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Should you let your cat sleep in your bed?

<p><strong><em>Dr. Bethany Richards is a cat lover working at </em></strong><span><strong><em><a href="https://southerncrossvet.com.au/">Southern Cross Vet</a></em></strong></span><strong><em> and the principal vet for </em></strong><span><strong><em><a href="http://lions-den.com.au/">The Lion’s Den</a></em></strong></span><strong><em>. In her spare time, Beth cares for her foster kittens Gracie &amp; Neko and her Golden Retriever, Archie.</em></strong></p> <p>Cats love sleeping in beds. Beds contain two things that cats love – warmth and their owner. Deciding whether or not your cat will sleep on the bed should be done before you get the cat. Once your cat has started sleeping in your bed it will be almost impossible to break the habit.</p> <p><strong>Risks of letting your cat sleep in your bed</strong></p> <p><strong>1. Disrupted sleep:</strong> Sleep is a hot commodity in the modern world. Cats will sleep for 15 hours a day, but unlike humans they aren’t fussy about when this sleep is. Some cats are night owls and might decide to move around on the bed in the night, waking you up.</p> <p><strong>2. Parasites: </strong>Fleas and mites do not live long on humans but can still bite us and cause irritation. Before you decide to let your cat sleep in your bed, make sure he/she is on regular flea control.</p> <p><strong>3. Bacterial and fungal Infection:</strong> Prolonged exposure to bacteria and fungi on cats can put some people at risk of bacterial and fungal skin infection. Those people most at risk are those with compromised immune systems, such as the elderly, the very young or those undergoing cancer treatment. Ringworm is a fungal skin infection that can affect both cats and healthy people. Most cats do not have ringworm, but if your cat is diagnosed with this condition then you should not sleep with them in the bed.</p> <p><strong>4. Cat allergies</strong>: People who are allergic to cats should not sleep with cats.</p> <p><strong>5. Harm to or from young children:</strong> Very young children or babies can be at risk of accidental smothering if a cat is allowed in the crib. Young children should never be left unsupervised with cats as they can be too rough with the cat, possibly leading to bites and scratches.</p> <p><strong>Risks of NOT letting your cat sleep in your bed</strong></p> <p><strong>1. A disappointed cat banging on the door:</strong> Not letting a determined cat sleep on the bed might be more trouble than it is worth. Your cat might make a lot of noise in the night attempting to get into your room, which can disrupt your sleep.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><img src="/media/7820386/1_500x500.jpg" alt="1 (195)" width="500" height="500" /></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Dr. Beth's cat Gracie sleeps on her bed</em></p> <p><strong>2. Cold bed</strong>: Cats are warm and make perfect soft hot water bottles in winter.</p> <p>At the end of the day, the decision of whether or not the cat sleeps in the bed is often not made by the owner, but by the cat</p>

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Prince Frederik of Denmark hospitalised

<p>Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark has been forced to cancel his upcoming engagements after undergoing back surgery on Sunday.</p> <p>The Danish palace released a statement confirming that Frederik had an operation to correct a slipped disc. The operation was successful, and he was discharged from the Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen on Monday.</p> <p>The future king of Denmark was due to mark Nature Day on Monday and take part in an army-related engagement on Wednesday. His trip to Finland, scheduled for next week, has also been postponed.</p> <p>He is now recovering at home and will resume his royal duties in the coming weeks.</p> <p>Frederik was most recently pictured in public last Wednesday during French President Emmanuel Macron's visit to Denmark.</p> <p>The father-of-four has previously spoken up about his back pain. Prince Frederik, who celebrated turning 50 by participating in the <em>Royal Run</em>, said in May: "I have had a few back problems lately which have stopped me from going running as I would like to."</p> <p>The news come just days after it was revealed that Frederik and his Aussie-born wife Princess Mary will be coming to Australia for the upcoming Invictus Games.</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/prince-harry-and-duchess-meghan-aren-t-the-only-royals-visiting-australia-next-month">Frederik and Mary will join British royals Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan</a></span></strong> in Sydney for the Invictus Games, which will run from October 20 to 27.</p>

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Four-year-old fighting for her life after trying on new shoes

<p>A four-year-old girl from Wales in the UK is suffering from a life-threatening condition after contracting deadly sepsis from trying on new shoes.</p> <p>A day after trying on different sized shoes on bare feet, Sienna Rasul fell seriously ill. She was later diagnosed with sepsis – a life-threatening disease that can develop due to an infection.</p> <p>As reported by <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/7125547/girl-fighting-sepsis-infection-new-school-shoes-shop/" target="_blank">The Sun</a></em>, doctors believe the infection was present on the shoes that she tried on, and that there is a possibility that Sienna had a cut or graze on her foot that allowed the bacteria to enter her body.</p> <p>As a result, Sienna spent five days in hospital with a drip attached to her at all times. Her mother, Jodie Thomas, was by her side during the ordeal.</p> <p>“I was really shocked when the doctors said it was from trying on new shoes,” she said.</p> <p>“I’ve been worried sick. They’ve had to drain all the poison from her leg.</p> <p>“Normally she would have socks on but it’s the summertime, so she was wearing sandals.</p> <p>“The shoes she liked had been tried on by other little girls and that’s how Sienna picked up the infection.”</p> <p>Jodie knew something was wrong with her daughter when Sienna was constantly crying in pain after the shopping trip.</p> <p>When doctors noticed the infection, they used a pen to outline exactly where it had spread.</p> <p>“By the next day it had spread up her leg and her temperature was raging,” said Jodie.</p> <p>“I drove her straight to the hospital. She was shaking and twitching – it was horrible to see my little girl like that.</p> <p>“They said it was sepsis and thought they would have to operate.</p> <p>“But the doctors have managed to drain all the pus from her leg and say the antibiotic drip will do the job.”</p> <p>Sienna has been released from the children’s ward at Prince Charles Hospital in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales, but is still being closely monitored.</p> <p>After going through the horrifying ordeal, Jodie is now reminding parents of the importance of children wearing socks when trying on shoes.</p> <p>“I knew you risk getting things like athlete’s foot from trying on shoes, but blood poisoning is far more serious,” she said.</p> <p>“You don’t know whose feet have been in the shoes before you.</p> <p>“Sienna has been really ill. The infection was moving up her leg and spreading to the rest of her body.</p> <p>“I’m so glad I got her to the hospital quickly."</p> <p>When shopping for new children's shoes, Jodie advised mums and dads "to take a spare pair of socks with them".</p> <p>Chief executive of the UK Sepsis Trust Dr Ron Daniels said that: “This frightening case shows us that sepsis strikes indiscriminately and can affect anyone at any time.</p> <p>“Whenever there are signs of infection, it’s crucial that members of the public seek medical attention urgently and just ask: ‘Could it be sepsis?’” he added.</p> <p>“Better awareness could save thousands of lives every year.”</p>

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Why your muscles stiffen as you age

<p><strong><em>Andrew Lavender is a lecturer at the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science at Curtin University. </em></strong></p> <p>Many older people find they’re not able to move as freely as they did when they were younger. They describe their movements as feeling stiff or restricted. In particular, feeling stiff when getting out of bed first thing in the morning or after sitting for a long period. The feeling does eventually ease with movement as the muscles “warm up”, but it can be troublesome. There are a few reasons this happens.</p> <p>As we age, bones, joints and muscles tend to become weak. Movements feeling stiff is often our perception of the increased effort required to perform daily tasks.</p> <p>Many older people have <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3424705/">ageing-associated conditions</a> that can contribute to muscle stiffness. These include osteoarthritis (breaking down of the cartilage in joints), osteomalacia (a softening of the bones due to a lack of vitamin D), osteoporosis (where bone mass is reduced causing bones to become brittle), rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation of the joints, and muscle weakness due to sarcopenia (the natural loss of muscle mass and strength).</p> <p>Blood flow may also play a part. As we age, our arteries <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3738364/">become stiffer and less flexible</a>, meaning blood can easily pool, particularly in the feet.</p> <p>When we get up after sitting or lying down for a long period of time, the stiffness may be due to a lack of the lubricating fluid in the joints. Once we move around for a while and warm up, more of the lubricating fluid, called synovial fluid, is moved into the joint, so the joint surfaces have less resistance to movement and can move more freely.</p> <p>Normal healthy ageing results in a <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/1529-0131(200111)44:11%3C2556::AID-ART436%3E3.0.CO;2-U">loss of joint cartilage</a>, particularly of the knee. This cartilage provides a smooth articulating surface between bones at the joint that wears down, becoming thinner and providing less cushioning between the articulating surfaces. This may account for stiffness felt during movement.</p> <p>Another contributing factor is the change in ligaments, tendons and muscles that are relatively relaxed and flexible when we are young. These lose that flexibility with ageing and disuse. In fact, many of the age-related changes in muscles, bones and joints are <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4041600/">the result of disuse</a>.</p> <p><strong>Move it or lose it</strong></p> <p>As we get older, we tend to become less physically active. While that’s understandable and reasonable, reducing the amount we exercise too much or stopping exercise altogether can exacerbate these age-related changes. Muscles need to be stimulated by physical activity in order to maintain strength and mass.</p> <p>Bones also need stimulation through loading to keep their density. Joints too need stimulation from movement to keep that feeling of stiffness to a minimum. And aside from our muscles and joints, the heart, lungs and circulatory system also need to be stimulated by exercise to maintain their ability to function optimally.</p> <p>While there are many factors that contribute to this common feeling of restricted movement or stiffness, the most important action we can take is to move more. This can be achieved through a number of measures.</p> <p>Becoming involved with a formal exercise or sports club is a great way to ensure you continue to exercise regularly. Teaming up with a friend to meet for exercise which could include aerobic activities such as running, swimming or walking is another good way to make sure you get some exercise.</p> <p>Resistance training is also important for muscles and bones. Moving the limbs through the entire range of motion of the joints is important for maintaining the ability to move freely and keep the muscles, tendons and ligaments healthy.</p> <p>There’s a lot of truth to the old adage “move it or lose it”: if we don’t keep moving, we lose our ability to do so. Exercise can be fun and finding something enjoyable will help you to stick to it. The social interactions that come with exercising, particularly in groups or clubs, is an added advantage which also has mental health benefits.</p> <p><em>Written by Andrew Lavender. Republished with permission of <strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/">The Conversation.</a></strong> </em></p> <p><img width="1" height="1" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/101808/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-advanced" alt="The Conversation" style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;"/></p>

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Richard Hammond and family “gassed” and robbed on Saint Tropez holiday

<p><em>The Grand Tour</em>’s host Richard Hammond and his wife were gassed and robbed in their holiday villa in the South of France.</p> <p>The former <em>Top Gear</em> host and his wife Mindy, along with 15 guests who were staying together in a San Tropez villa, were stunned with anaesthetic gas before a team of thieves stole from them.</p> <p>Mindy, 53, described how she woke up as a group of burglars pilfered cash and jewellery.</p> <p>“I went downstairs and into the hallway. The door into the living room was shut but I heard a male voice behind the door,” the columnist said.</p> <p>“I thought it was another couple staying up and went back to bed.</p> <p>“Actually, it was the burglars.”</p> <p>She said the burglars searched the rooms of all of their 15 guests.</p> <p>“That just makes my blood run cold,” she said. “I could have easily walked in and it could have been unpleasant.”</p> <p>Guests at the villa had been enjoying a 1920s themed cocktail party the night before.</p> <p>Gas raids have been on the rise in the region where the rich and famous holiday.</p> <p>“You have got to have some kind of confidence to do that and to be quite satisfied that people aren’t going to wake up,” Mindy added.</p> <p>“That morning I slept in until eight. I didn’t even wake to Richard’s snoring! Nobody woke up.</p> <p>“It turned out they had burgled the neighbouring property as well in the same night.”</p> <p>The robbers also targeted neighbouring villas on the same night.</p> <p> </p>

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Could you be at risk? Here’s what your wrinkles may be telling you about your health

<p>Your wrinkles may be saying more about your health than you think. While wrinkles have been an aesthetic concern for some, scientists reveal that deep facial lines can be an early warning sign of deadly heart trouble.</p> <p>According to research shown at the world’s largest heart conference, adults who have prominent forehead wrinkles and lines between their eyebrows are 10 times more likely to die at a younger age than those with smooth skin.</p> <p>The research was conducted by following 3,221 volunteers for 20 years after examining and assessing their appearance.</p> <p>Those with no wrinkles were given a score of zero, but those who had “numerous deep wrinkles” were issued a score of three.</p> <p>Experts believe that by closely studying people’s skin, GPs will have an easy and affordable way to spot early signs of stroke and heart attacks.</p> <p>Yolande Esquirol, the associate professor of occupational health at the University Hospital of Toulouse in France, claims that deep furrows are a red flag for clogged arteries – also known as atherosclerosis.</p> <p>Atherosclerosis is a condition that stops the flow of blood and oxygen to reach organs inside the body, which in turn increases the chances of lethal clots.</p> <p>Esquirol told the European Society of Cardiology conference in Munich that “the higher your wrinkle score, the more your cardiovascular mortality risk increases".</p> <p>“You can’t see or feel risk factors like high cholesterol or hypertension.</p> <p>“Just looking at a person’s face could sound an alarm, then we could give advice to lower risk.”</p> <p>According to Esquirol, the cause of deep wrinkles has nothing to do with stress or hard work, but more to do with cell and protein damage.</p> <p>Fellow researcher Professor Jean Ferrieres, from Toulouse University School of Medicine, said that assessing a wrinkled forehead is a better indicator of heart problems than high cholesterol.</p> <p>“We found it is a simple visual screening tool that can be used by GPs to identify people at risk,” Prof Ferrieres said.</p> <p>“This is more precise than cholesterol levels, as it is a sign blood vessels are already being damaged.</p> <p>“We would advise patients with wrinkly brows to see their GP and make lifestyle changes, such as more exercise and better diet.”</p> <p>While the risk of heart disease is inevitable as people age, there are ways to reduce the chances of being in a dangerous situation through lifestyle and medical interventions.</p> <p>Professor Kamila Hawthorne, the Vice Chair of the Royal College of GPs, finds the results “interesting".</p> <p>“Any research that seeks to aid better identification or treatment of heart disease, and further our understanding of the condition, is welcome, however strange the connection may seem,” said Prof Hawthorne.</p> <p>But Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation, Professor Jeremy Pearson, says that these findings won’t be replacing traditional steps when uncovering heart-related problems.</p> <p>“Perhaps wrinkles can tell us more than we think about our heart health but counting lines won’t replace tests for well-understood risk factors, such as high cholesterol and blood pressure,” he said.</p> <p>What do you think about these findings? Let us know in the comments.</p>

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True love: 98-year-old shows his devotion to sick wife by walking 10km every day to see her

<p>At 98 years old Luther Younger, a Korean War veteran, walks 10 kilometres each way to visit his wife, who is currently paralysed and hospitalised according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="http://spectrumlocalnews.com/nys/rochester/news/2018/08/17/elder-man-walks-miles-to-be-alongside-hospitalized-wife" target="_blank">Spectrum News Rochester</a></em>.</p> <p>Having been married for over 50 years, Luther’s devotion to his wife Waverlee is inspiring to say the least.</p> <p>“I ain’t nothing without my wife,” Luther told Spectrum News. “It’s been a rough pull. It’s been tough.”</p> <p>Luther and his wife both live with their daughter, Lutheta Younger. Working with her sister Joyce Johnson, they both have taken responsibility for their parents and vouch to take care of them the same way their mother did when she and her siblings were younger said Lutheta.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Luther Younger and his wife, Waverly, have been married more than 50 years. Due to health issues, she's been hospitalized for nearly two weeks. Even in the rain, he walks to be by her side. <a href="https://t.co/O1NbFS9hOP">pic.twitter.com/O1NbFS9hOP</a></p> — Spectrum News ROC (@SPECNewsROC) <a href="https://twitter.com/SPECNewsROC/status/1030296964968140800?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">17 August 2018</a></blockquote> <p>“I moved them out of their house, moved them in with me,” she said.</p> <p>According to Lutheta, her father has been making the 10-kilometre trip for a long time now.</p> <p>“He doesn’t have to, but he wants to. I can drive him. He just doesn’t want to wait; he’s impatient.”</p> <p>Waverlee has suffered from brain cancer since 2009, but Luther still remembers the good times they shared together.</p> <p>“She’s the best cup of tea I ever had,” he said.</p> <p>“She would come in and kiss me and say ‘baby’ and feed me in bed, and this is what I need right here.”</p> <p>“The whole time she was sick, he would stay overnight [in the hospital],” Lutheta said, “You know, he just wants the best for my mom.”</p> <p>A <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gofundme.com/luther-and-waverlee-yonger" target="_blank">GoFundMe</a></em> page has been set up for Luther and his family to help with hospital expenses and travelling costs to and from the hospital.</p>

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Common blood pressure pills recalled worldwide

<p>A popular blood pressure drug has been recalled worldwide after it was contaminated with a cancer-causing chemical.</p> <p>The drug Valsartan, made in a factory in China, was first recalled in 22 countries – including the UK and the US earlier this month – but the warning has now been issued worldwide.</p> <p>A cancer-causing chemical used in rocket fuel, N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), contaminated the drug’s production at Zhejiang Huahai Pharmaceutical.</p> <p>Production of Valsartan has stopped, and experts believe the contamination could date back to 2012, when the company changed its manufacturing process.</p> <p>The drug, which has been commonly prescribed for 15 years, was recalled in the UK and then in the US two weeks later.</p> <p>Valsartan was first developed by Novartis and the Swiss company marketed it as Diovan, but it is now off patent and is used in various generic medicines supplied by numerous companies.</p> <p>Valsartan is prescribed to patients to treat high blood pressure and heart failure.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="497" height="330" src="/media/7819906/1_497x330.jpg" alt="1 (175)"/></p> <p>Zhejiang Huahai, which was one of the first Chinese companies to get drugs approved in the US market, also makes medicines to treat heart problems, depression, allergies and HIV, according to its website.</p> <p>The European Medicines Agency (EMA), which first issued the warning over Valsartan, said it was working to find out how long and at what levels patients might have been exposed to NDMA.</p> <p>The agency said: “It is still too early to provide information on the longer term risk NDMA may have posed for patients.”</p> <p>“EMA has made this aspect of the review a priority and will update the public as soon as new information becomes available," reported the <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em>Daily Mail</em></strong></span></a>. </p> <p>The EMA said all medicines containing Valsartan from Zhejiang Huahai should be recalled and no longer available in pharmacies.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>The EMA believes the unexpected impurity, which was not detected by routine tests, may have been produced from manufacturing processes that were introduced in 2012.</p> <p>The EMA has informed patients that only some Valsartan medicines have been affected and recommended speaking to a pharmacist or doctor who can tell you if your medicine is being recalled.</p> <p>“You should not stop taking your Valsartan medicine unless you have been told to do so by your doctor or pharmacist,” the agency said in a <a href="http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/Press_release/2018/07/WC500251498.pdf" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">press release.</span></strong></a></p>

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Dad dies just moments after visiting new baby

<p>A new father has been killed in a car crash on his way home from visiting his wife and their newborn daughter in hospital.</p> <p>Kevin Quinn was on his way home from Cape Cod Hospital in Massachusetts, when another vehicle that was allegedly fleeing police with two people inside, crashed into him.</p> <p>The 32-year-old father, who is a combat veteran that served two deployments in Afghanistan, was rushed to a nearby hospital with severe injuries on Wednesday when the incident occurred, but later died.</p> <p>The other driver, Mickey Rivera, died instantly while his 24-year-old passenger, Jocelyn Goyette, was taken to hospital with life-threatening injuries.</p> <p>Kevin’s friend Rob Dinan told WCVB News: “(Saturday) should have been, you know, a day filled with nothing but joy … it just turned into this senseless tragedy.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img width="498" height="280" src="/media/7819897/2_498x280.jpg" alt="2 (102)"/></p> <p>“(He was) a very outgoing guy, kind of a practical joker, always had a great smile.</p> <p>“Very quick to help people out in a moment’s notice. He was right there for them all the time. Never asked for anything in return.”</p> <p>Th family set up a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/kevin-quinn-memorial-fund" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">GoFundMe</span></strong></a> page to support Kevin’s wife Kara and their baby daughter, Logan.</p> <p>The page described the heartache of Kevin’s family and friends.</p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p>“He was supposed to return to the hospital later Saturday morning to bring his wife Kara and their first child Logan home," the family friend posted on the page.</p> <p>“Kevin was very much excited but nervous about being a father.</p> <p>“We all told him that he was going to do just fine as a dad and that we felt really bad for any guy that wanted to date his daughter when she was old enough.</p> <p>“We encourage all to please support the family of this fallen Marine, a man who sacrificed so much for this country and who spent many hours helping others who were less fortunate while never asking for anything in return. Please do what you can to help, Thank You.”</p>

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Zara Tindall reveals secret trauma

<p>She welcomed her second daughter Lena in June, but Zara Tindall has revealed she suffered a second miscarriage shortly after <strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/2016/12/queens-granddaughter-loses-her-baby/">losing her unborn baby in 2016.</a> </span></strong></p> <p>In an interview with the Sunday Times Magazine, alongside her brother Peter Phillips, Zara said the loss happened “really early on”.</p> <p>The Queen’s eldest granddaughter has previously revealed she suffered a miscarriage, but not her secret second heartache.</p> <p>“I think you need to go through a period where you don’t talk about it because it’s too raw,” she said. “But, as with everything, time’s a great healer.”</p> <p>She explained that going through her first miscarriage was tough as the pregnancy had to be made public, as is the rule for descendants of the Queen.</p> <p>“We had to tell everyone and it’s like, everyone knows — that’s the hardest bit,” she said.</p> <p>“That’s why I think a lot of people don’t talk about it because [a miscarriage] can happen early enough or it’s only your group of friends and your family that know.”</p> <p>But when Zara lost her second baby, she and her husband, former England rugby player Mike Tindall, were able to mourn in private.</p> <p>The 37-year-old equestrian said mourning was easier for her when the miscarriage happened earlier on in the pregnancy.</p> <p>“I think a lot of the time you’re lucky if it happens a lot earlier,” she said.</p> <p>“It’s something a lot of families are affected by but then, hopefully, a lot of the stories I’ve heard, they’ve gone on and had more children and they’re very lucky.”</p>

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5-year-old boy helps write his own obituary before tragic cancer death

<p>A 5-year-old boy, who died of cancer, helped his parents write his obituary before his heartbreaking death earlier this month.</p> <p>Garrett Matthias, from the US, was diagnosed with alveolar fusion negative rhabdomyosarcoma – a rare form or cancer – in September.</p> <p>The cancer attacked Garrett’s cranial nerve, inner ear and temporal bone, reported the <a href="https://www.desmoinesregister.com/" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Des Moines Register</span></strong></em></a>.</p> <p>Before Garrett died on July 6, the spirited young boy with a sharp sense of humour helped his parents plan his funeral, which included assisting them write his obituary.</p> <p>The super-hero enthusiast’s mother, Emilie Matthias, told the<em> Des Moines Register</em> that Garrett couldn’t understand why the funerals of other cancer patients were sad.</p> <p>“He would say, ‘Why are funerals so sad? I’m going to have bouncy houses at mine,'” she said.</p> <p>Emilie said she would talk to her son about death after watching a melancholy movie.</p> <p>“I’d say things like, ‘When I die, I want to turn into a star,’” she said. “He’d say, ‘I want to be burned like in ‘Thor,’ and then I want to become a gorilla.’”</p> <p>Emilie and her husband then decided to ask their son what he wanted at his funeral.</p> <p>“We really tried to use his words, and the way that he talked,” she said. “Garrett was a very unique individual. What I really didn’t want was for his obituary to be ordinary and to have a really sad funeral. We’ve cried oceans of tears for the last nine months.”</p> <p>In the end, Garrett helped his parents write his obituary in which he included all his favourite things in the world.</p> <p>He said his favourite colours were “blue and red and black and green” and his favourite superheroes were “Batman and Thor, Iron Man, the Hulk and Cyborg".</p> <p>Garrett said he wanted to be a professional boxer when he grew up and that his favourite people were his family.</p> <p>He also included the two things he hated most: pants and “dirty stupid cancer”.</p> <p>Garrett said when he died he was “going to be a gorilla and throw poo at Daddy”.</p> <p>The obituary continued by talking about Garrett’s sense of humour.</p> <p>“Garrett endured nine months of hell before he lost his battle with cancer. During that time he never lost his sense of humour and loved to tease the doctors and nurses. From whoopee cushions and sneaking clothes pins on their clothes to ‘hazing’ the interns and new staff doctors, he was forever a prankster. Nothing caught people off guard as his response to ‘see ya later alligator’,” the obituary read.</p> <p>Garrett concluded the piece with: “See ya later, suckas! — The Great Garrett Underpants.”</p> <p>The young boy’s childcare was able fund five bouncy castles for his funeral on Saturday, just as he had wanted.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/garrett-mathiasmathias-family" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>GoFundMe</strong></span></a> page was set up for the Matthias family, which has raised over US$68,000.</p>

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Princess Eugenie opens up about her health struggle

<p>Being allowed to have her own Instagram account, as she’s not likely to ever ascend the throne in the British Royal Family, Princess Eugenie provides some entertaining insight into what life is like as a royal.</p> <p>She candidly shares behind-the-scenes and throwback photos, like the <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/2018/06/princess-eugenie-shares-rare-photo-of-buckingham-palace-in-tribute-to-father-prince-andrew/">rare recent snap</a> of her father Prince Andrew inside Buckingham Palace celebrating his first Trooping the Colour as Colonel of the Grenadier Guards.</p> <p>However, Princess Eugenie’s most recent post revealed the health struggle she has gone through with scoliosis (curvature of the spine), which she has suffered since the age of 12.</p> <p>Shining a light for International Scoliosis Awareness Day, the royal – who is ninth in line to the throne – shared two of her personal X-rays along with four other photos (scroll through the gallery above) to help spread the word about the condition, as well as thanking the hospital and staff that treated her.</p> <p>“I’m very proud to share my X Rays for the very first time,” Princess Eugenie wrote.</p> <p>“I also want to honour the incredible staff at The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital who work tirelessly to save lives and make people better. They made me better and I am delighted to be their patron of the Redevelopment Appeal,” she added.</p> <p>Opening up about the corrective surgery she underwent, Eugenie also revealed in an article on the hospital’s website, “This was, of course, a scary prospect for a 12-year-old; I can still vividly remember how nervous I felt in the days and weeks before the operation. But my abiding memories of RNOH, where the surgery was carried out, are happy ones – everyone there was so warm and friendly, and they went out of their way to make me feel comfortable and relaxed.”</p> <p>The operation, which took eight hours, involved surgeons inserting eight-inch titanium rods into either side of her spine, along with one-and-a-half inch screws at the top of her neck.</p> <p>The princess continued, “After three days in intensive care, I spent a week on a ward and six days in a wheelchair, but I was walking again after that.”</p> <p>Now the proud patron of the hospital’s Redevelopment Appeal and the new state-of-the-art facility – Princess Eugenie House – which has been named after her, the royal further acknowledged, “Without the care I received at the RNOH I wouldn’t look the way I do now; my back would be hunched over. And I wouldn’t be able to talk about scoliosis the way I now do and help other children who come to me with the same problem.”</p> <p>She continued, “My back problems were a huge part of my life, as they would be for any 12-year-old. Children can look at me now and know that the operation works. I’m living proof of the ways in which the hospital can change people’s lives.”</p> <p>To see Princess Eugenie's X-rays and photos of her visiting the hospital as a proud patron, scroll through the gallery above. </p>

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Why the Queen is refusing to have knee surgery

<p>Queen Elizabeth II is reportedly refusing to get knee surgery despite suffering from bad knees, as the operation will interrupt her densely-packed royal schedule.</p> <p>A palace source told <a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6666005/queen-royal-engagements-knee-surgery/" target="_blank"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The Sun</span></strong></em></a>, that Her Majesty has been enduring the pain for quite some time.</p> <p>The 92-year-old sovereign reportedly struggles to stand up after sitting and fears that she will fall over in public, but the inconvenience of an operation is stopping her from receiving treatment.</p> <p>"She was talking to friends at the Chelsea Flower Show and said her knees were playing up," the palace insider told <em>The Sun</em>. </p> <p>"But she is reluctant to have an op due to the time it would take to recover. She is incredibly brave.</p> <p>“People from her and Philip's generation battle through problems and carry on. And Her Majesty doesn't like to cause any fuss.”</p> <p>In May, the Queen had a cataract removed from her eye but chose to wear dark glasses instead of cancelling any official engagements.</p> <p>She was seen in dark glasses while watching the Epsom Derby and wore them the next morning after the royal wedding.</p> <p>The Queen’s son, Prince Andrew, previously described his mother as being incredible fit for her age, as she still rides her horses at Windsor and drives around her private estates.</p> <p>Although the Queen has delegated her long-haul public engagements to younger members of the royal family, she still has a full diary of events – completing 296 engagements in 2017. </p>

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Kate Spade’s “heartbroken” father dies on eve of designer’s funeral

<p>Kate Spade's "heartbroken" father has died just a day before the fashion designer's funeral on Thursday.</p> <p>Earl F. Brosnahan Jr., 89, passed away in Kansas City, Missouri on June 20, his family has confirmed.</p> <p>Brosnahan's loved ones say they believe he died, in part, of a broken heart after his daughter was found dead in her New York apartment on June 5.</p> <p>A chief medical examiner later confirmed Spade, 55, took her own life.</p> <p>"We are deeply saddened to announce that Katy’s father, Earl F. Brosnahan, Jr. [Frank], passed away last night at age 89," the statement read.</p> <p>"He had been in failing health of late and was heartbroken over the recent death of his beloved daughter. He was at home and surrounded by family at the time of his passing.</p> <p>"He was especially proud of his wife, children and grandchildren."</p> <p>Brosnahan is survived by his second wife Sandy, who was at his bedside when he died.</p> <p>Following Spade’s death, Brosnahan told the Kansas City Star that he had spoken to his daughter the night before she died and they had discussed her upcoming trip to the US West Coast.</p> <p>"She was happy and we made plans to meet in California," Brosnahan said.</p> <p>Speaking of how the family was coping in the tragedy, Brosnahan said the "close" group would "certainly miss our bright, sunshiney little person."</p> <p>He believes his daughter would have been gratified knowing the discussions about mental health taking place around her death.</p> <p>"Katy would have liked that. She was always giving and charitable. If that helped anybody avoid anything — fine, she'd be delighted," he said.</p> <p>The fashion icon's funeral went ahead as planned in Kansas City, with husband Andy Spade giving a eulogy and several other family members speaking.</p> <p>The couple were married for 24 years but had been living separately for several months before her death. The pair have one child, a daughter named Beatrice.</p>

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The little-known iPhone trick that will save you in an emergency

<p>A Facebook post which reveals a little-known iPhone feature that calls for help in a time of emergency has gone viral on social media. </p> <p>The post reads: “Ladies with iPhones! If you’re ever in a dangerous or unsafe situation, press the lock button on your phone five times in a row, you’ll get this screen,” reads the Facebook post.</p> <p>“Swipe the SOS, your GPS will send a ping to the nearest police station and an officer will be dispatched. RT TO SAVE A LIFE.”</p> <p><img width="349" height="537" src="https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/1c6f66f37a0829a603b26b2c23e36f03" alt="This post is doing the rounds on social media." style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>Unfortunately, the post isn’t entirely accurate so here’s what you need to know.</p> <p>Firstly, the step doesn’t actually notify your local police station with your GPS location. But it will send your location to the people you have listed as emergency contacts.</p> <p>Secondly, the post fails to mention that the action will send out a very loud tone – so you might not be able to activate it discreetly in an emergency situation.</p> <p>However, the Emergency SOS function is still a very nifty feature that is worth knowing as it will “indeed “quickly and easily call for help and alert your emergency contacts”. You’ll need the iOS 11 upgrade to use this function.</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://support.apple.com/en-au/ht208076">According to Apple</a></span>, here’s how it works:</strong></p> <p><img width="350" height="" src="https://support.apple.com/library/content/dam/edam/applecare/images/en_US/iOS/ios11-iphone7-call-options.jpg" alt="Slide to Power Off, Medical ID, and Emergency SOS options" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">On iPhone X, iPhone 8, or iPhone 8 Plus:</span></p> <ol start="1"> <li>Press and hold the side button and one of the Volume buttons until the Emergency SOS slider appears. </li> <li>Drag the Emergency SOS slider to call emergency services. If you continue to hold down the side button and Volume button, instead of dragging the slider, a countdown begins and an alert sounds. If you hold down the buttons until the countdown ends, your iPhone automatically calls emergency services.</li> </ol> <p><img width="350" height="" src="https://support.apple.com/library/content/dam/edam/applecare/images/en_US/iOS/ios11-iphone7-sos-place-emergency-call.jpg" alt="Emergency SOS countdown screen" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">On iPhone 7 or earlier:</span></p> <ol start="1"> <li>Rapidly press the side button five times. The Emergency SOS slider will appear. </li> <li>Drag the Emergency SOS slider to call emergency services.</li> </ol> <p>After the call ends, your iPhone sends your Emergency contacts a text message with your current location, unless you choose to cancel. If Location Services is off, it will temporarily turn on.</p> <p>If your location changes, your contacts will get an update, and you'll get a notification about 10 minutes later. To stop the updates, tap the status bar and select "Stop Sharing Emergency Location." If you keep sharing, you'll get a reminder to stop every 4 hours for 24 hours.</p> <p><strong>Wondering how to add emergency contacts?</strong></p> <p>You can add emergency contacts from the Health app on your iPhone. </p> <p><img width="350" height="" src="https://support.apple.com/library/content/dam/edam/applecare/images/en_US/iOS/ios11-iphone7-health-medical-id-edit-crop.jpg" alt="Medical ID screen" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <ol start="1"> <li>Open the Health app and tap the Medical ID tab. </li> <li>Tap Edit, then scroll to Emergency Contacts.</li> <li>Tap the plus button to add an emergency contact.</li> <li>Tap a contact, then add their relationship. </li> <li>Tap Done to save your changes. </li> </ol> <p>Here's how to remove emergency contacts: </p> <ol start="1"> <li>Open the Health app and tap the Medical ID tab. </li> <li>Tap Edit, then scroll to Emergency Contacts. </li> <li>Tap minus button next to a contact, then tap Delete.</li> <li>Tap Done to save your changes. </li> </ol> <p>You can't set emergency services as an SOS contact. </p> <p><em>Source: <strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://support.apple.com/en-au/ht208076">Apple</a></span></strong></em></p> <p> </p> <p> </p>

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A doctor’s advice for looking after yourself in your 60s and beyond

<p><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://kategregorevic.com/#gs.3ixTod4" target="_blank">Dr Kate Gregorevic</a></span> is a geriatrician with a research interest in health and lifestyle factors that are associated with healthy ageing and recovery from illness.</strong></em></p> <p>The average person turning 60 will have another 30 years of life. As a doctor with a research interest in healthy ageing, I find that I am always being asked for tips on lifestyle steps to stay well for as long as possible. The good news is that it is never too late to take make changes to improve wellbeing. As our bodies continue to change throughout life and health advice for a thirty-year-old won’t always apply for a sixty-year-old. These are my top tips for self-care for a healthy, active life:</p> <p><strong>1. Don't lose weight</strong></p> <p>Many people spend a lifetime trying restrict their eating to be ‘thin’, and it’s no wonder when this is so often portrayed as the height of fashion and beauty, but striving to be like the models in the magazines might actually have real health risks in older age. Body mass index is calculated as weight in kilograms over height in metres squared (kg/m<sup>2</sup>). Many studies have shown that having a BMI over 25, or in the overweight range is associated with increased risk of poor health for younger adults, but the opposite is true in older age. <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://jech.bmj.com/content/66/7/611" target="_blank">A number of studies of people in their sixties and beyond have shown that the lowest mortality actually occurs with a BMI between 25-30.</a></strong></span></p> <p>Having a BMI over 30 is associated with poorer health and difficulty doing day-to-day activities. It is possible to lose weight safely, but this should be done in consultation with your doctor.</p> <p>It is possible that the higher levels of mortality for those with a BMI in the lower range could be due to some people having lost weight due to illness, so if you are the same slim weight you have always been, there is no need to worry.</p> <p><strong>2. Keep up the exercise</strong></p> <p>If we could make a pill with the benefits of exercise, everyone would want to take it. When ever you move your body enough to get your heart rate up, you can start to have benefits. <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/in-depth/depression-and-exercise/art-20046495" target="_blank">The mood enhancing effects of exercise can actually be used as a treatment for mild depression.</a></strong> <strong><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29540588" target="_blank">Women who exercise more are also at a lower risk of dementia.</a></strong></span></p> <p>There are two key components to an effective exercise routine: aerobic exercise and strength training. Aerobic exercise is anything that raises your heart rate and makes you breathe a little faster, and can be as simple as walking fast enough to make it hard to carry out a conversation. The other key component is strength training, which is using resistance from weights or your own body to challenge muscles to improve power. Strength training can help to prevent sarcopenia, which is a loss of muscle mass and strength that can lead to disability.</p> <p>Once again, before starting any new exercise program, it is always wise to check in with your doctor and seek guidance from a physiotherapist or qualified exercise physiologist.</p> <p><strong>3. Look after your bones</strong></p> <p>Osteoporosis is a common and potentially debilitating disease. It occurs when bones become thin and brittle and increases the risk of fractures. Bones are constantly undergoing remodelling in response to the body’s need for calcium to control cellular processes and in response to the movements we make. <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2678622" target="_blank">Unfortunately Calcium and vitamin D are not sufficient to prevent osteoporosis</a></strong></span>, but exercise can improve bone density. Both strength training and weight bearing, like jumping or marching, can help to improve bone density and decrease the risk of osteoporosis. </p> <p><strong>4. Look after your pelvic floor</strong></p> <p>The pelvic floor is a sling of muscles that goes from the pubic bone to the sacrum that supports the organs in the pelvis and helps with faecal and urinary incontinence. Many women develop pelvic floor dysfunction around the time of childbirth, and receive inadequate pelvic floor rehabilitation in the post-partum period, which leads to long-term problems. As well as difficulties with incontinence and sexual function, pelvic floor weakness can also be associated with back pain. Luckily it is never too late to improve pelvic floor strength and function, seeing a women’s health physiotherapist can be an excellent way to start.</p> <p><strong>5. Feed your friends (fibre)</strong></p> <p>The <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://kategregorevic.com/gut-bacteria-and-frailty/#gs.Ae_FbfU" target="_blank">gut microbiome</a></strong></span> is made up of the trillions of bacteria and other micro-organisms that live in our gut. These are not just passive passengers, but active participants in creating health. A larger variety of gut bacteria is associated with better health in older age. These bacteria live on fibre, which is the indigestible cell wall from the plants that we eat. Eating a large variety of vegetables, legumes, wholegrains and fruit can support these bacteria and improve your chances of long-term health.</p> <p>Eating a diet that is high in wholefoods can also improve mood and memory, so the benefits are immediate.</p> <p><strong>6. Do something that sparks joy</strong></p> <p>Feeling physically well is an excellent basis for life, but human connection and living with purpose are essential for living with meaning. Caring for others and using our own individual skills and resources to create something in the world can help to improve long-term health and to protect cognition.</p> <p>Health is something to enjoy today, not something we achieve in the future by denying ourselves now, we need to prioritise our own wellbeing each and every day. Luckily by doing this with nutrition, exercise and spending time with those we love, we can dramatically increase our chances of living the longest, healthiest life possible.</p>

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