Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Family heartbreak as newborn baby mauled to death by "jealous" dog

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A family has been left in shock after a newborn baby has been mauled to death by the family's dog.</p> <p>12-day-old Elon was attacked in Doncaster, northern England by a chow chow cross.</p> <p>The baby suffered from serious injuries and was taken to the hospital but later died.</p> <p>The family had celebrated the birth of Elon by posting pictures on Facebook, with mother Abigail and father Stephen commenting “Our gorgeous baby boy. Love him to bits”.</p> <p>The couple were arrested on suspicion of gross negligence manslaughter after the attack, but have both been released on bail.</p> <p>The baby's uncle said that the baby had been lying in his bassinette when the dog ran inside after escaping from a pen in the yard.</p> <p>The father and uncle tried to save the baby, but to no avail.</p> <p>“It was horrible and we’re all in total shock,” the uncle said.</p> <p>“My sister is in bits. She’s lost her baby.</p> <p>“Teddy’s not a dangerous dog... I think he was jealous when the baby came along.</p> <p>“Or maybe he thought the baby was a toy – he was a tiny thing.”</p> <p>One of Abigail's closest friends said that the mum was a "brilliant" parent.</p> <p>“She loves dogs and would never have a dog around the kids if she thought they were dangerous,” the friend said.</p> <p>Ellis' other three children were at the house at the time of the attack.</p> <p>The dog has been removed from the home as investigations continue.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/newborn-baby-mauled-to-death-by-familys-jealous-dog-c-1323940" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">7News</a></em></p> </div> </div> </div>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

The truth about “horrible” Michael Schumacher claims

<p>Former Ferrari boss Ross Brawn has exposed the truth about claims Michael Schumacher was a “despicable, horrible character”.</p> <p>The man who was by the German driver’s side during his seven F1 world titles said Schumacher was a very different person when off the track.</p> <p>The legendary racer was known to be a ruthless driver on the track, which swayed public opinion.</p> <p>The 51-year-old was accused of driving “dangerously” as he needed to win no matter what, but Brawn said Schumacher changed people’s opinions once they met him away from the track.</p> <p>“I don’t know if he quite enjoyed the impression he created because he was quite an intimidating character in many ways,” Brawn told Sky’s new docu-series<span> </span><em>Race to Perfection</em>.</p> <p>“But if you knew him personally he was quite the opposite, very engaging, very personal.</p> <p>“So many times I introduced him to people who, before they met him, thought he was a despicable, horrible character and you introduce them, and once they got to know him they completely changed.</p> <p>“I had that happen so many times because there was Michael the racing driver out on the track and there was Michael the human being away from the track.”</p> <p>Brawn says whoever had the chance to get to know Schumacher on a personal level thought the world of him.</p> <p>“I don’t know of anyone who worked with Michael who had a bad word to say about him,” Brawn said.</p> <p>“Lots of people who raced against him had a different opinion but nobody I know who ever worked with Michael ever had a bad opinion about him because of his integrity, his commitment, his human side.</p> <p>“He was a very strong team member of any team he was part of and it’s a tragedy what’s happened but he’s a lovely human being.”</p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

The rise of ultra-processed foods and why they’re really bad for our health

<p>Humans (and our ancestors) have been processing food for at least <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/processed-food-a-two-million-year-history/">1.8 million years</a>. Roasting, drying, grinding and other techniques made food more nutritious, durable and tasty. This helped our ancestors to colonise diverse habitats, and then develop settlements and civilisations.</p> <p>Many traditional foods used in cooking today are processed in some way, such as grains, cheeses, dried fish and fermented vegetables. Processing itself is not the problem.</p> <p>Only much more recently has a different type of food processing emerged: one that is more extensive, and uses new chemical and physical techniques. This is called ultra-processing, and the resulting products <a href="http://www.fao.org/3/ca5644en/ca5644en.pdf">ultra-processed foods</a>.</p> <p>To make these foods, cheap ingredients such as starches, vegetable oils and sugars, are combined with cosmetic additives like colours, flavours and emulsifiers. Think sugary drinks, confectionery, mass-produced breads, snack foods, sweetened dairy products and frozen desserts.</p> <p><strong>Join 130,000 people who subscribe to free evidence-based news.</strong></p> <p>Get newsletter</p> <p>Unfortunately, these foods are terrible for our health. And we’re eating more of them than ever before, partially because of aggressive marketing and lobbying by “Big Food”.</p> <p><strong>Ultra-processed foods are harming our health</strong></p> <p>So concludes our <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/7/1955">recent literature review</a>. We found that more ultra-processed foods in the diet associates with higher risks of obesity, heart disease and stroke, type-2 diabetes, cancer, frailty, depression and death.</p> <p>These harms can be caused by the foods’ poor nutritional profile, as many are high in added sugars, salt and trans-fats. Also, if you tend to eat more ultra-processed foods, it means you probably eat fewer fresh and less-processed foods.</p> <p>Industrial processing itself can also be harmful. For example, certain food additives <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5872783/">can disrupt our gut bacteria</a> and trigger inflammation, while plasticisers in packaging can <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412019317416?via%3Dihub">interfere with our hormonal system</a>.</p> <p>Certain features of ultra-processed foods also promote over-consumption. Product flavours, aromas and mouthfeel are designed to make these foods ultra-tasty, and perhaps even <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30439381/">addictive</a>.</p> <p>Ultra-processed foods also harm the environment. For example, food packaging generates much of the plastic waste that enters marine ecosystems.</p> <p><strong>And yet, we’re eating more and more of them</strong></p> <p>In <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343478299_Ultra-processed_foods_and_the_nutrition_transition_Global_regional_and_national_trends_food_systems_transformations_and_political_economy_drivers">our latest study</a>, published in August, we found ultra-processed food sales are booming nearly everywhere in the world.</p> <p>Sales are highest in rich countries like Australia, the United States and Canada. They are rising rapidly in middle-income countries like China, South Africa and Brazil, which are highly populated. The scale of dietary change and harms to health are therefore likely immense.</p> <p><strong>‘Big Food’ is driving consumption</strong></p> <p>We <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343478299_Ultra-processed_foods_and_the_nutrition_transition_Global_regional_and_national_trends_food_systems_transformations_and_political_economy_drivers">also asked</a>: what explains the global rise in ultra-processed food sales? Growing incomes, more people living in cities, and working families seeking convenience are a few factors that contribute.</p> <p>However, it’s also clear “Big Food” corporations are driving ultra-processed food consumption globally — think Coca-Cola, Nestlé and McDonald’s. Sales growth <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1001235">is lower</a> in countries where such corporations have a limited presence.</p> <p>Globalisation has allowed these corporations to make huge investments in their overseas operations. The <a href="https://d1io3yog0oux5.cloudfront.net/_1b69e1e69528e5630a2842ce673df6eb/cocacolacompany/db/734/7242/annual_report/coca-cola-business-and-sustainability-report-2019+%281%29.pdf">Coca-Cola System</a>, for example, now includes 900 bottling plants worldwide, distributing 2 billion servings every day.</p> <p>As Big Food globalises, their advertising and promotion becomes widespread. New digital technologies, such as gaming, are used to target children. By collecting <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09581596.2017.1392483">large amounts of personal data online</a>, companies can even target their advertising at us as individuals.</p> <p>Supermarkets are now spreading throughout the developing world, provisioning ultra-processed foods at scale, and at low prices. Where supermarkets don’t exist, other distribution strategies are used. For example, Nestlé uses its “door-to-door” salesforce to <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/09/16/health/brazil-obesity-nestle.html">reach thousands</a> of poor households in Brazil’s urban slums.</p> <p>Rising consumption also reflects <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343478299_Ultra-processed_foods_and_the_nutrition_transition_Global_regional_and_national_trends_food_systems_transformations_and_political_economy_drivers">Big Food’s political power</a> to undermine public health policies. This includes lobbying policymakers, making political donations, funding favourable research, and partnerships with community organisations.</p> <p><strong>Here’s how things can change</strong></p> <p>The evidence that ultra-processed foods are harming our health and the planet is clear. We must now consider using a variety of strategies to decrease consumption. This includes adopting new laws and regulations, for example by using taxation, marketing restrictions and removing these products from schools.</p> <p>We cannot rely on industry-preferred responses such as <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14747731.2016.1239806">product reformulation</a> alone. After all, reformulated ultra-processed foods are usually still ultra-processed.</p> <p>Further, simply telling individuals to “<a href="https://theconversation.com/fat-nation-the-rise-and-fall-of-obesity-on-the-political-agenda-72875">be more responsible</a>” is unlikely to work, when Big Food spends billions every year marketing unhealthy products to undermine that responsibility.</p> <p>Should dietary guidelines now strongly advise people to avoid ultra-processed foods? Brazil and other Latin American countries <a href="http://www.fao.org/3/ca5644en/ca5644en.pdf">are already doing this</a>.</p> <p>And for us as individuals the advice is simple — avoid ultra-processed foods altogether.</p> <p><em>Written by Phillip Baker, Mark Lawrence and Priscilla Machado. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-rise-of-ultra-processed-foods-and-why-theyre-really-bad-for-our-health-140537">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

"I have outbursts": Djokovic breaks silence on US Open ejection

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Tennis star Novak Djokovic has broken his silence after he was disqualified from the US Open after hitting a line judge in the throat with a tennis ball.</p> <p>He explained that he has "outbursts" and can't promise that it won't happen again.</p> <p>He spoke in Rome ahead of competing in the Italian Open and said he was surprised he was disqualified from the competition but had accepted it.</p> <p>“Of course it was very hard for me to accept right after it happened,” said the 33-year-old.</p> <p>“For a couple of days I was in shock, and I was shaken by the whole default thing.</p> <p>“I checked with Laura after the match. She said that she was fine. No big injuries.</p> <p>“But, yeah, I mean, it was totally unexpected and very unintended, as well, of course to hit her.</p> <p>“But as I said, when you hit the ball like that, as I hit it, you know, you have a chance to hit somebody that is on the court.</p> <p>“The rules are clear, so I accepted it, and I had to move on. I have my first chance here in Rome.”</p> <p>It was the tennis player's first defeat in 2020.</p> <p>“I don’t think I will have any major issues coming back to the tour and being able to perform well and hit the tennis ball, of course during the point,” he said.</p> <p>Djokovic also explained that he couldn't guarantee that it wouldn't happen again.</p> <p>“I have outbursts, and this is kind of the personality and the player that I have always been, you know,” he said.</p> <p>“Obviously went through ups and downs in my career, managing to control my emotions more or less.</p> <p>“But you’re alone out there. It’s a lot of intensity and a lot of pressure.</p> <p>“I cannot promise or I cannot guarantee that I will never ever do anything similar to that in my life. I don’t know.</p> <p>“I mean, I definitely am going to try my best that something like that never happens again, obviously.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Major warning signs your grandchild is a bully

<p>With one out of every four children getting bullied, it's a growing epidemic. But what if your child is the bully? Experts share the signs that indicate your child might be the one causing the trouble.</p> <p><strong>They justify bad behaviour</strong></p> <p>Bullies may attempt to shift blame to the victim rather than themselves. Licensed professional counsellor Jay Clark says a behaviour that tends to correlate with bullying is when a child fails to recognise their actions may be contributing to a problem. Emotions may quickly escalate in intensity in a child with bullying tendencies, and they feel justified in treating another child badly. They may feel the other child ‘has it coming’.</p> <p><strong>They have friends who act aggressively</strong></p> <p>Children who bully often don’t have a shortage of friends. In reality, they usually have a large network of friends and a smaller, intimate group that encourages bullying behaviour, according to the Pacer Centre. No parent wants to find out their child is ill-behaved towards other students. However, if your child’s friends are mean towards other kids, or if they engage in some other type of bullying, your child might be participating in bullying as well.</p> <p><strong>They have difficulty sleeping</strong></p> <p>A 2011 study by the University of Michigan, published in the <em>Sleep Medicine</em> journal, revealed children with aggressive or bullying tendencies were twice as likely to exhibit sleep-disordered breathing problems like snoring or daytime sleepiness. While this study doesn’t prove sleep disorders actually cause bullying, it does show a possible link between sleep problems and contentious behaviour. A lack of sleep impairs mood and decision-making. If you think your child has sleep issues, a visit to the doctor might be a beneficial step to curb potential bullying.</p> <p><strong>They get in trouble at school</strong></p> <p>When Tori Cody received a call from the assistant director of her son’s preschool telling her she needed to talk to her son because he was “messing” with another boy, she felt shocked, saddened and embarrassed. “How could my four-year-old be a bully?” she asked. Realising she needed to take his aggressive behaviour seriously, she sprang into action. She began frequent talks with her son challenging him to consider how he would feel if someone behaved towards him in the same manner he behaved towards his classmate. Though it’s a work in progress, Cody has seen an improvement in her son’s actions at school.</p> <p><strong>They have behavioural problems</strong></p> <p>“Certain behaviours, if elevated, tend to correlate with bullying,” says Clark. Children who are hot-tempered, easily frustrated, impulsive, prone to fighting, and lack empathy towards others have a higher risk of being bullies. Some children may even brag about handling conflict by fighting.</p> <p><strong>They live in a violent home</strong></p> <p>If a child is in a home where they’re seeing violence, or they too are victims of violent behaviour, they are more likely to react violently in pressure situations.  Frustration builds up in kids who experience violence, Clark says. When an explosion of anger is modelled in the home, similarly, they might be inclined to take out their own anger on other children.</p> <p><strong>They have experienced bullying first-hand</strong></p> <p>Occasionally, children who have been the target of bullying will become bullies in an effort to regain some control over their lives. This was the case for Mischa van Loder, whose seven-year-old daughter began getting in trouble after she was the victim. Van Loder credits encouraging her daughter into friendship groups with positive role models as a key to curtailing her daughter’s behaviour. “Parental presence is everything in this situation,” she says. “Without support, love and lots of investigation, the problem is difficult to solve.”</p> <p><strong>They act aggressively towards their siblings</strong></p> <p>Clark suggests if you have more than one child, monitor how they’re treating the other siblings. If they display aggression towards their siblings, it’s likely they may also demonstrate aggression towards their peers.</p> <p><strong>They spend a lot of time online</strong></p> <p>With cyberbullying on the rise, Clark cautions parents to monitor their child’s internet use. There’s a level of anonymity that occurs online, allowing children to say things they might not otherwise say to another child face-to-face.</p> <p><strong>They’re intolerant towards children who are different</strong></p> <p>Licensed clinical social worker Carmen Berzinski says some children she works with show a lack of ability or willingness to accept kids who are different (diverse ethnic backgrounds, gender, disabilities, sexual orientation, etc). In an attempt to exert some control over these differences, a bully might engage in name-calling, sending harsh messages via text or social media, and fighting. For parents, Berzinki has this advice, “Nurture empathy and create opportunities for your child to do good. Reward your child for the positive steps forward they take.”</p> <p>Written by  Jenny Lelwica Buttaccio. This article first appeared in Reader’s Digest. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="https://readersdigest.innovations.co.nz/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRN87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Boy climbs UK's tallest mountain after being told he’d never walking again

<p><span>A seven-year-old boy with cerebral palsy has overcome huge adversity after climbing Britain’s tallest mountain for charity, even though his parents were told he’d never walk again. </span><br /><br /><span>Caeden Thomson, from Corby, Northamptonshire, was born 12 weeks premature, and has undergone intense physiotherapy to walk again. </span><br /><br /><span>Despite doctors' claims that he would never properly take his first steps, Caeden nor his family gave up. </span><br /><br /><span>On his JustGiving page, his mother Lisa said he wanted to be able to "give something back", because "he was so lucky for all the things he has had in his life".</span><br /><br /><span>At just seven, he hiked the 1,345 metres to the top of Ben Nevis in the Highlands on Saturday, and managed to raise more than £8,000 for his local NHS trust and disability equality charity, Scope.</span><br /><br /><span>The group began to make their way up the massive mountain at 9am. </span><br /><br /><span>Together, they would reach the summit at 5.30pm, before returning to the bottom five hours later.</span><br /><br /><span>Caeden said: "My body hurts a lot but I'm OK. It was really, really hard.</span><br /><br /><span>"I felt sick and exhausted at the top, and I felt exhausted but happy at the bottom!"</span><br /><br /><span>His mum says her son is "an absolute legend". </span><br /><br /><span>To say it was a “massive challenge” was an understatement for the group, who said it was “much, much harder than any of us expected".</span><br /><br /><span>She said: "There were many hard times along the way. From three-quarters of the way up, the pathway is just massive boulders and very hard to climb, and even at the top we didn't think he would make it down.</span><br /><br /><span>"There were danger areas where carrying was very difficult, so Caeden did have to walk down a lot of it too.</span><br /><br /><span>"The temperature dropped hugely and many climbers said they were turning back. But we made it!</span><br /><br /><span>"We are all super-proud of him, he deserves a medal.</span><br /><br /><span>"Last night no-one could move or celebrate, so today we are resting up and will celebrate tonight.</span><br /><br /><span>"We all love Caeden so much and can't believe his passion for getting to the top."</span></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Unsolved medical oddities that still mystify doctors

<ol> <li><strong> The girl who never aged</strong></li> </ol> <p>Brooke Greenberg died at the young age of 20 in 2013. But she didn’t look like your average 20-year-old because her body stopped developing at the age of five. Her hair and nails were the only parts of her body that continued to grow year by year. Despite being born premature, doctors remained perplexed as to why she stopped ageing. Numerous DNA studies showed no abnormalities in her genes associated with ageing. Nor did her parents have a history of abnormal development. Plus, all her sisters were normal and healthy. Scientists continued to refer to her condition as Syndrome X, a metabolic syndrome. Yet, her unusual condition remains unexplained by science.</p> <p>On the other hand, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/13-unsolved-mysteries-easily-explained-by-science" target="_blank">here are 13 unsolved mysteries easily explained by science.</a></p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Mermaid syndrome </strong></li> </ol> <p>Sirenomelia is a birth defect that partially or completely fuses the legs together, similar to how a mermaid looks, thus the alternative name “mermaid syndrome.” Most newborns don’t survive for long with this anomaly but some children defy the odds like Shiloh Pepin who lived until she was ten or Tiffany Yorks, the oldest known survivor of the condition, who died at age 27 in 2016. But the exact cause of sirenomelia is still unknown in the medical world because most cases occur randomly for no reason. Due to this randomness, researchers believe a new mutation or environmental factors may play a role in the development of the disorder.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> Highly superior autobiographical memory </strong></li> </ol> <p>If you give Jill Price a date, she can easily tell you what day of the week it fell on and what she did that day. Price was reported as the first known case of highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) in 2006. Since then, more adults and even children have been identified as having this ability. People with HSAM can recall almost anything from their memories in minute detail from events in their life to conversations they’ve had. The true mystery is why some people have this superhuman brainpower and others don’t. Brain images of people with HSAM have shown researchers that some parts of their brain structure are different from people who have a typical memory. But it’s not yet known if these brain differences cause HSAM or if they occur because the person uses areas of the brain associated with memory more.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/true-stories-lifestyle/thought-provoking/15-scientific-mysteries-boffins-cant-figure-out" target="_blank">Here are 15 more mysteries that have scientists perplexed.</a></p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Water allergies </strong></li> </ol> <p>Fewer than 100 people in the world have been diagnosed with aquagenic urticaria, a rare condition where people break out in hives or rashes every time they’re exposed to water. However, researchers have not found an underlying cause for the condition. Some scientific theories suggest that the hives are caused by an allergen in the water or an interaction between the water and a substance found in or on the skin that generates a toxic material, which causes hives. Some doctors recommend patients only bathe in or drink purified water (that is, if the condition is allergen-based), but an effective treatment still has yet to come to fruition due to limited data on this rare condition.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> Stiff person syndrome </strong></li> </ol> <p>This rare, progressive syndrome known as stiff person syndrome (SPS) can cause people to experience extreme stiffness, rigidity and painful spasms in their muscles. Sometimes, these muscle spasms are so strong they can even fracture bones. When the central nervous system, specifically in the brain and spinal cord, has decreased inhibition, it can cause a person’s muscle activity to increase, which can result in SPS. Scientists think the syndrome may have an autoimmune component and research has indicated that it may occur when the immune system mistakenly attacks the brain and spinal cord. Although scientists are on the cusp of discovering what could cause this disabling disorder, they still have yet to understand everything about SPS.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/6-myths-about-human-body-quashed" target="_blank">Here are 6 myths about the human body quashed. </a></p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Disembarkment syndrome </strong></li> </ol> <p>You know that feeling you get when you feel wobbly after you disembark a boat? You’ve probably heard someone say you’re “getting your land legs back.” For most people, this feeling of being in constant motion usually goes away after a few minutes or hours. But some people suffer from disembarkment syndrome, a condition where their bodies and brains can never shake that feeling of swaying and rocking. Unfortunately, it’s a hard condition to treat and usually goes away within a year. And it’s not just limited to being out on a boat either; riding in planes, trains, cars, even elevators can cause it too. Unfortunately, doctors still aren’t sure what really lies behind disembarkment syndrome. People who get migraines and women ages 30 to 60 are more likely to get it, but experts are uncertain if hormones play a role or how migraines could be linked.</p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong> Morgellons disease </strong></li> </ol> <p>People with this skin condition typically feel like something is stinging or crawling all over their skin. Unfortunately, Morgellons disease is an uncommon skin condition, characterised by small fibres or particles emerging from skin sores, that modern medicine still doesn’t understand. Some doctors think the condition is all in the patient’s head and try to treat them with cognitive behavioural therapy, antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs or counselling, while others in the medical field think the fibres could be caused by an infection from the bacterium Agrobacterium, commonly found to cause tumours in plants. As researchers attempt to study the cause of this mysterious disease, there’s still no official guidelines on diagnosis and treatment.</p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong> The boy who doesn’t feel hungry</strong></li> </ol> <p>In October 2013, Landon Jones, a 12-year-old boy from Iowa, U SA, suddenly woke up without an appetite or thirst. It only took a year for the boy to go from a healthy 47kg to a meagre 30kg. Doctors were baffled by his condition after countless brain scans, psychiatric evaluations and medical evaluations for digestive problems or eating disorders showed nothing. Some doctors wonder if he suffers from a rare brain dysfunction, particularly in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain that controls hunger and thirst. In 2014, his parents reached out to the National Institutes of Health to help evaluate Landon and possibly treat him for this rare disease. But there’s been no news to-date to say if doctors have determined a diagnosis.</p> <p><em>Written by Ashley Lewis. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/culture/8-unsolved-medical-mysteries-that-still-stump-doctors">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

10 perfect arguments that make mask wearing a no-brainer

<p>Many people understandably feel powerless against the invisible but very real threat posed by the coronavirus. But we don’t need to resign ourselves to merely hoping it goes away.</p> <p>Wearing a face mask is one of the most powerful steps we can take – along with keeping our hands clean and maintaining social distance – to quash the spread of coronavirus in our communities, says Dr Andrew Pekosz, professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.</p> <p>“These things together provide a high degree of protection,” he notes. If you’re not already on board with masks (and 65 per cent of us are, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey), the following facts should convince you.</p> <ol> <li><strong> Masks of all types are effective</strong></li> </ol> <p>Masks unquestionably reduce the spread of droplets from the nose and mouth, says Pekosz. Researchers recently demonstrated this fact when they recorded high-speed video of people uttering a simple phrase both when wearing and not wearing cloth masks. A slightly damp washcloth prevented nearly all of the speakers’ droplets from passing through. Another study concluded that “the odds of developing an infection with a coronavirus were reduced by 78 per cent when wearing any mask.”</p> <p>Even at less than 100 per cent effectiveness, “you don’t throw up your hands,” Dr Peter Chin-Hong, an infectious disease specialist. “That’s silly. Nobody’s taking a cholesterol medicine because they’re going to prevent a heart attack 100 per cent of the time, but you’re reducing your risk substantially.”</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Coronavirus stats are lower where masks are required</strong></li> </ol> <p>A recent study compared death rates in countries where people were required to wear masks with those in countries where masks were optional, and the differences were stark. The mortality rate increased by an average of 43 per cent weekly in countries where people were not required to wear masks, compared with a 2.8 per cent increase in countries where people were wearing masks.</p> <p>In the United States, similar disparities have been seen. In a review of the first 15 states to require masks in public (between April 8 and May 5), researchers found “a significant decline” in the daily growth of cases once masks were mandated, and the effect increased each day after the orders were signed. The researchers concluded that up to 450,000 cases may have been averted due to these mandates by May 22.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> Masks prevent transmission from people who don’t know they’re sick</strong></li> </ol> <p>It takes an average of five days (but sometimes as long as 14 days) for people infected with COVID-19 to show symptoms. In addition, up to 18 per cent of people who have the virus never develop symptoms at all but can still pass it on to others, according to an article from the BBC. In fact, nearly half of all people who develop COVID-19 are infected by people who do not show any symptoms.</p> <p>If those asymptomatic people had worn masks – even though they felt fine – they could have prevented this transmission, Pekosz says. “That’s part of our critical defence against this virus,” he explains. “It’s people spreading this virus before they show symptoms who are really driving this infection.” Researchers still don’t understand why some people remain asymptomatic while others develop full-blown symptoms. That’s just one of the coronavirus mysteries that still can’t be explained.<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Wearing masks could help the economy</strong></li> </ol> <p>A study by the financial firm Goldman Sachs estimates that up to 25 per cent more people would wear masks if governments introduced a national mask mandate. That, in turn, would substantially reduce the rate of infection growth, allowing businesses to remain open and saving 5 per cent of the gross domestic product.</p> <p>Wearing masks would also protect the people who work in those businesses, thereby helping their community thrive.<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> If we all wore masks, kids’ schooling may not be as disrupted</strong></li> </ol> <p>Educators, parents, and students largely agree that the remote-learning options most schools put into place earlier this year have been fundamentally disastrous, especially for disadvantaged students. Learning and social skills have fallen by the wayside, while parents scramble to juggle their own work-from-home schedules with those of their kids, and teachers adapt to new methods of instruction.</p> <p>“If you can control the spread of the virus in the community, then schools can be opened up in ways that allow kids back in the classroom and allow them to have interactions with their teacher and peers, and go forwards in some way,” Pekosz says. One thing is certain, though: Education won’t be the same.<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Masks protect people with underlying conditions</strong></li> </ol> <p>The teenager working on the supermarket checkout might have Type 1 diabetes. The toddler on the bus might have a heart defect. The man in line in front of you might be caring for his wife who has MS. The truth is, more than half the people you encounter on a daily basis probably have an invisible underlying condition, such as high blood pressure or diabetes. A Canadian study found that 54 per cent of workers do. And the evidence is clear that people with underlying conditions are at the highest risk for severe complications from the coronavirus. Managing a chronic illness is difficult enough in the best of times. We can extend kindness by not making it harder. Donning a mask in public keeps everyone safe.<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong> Masks are an easy, low-tech preventive measure until we have a vaccine</strong></li> </ol> <p>Until a vaccine for the novel coronavirus becomes available, our only options for prevention are handwashing, physical distancing, and wearing masks. Even when a vaccine has been tested and determined to be both safe and effective, it will take some time before it’s widely available. “Even if you just focus on the United States, you’re talking about immunising 300 million people. It may be that these vaccines are going to need two doses to work – an initial shot and a booster dose. That’s an awful lot of vaccinations that have to take place to get a large percentage of the population immunised,” says Pekosz. “This won’t be a light switch. It will be a process, based on the logistics.”<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong> Masking up is a moral issue, not a political one</strong></li> </ol> <p>The Right and Left on the political spectrum alike endorse wearing masks in public were community have spikes in infections. Even those who initially resisted wearing them now are doing so. One American commentator Karen Hughes, wrote in an op-ed that not wearing a mask is “an incredibly selfish act that puts other people’s lives at risk. Like yelling ‘fire!’ in a packed theatre or brandishing a loaded gun in a crowd, failing to don a mask greatly increases the risk that one person will endanger others.”</p> <p>And wearing a mask doesn’t infringe on individual liberty any more than wearing a seat belt in the car or refraining from smoking in public places does. “There are limitations we accept to avoid hurting people in our community,” says Jeremy Howard, distinguished research scientist and founder of #Masks4All. “It’s reasonable, kind, and respectful to take some actions to reduce the risk of hurting others.”<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="9"> <li><strong> Wearing a mask is a sign of strength</strong></li> </ol> <p>Men are more likely than women to believe that “wearing a face covering is shameful, not cool, a sign of weakness, and a stigma,” according to recent research. Howard emphatically disagrees with that perception. “Wearing a mask is a strong behaviour,” he says. “It actually takes strength to do something that is awkward and uncomfortable to protect jobs, protect the economy, protect lives. Weak people take the easy way out – they’re too scared to do something that’s new or different.”<strong> </strong></p> <ol start="10"> <li><strong> Masks can serve other purposes</strong></li> </ol> <p>Masks have come to the rescue on more than one occasion, like when a cold sore or pimple pops up. Thanks to the mask, no one need ever know it’s there. Ditto that for hiding an uncontrollable smirk in a serious discussion and for keeping your coffee breath to yourself. You’ll also save money on lipstick, since there’s no need to make up the bottom half of your face. And finally, masks are available in such a wide range of designs that there’s sure to be one that expresses your sense of fashion, your personality, or your viewpoint.</p> <p><em>Written by Laurie Budgar. This article first appeared on </em><em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.co.nz/healthsmart/10-facts-that-will-convince-you-to-wear-a-face-mask">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.co.nz/subscribe">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

White Island volcano survivor’s emotional plea during COVID lockdown

<p>Stephanie Browitt overcame extreme adversity as she lost her father and her sister in the White Island volcano eruption.</p> <p>As she lives in Melbourne, she has also been in lockdown and has shared a message of hope.</p> <p>"As someone who is grieving deeply and has essentially been in lockdown since early December, due to my six months admission in hospital, I truly believe that focusing on what you can’t change is wasted energy that could be used elsewhere," she explained to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/coronavirus/melbourne-strong-white-island-survivors-plea-to-lockeddown-melburnians/news-story/f1753533b79b0936d98763a58bb7ea33" target="_blank" class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtflink"><em>The Herald Sun</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p>She explained that her time in hospital was tough, but she kept sane by focusing on having her "normal day to day life back".</p> <p>As she was released when Melbourne is in lockdown due to COVID-19, she unfortunately hasn't had that experience.</p> <p>However, she doesn't let it get her down.</p> <p>"I’ve learnt one of the hardest lessons in life which is that you never know when you’re going to lose someone you love," she shared.</p> <p>"I lost my dad and sister so suddenly and I would do anything and everything to have them in lockdown with mum and I.</p> <p>"I feel as though people don’t realise how precious time is and that you don’t often get the chance to be with family like this," she said.</p> <p>Stephanie also explained that being in lockdown in Melbourne is something that "everyone is going through together".</p> <p>"It isn’t forever and that’s what I choose to focus on.</p> <p>"I choose to take it one day at a time and enjoy my time with mum. I choose to explore what I can do from home and get creative with my time. I choose to stay home and accept this because everybody deserves to feel safe," she said.</p> <p>She also urged people not to be selfish and be "team players".</p> <p>"We need to be team players to overcome this petrifying pandemic.</p> <p>"We just can’t afford to branch off on our own, at the risk of killing another or perhaps our own family members," she said.</p> <p>Her mum Marie said that Stephanie will require more painful and expensive surgeries as she has amputated fingers and burns to most of her body that require a compression suit and full face mask.</p> <p>“She won’t complain,” Marie said.</p> <p>That’s despite the fact “she’s disfigured and her fingers are chopped and she’s burnt all over … she’s just trying to stay alive”.</p> <p>The loss of family members seems to have hit the pair the hardest.</p> <p>“My youngest daughter passed away on the mountain and my husband suffered to death. My other daughter is horrifically injured … I can tell you, there is nothing more important than family … just having your family alive and healthy,” Marie said.</p> <p>“There isn’t anything I wouldn’t do — I would live in a gutter and give up anything — to bring my husband and child back.”</p> <p>The loss still impacts them to this day.</p> <p>“We cry daily, which doesn’t have anything to do with isolation, but because of our grief, our great loss, and our empty home which was once full of laughter and food and people,” Marie said.</p> <p>“Every week, I go to the cemetery where my husband and daughter lay, just so I can talk to them. ”</p> <p>Marie has some advice for Melbourne citizens who are struggling, which is to be safe with your loved ones.</p> <p>“There are people out there, ignoring laws designed to protect their own family’s survival. I can’t comprehend it.</p> <p>“If you have your family, and you have your health, you have everything. I just wish people could see that.</p> <p>“But there are people out there putting themselves and their families, and other families, at risk, complaining about being stuck, with their family, at home.</p> <p>“People are complaining about losing their businesses and the economy, and not being able to go shopping or out for a leisurely stroll, but these things don’t matter.</p> <p>“There is no amount of money, no possessions, that I wouldn’t give up to get some of what I had back, just to get a glimpse of my child or hear her voice or laugh again, to smell her smell.”</p> <p>“Material things you can always get back. You cannot get your family back … Death is irreversible.”</p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Meghan and Harry fired baby Archie's nanny in the middle of the night

<p>In Omid Scoobie and Carolyn Durand’s new book<span> </span><em>Finding Freedom: Harry and Meghan and the Making of a Modern Royal Family,<span> </span></em>it has been revealed that Meghan and Prince Harry let go of Archie’s nanny in the middle of the night.</p> <p>In the book, which details all the ins and outs of Meghan and Harry’s relationship, Scoobie and Durand claim the royals fired their night nurse for their son Archie Mountbatten Windsor.</p> <p>While the personal details were not expressed, the author’s claim it was because the aide was “unprofessional and irresponsible.”</p> <p>“Meghan and Harry were forced to let the nurse go in the middle of her second night of work for being unprofessional and irresponsible,” the book claims.</p> <p>The couple went on to hire another night nurse who did a “fine job,” however neither Meghan or Harry felt comfortable leaving their son in the care of another nanny due to the traumatising experience they had with their first one.</p> <p>The book noted that the pair ended up letting the new aide go as well.</p> <p> “Neither found themselves comfortable sleeping through the night without going to check on Archie regularly,” Scobie and Durand wrote.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837320/meghan.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/fae763eb21af4ab09614e53cd7184a5e" /></p> <p>Though Harry and Meghan haven’t denied the claims in <em>Finding Freedom</em>, they both have made it loud and clear that neither of them had been interviewed for the book.</p> <p>They also said that any stories shared were solely from the author’s own reporting.</p> <p> “The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were not interviewed and did not contribute to <em>Finding Freedom</em>. This book is based on the authors’ own experiences as members of the royal press corps and their own independent reporting,” Meghan and Harry’s statement read.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CDwsTLrJJf7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CDwsTLrJJf7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by instylemagazine (@instylemagazine)</a> on Aug 11, 2020 at 12:30pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Meghan and Harry tied the knot in May 2018 and later went on to have their first son in May of 2019.</p> <p>In January 2020, the pair announced their decision to step down as senior members of the British Royal Family, detailing they would be moving to Canada with Archie.</p> <p>“After many months of reflection and internal discussions, we have chosen to make a transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution,” the couple wrote in a statement to their Instagram page, which left The Firm back at Kensington Palace in shock as they allege they were not made aware of any intention from the couple to step down.</p> <p>“We intend to step back as ‘senior’ members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent, while continuing to fully support Her Majesty The Queen.”</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess have since relocated to Los Angeles, which is Meghan’s hometown.</p> <p>The couple have both dug deep into working and are currently living in director Tyler Perry’s former mansion as they search for their forever home.</p> <p>In their announcement in January, Meghan and Harry, who completed their final official day as senior royals on April 1, shared their excitement for being able to raise Archie in North America.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CDdUrz9nETK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CDdUrz9nETK/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Uk royal family 🇬🇧 (@uk_royal.kidos)</a> on Aug 3, 2020 at 11:58pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“It is with your encouragement, particularly over the last few years, that we feel prepared to make this adjustment. We now plan to balance our time between the United Kingdom and North America, continuing to honour our duty to The Queen, the Commonwealth, and our patronages,” the couple wrote.</p> <p>“This geographic balance will enable us to raise our son with an appreciation for the royal tradition into which he was born, while also providing our family with the space to focus on the next chapter, including the launch of our new charitable entity.</p> <p>“We look forward to sharing the full details of this exciting next step in due course, as we continue to collaborate with Her Majesty The Queen, The Prince of Wales, The Duke of Cambridge and all relevant parties. Until then, please accept our deepest thanks for your continued support.”</p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Ricky Ponting reveals the moment he thought his son was dead

<p>Aussie cricket star Ricky Ponting has opened up on his son’s terrifying near-death experiences.</p> <p>Five-year-old Fletcher Ponting has come close to death twice in his short life, with his former Test captain father forced to watch helplessly on both occasions.</p> <p>When Fletcher was just six weeks old he fought off meningitis as he spent weeks in ICU clinging to life.</p> <p>The Ponting family’s world was turned upside down when at eight months old Fletcher contracted an infection during a hernia surgery.</p> <p>Ponting recalled the night the infection shut down his son’s body as the cricket great stood by while over 15 doctors and nurses attempted to save his life.</p> <p>“He was just limp. I thought to myself, ‘He’s gone!’ Every nurse and doctor from the level rushed into the room at the same time - it was like a code red,” Ponting told The Herald Sun.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B__Lqt5Bqk1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B__Lqt5Bqk1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Happy Mother’s Day to the best two mums in the world!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/rickyponting/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Ricky Ponting AO</a> (@rickyponting) on May 9, 2020 at 5:28pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“It’s where your mind goes. Your body goes numb. You are helpless. There’s nothing scarier.”</p> <p>The MRSA infection left Fletcher in excruciating pain as it took hold of him.</p> <p>“I thought he was going to come out with his whole right side cut out. Luckily, they got it before it got into his flesh and took over his body.”</p> <p>Ponting said he was glad his wife Rianna wasn’t in the room that night because it would still be “haunting her to this day”.</p> <p>He said his family appreciates just how fortunate they were as Fletcher made it out alive out of two potentially fatal situations - especially after their experiences with the Ponting Foundation.</p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Kmart shopper spots error on new laundry hamper

<p>A Kmart shopper spotted a hilarious mistake she spotted on a brand-new item she purchased.</p> <p>“Hmm, think there’s something wrong here,” the woman wrote, sharing an image of her new ‘Lights and Darks’ laundry hamper in a Kmart Facebook group.</p> <p>“Think I’ll have to take it back to Kmart. I haven’t quite finished putting it together but will have to pull it apart again,” she said.</p> <p>According to the shopper, the cloth baskets are not attached the wrong way, as it appears that the words on the "dark" side have been printed upside down.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837064/kmart-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ec9aaa6668a441e6aa8f938cfe28ce44" /></p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>“I did pick up one box and had the end of the box open and everything come out whilst I was walking through the shop with it,” she said.</p> <p>“Had a very nice Kmart lady nearby who saw what happened and helped me collect the bits only to realise one piece was missing.</p> <p>The shop assistant ended up opening the box of the item she now has set up at home to check all the pieces were there.</p> <p>“She was so helpful and lovely. Pity we didn’t check the words were the right way up,” the woman quipped.</p> <p>The mix-up was a hit on the Facebook group.</p> <p>“I would just keep it, it’s funny,” one person wrote, with many agreeing it was now an ‘original’ item.</p> <p>“I love it. Upside down and all,” another agreed.</p> <p>A Kmart spokesperson has said it is believed to be an isolated incident but the store is investigating the example.</p> <p>“At Kmart, the quality of our products are our number one priority,” the spokesperson told <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/kmart-shopper-mistake-light-dark-laundry-sorting-hamper-033604569.html" target="_blank" class="_e75a791d-denali-editor-page-rtflink"><em>7News</em></a><em>.</em></p> <p>“We are currently investigating this with our quality team and believe this may be an isolated incident as we have not been made aware of this sort of printing error before.</p> <p>“We welcome the opportunity to resolve this directly with the customer and encourage the customer to reach out to our friendly customer service team.”</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Facebook</em></p> </div> </div> </div>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Positive results from new COVID vaccine

<p><span>A vaccine for COVID-19 has been developed by scientists at Oxford University who claim they have seen positive results in healthy volunteers.</span><br /><br /><span>Researchers say in the journal <em>Lancet</em> that they trialled an experimental vaccine — labelled ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 — on more than 1000 people and prompted a protective immune response in those aged 18 to 55.</span><br /><br /><span>"We hope this means the immune system will remember the virus, so that our vaccine will protect people for an extended period," study lead author Andrew Pollard of the University of Oxford said.</span><br /><br /><span>"However, we need more research before we can confirm the vaccine effectively protects against SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infection, and for how long any protection lasts."</span><br /><br /><span>AstraZeneca's is among the leading vaccine candidates against COVID-19.</span><br /><br /><span>It has claimed more than 600,000 lives worldwide, alongside others in mid and late-stage trials.</span><br /><br /><span>AstraZeneca has signed agreements with governments around the world to supply the vaccine should it prove effective and gain regulatory approval.</span><br /><br /><span>British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the announcement was "very positive news", but also warned there are still further trials to take place.</span><br /><br /><span>"There are no guarantees, we're not there yet &amp; further trials will be necessary — but this is an important step in the right direction," he tweeted.</span><br /><br /><span>Researchers have also cautioned the public that the project was still at an early stage.</span><br /><br /><span>"There is still much work to be done before we can confirm if our vaccine will help manage the COVID-19 pandemic," vaccine developer Sarah Gilbert said.</span><br /><br /><span>"We still do not know how strong an immune response we need to provoke to effectively protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection," she said, adding researchers needed to learn more about COVID-19 and continue late stage trials which have already commenced.</span><br /><br /><span>AstraZeneca has said it will not seek to profit from the vaccine during the pandemic.</span><br /><br /><span>“We are seeing good immune response in almost everybody,” Dr Hill explained to the Associated Press.</span><br /><br /><span>“What this vaccine does particularly well is trigger both arms of the immune system,” Dr Hill said.</span><br /><br /><span>Researchers say “preliminary findings show that the candidate vaccine given as a single dose was safe and tolerated”.</span><br /><br /><span>“No serious adverse reactions ... occurred. The majority of adverse events reported were mild or moderate in severity, and all were self-limiting.</span><br /><br /><span>“We show that a single dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 elicits an increase in spike-specific Antibodies by day 28 and neutralising antibody in all participants after a booster dose.</span><br /><br /><span>“Further studies are required to assess the vaccine in various population groups including older age groups, those with comorbidities, and in ethnically and geographically diverse populations.</span><br /><br /><span>“We will also evaluate the vaccine in children, once sufficient safety data have been accumulated in adult studies. Phase 3 trials are now underway in Brazil, South Africa, and the UK and will evaluate vaccine efficacy in diverse populations.”</span><br /><br /><span>The trial took place between April 23 and May 21.</span></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Breakthrough treatment for glaucoma sufferers

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>An eye implant that's smaller than a grain of sand has the potential to revolutionise the treatment of glaucoma, which is a leading cause of blindness. </p> <p>The implant measures just 0.2mm by 1mm and is a tiny polyester plug that gradually releases bimatoprost.</p> <p>This is a drug that's already found in eye drops that are often prescribed to patients to treat glaucoma. </p> <p>With more than seven in ten patients failing to use the drops properly, this highly reduces the benefit of the drug and others suffer from side-effects of the eye drops.</p> <p>It is hoped that the implant will improve treatment as well as slow down the progression of the disease.</p> <p>Glaucoma is most common in people in their 70s and 80s and is often caused by fluid building up in the front part of the eye.</p> <p>This increases pressure in the eye and squeezes the optic nerve, killing some of the fibres needed to transmit information to the brain and leads to a loss of vision.</p> <p>The implant's benefits last for around eight months, with a patient only being able to be fitted for one.</p> <p>It is hoped in the future that they are able to have replacements when needed.</p> <p>"Anything that makes it easier for people to manage glaucoma is a good thing," says Daniel Hardiman-McCartney, clinical adviser for the College of Optometrists.</p> <p>"Implants are a possible option, but recent research suggests that a pressure-lowering laser treatment called selective laser trabeculoplasty may be even more helpful."</p> </div> </div> </div>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

The incredibly "puzzling" thing one boy did for the Queen to cheer her up

<p><span>While many members of the royal family have begun to return their normal lives, and even attend public engagements again - Queen Elizabeth is continuing to remain in lockdown in Windsor Castle.</span><br /><br /><span>Due to the royal’s older age, she is at higher risk for COVID-19 and that’s exactly why Essex boy Timothy Madders put his brain to the test and got to making Her Majesty the ultimate boredom buster present.</span><br /><br /><span>The seven-year-old "wanted to do something to cheer her up," his mother, Jo Madders, told the BBC.</span><br /><br /><span>And to do that, he configured a happiness-themed word puzzle in his “best handwriting.”</span><br /><br /><span>He included words like “smile”, “happiness,” “family” and “jolly.”</span><br /><br /><span>"She's probably wanting to keep herself busy," he explained.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">7-year-old Timothy Madders from <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Billericay?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Billericay</a> created a happiness themed word search and sent it to Buckingham Palace for the Queen. A few days ago he got a reply! <a href="https://t.co/oJJitT7XP2">pic.twitter.com/oJJitT7XP2</a></p> — BBC Essex (@BBCEssex) <a href="https://twitter.com/BBCEssex/status/1281482836655177728?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 10, 2020</a></blockquote> <p><br /><span>Timothy included a short but heartfelt letter along with the puzzle, writing, "You might be feeling sad or lonely during lockdown, so I thought I could make a word search for you to cheer you up."</span><br /><br /><span>The gesture was well-received, with Timothy revealing he recieve a letter from one of the British monarch's ladies-in-waiting, expressing her gratitude.</span><br /><br /><span>“The Queen wishes me to write and thank you for your kind letter, and for the puzzle you have created especially for Her Majesty," the letter read.</span><br /><br /><span>“Your thoughtfulness is greatly appreciated, and the Queen hopes that you too are keeping safe and well in the current situation.</span><br /><br /><span>“I am to thank you very much indeed for writing as you did at this time."</span><br /><br /><span>Timothy said the letter "was very good and it was very important and made me happy that she liked it."</span></p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

COVID super-spreader infects 71 people in 60 seconds

<p>An asymptomatic carrier of coronavirus rode an elevator alone, had no symptoms and self-quarantined after travel but managed to infect 71 people.</p> <p>Intensive contact tracing is revealing how infectious the virus can be, with the US Centres for Disease Control (CDC) analysing the impact of this single traveller.</p> <p>Coronavirus can spread through droplets, be carried through the air and linger on surfaces as well as be transferred through asymptomatic carriers.</p> <p>The CDC study did a deep-dive contact tracing effort in Heilongjiang Province, China, which had not reported a new coronavirus diagnosis since March 11.</p> <p>On the second of April, a man in the area suffered a serious stroke but had not tested positive for coronavirus.</p> <p>He was rushed to the hospital and his three sons took turns staying by his bedside, furthering infecting 28 people, including a nurse and a doctor.</p> <p>Before being diagnosed with coronavirus, the stroke victim was taken to a second hospital where he was the source of another 20 infections.</p> <p>Another man had also presented with coronavirus symptoms and his close contacts were tested. They were also all positive tests.</p> <p>Everyone the second patient had been in contact with was tested and put into lockdown, but for 50 of them, it was too late.</p> <p>Contact tracers were urgently trying to find out the source of the outbreak, as there were fears it could have started within the community. </p> <p>After tracing it back through the community, they tested the man's girlfriend and her daughter who lived with them, who both tested positive for coronavirus.</p> <p>The contact tracers then hit a wall, as no one had travelled or had contacts who had travelled. Due to standard genome sequencing of the virus, the tests indicated it had come from overseas, but every chain of contacts had come up blank as no one had travelled.</p> <p>It was only until they extended their search to people living in the same residential apartment tower that they figured out where the coronavirus cluster had started.</p> <p>A woman who had recently travelled from the United States and intensely followed self-isolation protocol still tested positive for coronavirus antibodies.</p> <p>After detailed questioning from the contact tracers, which showed that the women had not come into direct contact with each other, there was only one possible source of contagion.</p> <p>The lift that was shared by that portion of the apartment block.</p> <p>The traveller had used it to get into the apartment where she self-isolated for 14 days and had food delivered.</p> <p>“Therefore, we believe A0 (the traveller from the US) was an asymptomatic carrier and that B1.1 (the daughter) was infected by contact with surfaces in the elevator in the building where they both lived,” the researchers wrote.</p> <p>“Our results illustrate how a single asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection could result in widespread community transmission,” the study authors concluded.</p> <p>The researchers are urging people to not become complacent, as the virus is still wreaking havoc. It appears that isolation is the only tool available to stop the spread.</p> <p>“Continued measures to protect, screen, and isolate infected persons are essential to mitigating and containing the COVID-19 pandemic,” the study reads.</p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Young mother’s coronavirus test leads to devastating cancer news

<p>A young mother who feared she had COVID-19 has learned that her cancer had returned and spread through her body.</p> <p>Beth Pitt-Roche, 26, from the English county of Suffolk, took two coronavirus tests earlier this year after struggling with a cough and cold.</p> <p>The tests returned negative, but an X-ray and CT scan showed that Beth’s breast cancer came back and is now in her lungs, spine, hips and liver.</p> <p>The mother-of-two was first diagnosed with invasive HER2 breast cancer in 2017. After going through chemotherapy and recovering from her first diagnosis, she underwent a double mastectomy towards the end of last year in an attempt to eliminate the risk of the cancer returning.</p> <p>She started developing respiratory symptoms two weeks after the mastectomy, and was told in April that the cancer was back.</p> <p>“[The doctors] told me without treatment I had up to eight months left to live – it was indescribable,” Beth told <em><a href="https://7news.com.au/news/human-interest/young-mothers-coronavirus-test-leads-to-heart-wrenching-cancer-diagnosis-c-1151432">7News</a></em>.</p> <p>“I couldn’t catch my breath, but I didn’t cry.</p> <p>“All we have as a family is the day ahead now, and that’s how we live our lives. I don’t want to dwell on what I can’t change.”</p> <p>Beth is now having targeted therapy, which doctors expect could help prolong her life expectancy by at least five years.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CBsPU2fHI5_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CBsPU2fHI5_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Beth Pitt-Roche (@thepittrochediaries)</a> on Jun 21, 2020 at 1:57am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>She is also raising funds for a family therapy dog, an idea which she said was inspired by Netflix series <em>After Life</em>.</p> <p>“During lockdown, we binge-watched <em>After Life</em> on Netflix, in which a man, played by Ricky Gervais, loses his wife to cancer,” she said.</p> <p>“The only thing that keeps him going is her dog, Brandy. It was amazing seeing how much the dog helped him cope.”</p> <p>She decided to carry out the idea following a discussion with her husband Nick. In late June, her friend Karis Nurse launched a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/Make-a-Warrior-of-Cancers-dream-come-true?utm_source=customer&amp;utm_campaign=p_cp+share-sheet&amp;utm_medium=copy_link-tip">GoFundMe page</a> with a £3,500 goal to purchase the dog.</p> <p>“Knowing that the family will have the unconditional love of a devoted dog when I’m not here is a reassuring thought,” Beth said.</p>

Caring

Placeholder Content Image

Prince Harry's moving message for the 2020 Diana Awards

<p><span>Last month, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, spoke out against the death of George Floyd during her commencement speech for her former high school’s graduation.</span></p> <p><span>Since then, she and her husband, Prince Harry, have become more vocal about the Black Lives Matter movement, and in a newly released video, Harry made his own strong statement against racism.</span></p> <p><span>In what would have been Princess Diana’s 59th birthday, it was also the annual presentation of the Diana Awards, established in the memory of the late royal.</span></p> <p><span>The awards recognise the youth for their social or humanitarian work, as Diana believed young people could change the world.</span></p> <p><span>In a video recorded for the awards, Prince Harry asked young people to help repair the current ills in our society and praised what the recipients had already accomplished.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Prince Harry recorded a video for the <a href="https://twitter.com/DianaAward?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@DianaAward</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/2020DianaAwards?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#2020DianaAwards</a> taking place today (on what would be Princess Diana’s 59th birthday).<br />In it, he says institutional racism is still “endemic” in our societies and has pledged that he and Meghan will be “part of the change” needed. <a href="https://t.co/5tbE263b3k">pic.twitter.com/5tbE263b3k</a></p> — Omid Scobie (@scobie) <a href="https://twitter.com/scobie/status/1278352027953893376?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 1, 2020</a></blockquote> <p><span>"I am so incredibly proud to be part of these awards because they honour the legacy of my mother and bring out the very best in people like you," the Prince said. "You all are doing such incredible work, and at a time of great uncertainty you have found the power and inspiration inside of you to make a positive mark on the world."</span></p> <p><span>Harry mentioned how his mother would have felt a feeling of admiration for the recipients as she knew what they did was necessary and important, even though it was difficult.</span></p> <p><span>"I can assure you [Diana] would have been fighting in your corner," Harry noted. "Like many of you she never took the easy route, or the popular one, or the comfortable one, but she stood for something and she stood up for people who needed it."</span></p> <p><span>The Prince then began talking about issues related to the current climate, as the world has been protesting against racial discrimination.</span></p> <p><span>In his statement, Harry followed in his wife’s footsteps and mentioned that society has not yet done enough to combat these issues.</span></p> <p><span>"My wife said recently that our generation and the ones before us haven’t done enough to right the wrongs of the past," Harry said. "I too am sorry—sorry that we haven't got the world to the place that you deserve it to be."</span></p> <p><span>The Prince continued, calling out the racism still ever-present today. "Institutional racism has no place in our societies yet it is still endemic," he said. "Unconscious bias must be acknowledged without blame to create a better world for all of you."</span></p> <p><span>Harry then finished off his speech by asking young people, especially the recipients of the Diana Award, to continue fighting for a more equitable and fair society. He also verified his own commitment to these causes.</span></p> <p><span>"I want you to know that we are committed to being part of the solution and to being part of the change that you are all leading," Prince Harry said. "Now is the time and we know that you can do it."</span></p>

Caring