wyza-life/feel-great-about-your-life-ahead.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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How social media can change your life

<p>So you think this whole social media caper is just a fad and only of real interest to Gen Y and Gen X? If so, then read on, you may just be surprised to find social media has been around a lot longer than you think and it has some tangible benefits for the modern Baby Boomer.</p> <p>When you strip it back, social media has been in existence since the time of Socrates and Plato – only their equivalent of broadband were messengers and instead of a computer, they used papyrus scrolls. In ancient Rome they even had small tablets restricting the amount of characters you could fit - Twitter springs to mind here.</p> <p>The Romans even used acronyms to shorten messages and long-distance communications, much the same as today’s social network users shorten ‘by the way’ to BTW and ‘please’ to PLZ.</p> <p><strong>Did you know<br /></strong>More than 500 000 Australians aged 60 years and over have a Facebook page. <br />In fact, 60 per cent of Australians aged 55 to 64 use the internet, with more than 30 per cent of those over 65 spending time online. The whole social media sphere has been somewhat hijacked by the younger generation. It’s seen as a trend with a new platform coming onto the scene every year. First it was My Space, then Facebook and now Twitter and Instagram are the flavour of the moment.</p> <p>Irrespective of the slight differences, these platforms all serve the same purpose; facilitating communication and peer-to-peer connection - this is a universal desire, not just the domain of younger generations.</p> <p><strong>Safe use of social networking sites<br /></strong>As with anything, while social networking sites offer you great opportunities, you should always remain cautious and know how to use these sites safely. You need to understand how privacy and security settings work on these sites up front. A common misconception is that only your contacts or “friends” can access the information you post, when in reality the default setting is that many more can view the material. Facebook has a <a href="https://www.facebook.com/help/325807937506242/">comprehensive explanation</a> on their site about the importance of changing the default setting.</p> <p>You may also, want to watch the video tutorial above which will show you how to change your settings step-by-step. Once you know how to take advantage of the medium and not the other way around you can start enjoying the benefits of being active online.</p> <p><strong>Reasons you need to get onto social media today</strong></p> <ul> <li>Social interaction – you can easily meet new likeminded friends online.</li> <li>Instant access to news and information – often news and information is leaked on social networking sites before mainstream media gets hold of it.</li> <li>Find a new job - If you are looking for work, many people find sites like LinkedIn valuable for job searching and notices posted on Facebook have been known to lead to a job.</li> <li>Long distance communication - You can communicate with people interstate and overseas more immediately and easily and at lower cost than a phone call.</li> <li>Keeping engaged despite geographical location - Beneficial is you live in rural, regional and remote communities where there’s limited means of socialising.</li> <li>Find lost friends and make new ones – track down old school friends or colleagues and connect with like-minded people in special interest groups.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Danielle Cesta. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/how-social-media-can-change-your-life.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Duchess Fergie moves crowd to tears after delivering emotional speech

<p>Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York, does extensive charity work but it is often kept under wraps.</p> <p>However, UK Magazine <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.hellomagazine.com/celebrities/2019062574616/sarah-ferguson-moves-audience-to-tears-star-mum-awards-hello-magazine/" target="_blank">Hello!</a></em> sought to change all of that as it hosted its first Star Women awards.</p> <p>The Duchess of York received the Inspiration of the Year award for her charity work, which also includes being founder patron of Street Child.</p> <p>Street Child is a UK charity that was established back in 2008 and aims to create education opportunities for vulnerable children in Africa and Asia.</p> <p>The 59-year-old worked the room as she accepted her award, before moving the audience to tears and then later on having them in stitches.</p> <p>In her speech, she promised to help last year’s star mums Lisa Wells at her fundraising ball.</p> <p>However, the Duchess of York quipped: <span>"Maybe you'd prefer one of the other duchesses?"</span></p> <p>The same day as the award ceremony, she appeared on <em>This Morning</em>, where Sarah went into a detailed explanation about her support for a campaign that ensures all ingredients are listed on pre-packaged food.</p> <p>This comes after the death of a girl who died as a result of consuming something with incorrect labelling.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzIQo4VFBLV/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BzIQo4VFBLV/" target="_blank">An honour to join Natasha Ednan-Laperouse’s parents Nadim and Tanya to launch @natashasfoundation on @thismorning with @hollywilloughby and @schofe. We need to make her death a watershed moment and support research into a cure #natashaslegacy So proud to have been asked to be patron of @natashasfoundation. Today we’re delighted to welcome Government announcement of Natasha’s Law to support allergy sufferers but there is much more work to do to promote research @itv #natashaslegacy</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sarahferguson15/" target="_blank"> Sarah Ferguson</a> (@sarahferguson15) on Jun 25, 2019 at 3:16am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>To top off the day, she also attended the British Heart Foundation’s “Bias and Biology” panel, where she advocated for more awareness about the inequalities in women’s healthcare surrounding heart disease.</p>

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Ash Barty's injury setback: Pulls out of tournament one day after becoming World No. 1

<p>Australian tennis star Ash Barty has suffered a flare up of an existing arm injury and has withdrawn from the Eastbourne International to recover ahead of Wimbledon.</p> <p>The new World No. 1 female tennis player insists she will be fit to enter the line up as the number one seed for the event.</p> <p>"It's an injury I've had to manage since I was 16 years old," Barty said to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-25/ash-barty-pulls-out-of-eastbourne-to-rest-ahead-of-wimbledon/11243222" target="_blank">The ABC</a>.</p> <p>"It happens when I have a spike in load, it's just a bone stress injury and I need to look after it.</p> <p>"We know how to manage it but it is important to get on top of it straight away.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bx-lSOSoWRj/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bx-lSOSoWRj/" target="_blank">🔲 Black and white 🔲</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/ashbar96/" target="_blank"> Ash Barty</a> (@ashbar96) on May 27, 2019 at 12:33pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Barty was set to play her second-round match on Tuesday, but is instead taking it easy and is hoping to catch Australia’s Cricket World Cup clash with England at Lord’s instead.</p> <p>"If it works out, we'll try and get to the cricket, If not, we'll be watching on telly," Barty said at Devonshire Park on Monday.</p> <p>"I've been in touch with most of [the players]. I heard from JL [Justin Langer] yesterday and we've been in touch over the last few months.</p> <p>"Hopefully I can get there."</p> <p>However, Barty is aware that a potential injury flare up could impact her chances at Wimbledon.</p> <p>"I really need to look after it, particularly in the first few days.</p> <p>"We pulled out of the doubles [in Birmingham] to give it the best chance to be ready for singles.</p> <p>"It's about rest, time off court and then monitoring how many balls I do hit when I am on court.</p> <p>"It's just certain times of the year I need to be careful."</p>

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58-year-old Aussie curbs “horrendous” 27-year smoking addiction with these simple steps

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Queensland, Australian man who claimed he smoked up to 100 cigarettes a day “nonstop” for 27 years has opened up about just how exactly he kicked the “filthy” addiction. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">58-year-old Walter Humphreys admitted to the </span><a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7101949/Die-hard-smoker-100-day-cigarette-habit-QUITS-puffing-27-years-heres-how.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Daily Mail</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> he was a “walking disaster” before he quit his drug addiction. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Townsville local explained he would puff on a cigarette from the moment he woke up at 5am until 10pm, every day. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was one after the other, all day and all night.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I had nicotine stains all over me fingers, me bed. I was just a wreck.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The “horrifying” addiction began for Mr Humphrey’s when he was just 13 and his stepbrother and mates peer-pressured him into taking his first puff. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The bad habit soured into a full-blown addiction when the 58-year-old landed himself in jail in 1990. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His addiction did not waver when battling with leukemia and several bouts of chemotherapy seven years ago. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The turning point for Mr Humphreys began two years ago when he was diagnosed with chronic lung cancer which is when the 58-year-old decided to make the most of his “second chance” at life. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Walter managed to cut down 100 cigarettes per day to 80, then to 60, 40, 20 and then zero with the help of Queensland’s Quitline. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He revealed the hardest part was slashing his addiction from 100 smokes a day to 80. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Your lungs are so used to copping a beating, and the cravings were more strong,” he said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was craving (so bad), I was chewing my fingers, my fingernails - I just couldn't keep busy enough.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Humpreys biggest tips to those struggling with a smoking addiction is to think about anything other than cigarettes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If you think about it, you're gone,” he said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Go and do something, anything - watch TV, have a shower - keep busy and don't think about it.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the former smoking addict has completely cut cigarettes from his life, he confirmed “everyone relapses, we’re not perfect… I’m trying my best.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Before you know it, you're walking down the street and going, 'I can smell the fresh air, and smell the ocean' - I couldn't do that before..</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If I can help just one person to quit the habit then it's worth doing this story.”</span></p>

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Climate change is hitting hard across New Zealand, official report finds

<p>The major focus on climate change in<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/environment-aotearoa-2019">Environment Aotearoa 2019</a>, a stocktake on New Zealand’s environment<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/news-events/new-report-signals-nine-top-environmental-issues-facing-new-zealand">released</a>, is a welcome change.</p> <p>The report describes an environment that faces<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/news-events/new-report-signals-nine-top-environmental-issues-facing-new-zealand">serious pressures</a>, including species at risk of extinction, polluted rivers and streams, the loss of productive land as cities expand, and climate change.</p> <p>On climate change, the report is more detailed and hard-hitting than<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporting/environment-aotearoa-2015">past</a><span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporting/environment-new-zealand-2007">reports</a><span> </span>have been.</p> <p><strong>New Zealand’s global share of emissions</strong></p> <p>New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions are high<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Environmental%20reporting/environment-aotearoa-2019.pdf#page=94">internationally</a>. In 2015, New Zealanders produced 17.5 tonnes of greenhouse gases (measured as carbon dioxide equivalent) per person, 33% higher than the average of 13.2 tonnes from industrialised countries.</p> <p>In the<span> </span><a href="https://emissionstracker.mfe.govt.nz/#NrAMBoEYF12TwCIByBTALo2wBM4eiQDs2AHEltEA">latest figures</a><span> </span>from 2017, gross emissions<span> </span><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&amp;objectid=12221417">rose 2.2% from 2016</a><span> </span>and remain 23% above 1990 levels. The immediate causes are clearly stated: high emissions of methane and nitrous oxide from agriculture and sharply rising emissions of carbon dioxide from transport.</p> <p>The report is silent on the root causes of rising emissions, including ineffective government action and community attitudes that rank<span> </span><a href="http://www.roymorgan.com/findings/7128-most-important-problems-facing-new-zealand-february-2017-201702271519">climate change as a relatively low priority</a>. Instead it states:</p> <p><em>Our high per-person emissions are reversible if we adopt policies, technologies, or other means that reduce our production of greenhouse gases.</em></p> <p>But this obscures the story of 30 years of policy work on climate change and 11 years trying to make<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/ets">New Zealand’s Emissions Trading Scheme</a> work.</p> <p>An earlier<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/environmental-reporting/environment-aotearoa-2015">report</a><span> </span>on climate change did not foresee the flood of vehicles entering the country. This has now given New Zealand the highest rate of vehicle ownership in the<span> </span><a href="https://doi.org/10.1787/9789264268203-en">OECD</a>. New Zealand has<span> </span><a href="https://www.transport.govt.nz/mot-resources/vehicle-fleet-statistics/">4.36 million vehicles</a>, up half a million since 2015, but lacks the regulations found in many other countries, such as CO₂-linked registration fees and fuel efficiency standards. With a flood of cheap, high-emission used imports, it is no surprise that New Zealand’s transport emissions continue to rise.</p> <p><strong>Known unknowns</strong></p> <p>A key function of this latest report is to identify knowledge gaps. An important one for New Zealand is the relative strengths of different carbon sources and sinks, for example by different types of vegetation, soils and agricultural practices.</p> <p>As emphasised recently by the<span> </span><a href="https://www.pce.parliament.nz/about-us/the-commissioner">Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment</a>, New Zealand is still focusing too much on<span> </span><a href="https://www.pce.parliament.nz/publications/farms-forests-and-fossil-fuels-the-next-great-landscape-transformation">plantation forestry as a short-term fix for our emissions problem</a>. It is a risk because it creates a carbon liability for the future, as well as exposure to diseases and fires. Its true environmental impact is not well understood.</p> <p>The<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Environmental%20reporting/environment-aotearoa-2019.pdf#page=98">section</a><span> </span>on current climate impacts could not be more clear.</p> <p><em>Climate change is already affecting Aotearoa New Zealand. Changes include alteration to temperature, precipitation patterns, sea-level rise, ocean acidity, wind, and sunshine.</em></p> <p>New Zealand’s temperature has increased by 1ºC since 1909. While this is close to the global average, it is less than the<span> </span><a href="https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cag/global/time-series/globe/land/ytd/12/1880-2017">global land average</a><span> </span>which has increased by 1.4ºC. New Zealand is protected to some degree by the Southern Ocean.</p> <p>Warm days have increased and frosts decreased. Soils have dried, glaciers have melted, sea levels have been rising, the oceans have warmed and acidified, and sunshine hours have increased. No surprises so far. Climate science predicts an increase in extreme rainfall events, but this has not yet been detected statistically. At one-third of the measured sites, extreme wind has decreased, whereas an overall increase in wind is expected.</p> <p><strong>New Zealand not immune to climate change</strong></p> <p>If anything, the section on current impacts is too conservative. The data stops in 2016 before the epic years of 2017 and 2018, which saw<span> </span><a href="https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/ab012a">many extreme weather events</a><span> </span>of all types. These were linked in part to El Niño, which raises global temperatures, and in part to an extreme<span> </span><a href="https://theconversation.com/farmed-fish-dying-grape-harvest-weeks-early-just-some-of-the-effects-of-last-summers-heatwave-in-nz-110577">Southern Annular Mode</a>, an indicator whose strengthening is itself linked to climate change.</p> <p>Few New Zealanders will forget the sequence of ex-tropical cyclones, 1-in-100-year floods, the sight of the<span> </span><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/102181406/our-barren-alps-aerial-survey-shows-snow-loss-incredibly-extreme">Southern Alps without snow</a><span> </span>or the<span> </span><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/101276704/port-hills-fires-one-year-on-youd-think-they-would-try-to-help-us-out">Port Hills on fire</a>.</p> <p>The report’s final<span> </span><a href="http://www.mfe.govt.nz/sites/default/files/media/Environmental%20reporting/environment-aotearoa-2019.pdf#page=100">section</a><span> </span>covers future impacts in the most forceful official statement seen yet. It lays out a blizzard of impacts in all areas of the environment, country, economy and infrastructure, including coastal flooding, erosion, tsunami risk, liquefaction risk and saltwater intrusion.</p> <p><em>All aspects of life in New Zealand will be impacted.</em></p> <p><strong>The way forward</strong></p> <p>The uncertainties are clear. We don’t have a clear idea of the rate of future emissions, or the impacts under different emission scenarios. Some of the most important impacts, such as sea-level rise, are also the most uncertain. The report notes that information on cumulative and cascading impacts is limited. Climate change has the capacity to undermine environmental efforts elsewhere.</p> <p>Polls show a<span> </span><a href="https://horizonpoll.co.nz/page/504/climate-con">rising awareness of climate change</a><span> </span>and a<span> </span><a href="https://www.iag.co.nz/latest-news/articles/IAG-Ipsos-poll-Kiwis-pessimistic-that-we-will-meet-the-challenge-of-climate-change.html">hunger for stronger action</a>. The<span> </span><a href="https://www.mfe.govt.nz/have-your-say-zero-carbon">Zero Carbon bill</a><span> </span>is expected to go to select committee before June, but even when passed, emissions will not start falling<span> </span><a href="https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/morningreport/audio/2018688375/james-shaw-defends-climate-change-action">until the mid-2020s</a>, with the heavy lifting left to the 2040s and future emission reductions technologies.</p> <p>A<span> </span><a href="https://www.productivity.govt.nz/inquiry-content/3254?stage=4">recent report</a><span> </span>on New Zealand’s transition to a low-emission economy outlines many more immediate actions. Let’s hope that this report, along with the public pressure from the<span> </span><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/111447430/kids-feel-the-fear-and-march-the-streets">School Strike 4 Climate</a><span> </span>and<span> </span><a href="https://extinctionrebellion.nz/">Extinction Rebellion</a><span> </span>movements, give the government the courage to act decisively.</p> <p><em>Written by Robert McLachlan. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/climate-change-is-hitting-hard-across-new-zealand-official-report-finds-115661">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

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Why some animals don’t get weaker with age

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While there are obvious signs that come with ageing for us – from grey hairs to bad knees, and hot flashes to the need for supportive socks – there are some species who don’t quite experience ageing the way we do. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Research has revealed some creatures do not grow weaker with age, and in fact adopt the reverse effects than what humans experience. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Owen Jones, the head scientist behind the study conducted by </span><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nature12789"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nature International Journal of Science</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> looked at the mortality rates of 46 different species to determine how they have changed over time. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The research found some animals get less fertile and closer to dying as they get older. However, there are creatures, like hermit crabs and abalone snails, that become more vibrant and their ability to be fertile remains unwavering. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Desert tortoises actually are less likely to die in their old age than they are in their younger days as they have basically lived through their most dangerous and deadliest years – every day after their days as a “baby” is basically smooth sailing from there. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What this means in the most profound sense, is that ageing and nature is not as clear and simple as we like to think.  </span></p>

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Bad hair day? Not with these fantastic tips

<p>Hair allows us to express our personality and change our look depending on our mood or the weather. It is also a good indicator of overall health. We have collated the most reliable and effective tips to ensure every day is a good hair day.</p> <p>There are a plethora of simple tips, questionable myths and reliable scientific results surrounding the mystifying quest towards healthy hair. Here's what you need to know.</p> <p><strong>Choosing shampoo and conditioner</strong></p> <p>The best advice when choosing your shampoo and conditioner is to look at the active ingredients. Don’t be fooled by marketing, as words like ‘natural’ aren’t regulated and don’t provide any kind of guarantee. One positive ingredient to look for is silicone (or dimethicone) as this coats and protects the hair. Look out for artificial scents and colours or detergents. Some particularly harmful ingredients to be wary of are sodium laurel sulphate, parabens and benzyl benzoate. Try to buy shampoo and conditioner that is specifically targeted to your hair type and use the same line of products as they are designed to complement each other.</p> <p>There is no single rule for how frequently you should wash your hair. If you have an oily scalp, for example, you will need to do it more often. As you age, your scalp produces less oil and you can usually wash it less frequently. However, if you’re getting dandruff or a flaky scalp this generally means your washes are too seldom. When washing with conditioner, start a few centimetres from the scalp and concentrate most of the conditioner on the tips of your hair as otherwise it can make the scalp oily.</p> <p><strong>Old wives tales - true or not?</strong></p> <p>You’ve probably heard many old wives' tales about hair care however surprisingly there is some truth to them. The old saying ‘100 brush strokes a night’, for example, has merit because brushing your hair from root to tip distributes the hair’s natural oil down the hair shaft, making it shinier, less damaged and less prone to breakage.</p> <p>Start from the tip then travel upward to detangle the knots. Also be sure to use a dense boar brittle brush, as this is the most effective at removing dirt, dust and debris and moving oil down the hair shaft.</p> <p>Ever heard the one about using cold water to wash out conditioner? It is true that this seals the cuticle and makes it harder for moisture to enter, effectively preventing the process that can cause 'frizz'.</p> <p>One of the most important practices to avoid is very frequent blow drying or straightening. These events damage the hair make it more prone to breakage. If you are blow drying your hair, put it on a lower heat level and be sure to never straighten wet hair. Wet hair is more vulnerable, which also means you should avoid brushing it. Try to towel dry hair by patting rather than rubbing it. Furthermore, avoid tying hair back too tight to the point of pain, particularly when sleeping, as this increases friction and causes breakage. Finally, try to avoid smoking or too much stress, as these factors can make your hair duller and brittle.</p> <p><strong>Thinning hair</strong></p> <p>While going bald is a well-known issue for men, surprisingly, 40 per cent of people who experience temporary or long-term hair loss are women. If you are experiencing sudden hair loss, you should consult a medical professional. However, there are some easy hair thinning prevention and treatment methods to try at home.</p> <p> </p> <p>To disguise thinning hair, try a different hairstyle such as a shorter cut, a different part or more layers to heighten the volume. Try getting into the habit of gently blow-drying your hair (after it has partially air dried) to build volume. A scalp massage has also been shown to prevent thinning hair as it temporarily increases circulation to the scalp, thereby pumping the hair follicles with the nutrients it needs to grow. Use your fingertips and a small amount of argan or coconut oil and rub in a circular motion for a few minutes prior to shampooing.</p> <p><strong>Greying gracefully</strong></p> <p>Embracing grey hair can be a sophisticated look. The first step is to blend your roots, as the contrast in texture and tone makes it look unkempt. It is worth getting a do-it-yourself highlighting or root-touch-up kit to blend the roots until at least 60% of your roots are silver. Then you can give up your dye job and just embrace the grey. Silver strands often have a duller look as they absorb light instead of reflecting it. Consequently, you should use an oil-absorber or glaze to give your hair added shine between washes. Also ensure your styling products are colourless so they don’t tarnish your grey hair.</p> <p><strong>Natural hair masks</strong></p> <p>Many of the most helpful and nutrient-rich treatments for your hair aren’t found in hair salons but they are found in your kitchen cupboard. The natural vitamins, minerals and proteins in certain food items make them the ideal nourishing hair treatments.</p> <p>For the 'hair masks' recipes below, you should mix the ingredients together to make a paste then apply liberally over the hair. Cover your head and hair with a shower cap and leave the paste for 20 minutes to a few hours depending on the damage. Thoroughly rinse out the mixture and follow with your usual shampoo and conditioner regime.</p> <p>For hydration, softness, body and shine: give your hair a deep hot oil condition by mixing ¼ cup of olive oil, ¼ cup aloe vera oil, 6 drops of rosemary oil and 6 drops of sandalwood essential oils. Heat it so that it is warm to touch and then soak through the hair.</p> <p>To give your locks a softer, more luscious look: simply blend one ripe banana and a teaspoon of honey into a smoothie-like mixture.</p> <p>To give your hair a glossy finish: simply apply plain yoghurt to wet hair. Allow the mixture to sit for at least 10 minutes then rinse thoroughly.</p> <p>To prevent dandruff: use a hibiscus leaves paste or powder with water.</p> <p>To restore lustre: combine one ripe avocado and an egg to wet hair and replenish it with vitamins and essential fatty acids.</p> <p>For a softness and shine: simply prep your hair with warm water and coat your hair with mayonnaise, put on a plastic wrap such as a shower cap, let it sit for 20 minutes or more and rinse.</p> <p><strong>Feed your hair naturally</strong></p> <p>As well as putting food items in your hair, a balanced diet with plenty of healthy oils for essential fatty acids is also crucial for restoring hair health and vibrancy. A diet rich in zinc, iron, protein and biotin (a B vitamin) is important for shine and strength. Aim to get these vitamins naturally. Particularly beneficial foods for your hair include foods such as salmon, walnuts, yoghurt, sweet potatoes, spinach and blueberries.</p> <p>If you have specific concerns about your hair, consult a hair or medical professional.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/wellbeing/bad-hair-day-not-with-these-fantastic-tips.aspx"><em>Wyza.com.au.</em></a></p>

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7 annoying habits and the fascinating scientific reasons for them

<p>Why does your co-worker constantly clear her throat? What's behind your best friend's Facebook oversharing? Science has the answers to these annoying habits.</p> <p><strong>1. Constantly clearing throat</strong></p> <p>Ahem, ahem! Someone who constantly clears his or her throat could have a nose and sinuses problem, called chronic rhinitis, which results in excessive mucus production. It occurs when an irritant (typically allergies) inflames the membrane in the upper respiratory tract. People with year-round allergies, like house dust mites, may have a constant build-up of mucus in their throat, which leads to that non-stop clearing. It can usually be treated with a few weeks of a strong anti-allergy medication. Another potential cause: acid reflux. When acid passes from the stomach upward into the esophagus, the throat swells. Mucus sticks to the swollen tissues, causing hoarseness and a cough. If over-the-counter heartburn medications don't resolve the issue, a doctor may be able to prescribe stronger treatment.</p> <p><strong>2. Always saying, "you know" or "like"</strong></p> <p>There's always, like, one not-so-brilliant movie character who talks this way, you know? Don't write off their intelligence: Research suggests that those who often say "like" and "you know" may be especially thoughtful. In a study published in the Journal of Language and Social Psychology, researchers examined more than 260 transcriptions of normal conversations. They discovered people who used these "filler words" tend to be more conscientious than people who don't. Researchers say discourse markers imply a desire to thoughtfully share opinions with others, and may give someone more time to phrase something just right.</p> <p><strong>3. Oversharing on Facebook</strong></p> <p>A minute into checking social media, you find out your high school lab partner is potty training her 6-week-old Labradoodle puppy ... unsuccessfully. You may roll your eyes when you get too much detail, but these oversharers reap a neurological reward when they spill their TMI news. Harvard researchers used an MRI machine to track 212 participants' brain activity as they answered questions about their own opinions or others' opinions. Researchers found that talking about oneself activates brain regions associated with reward (the nucleus accumbens and the ventral tegmental area). Only about 60 percent of real-life conversations typically revolve around an individual's personal thoughts and stories, compared to 80 percent of social media communication.</p> <p><strong>4. Biting nails</strong></p> <p>Distracted by a pal who just can't sit still? Perfectionism may be an underlying cause of nail biting, skin picking, or eyelash pulling, according to a study published in the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry. Researchers asked 48 participants questions about how often they experienced certain emotions, including boredom, anger, and anxiety, and put them in situations meant to trigger feelings such as boredom or relaxation. People with fidgety habits reported greater urges to pick at themselves when bored compared to when in relaxing scenarios. Researchers say perfectionists are more likely than others to become bored easily, and that behaviors like picking at nails deliver a form of reward in unsatisfying situations.</p> <p><strong>5. Complaining about ailments</strong></p> <p>It may be tiresome to comfort a hypochondriac (they have a sore stomach on Monday, a swollen lymph node on Tuesday, an achy back on Wednesday) but your pal could truly believe these abnormalities are serious. This condition may be a sign of what medical experts call illness anxiety disorder (IAD), which involves excessive worry about contracting a serious illness even when no (or only mild) symptoms are present. Even doctors usually cannot calm an affected person's fears. Though it's uncertain what causes IAD, people with major life stress, a history of childhood abuse, or another mental disorder such as depression are at higher risk. The disorder typically appears between the ages of 25 to 35; therapy and certain antidepressant or antianxiety medications may help treat IAD.</p> <p><strong>6. An ear-shattering sneeze</strong></p> <p>Know someone with a trumpeting sneeze? Blame their anatomy. Irritants, such as bright light or an allergen, stimulate the nasal cavity's trigeminal nerve and trigger a coordinated reflex from the diaphragm to the brain. Many different muscles are involved in building the pressure needed to expel the irritant via a sneeze. Individual differences in anatomy such as abdominal strength, trachea size, and lung volume may cause some sneezers to be especially loud; others may naturally use more muscles in sneezing. Suspect this is you? When you feel a sneeze coming, put your index finger at the base of your nose and slightly push up. This will reduce the severity of a sneeze, or perhaps even completely suppress it.</p> <p><strong>7. Aggressive driving</strong></p> <p>Road ragers may be prone to making themselves highly visible in other ways, too. In a Colorado State University study, researchers found that drivers of cars with window decals, personalized license plates, and bumper stickers are far more likely that those without personalized cars to use their vehicles to express rage, such as by tailgating or honking. Researchers say both road rage and car markers are signs of territorialism, and that the more markers a car has, the more aggressively someone drives when provoked. The effect remained whether the messages were, for example, "Visualize World Peace," or "My Kid Beat Up Your Honor Student." Territorial people see a car as an extension of themselves, and have a difficult time viewing public property differently from private property ("our road" is "my road" in their minds.)</p> <p><em>Written by Kelsey Kloss. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/think-your-sex-life-over-after-40-hardly"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a><span> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"></a></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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