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Couple die of coronavirus within same minute

<p>After spending 47 years together, Patricia and Leslie McWaters have died together too.</p> <p>The couple have raised children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren by each other’s side and now it has been revealed the pair died within the same minute of each other.</p> <p>"They literally did everything together and although we're shocked about it, when we look at it, we also think it's not so surprising, because they were together all the time and they had so much fun together in life," one of their two daughters, Joana Sisk said.</p> <p>At first glance, the two were quite different: she was a no-nonsense retired nurse, and he was a fun-loving veteran and retired truck driver. She was the boss, and he was the king of one-liners.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839051/couple-coronavirus-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/64e2013b6c744a438ee54a9037ed0520" /></p> <p>While Patricia and Leslie were quite different in many ways, Sisk says they connected through their genuine kindness and care for other people.</p> <p>"Pat was the most beautiful woman ever and boy did she look good in hot pants and go-go boots!" Sisk remembers her father saying.</p> <p>However, when Pat went to hospital to be treated for a coronavirus infection, she was told to go home and isolate.</p> <p>She followed the instructions carefully since she had over 35 years in the medical field, but she still felt poorly.</p> <p>The following week, the couple went to the hospital again, this time in an ambulance and remained there for a week.</p> <p>When they both died of the virus, the hospital staff tending to them said their times were too close to call, and recorded the exact same time: Tuesday, November 24, 2020 at 4:23pm.</p> <p>"Those of us that know them, know that Mum went first and said, 'LD, it's time to go!'" Sisk said.</p> <p>Sisk says she hopes her parent’s sad but powerful story would encourage more people to wear a mask and self-isolate if possible.</p> <p>"I'm so thrilled that my mom, being the nurse that she was ... that even in heaven she's going to keep saving lives and it means so much," Sisk said.</p>

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22-year-old dies of cervical cancer after GPs turned her away 15 times

<p>A 22-year-old woman died of cervical cancer after GPs turned her away 15 times and told her not to worry about the “Jade Goody effect”.</p> <p>Emma Swain pleaded with her GP for a smear test as she was experiencing symptoms, but was told she was too young by medical professionals.</p> <p>Instead, doctors had placed the blame on her contraceptive pill for her symptoms and told her what happened to Jade Goody was unlikely to happen to her.</p> <p>In 2009, TV personality Jade Goody died from cervical cancer at the age of 27.</p> <p>Emma first approached her doctor about a smear test in May 2013 after experiencing back pain and bleeding after sex.</p> <p>But her request was refused because the cervical screening is only offered to women over the age of 25.</p> <p>Her GP has since admitted that if the 22-year-old had been given the smear test, she may still be alive.</p> <p>Devastated at the loss of his daughter, Darren Swain <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/woman-22-cervical-cancer-told-23084319" target="_blank">told the Mirror</a>: “To have watched one of your children go through that and to know it could have been ­prevented is ­incredibly hard to ­accept.</p> <p>“We trusted these people – the professionals – to know what they were doing. I’ll never forgive them.”</p> <p>Darren, 51, said: “Basically, he told her she was worrying over nothing. He couldn’t have been more wrong. It cost Emma her life.”</p> <p>Over the course of four months, Emma contacted her doctor 14 times but was advised to swap her brand of contraceptive pill.</p> <p>She changed her pill five times during those four months.</p> <p>Unfortunately, Emma was diagnosed with cervical cancer in December of that year and died the following year in 2014.</p> <p>Emma’s family has since been fighting a six-year legal battle, one that they have recently won.</p> <p>Her family has been awarded compensation for her death.</p> <p>In a letter to the dad-of-three, Dr Stephen Golding, Dr Hendrik Parmentier and practice nurse Maureen Dillon from The Haling Park Partnership in Croydon, South London, apologised for what ­happened to Emma.</p> <p>They wrote: “We admit that if the care and treatment provided to your daughter had been of a reasonable standard, on the balance of probabilities, she would have survived.”</p> <p>A spokesperson for the surgery told the Mirror: “Since Emma’s death, the practice has reviewed its processes to ensure lessons have been learned.”</p>

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The letters to Santa that will leave you heartbroken

<p>A little boy’s sweet letter to Santa has broken the hearts of thousands online after he admitted he just wants to be loved.</p> <p>The young boy, known as Will, wrote a letter to Father Christmas as part of the US Postal Service’s “Operation Santa”, an initiative that helps children and families in need at Christmas.</p> <p>In his handwritten note, Will said all he wants for Christmas is to be loved the way he is.</p> <p>He wrote: “Dear Santa, do you support the LGBTQ community?</p> <p>“And if you can speak to God can you tell him I love him and [ask] if he loves me for being gay?</p> <p>“Thank you. Love, Will.”</p> <p><img style="width: 325.47169811320754px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838953/screen-shot-2020-11-27-at-114254-am.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0038ae4a3d224784aafff131860dcfb3" /></p> <p>The heartwrenching message was posted to the postal service’s website, which then made its way on to Twitter.</p> <p>“This letter to Santa broke my heart,” wrote Twitter user Nancy.</p> <p>Her tweet ended up going viral and garnered 200,000 likes and over 22,000 retweets.</p> <p>“This hurts my heart so much. I hope Will and all the other little LGBTQ+ babies know (and get told) they’re so, so loved,” one person wrote.</p> <p>“Being a queer kid is so difficult. I hope this little boy knows that God does love him no matter what,” another said.</p> <p>Others said they were “crying” and a “blubbering mess” after reading the note.</p> <p><img style="width: 320.4272363150868px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838954/screen-shot-2020-11-27-at-114306-am.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/bbaf55a583dd49d2bbaf5d4fb1d43e60" /></p> <p>Some of the other emotional letters including a child asking for help to pay his parent's bills.</p> <p>“We also need internet so I can study,” the child said.</p> <p>One girl called Kayla asked Santa to bring her a sofa bed, saying her parents spell on a sofa in their one-bedroom unit.</p> <p>She added that her dad “works a lot” and she doesn’t want him to wake with “back pain”.</p> <p>Another child, Almir, spoke about his mum who recently passed away from cervical cancer, and said how hard it has been on his entire family.</p> <p>He asked Santa to help his loved ones at Christmas, and also asked for some gloves and a coat to keep him warm.</p> <p>“These break my heart,” one person declared.</p> <p>“This is the most heart breaking thing,” another agreed.</p> <p>Operation Santa began in the US in 1912 when Postmaster General Frank Hitchcock authorised local Postmasters to allow postal employees and citizens to respond to the letters – a program that eventually became known as Operation Santa.</p>

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"Bubble boy" Thomas Collins dies after being unable to return home to QLD

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A young boy who struggled with an auto-immune disease for most of his life passed away on Saturday.</p> <p>Thomas Collins was just 3 years old when he died after being diagnosed with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) just days after he was born.</p> <p>The deficiency means he has no ability to fight off diseases and makes the risk of infections life-threatening.</p> <p>He spent 858 days in the hospital and was kept in a "plastic bubble" to stop him from catching diseases.</p> <p>Tom's conditions worsened while in a Melbourne hospital and the young family weren't able to move back to Queensland for support from their other family members due to COVID-19 restrictions.</p> <p>Tom's parents Leah and Morgan Collins have been fighting for their son to be let into Brisbane as he was nearing the end of his days but were unable to get a response from Queensland Health in time.</p> <p>The reason the family were in Melbourne was due to a specialist in a Melbourne hospital being the only person who could deliver the treatment Tom needed.</p> <p>The family shared their heartbreak on Facebook.</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Ftomsbattle%2Fposts%2F913107189094286&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=552&amp;height=760&amp;appId" width="552" height="760" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="true" allow="autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; picture-in-picture; web-share"></iframe> <p>“It is with deepest sorrow and fractured hearts that we tell you of Thomas’s passing this evening,” the Collins family posted on Facebook.</p> <p>“He passed peacefully in the arms of his parents.</p> <p>“Despite our best efforts we were unable to get him home to Queensland.</p> <p>“No response from Qld was received in time. We understood the potential conditions were very distressing and would have separated our family during transport.</p> <p>“We would then be forced to quarantine in the room he would have passed in as he was unlikely to survive 14 days quarantine.</p> <p>“We chose to do what our son needed most, which was to be with his parents in a peaceful environment to the end. We were able to do that for him.”</p> <p>“Sadly, we now have a choice between 14-day hotel quarantine, or wait 14 days south of the border to get back to Queensland, via NSW,” they said.</p> <p>“We wished we could be surrounded by family during this time but this is the hand we have been dealt.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Heartwarming update on F1 legend Michael Schumacher

<p><span>Former Ferrari boss Jean Todt has given an incredibly heartwarming update on F1 legend Michael Schumacher.</span><br /><br /><span>Todt told media outlets that he has been closely following the motorsport career of his son Mick.</span><br /><br /><span>Schumacher is one of the world’s most successful F1 drivers, but his career came to a screeching halt when he suffered severe brain injuries while on a skiing trip in the French Alps back in 2013.</span><br /><br /><span>The formula legend has not been seen in public since.</span><br /><br /><span>Information on the 51-year-old’s condition has also been a tightly kept secret, with only tiny snippets of information being released so far.</span><br /><br /><span>However, Todt has always been a reliable source of information given his extremely close relationship with the Schumacher family.</span><br /><br /><span>The 74-year-old was team principal at Ferrari during five of Schumacher’s seven titles, and has revealed that Michael is closely watching the meteoric rise of his 21-year-old son Mick.</span><br /><br /><span>Mick Schumacher is currently on the verge of securing an F1 seat at Haas in 2021 after an extremely successful stint in FIA Formula 2.</span><br /><br /><span>“Of course he is following him,” Todt told <em>RTL France.</em></span><br /><br /><span>“Mick is probably going to race in Formula 1 next year which will be a great challenge.</span><br /><br /><span>“We would be delighted to have a new Schumacher at the highest level of motor racing.”</span><br /><br /><span>The comments have led the public to believe the F1 legend is conscious, following years of speculation he’s been in a vegetative state ever since his skiing accident.</span><br /><br /><span>Todt however has not given much details on the health of Schumacher.</span><br /><br /><span>“This is a question on which I am going to be extremely reserved,” Todt said of the former Ferrari superstar.</span><br /><br /><span>“I see Michael very often – once or twice a month. My answer is the same all the time – he fights. We can only wish for him and his family that things get better.”</span><br /><br /><span>The Frenchman is one of just a few family and friends allowed into Schumacher’s mansion on Lake Geneva, where the German racing legend is believed to be recovering.</span><br /><br /><span>The former Ferrari boss revealed back in 2019 that he watched an F1 race on TV with Schumacher.</span><br /><br /><span>“I’m always careful with such statements, but it’s true. I saw the race together with Michael Schumacher at his home in Switzerland,” Todt told <em>Radio Monte-Carlo.</em></span><br /><br /><span>“Michael is in the best hands and is well looked after in his house.</span><br /><br /><span>“He does not give up and keeps fighting.”</span><br /><br /><span>“His family is fighting just as much and of course our friendship can not be the same as it once was.</span><br /><br /><span>“Just because there’s no longer the same communication as before.”</span></p>

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Unlikely new weapon in the war on COVID

<p>A new study in the UK has shown that mouthwash has been shown to kill coronavirus in just 30 seconds.</p> <p>Scientists at Cardiff University found that there were "promising signs" that over-the-counter mouthwashes may help to destroy the virus.</p> <p>Dr Nick Claydon said the study could lead to mouthwash becoming an important part of people's routines.</p> <p>Dr Claydon, a specialist periodontologist, said: "If these positive results are reflected in Cardiff University's clinical trial, CPC-based mouthwashes... could become an important addition to people's routine, together with hand washing, physical distancing and wearing masks, both now and in the future."</p> <p>Dr Richard Stanton, lead author on the study, said: "This study adds to the emerging literature that several commonly-available mouthwashes designed to fight gum disease can also inactivate the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus (and other related coronaviruses) when tested in the laboratory under conditions that are designed to mimic the oral/nasal cavity in a test tube.</p> <p>"This study is not yet peer reviewed and published which means it has not yet been scrutinised by other scientists as is the usual process with academic research. It has now been submitted for publication in a journal.</p> <p>"People should continue to follow the preventive measures issued by the UK government, including washing hands frequently and maintaining social distance."</p> <p>Prof David Thomas, from the university, said the initial results were encouraging, but the clinical trial would not produce evidence of how to prevent transmission between patients.</p> <p>"Whilst these mouthwashes very effectively eradicate the virus in the laboratory, we need to see if they work in patients and this is the point of our ongoing clinical study," he said to the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-54971650" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>BBC</em></a>.</p> <p>"The ongoing clinical study will, however, show us how long any effects last, following a single administration of the mouthwash in patients with Covid-19."We need to understand if the effect of over-the-counter mouthwashes on the Covid-19 virus achieved in the laboratory can be reproduced in patients."</p>

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Roger Federer on the devastating tragedy that rocked his world

<p>Roger Federer may be considered one of the greatest tennis players of all time, but the 20-time Grand Slam champion has revealed the obstacles he had to face during his time as a junior.</p> <p>Speaking to BecomingX, an organisation started by Bear Grylls to showcase the stories of influential stars to help inspire people around the world, the athlete spoke about his doubts over making it professional.</p> <p>The 39-year-old opened up about his challenges as a junior and the hardships he faced as he played tennis away from home at such a young age.</p> <p>Federer recounts the first game he played, which he lost 6-0, 6-0, and was doubting his talent.</p> <p>“I kept on practicing hard, I started playing more tournaments,” Federer said.</p> <p>“I started to become very successful also, even as a junior, at least in my area. Nationally, I became Junior Swiss Champion for the first time when I was 12 years old.”</p> <p>But a few years later, Federer left his family to join the National Tennis Centre in Switzerland.</p> <p>The Swiss maestro said he became very homesick during this period.</p> <p>“And off I went at 14 to the National Tennis Centre. I was in a great family from Monday to Friday and then I would only come home on the weekends, and I'd be incredibly homesick for the first nine months,” he added.</p> <p>“Results dropped, I lacked confidence, couldn't speak the language, I really struggled.”</p> <p>Federer says those years shaped who he has become today.</p> <p>“It was quite a rough journey,” Federer said.</p> <p>“I think those were the two most influential years of my life, from 14 to 16. Being away from home, persevering and having that responsibility to figure out the things, sort of on my own sometimes.”</p> <p>But Federer also owes his success to his former mentor Peter Carter, who died in a car accident in 2002, a tragedy which changed Federer’s life forever.</p> <p>The Swiss maestro said the tragedy prompted him to “switch gears” and take tennis more seriously.</p> <p>“When I was 16, Peter Carter joined the NTC and he became my mentor,” Federer said.</p> <p>“If I play the way I play today, it's probably because of Peter.</p> <p>"Obviously, the news totally shocked me and rocked my world.</p> <p>“In some ways, it was truly a wake up call.</p> <p>This is when I guess I shifted gears and I was just like let's get serious about tennis, very serious."</p> <p>Federer took a back seat in 2020 and announced he would be sitting the remainder out, after the Australian Open, due to a knee injury.</p>

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Sean Connery’s widow shares dying wish

<p>The widow of Sean Connery has revealed the actor's dying wish.</p> <p>Micheline Roquebrune informed the<em> <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/mailonsunday/index.html" target="_blank">Scottish Mail</a> </em>that before her beloved husband passed away, he had asked for his ashes to be scattered across his native Scotland and in the Bahamas, which is where he had lived after retiring. </p> <p>"He wanted his ashes to be scattered in the Bahamas and also in his homeland," she told the outlet.</p> <p>"Whenever it is possible and safe to travel again, then it is the family's intention to return to Scotland with him."</p> <p>Roquebrune, who was Connery's wife of 45 years, also shared that a memorial service for the legendary actor will take place in his birth country.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838716/sean-connery.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/83c2e3779745449fad920b25140a76de" /></p> <p>Roquebrune is a French artist and also revealed that her late husband would be cremated at a private service in the Caribbean island at a later date.</p> <p>"We would like to organise a memorial service for him in Scotland -- that is our hope. But we cannot say when this will happen exactly," she said.</p> <p>On October 31 that Connery died peacefully in his sleep surrounded by family at his home in the Bahamas.</p> <p>He was 90 and it is believed that in his last years, he struggled with dementia.</p> <p>"It was no life for him," she told the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8901151/Sean-Connerys-widow-Micheline-reveals-final-moments-Bond-star-died-aged-90.html" target="_blank">Mail on Sunday</a> </em>following his death.</p> <p>"It took its toll on him. He was not able to express himself latterly. At least he died in his sleep and it was just so peaceful.</p> <p>“I was with him all the time and he just slipped away. It was what he wanted."</p> <p>Connery is survived by Roquebrune, whom he married in 1975; his son by ex-wife Diane Cilento, actor Jason Connery.</p> <p>He also has a grandson from Jason's marriage to actress Mia Sara.</p> <p>The Bond star was married to Australian actress Cilento from 1962. The couple divorced in 1973 and Cilento died in 2011.</p>

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Lonely great-grandmother tells family she “wants to die” after 8 months in isolation

<p>A lonely great-grandmother has broken her family’s heart when she admitted she “just wants to die” after spending eight months isolated in a care home during the pandemic.</p> <p>Relatives told reporters that their beloved, sweet grandma Doreen Tilly was “full of life” when she celebrated her 100th birthday at the beginning of the coronavirus lockdown.</p> <p>However, after months away from loved ones, the great-grandmother, who lives in a home in Scotland, has made a heartbreaking admission that she doesn’t want to live any longer.</p> <p>Doreen’s family told the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/i-just-want-die-scots-22975283" target="_blank">Daily Record</a> </em>they are “devastated” at her deterioration since March.</p> <p>Sonia Dixon, 37, said: “The difference in my nan is just devastating to see.</p> <p>“Before, she was full of life and thrived on regular visits from her family.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838720/grandmother-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d13c7c14295b478aa8a9e0a42c7e0a2d" /></p> <p>“While she has outlived her own two children, she has eight grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren and eight great-great-grandchildren, almost all of whom live in the area.”</p> <p>The UK Government has said it will review its approach to visiting people in care homes when England’s second national lockdown comes to an end.</p> <p>However Sonia said the government’s response is not enough and the enforced separation has been too much for her great-grandmother.</p> <p>“I can’t bear for this to go on any longer,” she said.</p> <p>“I’m watching her fade away with the loneliness – she has told me she just wants to die during the outdoor visits that I have been allowed.</p> <p>“She has become really down and has been prescribed antidepressants for the first time in her life at 100 years old.</p> <p>“People in care homes should have legal rights to see their families properly and I’d support any move to make it happen.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838721/grandmother.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8863d05dee5e436597ad83512f970636" /></p> <p>Retired pub manager Doreen is a resident at care firm HC-One’s Woodside Court Care Home in Fife.</p> <p>Sonia, a mum-of-one, said the family was offered “very limited indoor visits” for one person – or more outdoor visits for additional people.</p> <p>“In the end, we had to go with the outdoor socially distanced visits so Nan could see all of her family,” she said.</p> <p>“For someone who is 100, surely it should be up to them how much they see family members.</p> <p>“The home say they are just following the rules but, between them and the Scottish Government, they need to get this sorted out.”</p> <p>Doreen’s plea to reunite with her family follows just weeks after another Fife care home resident, 104-year-old Mary Fowler, was recorded begging to see loved ones again.</p> <p>Mary, who lives in the Balfarg Care Home, has only seen her children briefly through a window since March.</p> <p>In her message, she said: “It’s cutting me to bits.</p> <p>“I must see my kids, because time is getting on for me.</p> <p>“I must see my children and make things like they used to be.</p> <p>“Please help me. Help me. Please, please help.”</p> <p>In October, Scotland relaxed the rules of visiting residents.</p> <p>Indoor visits are no longer limited to 30 minutes and can instead last up to four hours.</p> <p>Visitors were also allowed to hold hands with residents as long as they followed COVID rules.</p> <p>Six visitors from two households, including children, were able to attend outdoor visits which can last up to one hour.</p> <p>However, new five-tier rules came into force in Scotland last Monday.</p> <p>Where Doreen lives, residents aren’t allowed to meet anyone who isn’t in their household indoors inside a home.</p> <p>Bosses at care company HC-One said: “Our caring colleagues know every resident in our homes and many relatives.</p> <p>“They understand how important visiting is and how difficult it is for all those who have missed out on precious moments over recent months.</p> <p>“While this is a challenging time for everyone, we must all work together to protect residents.</p> <p>“With safety at the forefront of everything we do, a very difficult balancing act needs to be achieved which considers the health and wellbeing of all residents and the threat of coronavirus.”</p>

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Prince Harry “deeply saddened” after Remembrance Day request denied

<p>Prince Harry is reportedly “deeply saddened” after his request to have a wreath laid on his behalf at the royals Remembrance Day service in London on Sunday was denied. </p> <p>Harry, the Duke of Sussex, resigned as a senior working member of the British royal family in January 2020. </p> <p>His wife Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex dutifully followed behind her husband, and as such neither of them represent the monarchy. </p> <p>As part of their exit deal, Harry gave up his military titles and walked away from all of his royal duties.</p> <p>This was painful for Harry, according to the authors of the book <em>Finding Freedom.</em></p> <p>"If his grandmother's validation of his experiences served as encouragement, the most demoralising aspect of the new deal was his being stripped of his honorary military appointments that had been awarded to him as a senior royal," they write.</p> <p>"As a retired serviceman, Harry would always be able to wear his medals, but no longer could he wear uniform as Captain General of the Royal Marines, Honorary Air Force Commandant of the Royal Air Force Base Honington, and honorary Commodore-in-Chief of the Royal Navy's Small Ships and Diving Operations. These roles had come to an end."</p> <p>Harry first laid a wreath at the Cenotaph in 2009 when he was just 25. </p> <p>He and Meghan now live in California in the United States, with their son Archie, where they are pursuing their own projects.</p> <p>Harry has recorded a Declassifed podcast that is set to air this week in which he speaks about the importance of Remembrance Day for him, saying: "Remembrance Day for me is a moment for respect and for hope.</p> <p>"I wear it [the poppy] to celebrate the bravery and determination of all our veterans. </p> <p>“These are the people and moments I remember when I salute, when I stand at attention and when I lay a wreath at the Cenotaph."</p>

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Captain Sir Tom Moore makes a pledge to “help the lonely”

<p>Captain Sir Tom Moore has launched a new campaign to get people walking to help support those who feel “lonely and frightened” during lockdown.</p> <p>The veteran helped raise £33m for the NHS by walking 100 laps of his Bedfordshire garden before his 100th birthday.</p> <p>His efforts were rewarded by the Queen who knighted him, and he has also released an autobiography which is reportedly set to become a film.</p> <p>Capt Sir Tom said: "We are in a difficult situation but we'll get through it if we all join together."</p> <p>The challenge encourages people to log their walking on social media using the hashtag #WalkWithTom over the next week.</p> <p>He hopes to raise money for his foundation, which aims to combat loneliness and support those facing bereavement. </p> <p>The 100-year-old, who was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire, said he has "always been optimistic things will improve".</p> <p>He said the second England-wide lockdown would be difficult but "we will get through it".</p> <p>Capt Sir Tom said: "We've got to consider that during this next coming period there are going to be a lot of unhappy people who are lonely and frightened and we need to go out and help those people.</p> <p>"That's why we've got the Captain Tom Foundation."</p> <p>The initiative works with four charities, the mental health charity Mind, The Royal British Legion, Helen and Douglas House children’s hospice in Oxfordshire and Willen Hospice in Milton Keynes.</p> <p>Capt Sir Tom's daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore said the family had been "given an incredible gift of a voice and platform to do powerfully positive things with".</p> <p>She said they wanted to "remind people that we are British and we can get through this".</p> <p>"We would like everyone to walk together with Tom so we can help support those who are lonely," she added.</p>

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Put the baking soda back in the bottle: Banned sodium bicarbonate ‘milkshakes’ don’t make racehorses faster

<p><em> </em></p> <p>The controversial and banned practice of giving horses baking soda “milkshakes” before a race doesn’t work, according to our analysis of the available research.</p> <p>Racing folklore says sodium bicarbonate milkshakes can boost racehorses’ endurance because the alkalinity of the baking soda helps counter the buildup of lactic acid in the blood when running.</p> <p>But our systematic research review, <a href="https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1bv2Z2dbxqYqLj">recently published in the Journal of Equine Veterinary Science</a> reveals milkshakes don’t boost horses’ athletic performance.</p> <p>This means any trainer still tempted to flout the ban on this tactic would be endangering their horses’ welfare and risking heavy sanctions over a practice that is basically snake oil.</p> <p>Despite the fun-sounding name, milkshakes are anything but. The process involves inserting a tube up the horse’s nose, down its throat and into the stomach, and then pumping in a concentrated solution of sodium bicarbonate dissolved in water.</p> <p>This can be stressful to the horse, and potential <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jevs.2004.08.014">side-effects</a> include lacerations to the nasal cavity, throat and oesophagus, gastrointestinal upset, and diarrhoea. It can even be fatal if the tube is mistakenly inserted into the trachea and the solution is pumped into the lungs.</p> <p>It’s little wonder Racing Australia has <a href="https://www.racingaustralia.horse/uploadimg/Australian_rules_of_Racing/Australian_Rules_of_Racing_01_March_2019.pdf">banned</a> the use of “alkalising agents” such as milkshakes on race day, with potentially career-ending ramifications for trainers caught doing it.</p> <p><strong>No boost after all</strong></p> <p>The effect of baking soda on athletic performance has been studied in human athletes for decades with <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31191097">inconclusive results</a>, but has only been analysed in horses since the late 1980s.</p> <p>Our analysis included data from eight experimental trials featuring 74 horses. Overall, sodium bicarbonate administration in the hours before treadmill tests or simulated race trials did not improve horses’ running performance in either type of test.</p> <p>In fact, in treadmill exercise tests in which horses were not ridden by jockeys, sodium bicarbonate actually had a very small negative effect on running performance, albeit not a statistically significant one.</p> <p>Whereas human athletes might gain a placebo effect from sodium bicarbonate, this is unlikely to apply to horses who don’t understand the intended point of the milkshake. And while some racehorse trainers may be educated in exercise physiology and the importance of blood pH, others may believe they work simply because received wisdom and racing folklore say so.</p> <p>Racing aficionados steeped in tradition might respond with scepticism, or argue that research can’t replicate the unique conditions of race day. But given that our comprehensive analysis of a range of research trials shows no evidence that milkshakes work, we argue any recalcitrant trainers have a moral responsibility to listen to the science.</p> <p>Milkshakes are already banned. But our research shows they deliver no benefit anyway. Trainers who are happy to continue this illicit practice and run the gauntlet of potential sanctions should consider whether it is worth it at all, and whether instead they should reconsider on moral, medical and scientific grounds.</p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/joshua-denham-1165121">Joshua Denham</a>, RMIT University and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/adam-hulme-401293">Adam Hulme</a>, University of the Sunshine Coast. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/put-the-baking-soda-back-in-the-bottle-banned-sodium-bicarbonate-milkshakes-dont-make-racehorses-faster-148907">The Conversation.</a> </em></p> <p> </p>

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Fury after Prince William chose to “lie” about coronavirus diagnosis

<p>Kensington Palace is under fire over its decision to keep Prince William’s coronavirus diagnosis a secret for six months.</p> <p>It was recently revealed that the future King contracted the virus in April, just a few days after his dad Prince Charles and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson were also diagnosed.</p> <p>William was reportedly left “struggling to breathe” but chose to keep his diagnosis under wraps as he didn’t want to ensue panic.</p> <p>But now royal commentator Rob Jobson has taken a swipe at the Palace, accusing them of lying and undermining trust.</p> <p>Jobson said The Standard newspaper, where he works, asked the Royal Family back in April after hearing of William’s diagnosis and was told that he did not have COVID-19.</p> <p>“It was quite clear in the email that we had it from an impeccable source that he had tested positive to coronavirus,” Jobson explained on Sunrise.</p> <p>“We had an email back saying “we get lots of these impeccable sources and they prove not to be true and this is a case and point here.”</p> <p>“Well If that is not a denial then I don’t know what is.”</p> <p>Jobson said it’s “appalling” that the Palace would “lie” to journalists rather than offer a simple “no comment” which is the standard response when they don’t want to confirm a story. </p> <p>“I understand why they didn’t want to cause panic at the time, but it’s the precedent they’re setting here that is the problem,” he said.</p> <p>“If you start lying to the media about this the what else are you lying about and why should you be believed?”</p> <p>Jobson also took to Twitter to slam the news in a series of strongly-worded posts.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Prince William’s decision to LIE about contracting COVID-19 earlier - for whatever reason - is appalling. KP were are asked several times by the media whether Prince William had contracted the virus and were told categorically “no”. This has created a serious issue of trust.</p> — Robert Jobson (@theroyaleditor) <a href="https://twitter.com/theroyaleditor/status/1323154789178499072?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 2, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">If the palace is prepared to LIE about an issue as serious as Prince William, second in line to the throne, contracting COVID-19 what else have they LIED about when questioned by the press and why should the media believe any denials going forward? This raises serious issues.</p> — Robert Jobson (@theroyaleditor) <a href="https://twitter.com/theroyaleditor/status/1323156062124580866?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 2, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The fact is the palace lied about it. KP were are asked several times by several media outlets whether Prince William had contracted the virus and were told categorically “no”. The decision was taken to LIE, thus creating a problem of trust going forward. Poor judgement. <a href="https://t.co/hrJ1LqnAMO">https://t.co/hrJ1LqnAMO</a></p> — Robert Jobson (@theroyaleditor) <a href="https://twitter.com/theroyaleditor/status/1323154036640698368?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 2, 2020</a></blockquote>

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“Scumbag”: Mother slammed after revealing why she missed her daughter’s open-heart surgery

<p>A mother has been slammed after revealing that she missed her seven-year-old daughter’s open heart surgery because she didn’t want to take time off from work.</p> <p>The mum said she felt guilty taking leave despite her boss insisting she take it.</p> <p>She went on to complain that her young daughter was “belligerent”, saying that she didn’t want to disappoint her clients by skipping her job.</p> <p>The woman’s confession has been met with severe backlash after she shared her story on Reddit.</p> <p>“I work as an analyst in a field where clients expect you to have your work done yesterday and the term ‘family first’ is just an empty statement,” the mother wrote.</p> <p>“My boss and I have been at a client site putting together this very urgent project.</p> <p>“My daughter suddenly had a very big health scare and needed open-heart surgery.</p> <p>“My ex-boyfriend has primary custody and I know my daughter wanted me to be there.</p> <p>“My ex-boyfriend demanded I ask for time off.</p> <p>“However I think it was unfair for him to ask for that because my boss is also my boyfriend.</p> <p>“After my boyfriend heard about my daughter he offered to give me as much time off as I wanted which I felt was unfair and he really needed me and wanted me to stay.</p> <p>“I felt like if I accepted I would be taking advantage of my boyfriend’s generosity and good will.</p> <p>“In addition, I knew that he needed me on this project.”</p> <p>The mum went on to make a series of comments about her sick daughter.</p> <p>“My daughter has had multiple instances of heart problems in the past, and every time she gets treatment she becomes extremely belligerent,” she went on.</p> <p>“She ends up continuously wetting the bed and crying and screaming all the time.</p> <p>“I knew if I went I wouldn’t be much help and I wouldn’t be able to do any work because she tries to take everyone’s attention hostage.</p> <p>“So I ended up missing my daughter’s surgery and now she’s in recovery.”</p> <p>The mother went on to say she was happy she chose work over family.</p> <p>“However, I could tell my boss was very grateful he didn’t have to call in another team member and that he appreciated that I was by his side, despite his reassurances that I could take a leave if I wanted to,” she explained.</p> <p>“It would have been selfish to everybody in the office if I had just stepped out and forced them to step up or else face the client’s ire.”</p> <p>Reddit users didn’t hold back in their criticism of the “selfish” mum.</p> <p>“No wonder dad has custody,” said one.</p> <p>“I don’t care if your kid is puking and needs a ride from school, you go to them. This is a major surgery. A surgery where they have to enter the rib cage in order to get the part they are operating on! And this is a child!”</p> <p>“Scumbag of the year,” said another.</p> <p>Said a third: “This woman is a terrible person and should just completely give up custody right now before she causes more trauma to this child.”</p> <p>Added one more: “She called her seven-year-old belligerent because she wants comfort after open heart surgery. Seriously!”</p>

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Our minds may be wandering more during the pandemic — and this can be a good thing

<p>Many feel the coronavirus pandemic has changed not just our everyday lives, but also our inner mental lives. There has been talk of a <a href="https://www.mhvic.org.au/images/PDF/Submission/MHV_input_Mental_Health_Pandemic_Response_Plan.pdf">mental health pandemic</a>, but also of <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2020-10-07/what-is-brain-fog-and-what-causes-it/12734948">lockdown brain fog when we are awake</a>, as well as <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-covid-19-pandemic-is-changing-our-dreams/">reports of more frequent, vivid, and bizarre dreams when we are asleep</a>.</p> <p>We tend to think of our waking and dream lives as separate. But it is striking how deeply they are linked.</p> <p>Spontaneous thought, or mind wandering, occupies <a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-psych-010814-015331">up to 50% of wakefulness</a>. Our thoughts and attention frequently drift away from what we are doing and what is happening in our immediate surroundings, with one thought following another along an associative trajectory.</p> <p>Spontaneous thoughts and experiences are also pervasive in sleep. The clearest example is dreaming, which has been described as an <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00412/full">intensified form of the mind wandering</a> that happens when we are awake.</p> <p>Considering dreaming and mind wandering together suggests the fluctuations in spontaneous experience, the natural ebb and flow of attention and somewhat erratic trajectory of thoughts continue throughout waking and sleep.</p> <p>In normal circumstances, we mostly <a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-psych-010814-015331">remain oblivious to the fact our minds have wandered</a>. Most people also only rarely remember their dreams, but when awakened in the sleep laboratory can report multiple dreams per night. Like mind wandering, dreaming is also largely (with the exception of certain <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30880167/">lucid dreams</a>) beyond our control.</p> <p>However, attention to our inner lives may be amplified at a time when control over our everyday lives is elusive.</p> <p>Paying attention to your dreams when you first wake up in the morning drastically increases dream recall. And <a href="http://journalpsyche.org/articles/0xc138.pdf">attempting to harness our thoughts and attention throughout the day</a> can actually make us more aware of our failures, including lapses in attention. If you have been paying more attention to your spontaneous thoughts during the pandemic, you might have become more aware of what was were there all along.</p> <p><strong>Changes in spontaneous thought — for better or worse</strong></p> <p>If you have been <a href="https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(20)30838-1">sleeping more during lockdown</a>, you are probably experiencing more early morning REM sleep. Because REM sleep is typically associated with the most vivid and complex dreams, this might lead to an increase in actual dreaming.</p> <p>If you have also ditched your alarm clock, you are probably awakening directly from REM sleep, which further increases dream recall.</p> <p>The pandemic has also changed what we daydream and <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-covid-19-pandemic-is-changing-our-dreams/">dream about.</a> Waking concerns about the pandemic seem paralleled by more frequent nightmares and dreams <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.573961/full">about topics such as social distancing, contagion, or personal protective equipment</a>.</p> <p>Some changes to our spontaneous mental lives can indicate something is amiss. Anxiety and stress are linked to increased repetitive thoughts and rumination; trouble focusing, disturbed sleep, nightmares, and unpleasant dreams, <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-covid-19-pandemic-is-changing-our-dreams/">all of which seem to have increased during the pandemic</a>.</p> <p>These repetitive, sticky and non-progressive thoughts <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nrn.2016.113">contrast with the free, meandering movement that characterises most dreams and mind wandering</a>.</p> <p><strong>Spontaneous thought might be beneficial</strong></p> <p>The restlessness of our minds might also have a silver lining. Mind wandering certainly does compromise how well we perform tasks demanding attention. But because of their associative nature, dreams and mind wandering can also help make new connections and see familiar topics in a new light. When our minds wander, our thoughts are often drawn to the <a href="https://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190464745.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780190464745">future and personal concerns</a>.</p> <p>Similarly, dreams have the tendency to weave disparate waking experiences and concerns into new and sometimes bizarre narratives. You might encounter a dream character who is a mixture of different people you have been close to at different times in your life.</p> <p>Or your initially pleasant dream of visiting friends in a faraway city might morph into a nightmare about getting infected, putting your family at risk, and being pursued by the police because you are breaching lockdown.</p> <p>Spontaneous thoughts in waking and sleep might help process memories and guide future planning and decision making, for example by enabling us to imagine alternative courses of action; they can also be a source of insight and creativity.</p> <p>Such thoughts may also contribute to coping and emotional processing. Future-oriented mind wandering is often <a href="https://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780190464745.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780190464745">positive, whereas past-oriented mind wandering tends to be associated with negative moods and emotions</a>.</p> <p><strong>A great escape</strong></p> <p>Being in the here and now is often lauded as a virtue we should aim to cultivate through mindfulness. But sometimes, distraction can be useful: <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.3758/s13423-015-0993-2">Mind wandering can provide a welcome break from boring tasks</a>, allowing us to return with refreshed attention.</p> <p>Other times, distraction might just be pleasant. In our dreams, we experience alternative realities; we can travel freely and, because <a href="https://open-mind.net/papers/the-avatars-in-the-machine-dreaming-as-a-simulation-of-social-reality">dreams are rich in social interactions</a>, we can interact with people we are separated from in waking life.</p> <p>Given the monotony, restrictions, and social isolation many of us are experiencing, the unruliness and unboundedness of our minds might sometimes be a great escape.</p> <p><em>If you are interested in joining a study on mind wandering and dreaming, please email spontaneous.experiences.sr@gmail.com.</em></p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jennifer-windt-1153552">Jennifer Windt</a>, Monash University. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/our-minds-may-be-wandering-more-during-the-pandemic-and-this-can-be-a-good-thing-145764">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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“Get the tissues out!“: Overwhelming reunion for couple kept apart for 215 days

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>An elderly couple who have been married for 60 years tearfully reunited at an assisted living home.</p> <p>Due to residing in the USA, the pair had been separated for 215 days, apart from a few emotional visits through a window. </p> <p>The pair are living at Rosecastle at Delaney Creek and the heartwarming reunion was uploaded to Facebook by the assisted living home.</p> <p>“We got to witness these two resident love birds see and hug each other for the first time since the pandemic,” the Rosecastle at Delany Creek’s Facebook post said.</p> <p>“Get your tissues out!”</p> <p>The post says that Joseph was in rehab after a surgery and the pandemic prevented the pair from seeing each other while Joseph recovered.</p> <p>“With just phone calls and a few window visits - they persevered,” the post said.</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?height=476&amp;href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frosecastleatdelaneycreek%2Fvideos%2F705069423756227%2F&amp;show_text=false&amp;width=357" width="357" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe> <p>The video shows Joseph's wife, Eve, sitting at a table while Joseph is being wheeled over to where she's sitting.</p> <p>“Who’s waiting for him over here?”</p> <p>“Look Miss Eve, who’s here?” the person off camera says.</p> <p>The pair embrace and start to cry, as they're overwhelmed with emotion.</p> <p>"I sure missed you," Joseph cries behind his face mask.</p> <p>"I didn't think I'd ever get over here."</p> <p>“You’re alright, I love you so much. For sixty years I’ve done something right," Eve said to try and calm him down.</p> <p>The life enrichment coordinator at Rosecastle, Clary Abreu said Eve was very excited to see her husband.</p> <p>“[Eve] was so excited that she paced probably all night and she sat out in the dining room waiting for him,” she said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Teenager leads discovery in finding COVID-19 cure

<p>Scientists across the globe are on a race to find a treatment for COVID-19, however the standout in all of this is a teenage girl. </p> <p>Anika Chebrolu, a 14-year-old from Frisco, Texas, has just won the 2020 3M Young Scientist Challenge and a whopping A$35,230 prize for a discovery that could give a potential therapy to COVID-19.</p> <p>Anika's invention that won the prize uses in-silico methodology to uncover a lead molecule that can bind to the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.</p> <p>The teen submitted her project while she was in the 8th grade, but she admitted her goal was not initially to find a cure for COVID-19. </p> <p>Her original intention was to use in-silico methods to identify a lead compound that could bind to a protein of the influenza virus. </p> <p>"After spending so much time researching about pandemics, viruses and drug discovery, it was crazy to think that I was actually living through something like this," Anika said.</p> <p>"Because of the immense severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and the drastic impact it had made on the world in such a short time, I, with the help of my mentor, changed directions to target the SARS-CoV-2 virus."</p> <p>Anika revealed she was inspired to find potential cures to viruses after learning about the 1918 flu pandemic. </p> <p>"Anika has an inquisitive mind and used her curiosity to ask questions about a vaccine for COVID-19," Dr Cindy Moss, a judge for the 3M Young Scientist Challenge, told CNN.</p> <p>"Her work was comprehensive and examined numerous databases. She also developed an understanding of the innovation process and is a masterful communicator. Her willingness to use her time and talent to help make the world a better place gives us all hope."</p> <p>Anika said winning the prize and title of top young scientist is an honour, but her work is not completed. </p> <p>Her next goal is to research and work alongside scientists and researchers who are fighting to "control the morbidity and mortality" of the pandemic. </p> <p>She will aid in developing her findings into an actual cure for the virus.</p> <p>"My effort to find a lead compound to bind to the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus this summer may appear to be a drop in the ocean, but still adds to all these efforts," she said.</p> <p>"How I develop this molecule further with the help of virologists and drug development specialists will determine the success of these efforts."</p> <p><em>Image Credit: NIAID-RML (AP/NIAID-RML)</em></p>

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"Most trolled person in the world": Meghan Markle and Prince Harry speak out

<p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have spoken out about the intense abuse they have received, saying it is “almost unsurvivable” in a podcast to mark World Mental Health Day.</p> <p>The couple joined three Californian high school students on an episode of their podcast Teenager Therapy to speak on topics including mental health stigma, self-care and online abuse.</p> <p>Meghan said the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in more online time for most people.</p> <p>“Yes, it’s a great way to connect, but it also ends up being a place where there’s a lot of disconnection, you know, I can speak personally to,” she told the hosts.</p> <p>“I’m told that in 2019 I was the most trolled person in the entire world, male or female. Now, eight months of that I wasn’t even visible, I was on maternity leave or with a baby.</p> <p>“But what was able to just be manufactured and churned out, it’s almost unsurvivable, that’s so big, you can’t think of what that feels like, because I don’t care if you’re 15 or 25, if people are saying things about you that aren’t true, what that does to your mental and emotional health is so damaging.”</p> <p>Prince Harry added that people feel safe hiding behind usernames on virtual spaces in order to say things they would not say in person.</p> <p>“I think many, many people are hurting, a lot, and are freaking out because of the way the world is and because of, sometimes, the echo chamber that has been created for them by the online platform that they’ve chosen to be on,” he said.</p> <p>“But also it comes down to control as well, you can control what you see, you can control what you do, so whether it’s notifications or whether it’s vibration ringtones, whatever it is, these things control you, rather than taking control.”</p> <p>The podcast was recorded in the US area of Santa Barbara where the Sussexes now live.</p> <p>Harry went on to emphasise the need of prioritising self-care and having important conversations about health.</p> <p>“The more we talk about it the more it becomes normal, and it is normal, and it’s not a sign of weakness, it’s a sign of strength,” he said.</p> <p>The pair also called out social media sites that use specific algorithms that don’t promote consuming online material in a healthy way.</p> <p>“I think it’s very easy to be sucked in and consumed by negativity, but we all have the choice to be able to cut that out of our lives,” Harry said.</p> <p>“Hate following has become a thing, you don’t need to do that.</p> <p>"Just as much as we worry about, be concerned, and take notice of what we put in our bellies as a diet, the same applies for our eyes and our mind, what we’re consuming is affecting us.”</p>

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Mum found dead by 5-year-old son was "broken" by COVID lockdown

<p>A mother who was struggling with the loss of a family member and being isolated from her parents has been found dead by her five-year-old son.</p> <p>Katie Simms, 32, was found by her only son Archie in their home in Kettering in the UK.</p> <p>Katie's brother David said to <em>Northants Live</em> that she had been "struggling" after their older brother Barry Gunn died in 2015.</p> <p>“Since my brother passed, she shut herself away and she ended up getting a bit of a phobia of not really going outside.</p> <p>“And I think COVID-19 broke her, to be honest.”</p> <p>“Back in 2015 my brother, who served in the Royal Anglians, suffered from PTSD after he returned from Sierra Leone,” said David, who is also in the army.</p> <p>“What he saw out there really scarred him and he couldn’t cope with his demons.</p> <p>“He was quite troubled with that; he tried to take his own life by taking an overdose, he then passed away in hospital a few months later, he’d been put on a ventilator.</p> <p>“[Katie] took that quite bad; he was only 40 at the time.”</p> <p>David said that Katie was struggling during the pandemic as she couldn't visit her mother.</p> <p>“She couldn’t get to visit mum, because she’s got breathing difficulties, so couldn’t leave the house to visit.</p> <p>“Dad’s diagnosed with bowel cancer, he’s now got a tumour so he can’t travel.</p> <p>“So lockdown has basically broken us all.”</p> <p>David started a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/funeral-costs-and-little-archie-fund?sharetype=teams&amp;member=5885594&amp;utm_medium=copy_link&amp;utm_source=customer&amp;utm_campaign=p_na+share-sheet&amp;rcid=9119badbf97c4960bf4919b7dfeba1f4&amp;fbclid=IwAR0pcfkEP2-xSUwaZ-lN61BgucYcc61Zrhvypmrt97yNmMNav4O40mlxbE0" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">GoFundMe</a> page with any extra funds going to help Archie grow up as well as funeral costs.</p>

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