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True crime: Grace was her name

<p> </p> <p>I have never met Grace Monte. But not a day goes by when I don’t think about her and what her life was like, her few happy moments along with her many difficult ones. I’ve always wondered about the sound of her voice and the kind of life she had once imagined having before she married my father. Her actual life was short and troubled, stuck on a dead-end path with a deadbeat man, with a child to raise and the threat of physical violence a constant presence.</p> <p>In late October 1946, Grace was 24, and my father, Mario Carcaterra, was 29 and already set in his troubled ways. Their daughter, Phyllis, was six. Grace and my father were separated for the third or fourth time – their few friends couldn’t keep track of the on-again, off-again marriage. Grace had taken a small room in a third-rate hotel about 1.6km from the cramped New York apartment they’d shared. She was weary of the unpaid bills, angry outbursts, and painful blows that were inflicted on her and then followed by tearful apologies and pleas for forgiveness. She could no longer tolerate the affairs my father carried on with a string of women – some of them her friends – and the near-daily interference from her mother-in-law, a domineering figure with a hypnotic hold over her son.</p> <p>Grace opened the hotel-room door after my father’s second knock. She stood there in a slip, her dark hair covering one side of her face. He barged in and began the routine that she was all too familiar with: he spoke of a new job coming through, a new place to live, a better life for them. His words had worked in the past but not on this cold autumn morning. Years of lies, abuse, and frustration weighed on Grace, and she wanted so much to be free of them. She lashed out at my father, telling him their marriage was over, the love she’d once felt for him had dissipated, and this time their separation was final.</p> <p>Then Grace said she was in love with another man.</p> <p>The short leash that barely held my father’s temper in check snapped. He tossed her on the bed. They struggled, Grace scratching, kicking, and clawing at him, but my father was much too strong a man. Straddling her thin body, he grabbed a pillow. He saw the fear in his wife’s eyes, pushed the pillow against her face, and held it there, his hands and arms keeping it tight.</p> <p>Within several minutes that must have felt like hours, my father, his body drenched in sweat, removed the pillow and stared down at the woman he loved.</p> <p>Grace Monte was dead.</p> <p>My father was no longer a wayward husband and a gambler. He was no longer a man dominated by his mother. My father was a murderer.</p> <p>I was 14 years old in 1969 when I heard the name Grace Monte. I was in Italy, visiting relatives on Ischia, an island off the coast of Naples. It was there on a beautiful beach in the middle of a sun-soaked morning, the two of us walking along the shore, that my mother shared with me the dark secret she carried in her heart. She was concerned that I was spending too much time in my father’s company and that of his friends. She dreaded the possibility that I would become who he was, a man she lived with and feared. She felt that this spot, far from our Manhattan neighbourhood, was the safest place to tell me the truth about my father.</p> <p>In short order, I learned he had confessed to the crime and was convicted of second-degree murder. He served nearly eight years in prison. Shortly after his release, he married my mother in an arrangement brokered by their families. She was a widow with a son – my half-brother, Anthony. She knew that my father had been in prison but claimed to have not known about the murder until the first night of their honeymoon.</p> <p>I have no choice but to believe her, to be convinced that even in her loneliness, in her desire to offer a better life for her son, she would not have married a wife killer. She said that she felt numb when he told her of the homicide in a manner as relaxed as if he were ordering a late-night meal. From that moment, she knew she had made the gravest mistake of her life.</p> <p>I spent the rest of the day alone and in stunned silence. I sat on that beach until well into nightfall. I had thought I knew my father as well as any son my age could. But after that day, I would never think of him in the same way again.</p> <p>I had, to that point, not been close to my mother. At best, she and I had had a frosty relationship. I couldn’t understand why she harboured such anger toward me. She seemed to resent the fact that I resembled my father. A deeply religious woman, she had few friends, detested my father’s family, and never learned to speak English. Yet she was dependent on an undependable man for all her needs.</p> <p>As I grew older, I came to understand her anger. She had made a horrific choice and was a prisoner in a loveless marriage for 34 years, not to be freed until my father’s death from cancer in 1988. She then moved back to Italy, where she lived, a shell of a once-vibrant woman, until her death in 2004. We spoke regularly during that time, and I sent her money whenever I could. But our relationship had been poisoned from birth.</p> <p>Years passed before I spoke to my father about the murder. But my knowing about it altered our close bond. I no longer felt at ease in his company, and I looked for excuses not to spend time with him. Our laughter-filled days at the racetrack and nights cheering on fighters at Madison Square Garden became distant memories. Instead, I devoted the bulk of my free time to finding out what I could about the woman he had killed and the child he’d left behind.</p> <p>My father’s family shut the door to any questions I had about Grace. To them, her murder was a shame and a horror that they did not want to relive. Over the years, a few pieces of the stained puzzle of my father’s past slipped out. Once, at a relative’s house, I spotted a copy of a true-crime magazine from the 1940s. The cover story was about my father and Grace, with a headline that blared “No Other Man Could Have Her”. And there was the photo that fell out of a family album. I didn’t have to be told whose picture it was; all I needed to see was the reaction of the other people at the table, frantically hiding it. But I had seen enough. She was as beautiful as I’d imagined her to be, her eyes filled with passion and with a smile as bright as any light.</p> <p>I did meet my half-sister once at a wedding reception I attended with my father. I was ten, and she was 24. We were introduced by a cousin who told me she was a family friend, but as drinks were poured, lips became looser. An old woman from the neighbourhood pulled me aside, smiled, pointed at her, and said, “That young girl is your sister. You’re not supposed to know about her, and that’s wrong. But you should know – a brother deserves to know.” I was struck by how much she resembled my father.</p> <p>My most lingering memory of my half-sister occurred at the end of the evening. She and I were sitting in the backseat of a crowded car. With one arm around my shoulders, she leaned down and kissed me gently on the top of my head. “I hope we see each other again,” she whispered.</p> <p>After the car pulled to a stop, she got out and walked away. I wanted to jump out and hug her. I felt a connection to her, a bond. I was later told by relatives that she was prohibited by law from having anything to do with her father or his family. But she and my father secretly kept in contact and, I came to learn, met once or twice a year. Later still, I found out that she had five children and had moved numerous times. Although I want answers, my half-sister has wanted peace. At the very least, I feel I owe her that much.</p> <p>I was a married man with two children of my own by the time I finally spoke to my father about Grace Monte. Although I had tried numerous times to broach the subject, I could never muster the words or the courage. In 1988, he was dying of cancer, in the late stages of a disease that had sapped him of his strength and forced him to direct his anger at his illness instead of at others. He knew that I had been told about his crime, and he wanted to tell me that while he had loved my mother in his own way, Grace Monte was his one true love.</p> <p>His powerful sense of loss, the emptiness and loneliness he had endured in silence for all those years since that horrible day in the hotel room in 1946 – that was his real punishment. “I ask myself one question every day,” my father said. “The same question. Why? Why? Why did I kill her? Why?” He had mourned for Grace every day since her death. My father was a tortured man, sentenced to live and die under the weight of an unforgivable crime.</p> <p>Grace Monte is as much a part of my life as she was a part of my father’s. Even now, I try to learn as much about her as I can. I know she loved to dance and heard Frank Sinatra sing live at the Rustic Cabin in New Jersey. She enjoyed going to the movies and, like my father, preferred James Cagney to Humphrey Bogart. She had a sharp sense of humour and a quick temper, and she doted on her only child. She didn’t care much for religion or neighbourhood gossip. She liked reading, and despite her lack of money, she always looked stylish.</p> <p>Grace Monte is my constant shadow, a woman never known but always seen, a woman I will never be able to forget. I have come to think of her in the same way that one thinks of an old friend long gone or a first love. We are linked – Grace and I – and we always will be. It is a link forged by murder and blood, but it exists, and nothing can sever it.</p> <p>Not now.</p> <p>Not ever.</p> <p><em>Written by Lorenzo Carcaterra. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/survival/Grace-Was-Her-Name"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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5 ways sex could save your life

<p>From burning calories to boosting your immune system, here are 5 ways scientists have found sex can enhance your health.</p> <p><strong>1. Sex protects your heart</strong></p> <p>Men who make love once a month have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease over men who have nookie at least twice a week.</p> <p><strong>2. Passion relieves pain</strong></p> <p>Your pain threshold can leap by up to 74 per cent as you reach orgasm.</p> <p><strong>3. Sex burns calories</strong></p> <p>It’s the equivalent of a 1km walk followed by a climb up two flights of stairs.</p> <p><strong>4. Making love reduces stress</strong></p> <p>Volunteers who’d had intercourse were least stressed, with blood pressure returning to normal faster.</p> <p><strong>5. Intimacy boosts your immune system</strong></p> <p>Having sex once or twice a week may result in higher levels of an antibody called IgA, which protects against infections.</p> <p><em>Written by Susannah Hickling. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/5-ways-sex-could-save-your-life">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine,</em> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Say goodbye to bad breath

<p>If you suffer from bad breath, there are simple things you can do in addition to regularly brushing and flossing your teeth. Don’t forget to brush the top of your tongue with your toothbrush, too, to get rid of food particles and bacteria.</p> <p><strong>1. Drink plenty of water</strong></p> <p>Coffee, beer, wine and whisky leave residues that infiltrate the digestive system, so that for some time afterwards each breath expels traces of them.</p> <p><strong>2. Cloves, fennel and anise seeds</strong></p> <p>These are effective breath fresheners. Mix together a small amount of each and carry a small bag of them so you can chew some after meals – if you don’t mind the rather strong taste.</p> <p><strong>3. Avoid highly spiced foods</strong></p> <p>Foods such as garlic, onions, chillies, salami, strong cheeses and smoked foods recirculate through essential oils left in your mouth.</p> <p><strong>4. Chew a few sprigs of Mint or parsley</strong></p> <p>The chlorophyll in these green plants neutralises odours.</p> <p><strong>5. Try gargling lavender</strong></p> <p>Lavender is an effective mouth-freshener. Put a few drops of lavender essential oil in warm water and gargle.</p> <p><strong>6. Try a sea salt rinse</strong></p> <p>Rinse your mouth with a teaspoon of salt dissolved in warm water after flossing. Salt’s mild antiseptic properties help to get rid of bacteria that cause bad breath.</p> <p><strong>7. Brush with tea-tree oil</strong></p> <p>Use a toothpaste that contains tea-tree oil, a natural disinfectant. If you can’t find it in the pharmacy, look for it in health-food shops.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/Say-Goodbye-to-Bad-Breath">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Is there room for alcohol in your diet if you have diabetes?

<p>Is there room for alcohol in your diet if you have diabetes?</p> <p>Yes, unless your GP has asked you to avoid it for a specific medical reason.</p> <p>But bear a couple of points in mind.</p> <p>Firstly, alcohol lowers blood glucose levels owing to its effect on the liver.</p> <p>Secondly, it is high in kilojoules – almost as high as fat – but with few nutrients.</p> <p>Here are some useful tips in managing alcohol consumption: Pair alcohol with carbohydrate containing food. This acts like a sponge, helping to absorb some of the alcohol and in turn minimising its effect on blood glucose. Likewise, sip your drink slowly to slow absorption. Or add a sugar-free mixer to make it go further.</p> <p>Don’t drink when your blood glucose is low. By taking consistent daily blood glucose readings, you will be in a much better position to make an intelligent decision as to whether to drink or not. If your blood glucose is already low, avoid causing more problems and don’t drink alcohol.</p> <p>Observe the safe drinking limit. The safe alcohol drinking guidelines for people with diabetes are the same as for the entire adult population.</p> <p>The National Health and Medical Research Council recommends not more than four standard alcoholic drinks a day for men and not more than two for women.</p> <p>It is also recommended that you have two alcohol-free days per week. But note that these are the maximum recommended amounts, and drinking less than this is, of course, preferable.</p> <p>One standard unit of alcohol is equal to:</p> <ul> <li>300 ml beer</li> <li>30 ml sherry, aperitif, liqueur or spirit (such as vodka or gin)</li> <li>100 ml wine</li> </ul> <p>Don’t drink every day. Try to space your drinking throughout the week and to have two or three alcohol-free days each week.</p> <p>Alcohol can cause hypoglycaemia (a ‘hypo’, or low blood glucose)</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/diabetes/there-room-alcohol-your-diet-if-you-have-diabetes"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p> </p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Need pain relief? Grab a beer instead of an aspirin

<p>A recent <a href="http://www.jpain.org/article/S1526-5900%2816%2930334-0/fulltext">study</a> from <em>The Journal of Pain</em> found that drinking beer, besides giving you a pleasant buzz, can actually make you feel less physical pain. Study author Trevor Thompson, PhD, told <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/living/3440973/two-pints-of-beer-are-better-than-paracetamol-for-beating-pain-and-cut-agony-by-a-quarter-doctors-claim/">The Sun</a> that alcohol could even be “compared to opioid drugs such as codeine,” and that “the effect is more powerful than paracetamol” (comparable to Tylenol). According to their findings, drinking two beers is more effective at relieving pain than taking painkillers.</p> <p>For their research, the scientists—from London’s Greenwich University, conducted a total of 18 experiments in which 404 participants were given either an alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverage. Next the team administered 13 pain-threshold tests as well as 9 pain intensity ratings. What they found was that alcohol had a significant analgesic effect, meaning it greatly reduced pain. The tipping point was a legal driving blood alcohol content (BAC) limit of .08.</p> <p>Although the effect was clear, the research team couldn’t determine whether the pain relief came from an effect on pain receptors or just maybe a lowering of anxiety, which could lower perception of pain. Regardless of exactly how beer works to ease pain, the researchers did note that people who suffer from chronic pain tend to drink more due to the pain-dulling effect.</p> <p>While a few drinks a day could dull your pain, the study caution that there are numerous unhealthy effects that may not make beer your go-to analgesic (in short: keeping your drinking in check is the way to go). And as with any study, more research is likely needed to confirm the results.</p> <p><em>Written by Chhaya Nene. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/flu/need-pain-relief-grab-beer-instead-aspirin">Reader’s Digest.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V">Here’s our subscription offer.</a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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What to do when someone faints

<p><strong>No matter the cause of fainting</strong>, if someone suddenly appears sweaty or has a vacant look in her eyes, suggest she sit down and bend over so her head is lower than her chest. If she’s willing, lying down is even better. If she starts to fall, try helping her down so she won’t get hurt.</p> <p>Never keep her upright, because this may continue to keep blood from getting to the brain. Once the head is as low as or lower than the heart, the victim should regain consciousness, albeit probably in a groggy state.</p> <p>Have her stay in that position for several minutes until the fainting symptoms subside. Check her pulse and blood pressure if you have a cuff. Make sure they’re normal before she tries to get up. Let her sit for a few minutes, and if there are no symptoms, she could slowly try to stand.</p> <p>If the fainting symptoms recur, help her lower herself again, let the symptoms subside, and slowly try once more.</p> <p>If the person is able to sit up for a few minutes and eventually stand, the cause is likely vasovagal (associated with a temporary fall in blood pressure), especially if you can pinpoint a trigger, such as a fright or the sight of blood. If you’re not sure it’s vasovagal, call emergency services or a doctor.</p> <p><strong>When it may be dangerous</strong></p> <p>Often, the likely reason for the fainting is pretty obvious, such as if the person has lost a lot of blood or is dehydrated from vomiting.</p> <p>However, there are some red flags that indicate that something serious is going on and that expert treatment is needed. These include sudden onset; heart palpitations; passing out while exercising; severe headaches; excruciating back or stomach pain; and double vision.</p> <p><em>Written by Dr. James Hubbard. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/What-to-Do-When-Someone-Faints"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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How to survive anything

<p><strong>1. How to Survive… A Plane Crash </strong></p> <p>The smallest bump feels like an earthquake at 35,000 feet. But plane crash fatalities are low despite high-profile media coverage – and with a few precautions, you can make them a little lower.</p> <p><strong>– Forget first class </strong></p> <p>A Popular Mechanics study of 20 commercial jet crashes with both fatalities and survivors found that passengers seated in the rear cabin (behind the wings) had a 69 per cent chance of survival, compared with just 49 per cent for those in first class. If you fear flying, it’s worth giving up the legroom for peace of mind in the rear cabin.</p> <p><strong>– Brace yourself </strong></p> <p>In a 2015 crash simulation, Boeing found that passengers who both wore their seat belts and assumed a brace position (feet flat, head cradled against their knees or the seat in front of them if possible) were likeliest to survive. Seat-belted fliers who did not brace suffered serious head injuries, and those with no seat belts who also didn’t brace died on impact.</p> <p><strong>– Don’t dally with the mask </strong></p> <p>During a loss of cabin pressure, the drop in oxygen can knock you unconscious in as little as 20 seconds. Listen to the safety advice of your flight attendants: always secure your oxygen mask before helping others. You can’t help if you can’t breathe.</p> <p><strong>2. How to Survive… Being Stranded in the Wilderness</strong></p> <p>As longtime editor of many RD survival stories, Beth Dreher learned a lot about how to stay alive in dire circumstances. Here, she gives us her most important how-tos.</p> <p><strong>– Find water </strong></p> <p>As the subjects of my stories know too well, you can last only about four days without water. To ward off dehydration, search for animals, birds (especially songbirds), insects (especially honeybees) and green vegetation, all of which can indicate that water is nearby. Rock crevices may also hold small caches of rainwater.</p> <p><strong>– Find food </strong></p> <p>You can survive up to three weeks without food, but a growling stomach will set in much sooner. These items are reliably edible: grass, typha (often called cattails or bulrushes), acorns and pine needles. And if forced to eat berries, this rhyme could save your life: “White and yellow, kill a fellow. Purple and blue, good for you.”</p> <p><strong>– Brave an animal ambush </strong></p> <p>We’ve all read about bear and shark attacks. But what about other outdoor ­aggressors? Regardless of species, your best bet is to stand your ground; running can often trigger an animal’s chase mentality, and unless you’re trying to avoid a snake, you’ll likely not run fast enough.</p> <p><strong>– Signal a rescuer </strong></p> <p>The subjects of many of my stories are able to attract the attention of rescuers using a reflection or a signal fire or by making a lot of noise. To increase your chances of being discovered, go to an open area on a hilltop, then use a mirror, CD, belt buckle or water bottle to reflect light towards the pilot of a plane or a helicopter overhead. To create white smoke, which is easy for rescuers to see, add green vegetation to your fire.</p> <p><strong>– Splint a broken bone </strong></p> <p>The people in the stories I read climb cliffs in remote areas, survive plane crashes, fall hundreds of metres without a parachute – and often break bones. One key to their survival? A splint, which can help reduce pain, prevent further damage and allow you to move to a safer place. Basic rule of splinting: if you break a bone, immobilise the joints above and below it; if your joint is injured, immobilise the bones above and below it. Either way, first pad the injury with something soft like a shirt or socks; next, lay out something hard, like a tent pole or a sturdy stick, that extends past either side of the injury; finally, tie it all in place with duct tape, strips of clothing or a padded rope from your camping gear. Don’t tie it so tightly that you lose circulation. One injury is enough.</p> <p><strong>3. How to Survive… A Terrorist Attack</strong></p> <p>Following the Paris attacks of November 2015, the BBC surveyed survival experts and came away with some confidence-building advice.</p> <p><strong>– Get in the habit of casing the room </strong></p> <p>In the attack on the Bataclan concert hall, a security guard led a group of people to safety through a fire exit left of the stage. But there won’t always be a guard to help. Make a point of identifying emergency exits for yourself.</p> <p><strong>– Make yourself smaller </strong></p> <p>“Where there’s cover from sight, there’s cover from gunfire,” advises Ian Reed, a British military instructor and chief executive of the Formative Group security firm. Hard cover such as a concrete wall is the best option. If there’s no cover available, play dead.</p> <p><strong>– ‘Run, hide, tell’ </strong></p> <p>In its report on ‘dynamic lockdowns’, the UK government’s advice is to run if there is a safe route out. If you can’t run, hide. If you escape, immediately tell an official what’s happening. Separate from gathering crowds; always assume there’s going to be a secondary action.</p> <p><strong>– Be a team player </strong></p> <p>It’s the most efficient way for a group to evacuate and avoid jams. Social psychologist Chris Cocking says most people are likely to try to help one another even in extreme situations – such as the group of people who cooperated to escape the Bataclan via a skylight.</p> <p><strong>4. How to Survive… The Doctor’s Needle</strong></p> <p>If you are among the roughly ten per cent of people who fear a loaded syringe, heed these tips:</p> <p><strong>– Fess up </strong></p> <p>Tell your doctor how needles make you feel; she might have you lie down to avert wooziness.</p> <p><strong>– Visit your happy place </strong></p> <p>Close your eyes, breathe deeply and listen to your favourite song on noise-cancelling headphones.</p> <p><strong>– Chew the fear away </strong></p> <p>A piece of gum or sweet treat provides a distraction from the doc.</p> <p><strong>– Skip the coffee </strong></p> <p>Caffeine can make you anxious for up to six hours before your procedure.</p> <p><strong>– Request a security blanket </strong></p> <p>According to dentist Mark Burhenne, wearing a weighted blanket like the ones used during X-rays can make you feel safer in the chair.</p> <p><strong>5. How to Survive… A Lay-off</strong></p> <p>The best thing you can do with your time (besides look for a new job, of course): get moving! According to a happiness study from Canada’s University of Alberta, physical activity increases life satisfaction three times as much as being unemployed reduces it.</p> <p><strong>6. How to Survive… A Divorce</strong></p> <p>“Divorce is always good news, because no good marriage has ever ended in one,” says comedian Louis C.K. This hard truth may not make the emotional process any easier to deal with – but these three actions might.</p> <p><strong>– Write the pain away </strong></p> <p>Relief can be as simple as free-writing for 20 minutes a day, four days in a row, says James W. Pennebaker, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas. “Across multiple studies, people who engage in expressive writing report feeling happier and less negative than they felt before,” he writes in his book, Expressive Writing: Words That Heal. Per one study, “those who kept their traumas secret went to physicians almost 40 per cent more often than those who openly talked about them.”</p> <p><strong>– See it through your kids’ eyes </strong></p> <p>In 2014, Gwyneth Paltrow popularised conscious uncoupling as a byword for a positive, amicable divorce. As doctors Habib Sadeghi and Sherry Sami subsequently wrote on Paltrow’s website, “Children are imitators by nature … If we are to raise a more civilised generation, we must model those behaviours during the good and bad times in our relationships.”</p> <p><strong>– Launch a project (or a rocket) </strong></p> <p>Like the jilted New Zealand woman who launched her wedding ring into space on a homemade rocket, or the blogger who got a book deal from devising ‘101 uses for my ex-wife’s wedding dress’, you, too, can channel hard feelings into hard work.</p> <p><strong>7. How to Survive… An Earworm</strong></p> <p>It takes only one passing toddler to get ‘It’s a Small World (After All)’ stuck in your head and a whole teeth-gnashing day to get it out. There is a better way to cure what scientists call involuntary musical imagery (aka, the common earworm). In fact, there are two ways:</p> <p><strong>– Option one – embrace it. </strong></p> <p>Listen to the song all the way through, at full volume, ideally singing along. The idea is that by confronting your brain with the full version, your earworm will end when the song does.</p> <p><strong>– Option two – replace it. </strong></p> <p>Play a different song all the way through, at full volume, in an attempt to chase away your earworm with something more forgettable. In one UK study, the most popular ‘cure’ song was the national anthem, ‘God Save the Queen’. Try humming your own national anthem and see if it has the same magical, restorative properties.</p> <p><strong>8. How to Survive… An Awkward Conversation</strong></p> <p>Somehow you’re sitting next to the only person at the party you’ve never met, and the mood is definitely uneasy. How do you draw them out?</p> <p><strong>– Open with a compliment </strong></p> <p>The other person will feel a wave of positive feelings, and you will be more likely to remember them later as the person with the ‘nice hat’. A win–win encounter.</p> <p><strong>– Listen like a hostage negotiator </strong></p> <p>A common creed of hostage negotiators is ‘talk to me’ – because they’re taught to spend 80 per cent of their time listening and only 20 per cent speaking. Draw your subject out by talking about what they want to talk about, nodding and asking follow-up questions along the way. The more you make your subject feel understood, the more they will enjoy the conversation.</p> <p><strong>– Have an escape plan </strong></p> <p>The phrases ‘I won’t keep you’ and ‘Give my regards to [mutual acquaintance]’ are your allies. When the conversation reaches a dead end, employ them.</p> <p><strong>9. How to Survive… An Ice Cream Headache</strong></p> <p>A ‘brain freeze’ occurs when nerves in the roof of your mouth tell your brain that it’s too cold; the brain, drama queen that it is, overcompensates by rushing warm blood into your head. How can you tell your big mouth to shut up?</p> <p><strong>– Thaw the freeze </strong></p> <p>Replace the cold stimulus with a warm one by filling your mouth with room-temperature water or pressing your tongue against the afflicted area.</p> <p><strong>– The key to prevention? </strong></p> <p>Eat slower. As one Canadian doctor found in a study of 145 students from his daughter’s school, kids who gulped down a bowl of ice cream in five seconds or fewer were twice as likely to feel brain freeze as those who took their time.</p> <p><strong>10. How to Survive… A Sunburn</strong></p> <p>Remember this: when you’re as red as a beet, make yourself a salad. Freshly cut cucumber cools and soothes the skin, as does the starch from a grated potato or a spritz of apple cider vinegar. Your skin needs vitamins A and D to heal quickly – augment your produce regimen with lots of milk, and find a cool place to veg out.</p> <p><em>Written by Brandon Specktor. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/11-Things-to-Never-Say-to-Someone-With-Chronic-Pain"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a> <a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p>&lt;p&gt;&lt;img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</p> <p> </p>

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Why you should get your grandkids busy in the kitchen

<p><strong>What do kids learn in the kitchen?</strong></p> <p>I’ve found that when kids cook, they’re more likely to taste new foods and, well, eat dinner! More than once, I’ve watched in dismay as my children refused to eat what I’d prepared. But when they’re involved in the cooking, they’re invested in the meal.</p> <p><strong>Why is it important for kids to learn about food?</strong></p> <p>A UK study found that if a child learns to cook from scratch, they’ll be far more likely to do the same as an adult – and preparing food from scratch is linked to healthier eating. It’s an investment in their future.</p> <p><strong>What should budding chefs attempt first? </strong></p> <p>Whichever type your child loves to eat. If they love macaroni cheese or roast chicken, take the cue and empower them to make the foods they love.</p> <p><strong>How can parents get their kids engaged in the kitchen? </strong></p> <p>Choose a day of the week that isn’t packed with commitments. Spend time with your kids beforehand and find a recipe they’d like to try. Make sure you have the ingredients in advance and be nearby to help or supervise as your children prepare the meal. Parents need to take a step back and let their children have more time in the kitchen – it does so much for their sense of independence.</p> <p><em>Written by Liz Bruckner.This article first appeared </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/Why-Kids-Should-Get-Busy-in-the-Kitchen">in <em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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5 steps to stop a nosebleed

<p>Nosebleeds (or epistaxis) are fairly common, especially in children. They usually happen as a result of a minor injury, nose picking, or nose blowing. Occasionally, nosebleeds can signal underlying illness or injury. Very rarely, a nosebleed can be life-threatening, especially in older people. Treating a nosebleed incorrectly can prolong bleeding and make things worse. Follow these five steps to handle a nosebleed.</p> <p><strong>1. Sit the patient down.</strong></p> <p>Ask them to lean forwards (not backwards) so that the blood drains away from the nose, not down the throat. Wear disposable gloves if you have them to protect yourself and the patient.</p> <p><strong>2. Pinch the nose.</strong></p> <p>Tell the patient to breathe through their mouth and pinch the soft part of their nose to help reduce blood flow, blocking the nostrils. He or she can lean over a sink or a bowl so that they can spit out any blood as swallowing it can make them sick. Advise them not to sniff, swallow, or cough, as it can disturb the clots that are forming.</p> <p><strong>3. Check the nose.</strong></p> <p>After ten minutes, release the pressure and check the nose. If still bleeding, pinch the nose for another ten minutes.</p> <p><strong>4. Offer a cold compress.</strong></p> <p>Give the patient an ice or cold pack to hold against the bridge of their nose to help reduce blood flow.</p> <p><strong>5. Check the nose again.</strong></p> <p>Once the bleeding has stopped, let the patient clean around their nose with a damp cloth. Tell them not to blow their nose and avoid strenuous activity for up to 12 hours.</p> <p><strong>Seek medical advice for a nosebleed if you have:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Frequent nosebleeds (more than once a week) – this can be a sign of high blood pressure.</li> <li>Persistent nosebleeds in a person who is on blood-thinning medication such as Warfarin.</li> <li>Thin watery blood from the nose following a blow to the head, which can indicate a possible skull fracture.</li> <li>Frequent nosebleeds accompanied by bleeding gums as well as bruises that develop for no apparent reason.</li> </ul> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/5-Steps-to-Stop-a-Nosebleed"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>Here’s our subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Royal baby: Ambulance spotted near Meghan and Harry’s home

<p>A private ambulance escorted by police has been spotted driving through Windsor as fans eagerly wait for the announcement of the arrival of Baby Sussex.</p> <p>The ambulance was seen on Thursday afternoon local time close to where Duchess Meghan and Prince Harry reside.</p> <p>The birth has so far been a mystery, as the couple announced that few aspects will be kept private.</p> <p>Simon McCoy, presenter for <em>BBC News,</em> tweeted: “Private ambulance with police escort seen driving through Windsor #justsaying.”</p> <p>Many have already placed bets on girl names for the baby. William Hill was offering 4/1 on Diana, with Allegra and Grace at 8/1.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Private ambulance with police escort seen driving through Windsor. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/justsaying?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#justsaying</a></p> — Simon McCoy (@BBCSimonMcCoy) <a href="https://twitter.com/BBCSimonMcCoy/status/1123927814439428096?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">2 May 2019</a></blockquote> <p>The news comes after Buckingham Palace announced Prince Harry’s trip to the Netherlands next week, to mark the one year countdown to next year's Invictus Games, convincing some speculators that the Duchess has already given birth.</p> <p>But according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/" target="_blank">Fabulous Digital</a></em>, the 37-year-old is yet to go into labour, with a palace insider saying she has “categorically not given birth”.</p> <p>As the world prepares for the announcement, royal fans are on the edge of their seats with anticipation.</p>

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The three stages of menopause

<p>For women who experience it naturally (not as the result of surgery or other causes), menopause has three distinct stages: perimenopause, menopause and postmenopause.</p> <p><strong>1. Perimenopause,</strong> which means ‘around the end of menstruation’, is generally what we think of as the menopause experience. During this time, a woman’s ovaries start producing less of the sex hormones oestrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The decline isn’t necessarily steady — sometimes hormone levels fluctuate and cause irregular periods. (If you suddenly experience heavy periods, let your doctor know so other causes, such as fibroid tumours and endometrial cancer, can be ruled out.)</p> <p>Symptoms such as hot flushes, insomnia and forgetfulness are at their peak. The tissues of the vagina and urinary tract may become dry and atrophied, possibly making sex uncomfortable and making urinary-tract infections more common. It is still possible for a woman to become pregnant.</p> <p>If you’re not sure whether you’re in perimenopause, your doctor can order blood tests to measure your hormone levels. Consistently high levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and low levels of estradiol (the most common form of oestrogen), combined with some of the symptoms above, provide compelling evidence.</p> <p>Women may benefit from beginning hormone replacement therapy (HRT) at this stage. Alternatively, your doctor may prescribe low-dose birth control pills as a form of HRT. The advantage of this is better control of the menstrual cycle. It’s important to remember that taking either birth control pills or HRT can make it more difficult to determine exactly when menopause has occurred.</p> <p>While women can enter natural menopause at any time during their forties or fifties, the average age of menopause in the Western world is 51. Perimenopause begins on average at the age of 47 and lasts anywhere from two to 10 years. Contrary to popular belief, there is no relationship between the age at which a woman started menstruating and the age at which she enters menopause.</p> <p>Chances are, you’ll go through menopause at about the same age as your mother and grandmother did. Women who smoke typically enter menopause two to three years earlier than those who don’t.</p> <p><strong>2. Menopause</strong></p> <p>In literal terms, menopause is a single, isolated event in a woman’s life: her last period. Of course, you can’t know when your last period took place until no others follow, so this is a retrospective determination. Doctors consider menopause has occurred once you have gone 12 consecutive months without a period.</p> <p><strong>3. Postmenopause</strong></p> <p>The period from menopause through the rest of a woman’s life is called postmenopause (‘after the end of menstruation’). Once upon a time, when living to the age of 55 was rare, this was the beginning of the end. With life expectancy now extending beyond the eighties and even into the nineties, women today may enjoy nearly as many years of life after menopause as before it.</p> <p>Women face an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and osteoporosis during postmenopause. For this reason, some doctors recommend hormone replacement therapy following menopause and encourage women to engage in lifestyle behaviours that reduce their risks. These include supplementing with calcium, magnesium and vitamin D; eating a nutritious, low-fat diet; and regular, moderately intense exercise.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/three-stages-menopause">in <em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA93V"><em>h</em></a><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>ere’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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6 magic phrases that can save an awkward conversation

<p><strong>1. Pay a compliment</strong></p> <p>Why is it so easy to forget someone’s name within seconds of meeting them? Because, you weren’t really listening—you were too busy thinking about what to say next. One easy way to skirt that natural selfishness and propel any conversation forward is to open with flattery. When you meet someone for the first time, 'Pay that person a compliment when repeating their name, thus helping to anchor and embed it even deeper into your memory,' says professional mentalist Oz Pearlman, who sometimes has to remember the names of hundreds of people he just met for his act. If you compliment Alyssa on her necklace, you instantly prime your brain to recall her name the next time you see that necklace, Pearlman says. 'As a bonus, everyone enjoys flattery, so that compliment can go a long way toward you being remembered as well.''</p> <p><strong>2. Ask lots of questions – good questions</strong></p> <p>Research shows that in conversations with unfamiliar people, we tend to rate the experience based on our own performance, not theirs. What’s more: the experience of talking about ourselves can be more pleasurable than food or money. So, how do you give your conversation partner the pleasure of a good conversation? Ask them questions—a lot of questions, and ones that call for more than vague one-word answers (a good rule is, if your question can be answered with “fine,” don’t ask it). Avoid work if you can; instead, ask about play—”What keeps you busy outside of work?” is a good place to start. According to Debra Fine, author of The Fine Art of Small Talk, one question pretty much guaranteed to put someone in a positive mindset and open doors to their personality: “What has the highlight of your year been so far?” This allows the person to show you her best self and, if her highlight includes a topic you’re interested in too, may lay the groundwork for a true friendship.</p> <p><strong>3. Try to make their day better</strong></p> <p>If your conversation partner still isn’t biting, make things even easier for them by asking games researcher Jane McGonigal’s favourite question: “On a scale of one to ten, how was your day?” Anyone can think of a number between one and ten, McGonigal says, and they’re likely to elaborate on their answer as they go. But it gets even better. After they respond, ask them this: “Is there anything I can do to move you from a six to a seven (or a three to a four, etc.)?” You’d be surprised how happy this little gesture will make someone.</p> <p><strong>4. Play the sympathy card</strong></p> <p>Ready for a cheater’s way to advance a conversation? Memorize three magic words: 'that sounds hard.'  'Nearly everyone in the world believes their job to be difficult,' entrepreneur Paul Ford wrote in his viral essay, 'How to Be Polite.' 'I once went to a party and met a very beautiful woman whose job was to help celebrities wear Harry Winston jewelry,' Ford wrote. 'I could tell that she was disappointed to be introduced to this rumpled giant in an off-brand shirt, but when I told her that her job sounded difficult to me she brightened and spoke for 30 straight minutes about sapphires and Jessica Simpson.'</p> <p><strong>5. Seek their opinion</strong></p> <p>This tip has been tested by tactful US founding father, Benjamin Franklin. In his memoir, Franklin describes an 'old maxim' that helped him along in his political career: 'He that has once done you a kindness will be more ready to do you another, than he whom you yourself have obliged.'  In other words, if you ask someone for advice or a favour and they oblige you, they will be psychologically primed to like you and help you again (today this phenomenon is know as The Ben Franklin effect). So, if you truly want to endear yourself to a stranger and show them you value their mind, ask for their advice on something. If they give it to you, they get to feel important and valued—and you might just learn something in the process.</p> <p><strong>6. Exit gracefully</strong></p> <p>When your conversation reaches a natural conclusion, pull the trigger by saying 'I won’t keep you' or 'Give my regards to [mutual acquaintance]' before making your escape. Adam Dachis, coauthor of The Awkward Human Survival Guide, adds that context can provide you the perfect exit strategy. 'If you’re at a party, excuse yourself to get a drink; if you’re at work, you can leave to get some coffee. You can also say, ‘It’s nice talking to you, but I have to talk to someone before they leave.’'</p> <p><em>Written by Brandon Spektor. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/6-magic-phrases-can-save-awkward-conversation?items_per_page=All"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN93V"><em>here’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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The Queen's last-minute visit to Duchess Meghan

<p> </p> <p>The 93-year-old monarch has paid a visit to the soon-to-be parents, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, at their new home in Frogmore Cottage.</p> <p>The newly renovated home, which lies on the grounds of Windsor Castle, has been seen by the Queen just weeks after the couple has moved in but not just to see the changes.</p> <p>Royal insiders said the Queen wanted to see Duchess Meghan before the imminent arrival of her first child with Prince Harry.</p> <p>“Her Majesty wanted to formally welcome the Sussexes to their new home so she was their first visitor,” a royal insider told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8966971/meghan-markle-prince-harry-frogmore-cottage-queen/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em>.</a></p> <p>“After all, they’ve practically moved into her back garden. She visited with other family members and Harry and Meghan were delighted to show them round.”</p> <p>The home is said to be a favourite royal residence of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip's.</p> <p>Aside from Her Majesty, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge also reportedly were hosted by Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan following the Easter church services at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle, as well as Princess Anne’s daughter Zara and husband Mike Tindall.</p> <p>Frogmore Cottage recently underwent a massive $5.5 million renovation, in preparation of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex moving in.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Queen Elizabeth and the Duchess of Sussex through the years.</p>

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Royal baby update: Pregnant Duchess Meghan under "increased care"

<p>Duchess Meghan is likely to be under “increased care” for the arrival of baby Sussex, a midwife has claimed.</p> <p>Liz Halliday, Deputy Head of Midwifery at Private Midwives, told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8960683/heavily-pregnant-meghan-markle-will-be-under-increased-care-now-because-shes-a-geriatric-mum-midwife-claims/" target="_blank"><em>The Sun</em></a> that the royal’s “geriatric” pregnancy at the age of 37 may put her under “increased risk” for the labour.</p> <p>Geriatric pregnancy, also known as advanced maternal age pregnancy, is a pregnancy that occurs when a person is 35 years or older. Experts warn that this type of pregnancy may increase health risks for both the infant and the woman giving birth, such as premature birth, preeclampsia and more.</p> <p>Pregnant women aged 35 and over may be advised to opt for early induction before their due date to reduce <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nhs.uk/news/pregnancy-and-child/older-mothers-may-benefit-being-induced-their-due-date/" target="_blank">the risk of birth complications</a>.</p> <p>“[The Duchess] is likely to have been offered increased care in these last weeks and days of her pregnancy, possibly including scans to confirm the wellbeing of her baby,” said Halliday.</p> <p>“Although the Duchess of Sussex may have some very slightly increased risk factors due to her age, induction of labour carries risks itself and these should be fully discussed as part of a balanced discussion.”</p> <p>Earlier this month, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex announced in <a rel="noopener" href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-prince-harry-royal-baby-birth-plan-details/" target="_blank">a statement</a> that they would keep the plans surrounding the birth of their first child private.</p> <p>“The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are very grateful for the goodwill they have received from people throughout the United Kingdom and around the world as they prepare to welcome their baby,” read the statement released by Buckingham Palace.</p> <p>“Their Royal Highnesses have taken a personal decision to keep the plans around the arrival of their baby private. The Duke and Duchess look forward to sharing the exciting news with everyone once they have had an opportunity to celebrate privately as a new family.”</p>

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“The signs aren’t good”: Sir David Attenborough admits he doesn’t have long left to live

<p>Sir David Attenborough has admitted that he hasn’t got long left on Earth after coming to terms with his own mortality.</p> <p>He mused to the former UN climate chief, Christiana Figueres, in an interview that he “can’t bear” to think about the world his great-grandchildren will live in. <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/apr/26/david-attenborough-backs-school-climate-strikes-outrage-greta-thunberg" target="_blank">The Guardian</a> reported:</p> <p>“I don’t spend time thinking about that because I can’t bear it," Attenborough explained.</p> <p>“I’m just coming up to 93, and so I don’t have many more years around here. I find it difficult to think beyond that because the signs aren’t good.”</p> <p>Attenborough also dismissed critics of the global movement of school strikes as cynics.</p> <p>“[Young people] understand the simple discoveries of science about our dependence upon the natural world,” he said.</p> <p>“My generation is no great example for understanding – we have done terrible things.”</p> <p>He also explained that the protests are the reason he feels that progress is being made.</p> <p>“That is the one big reason I have for feeling we are making progress. If we were not making progress with young people, we are done.”</p> <p>Attenborough also said in the interview that stopping climate change and the destruction of wildlife is essential.</p> <p>“We have no option, if we want to survive,” he told Figueres.</p> <p>“We have a [moral] obligation on our shoulders and it would be to our deep eternal shame if we fail to acknowledge that.”</p> <p>Figueres also agreed.</p> <p>“The other young people are justifiably furious with us. They say we have been at this for 30 years and we still haven’t solved this. Young people are calling us adults to account,” she said.</p> <p>“We now know we can do it: we know we have the technology, the finance [and] the policies,” she said. </p> <p>“The outrage is about how is it possible that, knowing that we can do it, we are not doing it fast enough?”</p>

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Don’t even think about sitting on your bed wearing outside clothes

<p>Let’s face it, just because you took a shower in the morning and you don’t smell doesn’t mean the outfit you wore on the train, in the bank, at work, to the gym or on a dinner date is clean. Some would say your fancy duds are downright dirty. Before you think about getting cozy under the sheets without changing into pyjamas (or at least a T-shirt and shorts), here are some potential gross consequences that may have you heading to the laundry room instead of the bedroom.</p> <p><strong>Humans are nasty</strong></p> <p>Of course, practicing good hygiene is very important for your overall health, not to mention your social life, but understanding what naturally occurs over the course of a day to a person’s body will clarify how gross it is to not change your outerwear or undergarments. A video from Brit Lab, shown on Lifehacker.com reveals that you, in fact, produce dirt – and a lot of it. The expert says, “We’re constantly shedding skin cells, oozing skin oils, and secreting sweat onto everything we’re wearing. In fact, a human shed about 500 million skin cells and a litre of sweat, every day.”</p> <p><strong>Germs stick to you like glue</strong></p> <p>“Bacteria and organisms can survive weeks or even months on clothes,” Philip Tierno, MD, director of Microbiology and Immunology at New York University revealed in a 2010 investigation after discovering that brand-new clothes (still with the tags on them) can be contaminated with bacteria, norovirus or staph germs. Since he suggests washing new clothes before wearing them, then it’s probably a good idea to sterilise the T-shirt you just walked around in on that hot day for 12 hours. Not judging, just saying.</p> <p><strong>Rashes, acne, infection, oh my!</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.dermascope.com/acne/acne-on-the-body">Dermascope.com</a> explains how restricted fabrics could trigger flare-ups or skin irritations. “One of the main causes of back and chest acne is caused by prolonged pressure and friction by anything repeatedly rubbing on skin, such as tight shirts and backpacks.” And the grimier something is, the worse the breakout could be. “Dirty sheets and dirty clothes can transfer dirt and bacteria into the hair follicle, causing it to clog and become infected.”</p> <p><em>Written by Hope Daniels. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/home-tips/dont-even-think-about-sitting-your-bed-outside-clothes"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p> <p> </p>

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How Michael Schumacher's secret plan has tragically ended

<p>Michael Schumacher’s former manager has revealed the Formula One legend had a plan to manage his son Mick, until the 2013 skiing accident left him with severe brain injuries.</p> <p>In an interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.motorsport-total.com/formel-1/news/willi-weber-michael-wollte-micks-manager-in-der-formel-1-werden-19041801" target="_blank"><em>Motorsport-Total.com</em></a>, Willi Weber admitted the seven-time world champion wanted to help “his boy into Formula One and even manage him the way I used to manage him.”</p> <p>However, the December 2013 accident in the French Alps ended that big plan for the father and son duo. </p> <p>“Michael was anxious to get his boy into Formula One and even manage him,” Weber said. “That would have been a great story. He would have loved that.”</p> <p>Weber said Michael would have made a great manager due to his extensive experience in Formula One. </p> <p>“Michael knew which teams he could speak to and how it works because he garnered many years of experience. That was his grand ambition,” said Weber.</p> <p>Mick Schumacher has recently moved up to F2 racing after winning the European Formula Three Championship last year. Earlier this month, the 20-year-old drove in his first F1 test for Ferrari in Bahrain.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 333.496px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7826186/schumacherjr.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/021b789d0df54401a9efac3773ff5a01" /></p> <p>Ferrari’s Formula One team leader Mattia Binotto said the way Mick works reminds him of the young racer’s father. </p> <p>“The very first time I saw him after many years … I looked at him, and I didn't think he’s really looking similar to Michael,” said Binotto, as reported by <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.motorsport.com/f1/news/ferrari-schumacher-mick-michael-approach/4368738/" target="_blank"><em>motorsport.com</em></a>.</p> <p>“But the way he’s behaving is very similar, and the way he approached the exercise, the way he’s interested in the car, discussing with technicians.</p> <p>“And I think that’s a bit similar to his father.”</p> <p>Mick said he is looking to get into Formula One as “a complete racing driver”, but he is not in a hurry to do so.</p> <p>“Obviously it's my first year in F2, we'll see how it goes,” he said.</p> <p>“I want to arrive into F1 being a complete racing driver, being as prepared as possible … I think time will tell if that’s next year, if that’s the years to follow, really. So, I'm taking it one step at a time.”</p>

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Why can't you tickle yourself?

<p>If you want to probe one of the great mysteries of the human mind, all you need is a feather duster and your feet. Sit back, take your shoes and socks off, and gently stroke the feathers against your sole. Now ask a friend to do the same for you. If you are like most people, you will be left stone-faced by one but convulsed in ticklish agony by the other. Why?</p> <p>Once the domain of childhood curiosity, the question of why we can’t tickle ourselves is now exciting neuroscientists. To understand their interest, consider this: every time your body moves, it creates sensations that could potentially confuse you in all kinds of ways. Just imagine the chaos if every time one of your hands brushed your leg, you assumed that someone was fondling or attacking you. Being able to distinguish between your movement and the actions of others is therefore a central part of our sense of self and agency, aspects of the psyche that even the smartest robots can’t replicate – yet.</p> <p>Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, of University College London, was one of the first to investigate the way the brain makes these lightning-fast decisions about the self and others. She scanned subjects’ brains as her colleagues tickled the palms of their hands and as the participants attempted to do so themselves. From the resulting brain activity, she concluded that whenever we move our limbs, the brain’s cerebellum produces precise predictions of the body’s movements and then sends a second shadow signal that damps down activity in the somatosensory cortex (where tactile feelings are processed). The result is that when we tickle ourselves, we don’t feel the sensations with the same intensity as we would if they had come from someone else, and so we remain calm.</p> <p>Blakemore suspected there could be ways to fool the process and allow people to tickle themselves. So she designed a machine that allowed her subjects to move a stick that gently stroked a piece of foam over their palm, sometimes instantaneously and at other times with a delay of up to 200 milliseconds. It turned out that the greater the delay, the more ticklish the foam felt, perhaps because the cerebellum’s predictions no longer matched what the person was actually feeling.</p> <p>Many others have since tried to find ways to trick the brain into tickling itself. For instance, controlling someone’s foot movements with magnetic brain stimulation, so that the hand tickles the foot against the person’s will, seems to do the trick.</p> <p>But other experiments have produced puzzling results. One study tried to give subjects an out-of-body experience before tickling them, by fitting them with video goggles that let them see from the eyes of the experimenter and by synchronising their movements. Even with the subjects confused about which body they inhabited, they were largely unmoved when they pressed a button that tickled both bodies simultaneously. Another experiment, in which expert lucid dreamers tried to tickle themselves in their sleep, also failed.</p> <p>It may seem random, but understanding the self-tickling barrier could answer more practical scientific questions, like why many schizophrenics can tickle themselves or whether robots ever could.</p> <p>“Your inability to tickle yourself suggests neurologically based definitions of self and other,” writes Robert Provine of the University of Maryland. “Developing a similar machine algorithm may lead to ‘ticklish’ robots [that can] distinguish touching from being touched and may provide a [new] construct of machine personhood.” If so, a featherduster could soon provide a bizarre new test for artificial intelligence: just aim for the robot’s feet and see if it laughs.</p> <p><em>Written by David Robson. This article first appeared in </em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/tips/Why-Cant-You-Tickle-Yourself"><em>Reader’s Digest</em>.</a><em> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V"><em>here’s out subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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