Relationships

Tue, 22 Jan, 2019Over60

Think your sex life is over after 40? Hardly

Think your sex life is over after 40? Hardly

You may need to put a little more work into it

You can thank declines in hormone levels for the fact that you may not be ready to go at a moment's notice. "Both men and women deal with hormone changes in their 40s that can cause changes in sexual arousal, desire and general physical comfort during sexual activity," says Shannon Chavez, PsyD, CST, a licensed psychologist and certified sex therapist in Los Angeles.

"Changes in hormones may require an increase in stimulation during sexual activity or increased focus on sensual pleasuring in order to get aroused."

You may be wilder in the sack

Think you're in for the same old, same old if you're in a long-term relationship?

Think again—that's just one of the many myths about ageing.

"Couples in their 40s are having some of the best sex of their lives—they have more permission and motivation to explore different aspects of sexuality," Dr. Chavez says.

"Couples may try kink, role play, watch erotica together, open their relationship or try Tantra in their 40s. Couples are more open to exploring at this age due to sexual confidence, a stronger sense of sexual self, desire to make sex more playful, or feeling deeper emotional bonding for more meaningful and passionate sex."

You'll need to start paying attention to your heart health

We're not talking about the state of your love life. Your cardiovascular system is key to a thriving sex life.

"A healthy cardiovascular system is essential to sexual functioning," says Gracie Landes, a licensed marriage and family therapist and certified sexual therapist in New York City.

"Maintaining good physical health is important." That means keeping up with your cardio, but don't skimp on the strength training, either. You'll have more energy for fun in the sack, and the confidence that comes with looking better always helps—heck, even just going to the gym increases libido.

You may go through a lull - and that's OK

Sexual desire may fluctuate—and you might be starting to head into the slow decline that comes for many couples as they age.

"A lull in your sex life, no matter what age, is inevitable," says Dr. Chavez.

"People in long-term relationships get comfortable and may lose the routines around sex that worked in earlier phases of the relationship like getting ready for sex, taking each other out on dates, flirting, and being playful with one another. Couples are not always talking about sex in healthy ways that enhance desire for connection. The important part is being able to talk about it with your partner or a professional."

It may get really boring if you're trying to conceive

The quantity and quality of a woman's eggs decreases significantly as she ages—making conception after 40 more challenging. If you're still looking to expand your family, you may find yourself engaged in fertility treatments and lots of not-so-successful baby-making sex. And that can make sex feel, well, a little bit like doing dishes.

"For those struggling to conceive later in life, sex can become a chore," Landes says.

Women may be more orgasmic

You may see myths that claim that older women lose their ability to orgasm, but experts say that women over 40 may find more pleasure in sex than they ever did before. "For some women, orgasm becomes easier with experience, self-confidence, and comfort," Landes says. If fact, many women may find discover a second phase to their sexual experience: They know what it takes to get there and aren't shy about making it happen.

Guys can hold out longer

There's an upside to the decline in hormone levels over this decade: Men over 40 find themselves lasting longer than they did in the past. "As men age they are often better able to delay orgasm," Landes says. "They can slow down and enjoy the experience more fully in a more connected way."

You may need to break out the lube - or the estrogen cream

Blame hormones for the fact that sex gets a whole lot drier after 40. "Fluctuating estrogen levels and irregular menstrual periods can bring discomfort," Landes says. "The vaginal walls start to become thinner, more easily irritated, more likely to bleed or tear." The cure? Invest in lube—and some doctors will recommend oestrogen cream applied to the area to help with dryness.

Written by Lisa Milbrand. This article first appeared in Reader’s Digest. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, here’s our best subscription offer.

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