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Famous ‘Napalm Girl’ receives final burns treatment

<p dir="ltr">The woman known around the globe as “Napalm Girl” has received her final round of treatment for the burns she received as a child when her village in Vietnam was hit by a napalm bomb.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kim Phuc was just nine years old when South Vietnamese planes dropped the bomb on the village of Trảng Bàng in 1972 and she was photographed running naked from her home, covered in third-degree burns after her clothes caught on fire.</p> <p dir="ltr">The iconic photo, taken by Vietnamese-American photographer Nick Ut before he rushed Ms Phuc to a hospital, won a Pulitzer Prize and became a symbol of the awful consequences of war.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Phuc, who has since become a Canadian citizen, has lived with the pain and scars from the attack ever since.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-592e9620-7fff-cb30-c831-53f262c58d99"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">On Tuesday, she underwent a 12-hour medical procedure in Miami, with local media reporting it was the final course of laser therapy for her scars.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/07/kim-phuc1.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Kim Phuc underwent the last of her laser therapy treatments for the burns across her body, 50 years after she received them. Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Now 59, Ms Phuc also reunited with Mr Ut and recalled the distressing moment when they first met.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I heard the noise, bup-bup bup-bup, and then suddenly there was fire everywhere around me and I saw the fire all over my arm,” Ms Phuc said of the moment the bomb landed, per NBC 6 South Florida.</p> <p dir="ltr">“[Ut] told me after he took my pic that he saw me burned so severely, he put down his camera and he rushed me to [the] nearest hospital.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Ut also recalled how terribly injured Ms Phuc was.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I saw her burning, her body burning so badly,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">But when he took her to a local hospital, staff initially refused to treat her and told him to take her to another hospital two hours away.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I get upset, I hold my media pass, I say, ‘I’m media, if she dies, my picture’s on the front page of every newspaper tomorrow’ … they took her right away inside,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">During her decades-long recovery, Dr Jill Waibel has been helping her, using laser therapy to heal and remove scar tissue.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-f7f833b3-7fff-f32a-9f73-40919640df43"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“It used to be that everyone with an injury like Kim’s would pass away and so we are blessed now that we can keep people alive but we really have to help them thrive and live,” Dr Waibel said.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CfR-zFYPGjV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CfR-zFYPGjV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Nick Ut (@utnicky)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Ms Phuc now lives in Toronto and is the founder of the Kim Foundation International, which provides aid to child victims of war.</p> <p dir="ltr">On the 50th anniversary of the attack, Ms Phuc penned an essay for <em><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/06/opinion/kim-phuc-vietnam-napalm-girl-photograph.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The New York Times</a></em>, revealing she hated the photo for a long time as she struggled to heal amid the photo’s growing popularity.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You don’t grow out of the scars, physically or mentally,” she wrote. “I am grateful now for the power of that photograph of me as a 9-year-old, as I am of the journey I have taken as a person.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m proud that, in time, I have become a symbol of peace. It took me a long time to embrace that as a person. I can say, 50 years later, that I’m glad Nick captured that moment, even with all the difficulties that image created for me.</p> <p dir="ltr">“That picture will always serve as a reminder of the unspeakable evil of which humanity is capable. Still, I believe that peace, love, hope and forgiveness will always be more powerful than any kind of weapon.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-800ccc89-7fff-32a8-334c-fe72a34f8c93"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Nick Ut / Canapress</em></p>

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How to use reminiscing as a way of moving your health forward

<p>Whenever people think about moving their health forward, it’s not uncommon for them to do so by thinking about how physically active they are. And that’s good! Thinking seriously about the level and frequency of physical activity is worthwhile because it’s hugely important for healthy ageing.</p> <p>But sometimes people struggle to find forms of physical activity that they really enjoy and feel excited about pursuing. They might have the will but lack the ideas.</p> <p>Then, when people are a bit older, the issue becomes more physical. Again, they might have the will, but there might be challenges posed by injury or illness.   </p> <p>The more I’ve researched the science of physical activity and healthy ageing, the more convinced I’ve become that memory has an important part to play in enhancing our physical and mental health. Let me explain…</p> <p><strong>Our physical activities stay with us</strong></p> <p>It has long been known that some of our strongest and most positive memories are those related to sport and recreation experiences. Why? Because they tend to be multi-sensory in nature – involving sight, sound, and touch – which gives them a stronger memory trace. They also tend to be linked to exciting activities and events, which make them easier to retrieve.  </p> <p>Recently, health care professionals have been able to make good use of such memories, especially for people living with dementia. As dementia affects short-term memory more than long-term memory, it is still possible to recall and relive experiences that are long past…particularly sports-based memories.</p> <p><strong>Back to the footy</strong></p> <p>The power of such memories was recently studied for 16 older adults living with dementia. The researchers wanted to know if recalling and reliving past sporting experiences could positively impact residents’ quality of life and social functioning.</p> <p>It was found they could. Over 3 weeks, the residents met twice a week (for 60-minutes) to recall and share memoires of supporting their local football team. As a result of sharing their stories, the residents became more animated, spoke more fluently, showed more engaged social behaviours, and reported an improved quality of life.    </p> <p>Whilst further research is being conducted, reminiscence therapy appears to be a simple, cost-effective way to enhance the life experience of older adults.</p> <p><strong>Looking backwards to look forwards</strong></p> <p>Reminiscing on the past can be helpful in other ways too. Think about people in their 30s, 40s and 50s who are finding it difficult to establish a regular pattern of physical activity and exercise. This is a common problem, a part of which can be identifying enjoyable forms of physical activity…things people will feel motivated to do. </p> <p>Here’s where reminiscence can also prove to be useful. I recently interviewed five adults in their 40s and 50s about their return to physical activity and exercise. In each case, many of their happiest and most vivid memories involved the physical pursuits of their youth. As it turned out, these early experiences were also important for inspiring an improvement in their health through an increase in physically activity. </p> <p>This makes personal memories a great place to start. Thinking back to earlier times and the things we used to love doing. But not just thinking about it…doing things that help to bring those experiences to life a bit. Finding old photos, watching videos, looking at memorabilia, and/or meeting up and talking to old teammates and friends.</p> <p><strong>Reminiscence as a pathway to better health </strong></p> <p>Reminiscing in this way has the potential to inspire health change. It can help to generate ideas about how we might get moving and keep moving. Whilst that might involve doing something ‘old’ (a physical pursuit we’ve enjoyed in the past), it might also involve doing something we’ve never, ever tried before (and always wanted to try).</p> <p>Using our ability to remember and reminisce is helpful for motivation. By generating some inspiration from within ourselves, it can provide a natural source of energy that helps us out of bed in the morning and get us out the door, without needing to think about it too much!   </p> <p><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/06/spence-book.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p><em>Image: Supplied</em></p> <p><em><span lang="EN-US">Dr Gordon Spence, author of Get Moving. Keep Moving, is a highly sought-after speaker, coach, educator and author who helps clients to live well and perform well. A psychologist and exercise scientist, Gordon’s areas of expertise are sustainable performance and healthy ageing, with a particular interest in people returning to exercise in mid-life. For more information visit </span><a href="http://www.healthyageingproject.com/"><span lang="EN-US">www.healthyageingproject.com</span></a></em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Rare personal message from Prince William and Kate for Dame Deborah

<p>Prince William and Kate have shared a heart-warming personal message on Twitter <a href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/news/news/vale-dame-deborah" target="_blank" rel="noopener">following the death</a> of cancer campaigner Dame Deborah James.</p> <p>"We are so sad to hear the heartbreaking news about Dame Deborah, our thoughts are with her children, her family and her loved ones. Deborah was an inspirational and unfalteringly brave woman whose legacy will live on. W &amp; C"</p> <p>The note was signed off with the couple's initials, marking that it was personally written by William and Catherine.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">We are so sad to hear the heartbreaking news about Dame Deborah. Our thoughts are with her children, her family and her loved ones. </p> <p>Deborah was an inspirational and unfalteringly brave woman whose legacy will live on. W &amp; C</p> <p>— The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (@KensingtonRoyal) <a href="https://twitter.com/KensingtonRoyal/status/1542069827971551234?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 29, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p>Deborah James, popular British media personality, has lost her battle with bowel cancer, dying at the age of 40.</p> <p>The mother-of-two and podcaster who raised millions of dollars for charity, "passed away peacefully" at home where she had been receiving hospice care, her family has announced.</p> <p>She received huge attention for detailing her five-year fight with terminal bowel cancer on the popular BBC podcast You, Me and the Big C.</p> <p>She stepped away from her career as a deputy headteacher and began blogging about her diagnosis under the name Bowel Babe in 2017.</p> <p>Dame Deborah went on to become a columnist for The Sun and released a book, F**k You Cancer: How to Face the Big C, Live Your Life and Still Be Yourself.</p> <p>Her fundraiser, the Bowelbabe Fund, has seen more than $12 million raised for bowel cancer. Soon after the fund's launch, Dame Deborah received a damehood from the Queen with Prince William personally delivering the honour at her parents' home.</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge praised her fundraising achievement saying in a tweet: "Every now and then, someone captures the heart of the nation with their zest for life &amp; tenacious desire to give back to society. @bowelbabe is one of those special people."</p> <p>In a statement shared, Dame Deborah's family said: "We are deeply saddened to announce the death of Dame Deborah James; the most amazing wife, daughter, sister, mummy. Deborah passed away peacefully, surrounded by her family.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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Moral injury: what happens when exhausted health workers can no longer provide the care they want for their patients

<p>Healthcare workers in New Zealand already face life-and-death decisions daily. But as multiple winter illnesses add pressure to a system already stretched by COVID, staff now also have to deal with <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/local-democracy-reporting/300534812/covid19-union-and-frontline-worker-say-staff-at-middlemore-hospital-facing-increasing-abuse" target="_blank" rel="noopener">daily abuse</a>, acute <a href="https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2022/05/christchurch-hospital-cancels-surgeries-as-it-hits-112-pct-capacity.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">staff shortages</a> and <a href="https://www.1news.co.nz/2022/06/17/dhb-clashes-with-union-over-stretched-palmerston-north-ed/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">unsafe working conditions</a>. At times, they cannot provide the care they would like for their patients.</p> <p>The impact on health workers is often described as <a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/rotorua-daily-post/news/great-minds-health-workers-on-covid-19-frontlines-burnt-and-bled-by-two-years-of-virus/T7JXOXGXEKKCICUNOMUJYT4QWM/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">stress and burnout</a>. The consequences of this prolonged pressure can be seen in the number of <a href="https://www.nzdoctor.co.nz/article/undoctored/acem-welcomes-111b-health-nz-budget-urges-fixes-health-workforce-crisis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">doctors</a>, <a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/nursing-shortage-nurses-broken-while-sector-faces-thousands-of-vacancies/L7NUXOPG4AB472OKXOH5QJSUMU/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">nurses</a> and other <a href="https://capsulenz.com/be/therapist-shortage-nz/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">health professionals</a> leaving their jobs for overseas positions and the private sector, or being lost to their professions completely.</p> <p>Many of these healthcare workers may well be suffering from a more serious form of psychological distress than burnout: moral injury.</p> <p><a href="https://www.phoenixaustralia.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Moral-Stress-Healthcare-Workers-COVID-19-Guide-to-Moral-Injury.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Moral injury</a> refers to the psychological, social and spiritual impact of events on a person who holds strong values (such as caring for patients) and operates in high-stakes situations (hospital emergency care), but has to act in a way inconsistent with those values.</p> <p>Examples include having to turn patients away despite them being in pain or discomfort; being unable to provide adequate care due to staff shortages; having to care for a dying patient isolated from their loved ones while wearing full protective gear.</p> <p>Symptoms of moral injury can include strong feelings of guilt and shame (about not being able to uphold healthcare values, for example) as well as high levels of anger and contempt towards the system that prevents proper care.</p> <p>High levels of self-criticism, loss of trust in people and organisations and a weakening of personal relationships are further <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpsy/article/PIIS2215-0366(21)00113-9/fulltext" target="_blank" rel="noopener">symptoms</a> of moral injury.</p> <p>It can be viewed as a <a href="https://www.afta.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Physicians-aren%E2%80%99t-%E2%80%98burning-out.%E2%80%99-They%E2%80%99re-suffering-from-moral-injury..pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">more severe form of burnout</a>. But while burnout can happen in most workplaces, moral injury requires the three core components listed above.</p> <p><strong>From war to the operating table</strong></p> <p>The term moral injury arose in <a href="https://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/treat/cooccurring/moral_injury.asp" target="_blank" rel="noopener">military psychology</a> to refer to situations where, for example, soldiers were unable to intervene to save lives in case they risked breaching the rules of engagement. More recently, the term has been adapted to apply to healthcare.</p> <p>Viewing the experiences of health workers through this lens can help us understand why they may experience a seesawing emotional state and the confusing conflict of simultaneously wanting to be at work while wishing they were anywhere but.</p> <p>For healthcare workers, understanding the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6752815/#:%7E:text=Over%20time%2C%20these%20repetitive%20insults,is%20in%20some%20way%20deficient" target="_blank" rel="noopener">concept of moral injury</a> may help reframe it as something that is happening to them rather than because they don’t have the skills to cope. The latter can sometimes be a mistaken implication of the term burnout.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/471254/original/file-20220627-22-u7c2tg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/471254/original/file-20220627-22-u7c2tg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=600&h=400&fit=crop&dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/471254/original/file-20220627-22-u7c2tg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=30&auto=format&w=600&h=400&fit=crop&dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/471254/original/file-20220627-22-u7c2tg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=15&auto=format&w=600&h=400&fit=crop&dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/471254/original/file-20220627-22-u7c2tg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&h=503&fit=crop&dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/471254/original/file-20220627-22-u7c2tg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=30&auto=format&w=754&h=503&fit=crop&dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/471254/original/file-20220627-22-u7c2tg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=15&auto=format&w=754&h=503&fit=crop&dpr=3 2262w" alt="Exhausted nurse" /><figcaption><span class="caption">Staff shortages can take health workers beyond exhaustion and burnout.</span> <span class="attribution">Getty Images</span></figcaption></figure> <p>While healthcare workers are largely at the mercy of the organisations they work for, there are some steps individuals can take to alleviate moral injury. Firstly, simply recognising they may be suffering from this condition can reduce confusion and validate their experiences.</p> <p>Secondly, reconnecting back to an individual’s values and beliefs can help refocus and re-energise, at least temporarily. Reminding themselves why they got into this job in the first place is a useful place to start.</p> <p><strong>Organisational responses</strong></p> <p>Organisations and businesses must play a lead role in preventing and treating moral injury. Many of the factors leading to it (lack of resources or staff, a pandemic or peak flu season) are outside the control of individuals.</p> <p>Most modern businesses will be aware they have a legal responsibility under the 2015 <a href="https://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2015/0070/latest/DLM5976660.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Health and Safety at Work Act</a> to look after their employees’ mental and physical well-being.</p> <p>At a high level, organisations can advocate for systemic change and increases in funding and resourcing, where needed. But these higher-level changes take time to achieve. In the meantime, it is important healthcare workers are protected and supported.</p> <p>Broad steps an organisation can take to prevent or reduce moral injury include removing the burden of difficult ethical decisions from frontline workers and instead adopting evidence-based policies to guide an organisation-wide response. Where possible, rotating staff between high and low-stress environments may help.</p> <p>Providing funding for workers to access professional psychological supervision is another practical step businesses can consider. At a team level, it can be helpful to have leaders who are visible, validating and can help make sense of the moral conflict. Leaders can also play a role in keeping alive professional values and modelling their own struggles with the situation.</p> <p>The general public also has a role to play in supporting healthcare workers. Any steps we can take to protect our own health and thereby reduce pressure on the system can have a cumulative effect on the well-being of doctors, nurses and allied health clinicians. The health of our nation rests with those who work in this field and it is in all our interest that their health is protected and prioritised.<img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/185485/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/dougal-sutherland-747623" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Dougal Sutherland</a>, Clinical Psychologist, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/te-herenga-waka-victoria-university-of-wellington-1200" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/moral-injury-what-happens-when-exhausted-health-workers-can-no-longer-provide-the-care-they-want-for-their-patients-185485" target="_blank" rel="noopener">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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How nostalgic, happy thoughts make you healthier

<h2>Longing for the past can improve your health in a number of surprising ways</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">“Nostalgia has been shown to counteract loneliness, boredom and anxiety,” John Tierney wrote in a recent New York Times article. “It makes people more generous to strangers and tolerant of outsiders. Couples feel closer and look happier when they’re sharing nostalgic memories.” It may even make you literally warmer: feelings of nostalgia are more common on cold days, and people in cool rooms are more likely to reminisce than those in warmer ones, research shows. Why? It might be evolutionary: “If you can recruit a memory to maintain physiological comfort, it could contribute to survival by making you look for food and shelter that much longer,” researcher, Dr Tim Wildschut, told the Times. Here’s how to leverage your happy thoughts and warm memories to make yourself healthier.</p> <h2>Carve out time for reminiscing</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Some 79 per cent of people naturally experience nostalgia at least once a week, research indicates, but you don’t have to wait for a chance memory to pop into your mind. Loyola University researchers discovered that thinking of good memories for just 20 minutes a day can make people more cheerful than they felt the week before, reported Psychology Today.  </p> <h2>Don’t write down your memories</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">To reap the full benefits of nostalgia, it seems better to replay happy thoughts in your mind rather than in a journal. When researchers at the University of California at Riverside asked people to either think about or write down a blissful life experience, those who simply thought about it experienced a greater boost in wellbeing, according to Psychology Today. “There’s a magic and mystery in positive events,” study author and psychologist, Dr Sonja Lyubomirsky, told the magazine. Analysing the details – by writing them down – may remove some of that wonder.</p> <h2>Focus on sound and smell to get there faster</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Listening to music is a quick, easy way to induce nostalgia; researchers often use it in their studies, according to the Times. Think about the songs on the radio when you were growing up, for example. Scents, too, are powerful tools to unlock memories. Smells get to our brain faster than sights or sounds – particularly, to our emotional centres – according to neurologist, Dr Alan Hirsch.</p> <h2>Try not to compare the past to the present</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Of course, not all old memories are positive ones; and looking back to happier times may make you feel anxious about where you are today. Recalling your academic successes in high school and university, for example, may make you feel like a has-been in your current job. It’s challenging, but experts recommend trying to focus on the memories alone, without comparing them to other events.</p> <h2>Think back with others</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Reminiscing with friends and family strengthens close relationships, says Psychology Today. Look at old photos and videos during holiday get-togethers; reconnect with former school friends on social networks and revisit your shared memories.</p> <h2>Make experiences memorable</h2> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;">Nostalgia researcher, Dr Constantine Sedikides, calls this strategy “anticipatory nostalgia” – living your life cultivating experiences you’ll want to savour down the road. This ties into research that spending money on experiences, rather than things, tends to make people happier. So splurging on the hot-air balloon ride will go farther than the take-home souvenir.</p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;"><em><strong>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/how-nostalgic-happy-thoughts-make-you-healthier" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader’s Digest</a>.</strong></em></p> <p style="font-size: medium; font-weight: 400;"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Writer's hilarious yet emotional obituary for her mother brings the internet to tears

<p>A writer has brought the internet to tears over her hilarious yet poignant obituary for her late mother. </p> <p>Caity Weaver, a journalist for the New York Times, posted the heartfelt tribute to her late mother, Dr. Maureen Brennan-Weaver, who passed away on June 14th in her hometown in Pennsylvania. </p> <p>Caity's post has since gone viral, in which she described her late mother as "riotously funny" and "pathologically generous".</p> <p>In the tribute to her mother, Caity described her amazing ability to find a good deal and how she would use this skill to treat her loved ones. </p> <p>"Maureen was six-foot and loved strays of all species," Caity wrote. "She could outthink any opponent, was riotously funny and pathologically generous."</p> <p>"If you mentioned a thing you liked, she'd get you 11 when she found them at a great price."</p> <p>"Maureen's true joys were helping people, and anyone anywhere saving money. She briefly employed a skilled housekeeper but found her a more lucrative job."</p> <p>"She clipped coupons for diapers and left them in the grocery store baby aisle. Decades ago, she acquired a huge box of toothbrushes for pennies on the dollar and has kept her family in toothbrushes ever since."</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Got the worst news I’ve ever gotten last week. My mom and I made each other cry laughing all the time. I hate to think about all the deals she’s going to miss out on. I hope she guides me to the best sales forever. <a href="https://t.co/dZoWdIu86C">pic.twitter.com/dZoWdIu86C</a></p> <p>— Caity Weaver (@caityweaver) <a href="https://twitter.com/caityweaver/status/1539735766863069190?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 22, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p>Caity spoke of her mother's fearlessness, saying, "Maureen had a cackle that crashed through rooms. She died before discovering what, if anything, she was afraid of."</p> <p>In the obit, which has been retweeted more than 32,000 times, the writer joked that her mum's death "shocked all who loved her" since she was "ahead of schedule for the first time in her life."</p> <p>She added that Maureen is remembered by her husband of 33 years, John, who she provided "selfless care" throughout his "prolonged infirmity."</p> <p>Caity went on to explain that Maureen, who worked as a podiatrist, was "treasured" by her patients, who often "showered her with homemade treats."</p> <p>"Dr. Brennan-Weaver could not stop herself from buying shoes for patients if she spotted just what they needed while shopping. She categorically did not do house calls, except for patients she 'really liked'."</p> <p>Caity concluded the tribute with an emotional statement about her mother, saying, "No amount of time with the astonishing Maureen would have been enough for her family and friends, though she gave us enough toothbrushes and memories to last several lifetimes. Oh, how we loved her!"</p> <p>Many users were moved by Caity's tribute to her mother, with readers saying it made them "laugh and cry at the same time".</p> <p>One person praised her obituary and offered condolences, saying, "I’m sorry for your loss, but it seems we are to be the beneficiary of a number of her fine qualities for some years to come."</p> <p>Another person said, "I can only dream of writing a tribute like this, that captures someone’s exuberance and boundless generosity. I’m so sorry for your loss. She sounds simply wonderful."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Twitter</em></p>

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Heartbroken husband speaks after honeymoon tragedy

<p>Grief stricken and heart-broken, the husband of Marina Morgan has shared an emotional tribute following the death of his new wife.</p> <p>Robbie Morgan was driving the buggy last Monday the 20th of June, when he and his wife of 10 days were involved in the tragic incident.</p> <p>Robbie is believed to have been performing a U-turn when it tipped over, resulting in Marina suffering fatal injuries.</p> <p>The 30-year-old Sydney man took to Facebook over the weekend to share a touching post in memory of his wife.</p> <p>“My heart is broken and my world shattered with the tragic loss of the most beautiful girl in the world.. my angel.. my saint.. my wife Marina Hanna,” he said..</p> <p>“My rock, my partner, my confidant, my angel, my saint, my everything! The world will never be the same…</p> <p>“I will love you forever and ever and EVER!”</p> <p>Meanwhile, Marina’s family have also shared their heartache following the tragic loss.</p> <p>“I will always love you sis. You will always be our angel. We miss you and are shattered,” her brother Mark Hanna posted on Facebook.</p> <p>Her brother-in-law Matthew Morgan paid tribute to the new wife of his brother Robbie Morgan.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CfGU9NDJSlJ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CfGU9NDJSlJ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Matty Morgan (@matty.morgan1)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“May your soul rest in paradise for all of eternity as you watch over us in the heavens above. I love you forever sis.”</p> <p>On Wednesday the 22nd of June, Hamilton Island resort operators issued a fresh statement, saying guests were encouraged to safely use golf buggies.</p> <p>“A number of different registered vehicle types including golf buggies operate to service the Island, all in accordance with Queensland Government road rules and requirements,” they said in a statement.</p> <p>“These are underpinned by our highest priority which is the safety and well-being of our guests, residents and staff.</p> <p>“Golf buggies on Hamilton Island, like other vehicles, are equipped with appropriate safety equipment including seatbelts and rules for operation.</p> <p>“Hamilton Island and Queensland Police enforce these rules and regulations and actively encourage all our guests, residents and staff to adopt a safety-first mindset when operating any vehicle on Hamilton Island."</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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"I ended her life": Brian Laundrie's diary finally released

<p>Sinister details of Gabby Petito’s murder have been revealed in the form of handwritten notes made by her fiance Brian Laundrie. He offered an apology, along with his confession for killing Petito out of ‘mercy’.</p> <p>The notebook – which was recovered from the Florida nature preserve where Laundrie's body was found after the 23-year-old took his own life in October 2021 – has been shared by the Laundrie family’s attorney, Steven Bertolino.</p> <p>“I ended her life,” Laundrie wrote in the notebook, which was recovered near his body, before going on to detail his version of events of the day that Petito died.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Pages of Brian Laundrie’s diary released. On this page Laundrie appears to say he killed <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GabbyPetito?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#GabbyPetito</a> out of mercy…because she had injured herself.<br />The diary doesn’t explain why he didn’t call for help <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/nbc4ny?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#nbc4ny</a> <a href="https://t.co/Dhps2JdEwr">pic.twitter.com/Dhps2JdEwr</a></p> <p>— Pei-Sze Cheng (@PeiSzeCheng4NY) <a href="https://twitter.com/PeiSzeCheng4NY/status/1540418661344808961?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 24, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p>“Rushing back to our car trying to cross the streams… before it got too dark to see… I hear a splash and a scream," the notebook pages read.</p> <p>“When I pulled Gabby out of the water she couldn’t tell me what hurt, she had a small bump on her forehead that eventually got larger.</p> <p>“Her feet hurt, her wrist hurt, but she was freezing, shaking violently.</p> <p>“Gasping in pain, begging for an end to her pain.”</p> <p>Laundrie then describes trying to keep her warm and awake while Petito was in “extreme” pain, but his entries do not explain any effort made to find medical attention.</p> <p>“I don’t know the state of Gabby’s injuries, only that she was in extreme pain.</p> <p>“I ended her life, I thought it was merciful, that it is what she wanted, but I see now all the mistakes I made.”</p> <p>Police encountered the pair during their trip in Moab on August the 12th<br />2021, after reports of domestic violence. The couple were on a cross-country road trip and sharing their adventures on social media.</p> <p>Bertolino said Laundrie flew home to Florida alone on August the 17th, and that Laundrie then returned to Utah six days later to “rejoin Gabby”.</p> <p>On September the 1st, Laundrie drove back to his parents' Florida home, again without Petito. He had been sending text messages from her phone to fool people into believing that she was still alive.</p> <p>Petito’s body was later found on September 19 in Bridger-Teton National Forest in Wyoming, with an autopsy later revealing she had been strangled by someone’s bare hands, and likely died three to four weeks before she was found.</p> <p>The notebook was found in October 2021, along with human remains, a backpack and a revolver, and a month later the remains were identified as Brian Laundrie’s.</p> <p>Bertolino said he met with the FBI in Tampa, along with the Petito family attorney, where personal items belonging to Laundrie and Petito were handed back to their families.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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Dramatic underwater rescue of unconscious swimmer captured in photographs

<p dir="ltr">The dramatic rescue of Team USA swimmer Anita Alvarez has been captured by underwater photographer Oli Scarff in a series of photos that make for a moment-by-moment replay.</p> <p dir="ltr">Alvarez was performing in the artistic swimming solo free final at the 2022 World Aquatics Championship in Budapest when, at the end of her swim, she became unconscious and sank to the bottom of the pool.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-01548cc8-7fff-8bb9-08a0-7e9ed3b7fe5e"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Head coach Andrea Fuentes quickly sprang into action, diving into the pool fully clothed and swimming down to grab Alvarez.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It was a good scare,” Fuentes told Spanish sports newspaper <em>Macra</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I had to dive in because the lifeguards didn’t do it. I was scared because I could see she wasn’t breathing.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-c768b9ad-7fff-b3c4-cf03-c7d3e2e2b8ae"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Fuentes then brought Alvarez to the pool’s surface, where another swimmer helped take the unconscious athlete to the edge of the pool.</p> <p dir="ltr">Alvarez was lifted out of the water and onto a stretcher so she could receive medical attention.</p> <p dir="ltr">In a statement, Fuentes confirmed that Alvarez had a medical emergency but that “all is okay”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The doctors checked all vitals and everything is normal: heart rate, oxygen, sugar levels, blood pressure, etc … all is okay,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We sometimes forget that this happens in other high-endurance sports.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We have seen images where some athletes don’t make it to the finish line and others help them to get there.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Our sport is no different than others, just in a pool, we push through limits and sometimes we find them.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Anita feels good now and the doctors also say she is okay. Tomorrow she will rest all day and will decide with the doctor if she can swim free team finals or not. Thank you for all your well wishes for Anita.”</p> <p dir="ltr">This isn’t the first time Alvarez has experienced a medical emergency in the pool, nor is it the first time Fuentes has saved her.</p> <p dir="ltr">Alvarez briefly lost consciousness at the end of a routine while at an Olympic qualification event in Barcelona last June, where Fuentes dove in to rescue her.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 25-year-old came seventh in Wednesday’s competition with a score of 87.6333, with Japan’s Yukiko Inui claiming victory having scored 95.3667.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-1d8743d9-7fff-d5de-90ba-85bf48e13c84"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Oli Scarff (Getty Images)</em></p>

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Model dies after battle with mental illness

<p dir="ltr">Model and influencer Niece Waidhofer has died following a long battle with mental illness, something she was very vocal about to her 4.2 million followers.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 31-year-old was found dead in her home in Katy, outside of Houston, in May 2022 after a concerned family member raised the alarm. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Sadly, Niece took her own life after a long battle with mental health issues,” a family member told TMZ.</p> <p dir="ltr">“She was very open with her followers about her struggles, even wanting to help followers who also suffered.”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cbht9HduDhj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cbht9HduDhj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Niece Waidhofer (@niecewaidhofer)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The influencer rose to fame in 2015 after starting the popular 'Roast Me' trend on Reddit and had fans worried after deleting almost all of her Instagram posts except for three. </p> <p dir="ltr">Her final posts include a selfie complimenting her new blonde hair, a video playing with her pet dog, and the engagement photo with her ex. </p> <p dir="ltr">In her Niece’s honour, the family will be creating a non-profit organisation for mental health awareness which looks to give grants into mental illness research. </p> <p dir="ltr">It will be called “Peace from Niece”.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram/TikTok</em></p>

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Meet the women who helped Afghanistan’s women's soccer team escape

<p dir="ltr">When the Taliban took control of Afghanistan in August 2021, a goalkeeper for the country’s female soccer team had to make the decision whether she and her teammates should stay in their home country or leave it and their loved ones behind.</p> <p dir="ltr">Fati, whose name and age have been withheld to protect her family’s identity, played with her teammates for years, representing an Afghanistan where women had more opportunity and freedom - and was free of the Taliban’s rule.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I accepted that Afghanistan was over,” Fati told the <em><a href="https://www.bbc.com/sport/football/61744830" target="_blank" rel="noopener">BBC</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I thought there’s no chance for living, no chance for me to go outside again and fight for my rights. No school, no media, no athletes, nothing. We were like dead bodies in our homes.</p> <p dir="ltr">“For two weeks I never slept. I was 24 hours with my phone, trying to reach out to someone, anybody for help. All day and all night, awake, texting and searching social media.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Fati and her teammates managed to escape, thanks to an invisible, international network of women.</p> <p dir="ltr">Haley Carter, a 37-year-old goalkeeper, former US marine and Afghanistan’s assistant coach from 2016 to 2018, described it as a “little virtual operation running out of WhatsApp”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Never underestimate the power of women with smartphones,” she added.</p> <p dir="ltr">Using WhatsApp and other encrypted messaging apps, Carter was sharing intelligence about the situation in Kabul with other marines and National Security staff in an operation dubbed ‘Digital Dunkirk’.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-be646504-7fff-57a9-37d6-18d21379c571"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">She had been enlisted to help Fati and the team flee by Khalida Popal, a former national team captain who left Afghanistan in 2011 because of death threats over her involvement in the sport, and has lived in Denmark since.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/06/khalida-popal.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Khalida Popal knew time was of the essence for Fati and her teammates, and enlisted the help of Haley Carter to secure their escape. Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p dir="ltr">With time not on their side, Popal knew Fati and her teammates had to act quickly, with their sporting involvements making them particularly vulnerable to Taliban investigations.</p> <p dir="ltr">She told the team to delete their social media accounts, burn their soccer gear and bury their trophies - a decision Fati said was hard to do.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Who wants to burn their jerseys?” she said. “I thought, if I survive, I will make [the achievements] again.”</p> <p dir="ltr">At the same time, Carter was working to get the team onto a military plane out of Afghanistan at the earliest opportunity.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Khalida texted all of us saying, ‘girls, be ready to leave the airport together, just one backpack each’,” Fati recalled.</p> <p dir="ltr">“She said: ‘We can’t tell you that we are even sure that you will go inside the airport. But if you fight, you will survive’.”</p> <p dir="ltr">When it was time to go, Fati carried as little as possible and wrote Carter’s phone number on her arm in case her phone was stolen or confiscated. Carter also told Fati that they should rotate having their phones on to preserve battery life.</p> <p dir="ltr">At the airport, they were among thousands who had congregated with the hope of leaving - but for many, the struggle would be in vain.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If your name was not on a list, or there wasn’t somebody inside the airport coming out to get you, you weren’t going in,” Carter said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So we had to work extra hard to make sure that marine counterparts at the gates had their information to make sure that they could get in.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Carter told Fati to meet “a guy” at the airport’s north gate with a password that would get them in.</p> <p dir="ltr">When they were turned back, Carter had to recalibrate the plan all the way from Houston.</p> <p dir="ltr">Meanwhile, Fati decided she and the players would try again at the south gate - though they would have to get past the two Taliban checkpoints in the way.</p> <p dir="ltr">After being separated from her brother - who was badly beaten - at the first checkpoint and being kicked and hit herself by men with rifles at the second, Popal’s text message gave her the push to keep going forward.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It was a thing that lighted up that darkness,” Fati said. “Suddenly, there was something telling me to get back up and I started again in a strong way.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The team regrouped, taking advantage of a moment when the Taliban guards were distracted to make a dash for Australian soldiers at the south entrance.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There were so many people but we managed to get past the last checkpoint,” Fati said. “We saw the Australian soldiers and shouted phrases like, ‘national team players’, ‘Australia’ and ‘football’.</p> <p dir="ltr">“They looked at our documents and let us through.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Along with some Afghan Paralympians, Fati and her teammates boarded a C-130 military transport plane heading to Australia. </p> <p dir="ltr">“The plane just took off and there was just noise and the fear that we had. Looking around, there were just scared faces,” Fati said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I was thinking, you will never be able to see this beautiful place where you made memories and grew up. It’s your last time.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-993ff729-7fff-85b3-88bc-c37f1809f0a1"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">She sent a photo and message to Carter, reading: “I made it. We made it”.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">“I still can’t get my head around what they’ve been through &amp; what they’ve come from but they just turn up to every session, always have a smile on their face”</p> <p>For <a href="https://twitter.com/gomvfc?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@gomvfc</a> coach Hopkins, working with <a href="https://twitter.com/AfghanWnt?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@AfghanWnt</a>’s reminded him why he got into coaching.<a href="https://t.co/vf0w0B7y8g">https://t.co/vf0w0B7y8g</a> <a href="https://t.co/mT7rIcRrte">pic.twitter.com/mT7rIcRrte</a></p> <p>— Sacha Pisani (@Sachk0) <a href="https://twitter.com/Sachk0/status/1530135643128745985?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 27, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">In February, Fati and her teammates trained together for the first time, after Melbourne Victory provided facilities and coaches. She described the feeling as “amazing” and a source of “new hope” for the team.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve locked those smiles in my memory. And I thought, I’m successful. We will not be lost,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Two months later, they played their first match against a local non-league team, though the backs of their jerseys had no names and just numbers out of concern for the safety of their relatives back home.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though their chances of competing internationally in an official competition requires the backing of the Afghan Football Association and the Taliban, Fati still has hope.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The goals instead will be for us to make the national teams of Australia or the country that we are in. Still we are Afghans and, somehow, we will be the representatives of our nationality,” Fati said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2c8bda40-7fff-9d8b-890a-cbdfe5706f00"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Could this 10 second balance test determine the longevity of your life?

<p>For adults who fall in the older age bracket, being able to balance briefly on one foot may predict how long they’ll live.</p> <p>People who failed the 10-second balance test, which involves standing on one foot were nearly twice as likely to die in the next 10 years, according to a report in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.</p> <p>Unlike aerobic fitness, flexibility and muscle strength, balance tends to be preserved until the sixth decade of life. After that, balance tends to wane quite quickly.</p> <p>Exactly why a simple balance test can predict risk of death is not yet known, said the study’s lead author, Dr Claudio Gil Soares de Araújo.</p> <p>Poor balance and poor muscular fitness can be linked with frailty in older adults. “Aged people falling are in very high risk of major fractures and other related complications,” Araújo wrote.</p> <p>“This may play a role in the higher risk of mortality.”</p> <p>Checking balance on one foot, even for those few seconds, can be valuable way to determine someone’s risk of falling.</p> <p><strong>How does balance predict longevity?</strong></p> <p>To explore whether a balance test might reveal insight into a person’s risk of death from any cause during the next decade, Araújo and his team reexamined data from the 1994 CLINIMEX Exercise cohort study.</p> <p>This study assessed associations between physical fitness, cardiovascular risk factors, and the risk of developing poor health and dying.</p> <p>For the new report, the researchers focused on 1702 participants from ages 51 to 75 with the average age being 61. At their first study checkup, when weight, waist size and measures of body fat were collected.</p> <p>The researchers included only people who could walk steadily in their analysis.</p> <p>At the first checkup, participants were asked to stand on one leg for 10 seconds without holding onto anything to support themselves.</p> <p>The participants were allowed three tries and were asked to place the front of the uplifted foot on the back of the weight bearing leg, while keeping their arms by their sides and their gaze fixed straight ahead.</p> <p>Overall, one in five failed the test with researchers noting inability to pass the test rose with age.</p> <p>In general, those who failed the test were in poorer health than those who passed, with a higher proportion being obese, having cardiovascular disease and unhealthy blood cholesterol levels.</p> <p>Type 2 diabetes was three times more common among people who failed the test as those who passed.</p> <p>After accounting for factors such as age, sex, BMI, history of heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol, the researchers found that the risk of death within 10 years was 1.84-fold higher in participants who failed the balance test.</p> <p>The good news, Araújo said, is “it is never too late to improve balance by specific training. A couple of minutes a day - at home or in a gym could help a lot,” he continued. </p> <p>During a physical, doctors typically check people’s hearts, lungs, cholesterol and blood pressure, but usually don’t measure what shape they’re in. If a doctor can determine if a patient has balance issues a program can be issued to improve overall fitness and wellbeing.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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"Only the good die young": Tragic twist in honeymoon death

<p dir="ltr">The newlywed bride who died in a tragic golf buggy incident on Hamilton Island was due to get married last year but instead it was delayed because of Covid. </p> <p dir="ltr">Marina Hanna, 29, and husband Robbie Morgan were due to get married on July 24, 2021 but because of lockdown and density limits they decided to delay their ceremony. </p> <p dir="ltr">But it wasn't until June 11, 2022, that the loved-up pair were finally able to say their vows in a lavish ceremony at Sydney’s Doltone House.</p> <p dir="ltr">The newlyweds then finally made their way to Queensland’s Hamilton Island for their honeymoon. </p> <p dir="ltr">The pair were travelling on a golf buggy - the main form of transportation on the island on June 20 when Morgan did a U-turn, causing the buggy to tip over.</p> <p dir="ltr">A doctor, off-duty dentist and off-duty firefighter rushed to the scene and desperately performed CPR for 35 minutes on Marina, who unfortunately could not be revived.</p> <p dir="ltr">“(This) is proof that the good die young,” Robbie’s brother Matty said of Marina’s passing.</p> <p dir="ltr">Queensland Police Inspector Anthony Cowan announced in a press conference that Marina was not wearing a seatbelt while in the buggy.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It was just a tragic accident with a golf buggy,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There may have been some inexperience driving those type of vehicles while turning it has rolled on its side and the woman has fallen out and sustained life-threatening injuries.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“It just appears inexperience in driving that type of vehicle, turned too quick and rolled on its side and unfortunately, it has ended up with this result.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It appears there was no seatbelt worn at this point in time; we come back to the Fatal Five but now is not the time to dwell on what they should have done.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Inspector Cowan confirmed that no drugs, alcohol or dangerous driving caused the accident.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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Benji Marshall’s incredible decision for Celebrity Apprentice prize money

<p dir="ltr">After being crowned the winner of <em>Celebrity Apprentice</em> for 2022, Benji Mashall has revealed the extraordinary way he plans to spend his prize money.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/tv/i-didn-t-expect-that-celebrity-apprentice-2022-winner-crowned" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The former football star won</a> after raising $387,105 ($NZD 426,230) in the grand finale - and receiving another $100,000 from Lord Alan Sugar - making for a total of $504,000 ($NZD 554,000) raised for his chosen charity, Souths Cares.</p> <p dir="ltr">But, in an interview with KIIS FM’s Will and Woody show, it was revealed he called the radio hosts - and castmates on the show - shortly after the finale to thank them, though the scene never made it to air.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Something the TV show didn’t show was that Benji called me after the finale - cause I did go back to help him with the final challenge - to thank me for getting so involved in the finale,” Woody Whitelaw explained.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He’s taken $30,000 ($NZD 33,000) out of the money he made, and he’s putting $30,000 in Gotcha4Life.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Gotcha4Life, the charity Woody and co-host Will McMahon chose, aims to prevent suicide through programs and social connections.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-17096d16-7fff-3a29-8f91-5fd2aa200654">It was revealed that Marshall also shared the cash with several of his other castmates, with another $30,000 going to Samantha Jade’s charity Cancer Council Australia, $30,000 to Vince Colosimo’s Dementia Australia and $30,000 to Bronte Campbell’s Carers Australia, per <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/reality-tv/benji-marshalls-incredible-act-with-celebrity-apprentice-prize-money/news-story/64b71506c77ca16f88556704e251e2af" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a></em>.</span></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cea7Ahyh1ks/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cea7Ahyh1ks/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Will and Woody (@willandwoody)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">During the interview, it emerged that Marshall, Whitelaw and McMahon being castmates wasn’t the only thing they had in common - they had all picked the same charity to support too.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Before the show started, Will and I locked in Gotcha4Life as our charity. So all the money we raised was going to go to Gotcha4Lide,” Woody said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Benji was late in replying to the email with what charity he wanted to do, and his first pick was Gotcha4Life.</p> <p dir="ltr">“And Benji, you’ve raised money for an incredible charity in South Cares, and I know that’s really close to your heart … But just to compare for the poor charity of Gotcha4Life, Will and I raised $20,000 and Benji, all up, how much money did you raise?”<br />“$540,000,” Marshall said laughingly.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.rabbitohs.com.au/community/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Souths Cares</a> is closely affiliated with Marshall’s former club, the South Sydney Rabbitohs, and supports disadvantaged and marginalised youth and their families by delivering programs that address people’s education, training, health and employment needs.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-961a3d8c-7fff-6918-e53b-9850dcd30289"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: @benji6marshall (Instagram)</em></p>

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Why scenes of sexual violence should be the exception, not the rule

<p dir="ltr"><em>Content warning: This article discusses sexual assault and rape.</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Portraying traumatic events in films and television shows, whether it is a grisly death or extreme violence, can be difficult to pull off in a way that sends its intended message and doesn’t spark outrage among viewers.</p> <p dir="ltr">With director Del Kathryn Barton’s <em>Blaze </em>confronting audiences during its showing at the 2022 Sydney Film Festival, depicting a graphic rape and murder scene witnessed by 12-year-old titular protagonist Blaze (Julia Savage), questions of when these scenes are needed and whether “very graphic” equals “very impactul” emerge.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Refinery29</em>’s Zahra Campbell-Avenell <a href="https://www.refinery29.com/en-gb/blaze-2022-del-kathryn-barton-film-review" target="_blank" rel="noopener">describes</a> being on the verge of tears for the film’s entirety, while <em>Variety</em>’s Peter Debruge <a href="https://variety.com/2022/film/reviews/blaze-review-1235290438/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">questions</a> whether Barton has “earned” the use of such a graphic scene, suggesting she treats it “as a device” to make a point about a child losing their innocence and navigating trauma.</p> <p dir="ltr">In a talk after <em>Blaze</em>’s premiere at the festival, Barton said it was important for the scene to be authentic, but being authentic to the realities of witnessing sexual assault doesn’t necessarily mean extreme depictions are needed – especially when the film works to address the issue of femicide and abuse.</p> <p dir="ltr">Representing the issues of sexual assualt, gendered violence and the trauma that follows is important, particularly given that, on average, <a href="https://www.ourwatch.org.au/quick-facts/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">one woman is killed by a current or former partner every week in Australia</a>, but the way that we achieve that might not be through depicting the event itself, but what comes after.</p> <p dir="ltr">Amanda Spallaci, an assistant lecturer at the University of Alberta, Canada, <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2076-0752/8/1/8" target="_blank" rel="noopener">writes</a> that portraying the event itself, usually in a way that evokes disgust or empathy, might last while audiences are watching the show or film but “fail to shift popular discourses” by neglecting to focus on effects, such as traumatic memory.</p> <p dir="ltr">She argues that making audiences witness these events fails to challenge common ideas about sexual assault and rape, particularly when it comes to the expectation that the truth of a victim’s story relies on their ability to provide coherent accounts and evidence.</p> <p dir="ltr">In reality, evidence is hard to find, witnesses are uncommon, and cases often come down to testimony from the victim and perpetrator – where beliefs that victims who are emotional during their testimony are more credible, <a href="https://www.aic.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-11/ti611_misconceptions_of_sexual_crimes_against_adult_victims.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">false allegations are common</a>, and that their recollections of the event should be detailed, specific and coherent make it even more difficult for victims to be believed.</p> <p dir="ltr">In comparison, Spallaci says that graphic film depictions mean “the viewer knows that the rape occurred not because they believe the survivor’s testimony, but because they bore witness to the event, adhering to the imperative of truth of the traumatic event and its relationship to the iconic veracity of the (rape scene)”.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s important to recognise that film and TV shows are shifting towards depicting traumatic events with a focus on memory and what comes afterwards, with <em>I May Destroy You</em> and <em>Sharp Objects </em>being good examples.</p> <p dir="ltr">Both shows rely on flashbacks and characters <a href="https://www.lofficielusa.com/film-tv/violence-against-women-on-tv-euphoria-game-of-thrones-unbelievable-cassie-howard-sydney-sweeney-nudity" target="_blank" rel="noopener">piecing together</a> what happened to them in fragments, though they still show scenes of sexual assuault as well.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Blaze </em>also deserves praise for its presentation of the struggles that victims (or, in this case, witnesses) face when giving testimony about sexual assault and murder.</p> <p dir="ltr">It also shows that, in the wake of the #MeToo era, changes to how we tackle sexual assault are sinking through, with depictions moving away from the gratuitous scenes used for shock value in <em>Game of Thrones</em>, but that there’s plenty more work to be done to do right by victims.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-2bfefe15-7fff-1a93-be6d-f03325d45067"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Readers Respond: What was the last thing you cried about?

<p dir="ltr">From grief and loss to movies that tug at the heartstrings, there are plenty of things that move us to shed a tear or two.</p> <p dir="ltr">When we asked you what the last thing you cried about was, your answers were filled with memories of friends, families and pets lost over the years, witnessing tender moments, and even times when a minor inconvenience on a bad day sent you over the edge.</p> <p dir="ltr">Here are some of the heartfelt answers you shared with us.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Charlie Hedges</strong> - When my dear guy departed for his great recliner in the sky. And I expect to cry again this year when my 15 yo pooch crosses the rainbow bridge.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Vivien Anne Metzger </strong>- Tharnicaa's little party to celebrate her 5th birthday, and in freedom - her first-ever out of detention. … Thank goodness for the compassion and mercy of our new government that has allowed a child to experience a 'normal' birthday with her family and be surrounded by people who love, and care about, her.</p> <p dir="ltr">Happy birthday dear Tharnicaa!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Ruth Fletcher</strong> - I cried often during Jubilee celebrations.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Marilyn Reaby</strong> - I cried yesterday when I saw a video of my two young granddaughters welcoming their Dad From USA at the airport in Aus who they hadn't seen for 2 and a half years because of covid.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Sharon Voican</strong> - When my new granddaughter was born 2 weeks ago.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Janet Lilley</strong> - I cry often at sad movies &amp; tv shows, I’m such a sook.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Liz Hardy </strong>- I had had a bad day anyway, and I tripped in the garden and the full watering can I was carrying somehow ended up pouring its contents all over me. It was the last straw and I sat on the lawn, soaking wet and crying my eyes out!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Raelene Pedler </strong>- Last week I watched the movie Anthony Fisher. I hadn't seen it for years, the scene at the end when he meets his family is very touching, it brought a tear to my eye. Great movie.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Richard Taylor</strong> - When a carton of beer rolled over in the back of my ute and one bottle broke.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Susan Hertrick</strong> - God...I cry about everything and anything!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Margaret Inglis </strong>- Questions like this. Memories of people, particularly my husband and family and dogs who are no longer here.</p> <p dir="ltr">To read what else you said, head <a href="https://www.facebook.com/oversixtyNZ/posts/2150425451784733" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-5c3a7683-7fff-f5c6-ea59-10976731d62a"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Grocery do-gooder finally unmasked

<p dir="ltr">A mystery supermarket do-gooder has been unmasked and revealed to be a retired businessman who says he never wants to grow up.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dean Graham, the son of late rich-lister Neil Graham, came forward and identified himself as the one paying for people’s groceries or restaurant bills, which he says he does on a weekly basis around New Zealand, per the <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/mystery-supermarket-angel-paying-for-peoples-groceries-in-canterbury/3FIF2AYHKUZPOUCM5NUGD2MP3Y/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZ Herald</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s just giving people something to put a smile on their face really,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“These days it’s a lot of doom and gloom, and things are tough for a lot of people.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Last month, the 56-year-old left more than $200 cash with a checkout operator at a Lincoln New World store to pay for the groceries of the family behind him in line.</p> <p dir="ltr">Jen Stewart, the mum who received his act of kindness, told Star News she and her young family had just been through a difficult period recovering from Covid and that Graham’s gift left her “speechless”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This person didn’t know how grateful I was on that very week that he would pay for my shopping,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">After using $100 to pay for her groceries, she gave the remainder to another grateful single mum to use for her bill.</p> <p dir="ltr">Graham said he first started his random acts of kindness two years ago, after seeing an elderly couple struggle to pay for their lunch at a local sandwich shop.</p> <p dir="ltr">When he went back to the store two months later, one of the staff memebrs told him the couple had begun doing the same for others.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I thought to myself, ‘If I can do that and change the way people think, I think it’s a good thing’,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I care, and I can help, I do want to change people’s lives.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I just think life is so short, I just want to put it out there to believe we all are for other human beings.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Graham has given even more generous gifts to his friends, including a $100,000 truck for a friend’s birthday and eight of his own motorbikes, but he isn’t worried about his generosity being taken advantage of.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Friends don’t hang around me for that, because they knew me from when I had nothing,” Graham said.</p> <p dir="ltr">He said he started at the bottom of Mainfreight, the trucking company his father co-founded, pinching pennies with flatmates while working as a storeman.</p> <p dir="ltr">His life has been anything but uneventful either, having been married twice, been a solo father of five for eight years, and now living with his partner and in the process of building his very own man cave.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-05599472-7fff-a929-aec1-4e935c8fe6f3"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Dean Graham (Facebook)</em></p>

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Readers Respond: What is the worst gift you’ve ever received?

<p dir="ltr">When it comes to gifts you think the other person put a lot of thought into it. </p> <p dir="ltr">But what about those gifts that you open and think “what on earth is this?” Makes you wonder why they even bought it for you in the first place – or could it even be some form of regift? </p> <p dir="ltr">It got us thinking in the office about some of the worst gifts we’ve received – and they are quite embarrassing, from a set of earrings that sparked an allergic reaction, to receiving a DVD of a wildlife/penguin movie that came free in the Sunday paper. </p> <p dir="ltr">So we decided to ask our readers what is the worst gift they’ve received and the answers are SHOCKING.</p> <p dir="ltr">Check them out below. </p> <p dir="ltr">Debbie Van Den Dungen - Face cream that was 18 years past its use by date. I kid you not.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rory Oldman - I gave my mother a Led Zeppelin album, she played it every day till I was sick of hearing it, just to make a point!</p> <p dir="ltr">Kay Jeffery - Disappointingly, a wedding gift from the people we had given it to six weeks prior to our wedding. I recognised the small tear in one corner of the box it came in. Only I knew the tear in the box was there.</p> <p dir="ltr">Lyn Colefax - One Christmas, my ex-husband presented me with a set of eight vinyl records of Monty Python, taped them, then returned them for a refund. Kid you not.</p> <p dir="ltr">Susan Kingston Shelley - Hubby gave me a cooking appliance for Christmas many years ago which I just pushed aside in disgust….my young sons said “didn’t you like the present from Daddy?”. I asked them if they would like text books for Christmas, they got the idea.</p> <p dir="ltr">Laura Plummer - Popcorn maker from my husband I do not like popcorn but he loved it.</p> <p dir="ltr">Heather Gem - I got regifted wine glasses that had obviously sat in someone's kitchen for years as they had a layer of grease on the box.</p> <p dir="ltr">Gay Sharran Gold - My paternal grandmother would give us one of her cracked plates or cup and saucer every year. I suppose it was better than throwing them in the garbage bin! My sister and I have both laughed about it.</p> <p dir="ltr">John Tymmons - My wife received a bed jacket on unwrapping and found a ticket “ this is your free gift for spending more than $40”. </p> <p dir="ltr">Share your worst gift <a href="https://www.facebook.com/oversixtyNZ/posts/pfbid02UrBSLsmtkwg5hyqCZiSi1ns3UuNAzeLDZDNUdh1cTX3VzzcB96BV9qzp8b4qazG9l" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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Girlboss or businessperson? Should we highlight or downplay gender in our language?

<p>Just hearing the term “girl boss” makes me cringe. But after reading new research findings on gendered language in the workplace, I’m now more open to embracing it.</p> <p>Gender-neutral words such as “businessperson” may not be gender-neutral at all, and may even be reinforcing stereotypes. This is because if gender is not specified, often we fill in the blanks with a masculine default – so suggests new research <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2022.05.001" target="_blank" rel="noopener">published</a> in <em>Trends in Cognitive Sciences</em>.</p> <p>“If anyone suggested saying ‘female politician’ or ‘lady scientist’, I think many would say, ‘No, thank you’,” says co-author of this study, Assistant Professor Stav Atir, from the University of Wisconsin, US. “But wholesale gender neutrality in language is no panacea. Occupation words such as ‘businessperson’ or ‘surgeon’, though technically gender neutral, likely conjure up an image of a man. Likewise, ‘nurse’ (also technically gender neutral) conjures up an image of a woman.”</p> <p>The alternative, using a gender-marking approach, can be useful to highlight women and nonbinary people’s successes in a normally male-dominated field. “In order to spotlight the breakers of glass ceilings and those following in their footsteps, we must mention their gender,” says Atir. “If we discuss the CEO of YouTube, for instance, or the 2020 Nobel laureate in physics, and don’t mention they are women (Susan Wojcicki and Andrea Ghez, respectively), we’d be missing an opportunity to change people’s perceptions of who belongs and who can be successful in these professions.”</p> <p>This is similar to the effect of not “<a href="https://ideas.ted.com/why-saying-i-dont-see-race-at-all-just-makes-racism-worse/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">seeing race</a>”, where ignoring someone’s <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/does-race-count-in-healthcare/">race</a> means we could be failing to recognise and celebrate additional obstacles overcome by underrepresented people.</p> <p>The lack of “gender marking” could have negative effects on nonbinary people too.</p> <div class="newsletter-box"> <div id="wpcf7-f6-p194192-o1" class="wpcf7" dir="ltr" lang="en-US" role="form"> </div> </div> <p>“The gender-neutral businessperson is technically inclusive, but the same male-default thinking that makes women disappear in gender-neutral language likely makes nonbinary people disappear, too.” says Atir. “Even writing about gender in a nonbinary way is difficult using existing linguistic tools.”</p> <p>Unfortunately, gender marking also has its own drawbacks, and potentially reinforce stereotypes between different genders.</p> <p>“Gender marking, then, should not be used thoughtlessly,” says Atir. “Though it can draw attention to professionals whose gender is underrepresented, it can also have ironic consequences, prompting stereotypical thinking and bolstering the perception of women as exotic exceptions to the male rule.”</p> <p><strong>So what do we do?</strong></p> <p>“We might be tempted to throw up our hands and give up the endeavour of using language to express and promote our beliefs,” says Atir. “That would be a mistake.</p> <p>“Language remains one tool in our toolbox for social change, and, unlike some of our other tools, it’s one that we can all use. The key to using this tool effectively is to tailor our language to the context, taking into account our situation-specific goals.”</p> <p><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=194192&amp;title=Girlboss+or+businessperson%3F+Should+we+highlight+or+downplay+gender+in+our+language%3F" width="1" height="1" /></p> <div id="contributors"> <p><em><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/people/girlboss-or-businessperson-should-we-highlight-or-downplay-gender-in-our-language/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/qamariya-nasrullah">Qamariya Nasrullah</a>. Qamariya Nasrullah holds a PhD in evolutionary development from Monash University and an Honours degree in palaeontology from Flinders University.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> </div>

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16 signs your heart palpitations could be something way worse

<h2>What are heart palpitations?</h2> <p>That odd sensation in the middle of your chest can be alarming, but often it’s just a misfire in your heart rhythm. A series of electrical impulses keep your heart pumping; when one of the impulses is mistimed, you’ll feel palpitations in your chest. Most of the time it’s nothing, but they can be a sign of something dangerous. There are numerous types of heart rhythm disorders, says cardiologist, Dr Denice Hodgson-Zingman. “Some of them make the heart beat irregularly, and this can be perceived as a sensation of ‘flip-flops,’” she says.</p> <h2>Symptoms to watch for</h2> <p>If those electrical impulses fire in the wrong order, you can have the sensation of neck fullness and heart pounding, says Dr Hodgson-Zingman. “Other rhythm disorders consist of intermittent single extra beats or runs of beats. Because these extra beats are too fast to allow the heart to pump blood efficiently, it can feel as if your heart is skipping beats.” According to cardiologist, Dr Joe Lau, palpitations may also feel like a fluttering or racing sensation.</p> <p>“Palpitations are a symptom, so there’s no way to generally define what they feel like because, like all symptoms, the way that it feels varies from one patient to another,” says electrophysiologist, Dr Emily Zeitler. She says palpitations require a diagnostic evaluation by your doctor.</p> <h2>Sign: you often have palpitations</h2> <p>“Depending on the exact causes, some patients may have symptoms infrequently, while others may have several continuous episodes a day, sometimes with each episode lasting for several minutes at a time,” Dr Lau says. Chances are, if palpitations are only occurring rarely, you don’t need to rush to the doctor. Less serious causes for palpitations can include stress, anxiety, caffeine, alcohol, illness, or pregnancy, he says.</p> <h2>Sign: you have chest pain</h2> <p>Go right to the emergency room (or call an ambulance) if you get chest pain with palpitations, warns Dr Zeitler. This is a classic sign that your heart’s in serious trouble.</p> <h2>Sign: you’re having trouble catching your breath</h2> <p>In fact, you probably shouldn’t even wait for a doctor’s appointment if you’re experiencing this, as you may be having a cardiac event. When experiencing palpitations, “if you feel like you might pass out or you actually do pass out then you probably need to be seen right away in an urgent care or an emergency department,” she says.</p> <h2>Sign: you passed out</h2> <p>While most people would know something’s wrong with fainting, if your loss of consciousness is preceded by or followed by palpitations, you have even more reason to get medical attention stat, warns Dr Zeitler. This could indicate some sort of cardiac event, she says. Dr Lau says dizziness and leg swelling with palpitations can also signal serious heart trouble.</p> <h2>Sign: you have stroke symptoms</h2> <p>“Any stroke-like symptoms such as asymmetric weakness, facial droop, confusion, word-finding difficulty, or visual changes, would be worrisome,” Dr Hodgson-Zingman says.</p> <h2>Sign: you can’t get through your day</h2> <p>Even if you’re not having very scary symptoms, if you just feel generally terrible or need to stay in bed due to the weird sensations in your chest, you could benefit from treatment, says Dr Zeitler. Although the cause itself may be benign, it needs to be addressed so that you can function. “Atrial fibrillation [AF], a very frequent cause of palpitations, comes from the top chamber of the heart, the atrium, and it causes the bottom chamber of the heart to squeeze in an irregular way; the heart rhythm is chaotic,” Dr Zeitler says. “You don’t have to treat AF, but doctors often do because it makes people feel really bad and we can make people feel better with medications or with procedures such as ablation.”</p> <h2>Sign: you’ve had palpitations for a long time</h2> <p>Another reason palpitations can be dangerous is that they can weaken the heart muscle. “Heart rhythm abnormalities, if they remain untreated and persist for weeks to months, can result in the heart muscle becoming weak, which is called cardiomyopathy,” Dr Hodgson-Zingman says. “Fortunately, this form of cardiomyopathy is often completely reversible once the heart rhythm disorder is corrected.” In addition, even less dangerous conditions like AF can have long-term consequences. “This rhythm is not fatal, but it is associated with a much higher risk of stroke and can cause cardiomyopathy if not recognised and treated,” she says.</p> <h2>Sign: your heart starts beating really fast</h2> <p>Normally, you won’t even notice your heartbeat – but if you do and it’s speeding up, it could mean your blood pressure is dropping. “When blood pressure is low, the heart compensates by beating faster and harder, and that can feel like a pounding or racing heart,” says Dr Hodgson-Zingman. If it’s temporary, it could stem from being startled or experiencing strong emotions. However, see your primary care doctor if it keeps happening.</p> <h2>Sign: you already have heart problems</h2> <p>If you already have a heart condition, any rhythm problems can be more serious. “A person with a weakened heart, or cardiomyopathy, may also be predisposed to have extra ventricular beats [from the bottom chambers of the heart],” explains Dr Lau. “When these heartbeats become frequent and fast, they are termed ‘ventricular tachycardia’, and in a weakened heart that may lead to cardiac arrest.”</p> <h2>Sign: you’ve had a heart attack</h2> <p>Heart muscle damaged from a heart attack will have scarring, and that can also predispose you to the extra contractions of ventricular tachycardia, says Dr Lau. Dr Zeitler says such patients should be treated immediately. “I would be more aggressive in making a diagnosis and treating with either medications, procedures, or with an implantable defibrillator,” she says. Dr Hodgson-Zingman says heart disease patients should be evaluated and monitored for rhythm abnormalities regularly.</p> <h2>Sign: You have other health issues</h2> <p>Besides prior heart disease, other health conditions could make palpitations more dangerous – and even though common heart rhythm problems like atrial fibrillation are generally not serious, in some people they can be. “If the patient has other risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and vascular conditions, their risk of stroke may be high because atrial fibrillation may lead to the formation of blood clots within the heart that can travel to the brain and cause a stroke,” Dr Lau says. If you have other health issues, alert your doctor if you’re having palpitations.</p> <h2>Sign: you’re getting older</h2> <p>Like many conditions, palpitations may be more common, and more serious, in older people. “Another common problem that occurs with age is the wearing out of the normal heart electrical system,” Dr Hodgson-Zingman says. “This can cause pauses or irregularity in the heart rhythm and may be a sign that you need a pacemaker.” Also, some types of heart rhythm disorders are more common as you age. “Atrial fibrillation occurs in like 20 per cent of people over the age of 80, and it’s increasingly common as we get older,” Dr Zeitler says. According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare an estimated five per cent of the population aged 55 and over have AF.</p> <h2>Sign: You have a family history of sudden death</h2> <p>Regardless of your age, if you have a family history of sudden death before age 50 – or a family member with cardiomyopathy – you should pay close attention to any heart palpitations, Dr Hodgson-Zingman says. Talk to your doctor about your symptoms and your family history.</p> <h2>Sign: another condition is triggering the trouble</h2> <p>It’s possible that your palpitations are not directly related to your heart. With anaemia, “the heart has to work extra hard to pump blood to increase cardiac output so that the body tissues can get enough blood, and therefore oxygen,” Dr Lau says. Or with overactive thyroid, for example: “Thyroid hormone can overstimulate the heart and make it beat faster,” he says. A blood workup can help identify these problems when you see your doctor about your palpitations.</p> <h2>Sign: your fitness tracker detects an issue</h2> <p>Use technology to your advantage – your doctor will likely even commend your Apple Watch for detecting an irregular heart rhythm. “Some of those commercially available tools are really good and have been validated scientifically for being accurate at detecting heart rhythm disorders,” Dr Zeitler says. “If somebody comes to me with palpitations and a tracing from their iWatch that is suggestive of a heart rhythm disorder, it’s pretty likely that I’m going to be doing a diagnostic workup.”</p> <h2>Sign: you feel like something’s not right</h2> <p>Dr Zeitler advises following your intuition – if you feel like your heart is beating strangely, it’s best to get it checked out. “It’s one of those situations where you have to listen to your body,” she says. “If it feels like you’re dying or you might die, or you pass out or you have an accident because you’re passing out, those are reasons to seek attention in an emergency room. Otherwise, you can generally wait to see your primary care doctor, which would be a really good first step. Your primary care doctor can decide when the right time is to refer you to a cardiologist or a heart rhythm specialist.”</p> <p><em><strong>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/16-signs-your-heart-palpitations-could-be-something-way-worse" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader’s Digest</a>.</strong></em></p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

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