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US banker fired and charged after a racist tirade over a smoothie

<p>A wealthy US banker has been fired from his job and charged with a hate crime after a video of him berating young staff in a smoothie shop has gone viral. </p> <p>James Iannazzo, 48, threw a smoothie at a teenage employee before calling her a "f**king immigrant", all while other staff filmed his racist rant. </p> <p>The bizarre encounter erupted after a visibly irate Mr Iannazzo returned to the store in Connecticut after an hour earlier ordering a smoothie that contained peanuts, which caused his highly allergic son to have a reaction and require hospitalisation, according to authorities. </p> <p>According to a police report, Mr Iannazzo ordered the drink without peanut butter, but did not mention his son's allergy to the workers. </p> <p>The video captured by an employee shows Mr Iannazzo demanding to know who made the original drink, before lashing out and calling the staffers <span>“f**king stupid, f**king ignorant high school kids”.</span></p> <p><span>He then allegedly called one of the workers a "f**king b***h" </span>before hurling the drink at her, striking her shoulder. </p> <p>Mr Iannazzo continued his expletive-ridden tirade before calling the employee he hit with the drink a "f**king immigrant".</p> <p>The video was originally posted to TikTok and Twitter where it has amassed over 16 million views, and thousands of comments blasting the man's behaviour. </p> <p>A spokesman for the man's employer Merrill Lynch told the <a href="https://nypost.com/2022/01/24/merrill-lynch-financial-adviser-fired-after-racist-tirade/">New York Post</a> that <span>Mr Iannazzo was fired from the wealth management firm as a direct result of the </span>incident. </p> <p><span>“Our company does not tolerate behaviour of this kind. We immediately investigated and have taken action. This individual is no longer employed at our firm,” a statement said.</span></p> <p><span>After initially fleeing the store before police arrived at the call of an employee, Mr Iannazzo later turned himself in. </span></p> <p><span>He told a local news station that he freaked out after his son's reaction to the drink, causing him to return to the store.</span></p> <p>“My son lost the capacity to breathe properly; his lips and face swelled up, and he required an EpiPen shot, but it did not offer him relief,” Mr Iannazzo told <a href="https://www.wtnh.com/news/connecticut/fairfield/man-arrested-for-altercation-at-robeks-goes-viral-on-tiktok/">WTNH</a>. “I called 911. My son then went to the bathroom, threw up and fell unconscious to the floor. He threw up again. My wife gave him another EpiPen while I called 911 again. Thank God, he is doing okay.”</p> <p>“I was out of my mind with fear for him when I returned to Robeks, and I wish I had not done so,” Mr Iannazzo said. “I also wish they had been more careful preparing my son’s beverage. I will be extending my apologies personally to the Robeks organization, particularly the staff that was working there that night.”</p> <p>“My actions at Robeks were wrong, and I deeply regret them. They do not reflect my values or my character. I feel terrible that I lost my composure so completely,” he said.</p> <p>Mr Iannazzo has since been charged with intimidation based on bigotry or bias, breach of peace and criminal trespass. </p> <p><em>Image credits: TikTok / Fairfield Police Department</em></p>

Legal

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Harry and Meghan’s $33 million podcast claimed by Spotify after lack of content

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The bosses at music streaming giant Spotify have reportedly <a rel="noopener" href="https://honey.nine.com.au/royals/spotify-takes-back-control-of-prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-podcast/d901095a-a9b0-4bf2-870e-7bd6ff9a43c6" target="_blank">taken control</a> of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s podcast, taking “matters into their own hands” due to a lack of content from the couple.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CI1Kyv2HOmt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CI1Kyv2HOmt/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Archewell by Harry and Meghan (@archewell_hm)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Spotify is currently recruiting in-house staff to work on a show for Harry and Meghan’s Archewell Audio that features “the voices of high profile women”, <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/17422252/spotify-meghan-markle-prince-harry-podcast/" target="_blank">The </a></em></span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/17422252/spotify-meghan-markle-prince-harry-podcast/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sun</span></a> </em><span style="font-weight: 400;">reports.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite signing a deal with the streaming company worth an estimated worth of $33 million, the couple have produced just one episode, released as a Christmas special in December 2020.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In an earlier announcement, Spotify said it was expecting a full-scale launch of content from the former royals during 2021.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CK1mDXuFHd3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CK1mDXuFHd3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Archewell Audio Podcast (@archewellaudios)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With just one 35-minute episode created so far - despite appearances in multiple interviews and other podcasts in 2021 - the couple has been paid around $935,000 per minute.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Spotify has been waiting a long time for some content from Harry and Meghan and now it appears they have finally taken matters into their own hands,” a source close to the project told </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An advertisement for a senior producer at Gimlet Projects, the production arm of Spotify, is looking for candidates with experience with “high-profile talent”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’re currently assembling a show team that will build and launch a new original show with Archewell featuring the voices of high profile women,” <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.lifeatspotify.com/jobs/contract-sr-producer-gimlet-projects" target="_blank">the ad reads</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Advertised as a six-month role, the job is called for experienced applicants to “launch an exciting new weekly show based in Los Angeles”.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The ideal candidate has experience working with high-profile talent, and an interest in the intersection of social activism and popular culture.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The wave of recruitment comes after Spotify was rumoured to have given the couple a “gentle nudge” in December to produce content.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p>

Technology

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Two US cops fired after abandoning a robbery to play Pokemon Go

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Two US police officers have been fired after they went off to chase virtual Pokemon creatures instead of responding to a robbery. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Eric Mitchell and Louis Lozano were cruising the streets searching for Pokemon in the augmented reality smartphone game, and abandoned their jobs in the process. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An in-car recording revealed that the pair heard the call for help during a robbery at a Los Angeles department store, and decided to drive away. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Officer Mitchell alerted Lozano that ‘Snorlax’ ‘just popped up’,” legal documents show.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“For approximately the next 20 minutes, the (recording) captured petitioners discussing Pokemon as they drove to different locations where the virtual creatures apparently appeared on their mobile phones.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The officers caught the virtual Snorlax before turning their attention to a much harder creature to conquer. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Holy crap, man. This thing is fighting the crap out of me,” Mitchell said of the Pokemon, according to the documents, which were published last week.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Both officers were charged with multiple counts of misconduct, and admitted to failing to respond to the robbery, but denied they had been playing Pokemon Go. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The smartphone game took the world by storm in 2016, with users searching for fantastical creatures using the real world through their smartphone screens. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite challenging the court’s ruling and upholding the notion they were not playing the game at the time of the robbery, both men were charged and fired from their jobs with the Los Angeles Police Department. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Getty Images</span></em></p>

Technology

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Couple on “world’s longest honeymoon” share their story

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After their dream wedding in 2011, Mike and Anne Howard made the radical decision to quit their jobs and leave their life in New York behind for the ultimate honeymoon.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Their plan was to see the world and now, over a decade on, the couple are still on the road visiting every corner of the globe. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Documenting their travels on their </span><a href="https://www.honeytrek.com/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">blog</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has become a way of life, as they use it to keep their family and friends updated while on the world’s longest honeymoon. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As their HoneyTrek brand began as a way to stay connected to loved ones back home, they have turned it into a career as travel bloggers, book authors and travel photographers. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, despite sharing their idyllic life with their online following, Mike and Anne have assured </span><a href="https://7news.com.au/travel/married-couple-mike-and-anne-howard-on-worlds-longest-honeymoon-tell-of-most-challenging-moments--c-5362530"><span style="font-weight: 400;">7Lifestyle</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that their journey is not always sunshine and roses. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CTpeQkYLJUe/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CTpeQkYLJUe/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Mike &amp; Anne - HoneyTrek.com (@honeytrek)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They were hit hard with the realities of travelling with Covid, as the pandemic worked its way into every corner of the world. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As the pandemic was in the early stages, the couple were heading to Italy, right as the country declared a Covid emergency in March 2020.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It hadn’t really sunk in what was going on,” Mike said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The couple decided to travel to Poland, thinking coronavirus was just “an Italy thing”, but were met with the hard reality of global travel restrictions once they arrived. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After three months of being stuck in Poland, they were finally able to return to the United States. </span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9927pBHJyb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9927pBHJyb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Mike &amp; Anne - HoneyTrek.com (@honeytrek)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As well as dealing with the struggles of Covid, the couple have come up with their own way to not be constantly living in each other's pockets. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s good to have a few things that are your own, you know I like to take more walks than he does and he likes to have more podcasts than I do,” Anne explains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We have a few things which are ‘your thing’, and we prioritise maintaining friendships outside the relationship.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We also love to meet new people and so we have a pretty global friend circle at this point, so it’s not as isolating as you may think,” she says.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Instagram @honeytrek</span></em></p>

Travel Tips

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Body and mind: Metastatic breast cancer impacts mental health too

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A diagnosis of breast cancer can be a difficult pill to swallow not just for those who receive the diagnosis, with friends, family and others in their support network also needing to come to terms with it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Dr Lisa Beatty, a clinical psychologist and senior research fellow at Cancer Council South Australia, everyone will react to their diagnosis differently.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We do know that the distress rates are roughly four in ten women will have what we call clinically significant distress and that is where it is actually getting to the point where it might be causing a real impact in how they’re able to function in their life,” she </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.breastcancertrials.org.au/blog/psychological-impact-breast-cancer" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">said</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stage IV breast cancer, also called metastatic, advanced or secondary cancer, can be even harder to cope with, as the diagnosis comes with a lower five-year survival rate and the knowledge that cancer cells have spread from the breast to the bones, liver, brain, or lungs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Nicholas Zdenkowski, a breast cancer researcher and member of the Breast Cancer Trials Scientific Advisory Committee, tells </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">OverSixty</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> that metastatic cancer is diagnosed at two time points: as an initial diagnosis or as a recurrence months or years after diagnosis and treatment.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7847044/nick.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9e95419ba42d4c5caa6a500d9169ac70" /></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Nick Zdenkowski says work is continuing into individualising diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer. Image: Supplied</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Breast cancer is most likely to be diagnosed around age 60, however it affects women and men across a broad range of ages (younger and older),” he says.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the Breast Cancer Trials, it is estimated that between five and ten percent of those diagnosed with breast cancer each year will have metastatic breast cancer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Additionally, it is estimated that 20-30 percent of people diagnosed with early breast cancer will go on to develop metastatic cancer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although the likelihood of developing metastatic breast cancer is well-understood on a population level, Dr Zdenkowsi says identifying exact individuals “is a major challenge”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We have greatly refined our understanding over the years, but it is still a work in progress,” he explains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Enormous effort is being put into individualising the level of risk of breast cancer so that further research into screening, prevention and early treatment can reduce the likelihood of metastatic recurrence.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With psychological symptoms of breast cancer diagnoses including anxiety, depression, shock, and issues surrounding body image and intimacy, there have been </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://jons-online.com/issues/2021/november-2021-vol-12-no-11/4165-information-and-support-needs-of-people-with-newly-diagnosed-metastatic-breast-cancer" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">appeals</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> from organisations such as Living Beyond Breast Cancer to improve the availability of information for those diagnosed about metastatic breast cancer, mental health, and talking to family.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For those looking to support a loved one with breast cancer, </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.cancer.org.au/about-cancer/patient-support/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cancer Council</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bcna.org.au/metastatic-breast-cancer/coping-with-metastatic-breast-cancer/where-to-find-support/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Breast Cancer Network Australia</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, and </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.breastcancertrials.org.au/blog/online-support-breast-cancer" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Breast Cancer Trials</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> have further resources that can help you figure out what to say to your loved ones, and how to support them through treatment.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Beatty will also be appearing at a free Q&amp;A panel on metastatic breast cancer hosted by journalist Annabel Crabb and organised by Breast Cancer Trials.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Taking place on Monday, February 7 between 5-6.30pm, the </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.breastcancertrials.org.au/qa-events" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Q&amp;A</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> panellists will discuss the latest research in metastatic breast cancer and the impacts of the disease on mental health and will be open to questions from registered attendees.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p>

Mind

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Why ‘turning it off and on again’ actually works

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Having problems with our phones, tablets, and other tech is an almost-universal experience, but one simple technique can fix almost every single one.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Popularised by the British show </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The IT Crowd</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, turning a device on and off again can fix a range of problems </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/gadgets/have-you-tried-turning-it-off-and-on-again-the-easiest-fix-for-tech-issues/news-story/5759759b1b1b9926527da81457a826a2" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">according to experts</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Restarting a device works because it wipes the current state of the software and restarts the system, meaning that any code that is stuck or misbehaving will be dumped too.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In addition, scheduling regular reboots can even prevent issues from popping up in the first place.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For phones and tablets, particularly Android and Apple devices, running non-stop can lead to issues such as slow performance, and connectivity issues. So if your issue is specific, such as a certain app or page not loading, restarting the phone should be your first step.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, that doesn’t mean you should be constantly restarting your devices, with experts recommending doing it about once every week or so for the best effect.</span></p> <p><strong>How to restart Android devices</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The easiest method of restarting your device involves holding down the power button and pressing the ‘Restart’ option when it appears on your screen.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If this doesn’t happen, you can just hold down the power button for 30 seconds to turn the device off, and start it again normally.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some phones also offer an option to schedule automatic reboots, even letting you choose the day and time. To do this on a Samsung Galaxy for instance, go to settings and search for auto-restart at set times, or go to settings, then battery and device care, tap the three dots and select automation.</span></p> <p><strong>How to restart iPhones and iPads</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Restarting an Apple device can be done by holding down the power button and one of the volume buttons until a slider appears which says ‘Power off’. Once you press the power button, you can push it again to restart the device.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Otherwise, you can try a force restart if the slider doesn’t appear.</span></p> <p><strong>Desktops and laptops</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though most modern computers prompt you when a restart is needed - such as after installing new software - it is recommended that computers have a full backup and restart at least once a year.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To keep things running smoothly, it’s best to turn your computer off each night and switch it on when you need it again.</span></p> <p><strong>How to restart Windows PCs</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Windows PC can be restarted by clicking the start menu, clicking on power, and choosing the restart option. It’s recommended that Windows devices are restarted about once a week.</span></p> <p><strong>How to restart Mac computers</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Unlike Windows, Apple recommends that you only restart your device when you encounter a problem.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To restart, click the Apple icon in the top left corner and then select restart.</span></p> <p><strong>What about Smart TVs?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Similarly to Apple, Smart TV manufacturers recommend restarting only when a problem arises, such as apps refusing to load or if the interface is slow.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The easiest way to restart a Smart TV is to turn it off, unplug it and wait for 30 seconds before plugging it back in and turning it on again.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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Charlise Mutten's cause of death revealed

<p><em>Image: 9News </em></p> <p>Detectives have revealed nine-year-old Charlise Mutten died from a gunshot wound. The Homicide Squad boss has called this and "unimaginable and egregious murder".</p> <p>The young girl was found dead in a plastic barrel on the banks of the Colo River in NSW last week. She was found an hour from where she was last seen in the Blue Mountains.</p> <p>Her mother's partner Justin Stein, 31, has been charged with her murder.</p> <p>"The cause of death of Charlise was that she suffered a fatal gunshot wound, and that's how she died," Homicide Squad Commander Danny Doherty said today.</p> <p>"We're disclosing this for investigative reasons but also just to clear up any ambiguity… this is the (alleged) murder of a nine-year-old girl."</p> <p>The family of the girl has only recently been told how she died.</p> <p>"It's important that they know, and it's important that the public know that this is an unimaginable and egregious (alleged) murder of a child," he said.</p> <p>Police are still searching the Mount Wilson property where Charlise was last seen and the surrounding areas for a gun. Detective Superintendent Doherty said the barrel Charlise was found in is believed to be from the property and police believe there is a "high probability" she died there.</p> <p>Charlise's mother Kallista Mutten has been reinterviewed and is being treated as a witness. Detective Superintendent Doherty said Ms Mutten was not believed to have been at the property at the time police allege Charlise was murdered.</p> <p>It comes as new CCTV was released, showing a ute towing a boat at multiple locations across Sydney.</p> <p>The CCTV footage shows the maroon coloured ute towing a covered boat at three locations on the evening of January 13. Just before 6pm, the ute pulls into a BP gas station at Marsden Park, in Sydney's north-west.</p> <p>At 7:17 pm the ute and boat are spotted in traffic in Drummoyne, in Sydney's inner west.</p> <p>Minutes later, close to the Five Dock Bay Boat Ramp near Drummoyne, the ute is captured on a home's private security system.</p> <p>Police believe the little girl was killed on January 11th or 12th. Charlise was visiting her mother for the school holidays from Queensland, where she lives, at the time of her death.</p>

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Stowaway who hid in plane wheel identified

<p dir="ltr">A man who was found stowing away in the wheel well of a plane in Amsterdam has been identified.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dutch police found the man on a cargo flight that had flown from Johannesburg to Amsterdam, a roughly 11 hour flight. The flight is believed to have made one stop, in Nairobi. At the time, Royal Dutch Military Police spokeswoman Joanna Helmonds told the<span> </span><em>AFP,<span> </span></em>"The man was found alive in the nose wheel section of the plane and was taken to hospital in a stable condition. It is quite remarkable that the man is still alive.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Police have identified the man as a 22-year-old Kenyan who plans to seek asylum in the Netherlands. He is conscious and able to communicate. A spokesperson for the Dutch military police told the<span> </span><em>BBC,<span> </span></em>“It is expected he will apply for asylum in the Netherlands, but his medical treatment is the priority at the moment."</p> <p dir="ltr">Stowing away in the wheel section of a plane is dangerous; according to the US Federal Aviation Administration, from 1947 to February 2020, 128 people around the world attempted it, and more than 75% of them died.</p> <p dir="ltr">A particularly famous case was that of the man who<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/apr/15/man-who-fell-from-the-sky-airplane-stowaway-kenya-london" target="_blank">fell out of the sky</a><span> </span>while stowing away on a flight to London from Nairobi. He fell from Kenya Airways flight KQ 100, landing in the southwest London neighbourhood of Clapham.</p> <p dir="ltr">In the past five years, seven stowaways have been discovered on planes in the Netherlands, but only two of them survived the journey. Several of the attempts involved nationals from Nigeria and Kenya.</p> <p dir="ltr">In 1970, Sydney teenager Keith Sapsford<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/heartbreaking-story-behind-49-year-old-photograph-034315026.html" target="_blank">made headlines around the world</a><span> </span>when he fell 60 metres from the wheel well of a Japan Airlines flight soon after take off at Sydney’s Kingsford Smith Airport. Tragically, the 14-year-old, whose parents said he had an innate curiosity for travel, died on impact.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Jun Xu</em></p>

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New messages between Charlise Mutten’s mum and Justin Stein emerge

<p dir="ltr">Messages sent by the mother of Charlise Mutten about her fiancé have emerged as investigations continue into the young girl’s death.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kallista Mutten messaged a friend through Facebook, telling them how she had fallen in love with Justin Stein and that he treated her “so good”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He’s amazing and treats me so good,” she told her friend, according to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/before-her-daughter-was-allegedly-murdered-kallista-mutten-was-getting-life-on-track-20220121-p59q85.html" target="_blank"><em>The Sydney Morning Herald</em></a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He’s completely loyal and I have no worries, I know his heart is with me.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The couple met while Ms Mutten was serving a three-year sentence in prison for causing a car crash that killed her passenger in 2017. She was high on ice at the time of the crash.</p> <p dir="ltr">After exchanging letters for the final two years of her sentence, the pair were engaged shortly after her release. They had plans to move to North Queensland and start their lives together, with Ms Mutten recently getting her driver’s licence after a long suspension.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Mutten also shared her excitement over her daughter coming to visit her at her fiancé’s family property in the NSW Blue Mountains for Christmas.</p> <p dir="ltr">“My daughter comes on the 21st, so I’m looking forward to that,” she wrote on December 5, as reported by the<span> </span><em>Herald</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">One month later, Charlise’s remains were found inside a barrel in bushland by the Colo River, with police alleging that Mr Stein has murdered her at his family’s property.</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Stein has been remanded in Silverwater Prison, while Ms Mutten remains in hospital. Police are yet to have a chance to speak to her but are keen to do so to aid their investigation.</p> <p dir="ltr">The<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-10433165/Charlise-Muttens-mother-sent-friends-Facebook-messages-doting-fiance-alleged-murder.html" target="_blank"><em>Daily Mail</em></a><span> </span>reported that Ms Mutten stayed at Sydney Clinic last November - which has treated Andrew O’Keefe, AFL player Ben Cousins, and reality TV star Suzi Taylor - and was housed in the clinic’s substance abuse unit.</p> <p dir="ltr">A fellow patient told the publication that Ms Mutten was visited by Mr Stein during her stay at the clinic, describing her as “over the top” and “very attention seeking”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The patient said Ms Mutten spoke about her upcoming wedding to Mr Stein in 2022 and claimed that she and Mr Stein “had sex in the back of the ute” after one of his visits.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though Sydney Clinic holds three-step group therapy sessions for patients, Ms Mutten’s fellow patients said she seemed uninterested in participating, according to the<span> </span><em>Daily Mail</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Mutten was convicted in November 2017 of dangerous driving occasioning death and driving with an illicit substance in her system, serving over two years in prison for the incident that killed her 53-year-old friend and passenger Karen ‘Kaz’ Bunch.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: The Daily Mail</em></p>

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Terence Kelly confesses to abducting Cleo Smith

<p><em>Image: Getty </em></p> <p>Cleo Smith’s abductor Terence Kelly has confessed to kidnapping the four-year-old from her family tent and keeping her captive for 18 days.</p> <p>Kelly, 36, was arrested after detectives raided his Carnarvon house at 12.46 am on November 3rd and found the little girl alone inside a bedroom playing with toys.</p> <p>The next day Terence was charged with child abduction and flown to Perth where he remains in custody at Casuarina Prison. During an appearance in Carnarvon Magistrate’s Court on Monday, Kelly pleaded guilty to child abduction via video link.</p> <p>Kelly appeared solemn and spent much of the hearing looking down. He spoke only one word, ‘guilty’, when asked by Magistrate Ben White what his plea to the kidnapping charge was.</p> <p>He admitted taking Cleo from her family’s tent on October the 16th at Quobba Blowholes campsite as her parents slept metres away.</p> <p>Following one of the largest missing persons investigations in Australian history, Cleo was rescued 18 days later after four detectives stormed Kelly’s home in a midnight raid.</p> <p>In the days after Cleo’s rescue, WA Police acting Commissioner Col Blanch said mobile phone data and CCTV footage of a car entering Carnarvon the night Cleo vanished led police to raid Kelly’s house.</p> <p>The details of why Kelly took Cleo, or how police solved the case, are yet to be revealed in court.</p> <p>Cleo’s family have declined to speak to media since her safe return, only issuing a statement thanking the community for its support and requesting privacy.</p> <p>The Nine Network, which publishes this masthead, will pay almost $2 million for an interview with the family in what is believed to be one of the largest deals in Australian television history.</p> <p>Outside court, before Kelly’s admission, a former neighbour of Kelly’s, Esther Mingo, told media she hoped Kelly would “open his mouth up” and tell the truth.</p> <p>She also voiced repeated frustration that none of his family members were attending his court hearings.</p> <p>“He’s got stacks of family ... where are his mother and father, why don’t they come here?” she said.</p> <p>After the hearing, Ms Mingo and two other women refused to speak to the media. His lawyer, Kate Turtley-Chappel, also declined to comment.</p> <p>Kelly will appear in Perth District Court on March 25th for a date to be set for his sentencing.</p>

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Peng Shuai T-shirt scandal puts Tennis Australia in hot water

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australian Open organisers are at the centre of even more criticism over their handling of spectators with items asking “where is Peng Shuai?”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tennis Australia (TA) has </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/sport/tennis/australian-open/tennis-australia-destroyed-over-peng-shuai-tshirt-scandal/news-story/cb7c1678360dd16a87bbf8e996924083" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">stood by</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> its decision after footage emerged of security and police requesting a fan remove her shirt calling for the Chinese tennis player’s fate to be addressed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Shuai gained worldwide attention after she “disappeared” following a post she shared on social media containing allegations of sexual abuse against a former high-ranking member of the Chinese Communist Party. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though she has since been seen <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/news/news/missing-tennis-star-makes-public-appearance" target="_blank">in videos and photos</a> shared by Chinese state media, many have expressed concerns that those were staged and activists have questioned whether she is able to act freely.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video of the scene at Melbourne Park ended with police saying TA was permitted to confiscate any material referencing Ms Shuai.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A TA spokesperson told News Corp Australia that the organisation feared for Ms Shuai’s safety, but that fans were not allowed to make political statements with clothing at the Australian Open.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Under our ticket conditions of entry we don’t allow clothing, banners or signs that are commercial or political,” the spokesperson said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Peng Shuai’s safety is our primary concern. We continue to work with the WTA (Women’s Tennis Association) and global tennis community to seek more clarity on her situation and will do everything we can to ensure her wellbeing.”</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Interestingly, journalists can ask questions about the Peng Shuai situation to players, but fans, seemingly, aren't allowed to.... <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AusOpen?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AusOpen</a> <a href="https://t.co/SCqNlH2bOx">pic.twitter.com/SCqNlH2bOx</a></p> — Matt Walsh (@MattWalshMedia) <a href="https://twitter.com/MattWalshMedia/status/1485052235251957760?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 23, 2022</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Drew Pavlou shared footage online of his friend Max Mok and another person being asked by security about their clothes - including shirts which said “Where is Peng Shuai?” - and later by police.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Mok slammed the TA’s reaction, telling </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theage.com.au/sport/tennis/tennis-australia-confiscate-where-is-peng-shuai-shirts-banners-at-open-20220123-p59qi2.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nine newspapers</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> it was a hypocritical decision.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I can remember him  (the security guard) saying over and over that he had been instructed by someone higher up to confiscate (the Peng items),” Mr Mok said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“On top of that, he also kept saying - and I don’t think this was in the video - but he kept saying he had eyes and ears everywhere, you can’t hide, things like that. Who exactly am I hiding from?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“He said someone found it political and reported it, but couldn’t say who.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I would be surprised if someone at the ground reported us.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Pavlou also spruiked a GoFundMe page to print more “Where is Peng Shuai?” shirts, revealing on Twitter that it had amassed nearly $6,000 in donations.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Wow, in less than 24 hours we have raised almost $6000 to print a thousand “Where Is Peng Shuai” shirts to hand out for free at the Australian Open women’s final. <a href="https://twitter.com/TennisAustralia?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TennisAustralia</a> good luck keeping your $25 million corporate sponsorship from China <a href="https://t.co/BN9oi6mPdl">https://t.co/BN9oi6mPdl</a> <a href="https://t.co/iNiVxDrwP8">pic.twitter.com/iNiVxDrwP8</a></p> — Drew Pavlou For Senate (@DrewPavlou) <a href="https://twitter.com/DrewPavlou/status/1484846760669638660?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Mok said the TA’s treatment of him was hypocritical considering its claims that Ms Shuai’s safety was its “primary concern”, and hoped that more people would follow their lead and show their support for the tennis star.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Hypocrisy is an understatement. It’s not sincere, and it’s just a way for them (TA) to avoid a PR disaster,” he told Nine.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You can see that from the huge amount of support that we’ve got from the public. If we had less support, this could have gone very wrong.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If Tennis Australia is serious about the movement, they’ll let people in (with Peng-related items). Time will tell which side they’re on.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Regardless, it’ll be a good message to send not just to Australia, but internationally. Imagine a whole court filled with ‘Free Peng Shuai’ shirts?”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many have shared their criticisms of the organisation online, while some have pointed out the double standard between spectators and journalists with questions about the missing player.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Interestingly, journalists can ask questions about the Peng Shuai situation to players, but fans, seemingly, aren’t allowed to,” journalist Matt Walsh wrote.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">I get if a hotel says 'No thongs', asks you to leave and then calls the police if you don't because the police can see that you're wearing thongs. I don't think the police can look at a 'Where is Peng Shuai?' t-shirt and just as easily tell that it's a political statement. <a href="https://t.co/hTmkcF7EXB">pic.twitter.com/hTmkcF7EXB</a></p> — Shaun Micallef (@shaunmicallef) <a href="https://twitter.com/shaunmicallef/status/1485115549718048771?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 23, 2022</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Comedian Shaun Micallef also weighed in, questioning why asking about Ms Shuai’s whereabouts was a political statement in the eyes of TA.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Only in mainland China would asking after somebody’s whereabouts be regarded as a political statement,” he wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I get if a hotel says ‘’No thongs’, asks you to leave and then calls the police if you don’t because the police can see that you’re wearing thongs. I don’t think the police can look at a ‘Where is Peng Shuai?’ T-shirt and just as easily tell that it’s a political statement.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Multiple players have been asked about Ms Shuai during the first week of the competition, with Aussie star Ash Barty saying she hoped she was doing OK.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Hopefully it’s not too long until we see her back out here,” Barty said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When asked whether she was concerned that something “sinister” was at play, Barty said she didn’t have the knowledge to answer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Belarusian Victoria Azarenka, who is a member of the WTA Player Council, also spoke about Ms Shuai, saying the association’s main goal was to hear from her personally, while Japan’s Naomi Osaka said she hadn’t heard any news either.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’m not sure if that’s concerning or not,” she said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I feel like it’s a situation where we need more information, which is definitely really hard. Kind of, I think everyone’s waiting.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: @CaraMia200 (Twitter)</span></em></p>

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Man drowns trying to save his daughter

<p dir="ltr">A family trip to the beach has come to a tragic end after an Adelaide father died trying to save his young daughter.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 49-year-old took to the water at Adelaide’s Grange Beach after the tide began taking his daughter - who was on an inflatable tube - further out to sea.</p> <p dir="ltr">Onlooker Michael Napper saw the situation unfold before racing out to help.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The little daughter jumped off the tube into his arms in deep water and he was trying to save her,” Mr Napper<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/news/disaster-and-emergency/tragedy-as-dad-dies-trying-to-save-daughter-at-adelaide-beach-c-5384036" target="_blank">told<span> </span><em>7News</em></a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7846961/drowning1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/769934c9d4ca4d8ba98eaba28675948c" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Michael Napper (left) took action after seeing the younger man struggle to rescue his daughter. Image: 7News</em></p> <p dir="ltr">“It was too deep. He was holding her out of the water and the water was above his head and when I looked around he was floating.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The 70-year-old went out on the water with his boogie board to rescue the pair.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I had to. She was crying and she was very upset,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I got her on the board and she was holding the board. She was alright.</p> <p dir="ltr">“By the time I got to (her dad) he was under water and the next thing he was floating.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So I grabbed him by the trousers and turned him over and got him above the water and then I swam in.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Two onlookers began performing CPR on the unconscious man until paramedics arrived.</p> <p dir="ltr">He was treated for over an hour but paramedics were unable to revive him.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img style="width: 500px; height: 296.1538461538462px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7846962/drowning2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/96af257f314e4b9093b9bd273ac19671" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Though other onlookers and paramedics worked to save the man, he could not be revived. Image: 7News</em></p> <p dir="ltr">The man’s passing comes as the second death by drowning this week, after a 71-year-old man died over the weekend after diving into treacherous waters to save two relatives near Victor Harbor, 80km south of Adelaide.</p> <p dir="ltr">Surf Lifesavers are urging people to take extra care around the water.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So far in six weeks we have seen four coastal drownings in South Australia,” Surf Life Saving SA spokesperson Daniel Willetts said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We urge people to please assist yourselves and help yourself before you go to the aid of others, otherwise you may find that you indeed yourself become the fatality.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: 7News</em></p>

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Ancient knowledge is lost when a species disappears. It’s time to let Indigenous people care for their country, their way

<p>Indigenous people across Australia place tremendous cultural and customary value on many species and ecological communities. The very presence of a plant or animal species can trigger an Indigenous person to recall and share knowledge. This is crucial to maintaining culture and managing Country.</p> <p>But as species disappear, ancient knowledge built up over thousands of years also fades away – and fragments of our culture are lost forever.</p> <p>For years, Indigenous groups have pushed for the right to partner with government authorities to “co-manage” culturally significant species and communities. Such recognition of Indigenous rights would require amendments to environment and land management laws.</p> <p>Unfortunately, changes to Australia’s federal environment laws currently underway fall short of what’s needed. To protect Australia’s imperilled species, the law must chart a new course that allows Indigenous groups to manage their Country, their way.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/434938/original/file-20211201-25-189bdrg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/434938/original/file-20211201-25-189bdrg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="A woman welcomed to Country" /></a> <span class="caption">Ngurrara Ranger Mary is welcomed to Paruku Country in the Great Sandy Desert. A meeting between many groups discussed threatened and culturally significant species.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Nicolas Rakotopare/Yanunijarra Aboriginal Corporation</span></span></p> <h2>Managing the Indigenous estate</h2> <p>Australia’s <a href="https://www.themandarin.com.au/68385-indigenous-estate-ilc-chairperson-eddie-fry-garma/">Indigenous estate</a> takes in about <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0173876">51% of the range</a> of the nation’s threatened vertebrate species.</p> <p>The Indigenous estate refers to the assets held, or reasonably likely to be held, by or for the benefit of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people. It includes land and sea held through such means as traditional ownership, native title and land rights organisations. It also includes intangible values such as cultural rights, practice and expression, as well as Indigenous knowledge and traditional management.</p> <p>A range of state and federal programs involve Indigenous participation in land and sea management, offering invaluable protection to the Indigenous estate. These include Indigenous Protected Areas and the successful <a href="https://www.niaa.gov.au/indigenous-affairs/environment/indigenous-ranger-programs">Indigenous Ranger program</a>.</p> <p>And many governments and other groups recognise that species and ecological communities can have significant cultural, spiritual and customary value to Indigenous Australians. But often, no legal mechanism exists to protect these entities.</p> <p>Some species and other entities of significance to Indigenous Australians are listed as threatened under Australia’s federal environment law, known as the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act. But authorities are not required to engage Indigenous Australians in the listing, management or recovery of these species.</p> <p>Indigenous Australians have successfully managed this continent’s landscapes and seascapes for tens of thousands of years. Their approach is holistic and integrated – considering the whole cultural landscape with a deep understanding of the interconnected relationships between species and Country.</p> <p>In contrast, management actions under federal environment law focus on the outcomes of the listed species instead of the overall health of Country.</p> <p>All this has left Indigenous groups underfunded and at the mercy of national-level management decisions, as opposed to place-based Indigenous-led action.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/434940/original/file-20211201-25-b87h6o.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/434940/original/file-20211201-25-b87h6o.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Men sitting around a map" /></a> <span class="caption">Ngurrara Rangers map potential night parrot habitat. The meeting was hosted by Paruku Rangers and Traditional Owners in the Great Sandy Desert.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Nicolas Rakotopare/Yanunijarra Aboriginal Corporation</span></span></p> <h2>‘Surprising and disappointing’</h2> <p>The EPBC Act was recently reviewed by Professor Graeme Samuel, who was commissioned by the federal government. His <a href="https://epbcactreview.environment.gov.au/resources/final-report">final report</a> in 2020 found the law was failing in many ways.</p> <p>Samuel recommended a suite of reforms. Among other goals, they aimed to “respect and harness the knowledge of Indigenous Australians”. One year on and <a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7591429/a-year-on-from-a-landmark-report-nature-and-law-reform-is-floundering/">progress</a> on implementing the 38 recommendations is slow.</p> <p>Among the recommendations were that the EPBC Act adopt a set of legally enforceable “national environmental standards” – clear rules that protect the environment and enable sustainable development. The standards <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/jan/28/australia-urged-to-overhaul-environment-laws-and-reverse-decline-of-our-iconic-places">would cover</a> matters such as threatened species, compliance, environmental data and <a href="https://epbcactreview.environment.gov.au/resources/final-report/appendix-b2-indigenous">Indigenous engagement</a> and participation in decision-making.</p> <p>It was both surprising and disappointing that Indigenous knowledge was not embedded across all proposed environmental standards. The omission means Indigenous perspectives will continue to be relegated to a stand-alone standard of “participation”.</p> <p>In particular, the national standard pertaining to threatened species made no reference to Indigenous knowledge or the Indigenous estate. And proposed <a href="http://www.environment.gov.au/system/files/pages/44b768d8-75ad-417d-84cc-dfb0e069e97e/files/national-environmental-standard-mnes-2021-draft.pdf">interim standards</a> completely omit Indigenous engagement, participation and values.</p> <p>Without a mandate to include Indigenous people in threatened species planning and recovery, biodiversity will remain at risk. What’s more, significant gaps in the application of Indigenous Knowledge and protection of the Indigenous estate will continue.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/434973/original/file-20211201-27-tg1guw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/434973/original/file-20211201-27-tg1guw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="hands with green turtle eggs" /></a> <span class="caption">Rangers collecting green turtle eggs on Yanyuwa Country in the Gulf of Carpentaria.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Nicolas Rakotopare</span></span></p> <h2>A new kind of recognition</h2> <p>During the submission process of the review, <a href="https://epbcactreview.environment.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-06/ANON-QJCP-UGT1-F%20-%20Indigenous%20Working%20Group%20-%20Threatened%20Species%20Recovery%20Hub.pdf">many</a> Indigenous and <a href="https://www.ecolsoc.org.au/news/esa-response-to-epbc-interim-report/">non-Indigenous</a> organisations <a href="https://epbcactreview.environment.gov.au/submissions/anon-qjcp-ugt1-f">lobbied</a> for the recognition of “culturally significant entities”. These groups include the government’s own <a href="https://epbcactreview.environment.gov.au/submissions/bhlf-qjcp-ug3c-z">Indigenous Advisory Committee</a> and <a href="https://epbcactreview.environment.gov.au/submissions/anon-k57v-xf2u-j">Threatened Species Scientific Committee</a>.</p> <p>“Culturally significant entities” are species and sites of great or exceptional cultural importance to Indigenous Australians. They might be a source of identity, a medicine, lore, an important traditional food or required for cultural practices. They usually feature prominently in Indigenous knowledge, language and ceremonies.</p> <p>Submissions to the review called for these entities to be formally recognised under the EPBC Act and afforded a far higher level of protection. They also called for the mandatory participation of Indigenous Australians in threatened species nominations, listings, policy and management.</p> <p>Many Indigenous Australians were disappointed this measure was not mentioned in Samuel’s final report. Without proper legal protection, culturally significant entities will not be assessed and can be damaged by threats such as climate change, inappropriate land management and poorly conceived development proposals.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/434970/original/file-20211201-13-1b11i3o.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Man holds lizard" /> <span class="caption">A yellow-spotted monitor – a culturally significant bush tucker species – on Karajarri Country.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Sarah Legge</span></span></p> <h2>From engagement to empowerment</h2> <p>It’s time for governments and conservation groups to recognise the enduring value of the Indigenous estate and knowledge in curbing Australia’s parlous record of biodiversity loss.</p> <p>While many of Samuel’s recommendations attempted to address issues raised by Indigenous Australians, they fall short of true empowerment and global best practice.</p> <p>As the size and scale of the Indigenous estate continues to <a href="https://minister.awe.gov.au/ley/media-releases/australia-signs-international-biodiversity-declaration">grow</a>, so to does the opportunity to arrest biodiversity decline. Rather than sitting in the back seat, Indigenous Australians must be up front in managing the recovery of Australia’s unique and precious environment.</p> <p><em>The authors acknowledge and thank the following people for their contributions to this work and article: Oliver Costello, a Bundjalung man; and Cissy Gore-Birch, a Jaru, Nyikina and Balanggarra woman, and Executive Manager Aboriginal Engagement at Bush Heritage Australia.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/172760/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/teagan-goolmeer-1288819">Teagan Goolmeer</a>, PhD Candidate, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/assoc-prof-bradley-j-moggridge-400729">Assoc Prof Bradley J. Moggridge</a>, Associate Professor in Indigenous Water Science, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-canberra-865">University of Canberra</a></em>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/professor-stephen-van-leeuwen-1289086">Professor Stephen van Leeuwen</a>, BHP / Curtin Indigenous Chair of Biodiversity &amp; Environmental Science, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/ancient-knowledge-is-lost-when-a-species-disappears-its-time-to-let-indigenous-people-care-for-their-country-their-way-172760">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Nicolas Rakotopare/Karajarri Traditional Lands Association</span></span></em></p>

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CDC and EU slap restrictions on travel to Australia

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As Covid-19 case numbers continue to rise due to the Omicron wave, two major international governing bodies have warned against travelling to Australia. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">America’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the European Union have both identified Australia as a “Covid danger zone”, and warned their residents against travelling Down Under. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The EU’s concerns could see Aussie travellers banned from entering Europe or forced into mandatory quarantine when arriving on European soil. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australia joins Canada and Argentina on the EU’s “danger zone”, as European Council officials recommend restrictions not be relaxed for these countries. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The new directive means that non-essential travel to Europe from Australia could be banned by individual EU countries, although Cyprus, Greece and Italy have already gone against the ruling. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The CDC came to a similar decision about the fate of Aussie travellers, as Australia joined the likes of Israel, Argentina, Egypt, and 18 other countries on a “very high” Covid warning. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">America’s health protection agency told US residents they should avoid travelling to the “dangerous” countries that feature in the CDC’s “level four: very high risk” list. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Australia first banned international tourists at the start of the pandemic in March 2020, but has recently started to relax restrictions as the nation’s leaders are encouraging everyone to “live with the virus”.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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The vaccine loophole that could see Novak defend his title

<p>Novak Djokovic could be allowed to defend his winning title at the French Open under new Covid-19 restrictions, even if he is not vaccinated. </p> <p>After Djokovic's high-profile deportation from Australia when he didn't meet the country's vaccine rules, his future at the French Open was also thrown into jeopardy. </p> <p>It initially appeared that the Serbian tennis star would not be welcomed at <span>Roland-Garros under a new law that intended to ban unvaccinated people from stadiums, bars, restaurants and other public places. </span></p> <p><span>French Sports Minister Roxana Maracineanu previously said that as soon as the law was passed, France's vaccine pass would be compulsory "for all spectators, practitioners, French or foreign professionals" to enter stadiums, theatres or exhibition centres. </span></p> <p><span>However, thanks to a loophole in the vaccine pass, Novak could be allowed to still </span>compete.</p> <p>The vaccine pass is not limited to Covid-19 vaccinations, as anyone who has tested positive to Covid within the last six months is exempt from having to display the pass. </p> <p>This rule suggests Djokovic could still compete in the French Open in May and June, due to the fact that he tested positive in mid-December 2021. </p> <p>The French sports ministry and French Open organisers have said its too early to comment on Djokovic's future at the event, saying restrictions may change between now and May depending on the virus situation. </p> <p>Novak has yet to make a comment on the situation, with his team claiming he will not give any public statements until the end of the Australian Open on January 30th. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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5 ways climate change boosts tsunami threat, from collapsing ice shelves to sea level rise

<p>The enormous eruption of the underwater volcano in Tonga, Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai, triggered a <a href="https://www.reuters.com/business/environment/tonga-volcano-generates-tsunami-us-tsunami-monitor-said-2022-01-15/">tsunami</a> that reached countries all around the Pacific rim, even causing a <a href="https://apnews.com/article/oil-spills-business-tonga-peru-trending-news-3a92a17e2101945afcb22f5eb5bfb2ad?utm_campaign=SocialFlow&amp;utm_source=Twitter&amp;utm_medium=AP">disastrous oil spill</a> along 21 beaches in Peru.</p> <p>In Tonga, waves about 2 metres high were recorded before the sea level gauge failed, <a href="https://twitter.com/ConsulateKoT/status/1483384039826464768/photo/1">and waves of up to 15m</a> hit the west coasts of Tongatapu Islands, ‘Eua, and Ha’apai Islands. Volcanic activity could continue for weeks or months, but it’s hard to predict if or when there’ll be another such powerful eruption.</p> <p>Most tsunamis are caused by earthquakes, but a <a href="http://tsunami.org/what-causes-a-tsunami/">significant percentage</a> (about 15%) are caused by landslides or volcanoes. Some of these may be interlinked – for example, landslide tsunamis are often triggered by earthquakes or volcanic eruptions.</p> <p>But does <a href="https://www.un.org/en/climatechange/what-is-climate-change">climate change</a> also play a role? As the planet warms, we’re seeing more <a href="https://www.usgs.gov/faqs/how-can-climate-change-affect-natural-disasters">frequent and intense</a> storms and cyclones, the melting of glaciers and ice caps, and sea levels rising. Climate change, however, doesn’t just affect the atmosphere and oceans, it affects the Earth’s crust as well.</p> <p><a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-climate-geology-idUSTRE58F62I20090916">Climate-linked</a> geological changes can increase the incidence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions which, in turn, can exacerbate the threat of tsunamis. Here are five ways this can happen.</p> <h2>1. Sea level rise</h2> <p>If greenhouse gas emissions remain at high rates, the average global sea level is <a href="https://www.ipcc.ch/srocc/chapter/chapter-4-sea-level-rise-and-implications-for-low-lying-islands-coasts-and-communities">projected to rise</a> between 60 centimetres and 1.1m. <a href="https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Ocean-fact-sheet-package.pdf">Almost two thirds</a> of the world’s cities with populations over five million are at risk.</p> <p>Rising sea levels not only make coastal communities more vulnerable to flooding from storms, but also tsunamis. Even modest rises in sea level will dramatically increase the frequency and intensity of flooding when a tsunami occurs, as the tsunami can travel further inland.</p> <p>For example, <a href="https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.aat1180">a 2018 study</a> showed only a 50 centimetre rise would double the frequency of tsunami-induced flooding in Macau, China. This means in future, smaller tsunamis could have the same impact as larger tsunamis would today.</p> <h2>2. Landslides</h2> <p>A warming climate can increase the risk of both submarine (underwater) and aerial (above ground) landslides, thereby increasing the risk of local tsunamis.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.nrdc.org/stories/permafrost-everything-you-need-know">melting of permafrost</a> (frozen soil) at high latitudes decreases soil stability, making it more susceptible to erosion and landslides. More <a href="https://climate.nasa.gov/news/2951/climate-change-could-trigger-more-landslides-in-high-mountain-asia/">intense rainfall</a> can trigger landslides, too, as storms become more frequent under climate change.</p> <p><a href="https://www.usgs.gov/faqs/how-do-landslides-cause-tsunamis#:%7E:text=Tsunamis%20are%20large%2C%20potentially%20deadly,a%20result%20of%20submarine%20earthquakes.&amp;text=Tsunamis%20can%20be%20generated%20on,a%20rapidly%20moving%20underwater%20landslide.">Tsunamis can be generated</a> on impact as a landslide enters the water, or as water is moved by a rapid underwater landslide.</p> <p>In general, tsunami waves generated from landslides or rock falls dissipate quickly and don’t travel as far as tsunamis generated from earthquakes, but they can still lead to huge waves locally.</p> <p>In Alaska, US, glacial retreat and melting permafrost has exposed unstable slopes. In 2015, this melting caused a landslide that sent 180 million tonnes of rock into a narrow fjord, <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-30475-w">generating a tsunami reaching 193m high</a> – one of the highest ever recorded worldwide.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441884/original/file-20220121-8856-1regaso.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441884/original/file-20220121-8856-1regaso.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <span class="caption">Scientists survey damage from a megatsunami in Taan Fiord that had occurred in October, 2015 after a massive landslide.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Peter Haeussler, United States Geological Survey Alaska Science Center/Wikimedia</span></span></p> <p>Other areas at risk include <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921818121000849">northwest British Columbia</a> in Canada, and the Barry Arm in Alaska, where an <a href="https://dggs.alaska.gov/hazards/barry-arm-landslide.html">unstable mountain slope</a> at the toe of the Barry Glacier has the potential to fail and <a href="https://www.woodwellclimate.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Letter-to-Stakeholders_-Barry-Arm-Landslide-Final.pdf">generate a severe tsunami</a> in the next 20 years.</p> <h2>3. Iceberg calving and collapsing ice shelves</h2> <p>Global warming is accelerating the <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com.au/chasing-ice-glacier-calving-climate-change-2014-10?r=US&amp;IR=T">rate of iceberg calving</a> – when chunks of ice fall into the ocean.</p> <p>Studies predict large ice shelves, such as the Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica, will <a href="https://news.climate.columbia.edu/2021/12/17/crucial-antarctic-glacier-likely-to-collapse-much-earlier-than-expected/">likely collapse</a> in the next five to ten years. Likewise, the Greenland ice sheet is <a href="https://climate.nasa.gov/news/3062/warming-seas-are-accelerating-greenlands-glacier-retreat/">thinning and retreating</a> at an alarming rate.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441878/original/file-20220121-8497-jjkh3d.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441878/original/file-20220121-8497-jjkh3d.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Iceberg near ship" /></a> <span class="caption">Icebergs colliding with the seafloor can trigger underwater landslides.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></p> <p>While much of the current research focus is on the sea level risk associated with melting and collapse of glaciers and ice sheets, there’s also a <a href="https://nhess.copernicus.org/articles/12/415/2012/">tsunami risk</a> from the calving and breakup process.</p> <p>Wandering icebergs can trigger <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-021-00767-4">submarine landslides and tsunamis</a> thousands of kilometres from the iceberg’s original source, as they hit unstable sediments on the seafloor.</p> <h2>4. Volcanic activity from ice melting</h2> <p>About 12,000 years ago, the last glacial period (“ice age”) ended and the melting ice triggered a dramatic <a href="https://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/32995/2/Tuffen_PTRSL.pdf">increase in volcanic activity</a>.</p> <p>The correlation between climate warming and more volcanic eruptions isn’t yet well constrained or understood. But it may be related to <a href="https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70182772">changes in</a> stress to the Earth’s crust as the weight of ice is removed, and a phenomenon called “<a href="http://people.rses.anu.edu.au/lambeck_k/pdf/152.pdf">isostatic rebound</a>” – the long-term uplift of land in response to the removal of ice sheets.</p> <p>If this correlation holds for the current period of climate warming and melting of ice in high latitudes, there’ll be an increased risk of volcanic eruptions and associated hazards, including tsunamis.</p> <h2>5. Increased earthquakes</h2> <p>There are a number ways climate change can increase the frequency of earthquakes, and so increase tsunami risk.</p> <p>First, the weight of ice sheets may be <a href="https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsta.2010.0031">suppressing fault movement and earthquakes</a>. When the ice melts, the isostatic rebound (land uplift) is accompanied by an increase in earthquakes and fault movement as the crust adjusts to the loss of weight.</p> <p>We may have seen this already in <a href="http://www.geotimes.org/oct04/NN_glacier.html">Alaska</a>, where melting glaciers reduced the stability of faults, inducing many small earthquakes and <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921818104000487?casa_token=BGo_KzIOuJkAAAAA:UHyQvV-tvVulwAfvOFPJILcG2206iyZhOM9TCVS_VAh0UdLimWrfu_NJRTHJVtwlKBL0cfA">possibly the magnitude 7.2 St Elias earthquake</a> in 1979.</p> <p>Another factor is low air pressure associated with storms and typhoons, which studies have also shown can trigger earthquakes in areas where the Earth’s crust is already under stress. Even relatively small changes in air pressure can trigger fault movements, as <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nature08042">an analysis</a> of earthquakes between 2002 and 2007 in eastern Taiwan identified.</p> <h2>So how can we prepare?</h2> <p>Many mitigation strategies for climate change should also include elements to improve tsunami preparedness.</p> <p>This could include incorporating projected sea level rise into tsunami prediction models, and in building codes for infrastructure along vulnerable coastlines.</p> <p>Researchers can also ensure scientific models of climate impacts include the projected increase in earthquakes, landslides and volcanic activity, and the increased tsunami risk this will bring.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/175247/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jane-cunneen-290217">Jane Cunneen</a>, Adjunct Research Fellow, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/curtin-university-873">Curtin University</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/5-ways-climate-change-increases-the-threat-of-tsunamis-from-collapsing-ice-shelves-to-sea-level-rise-175247">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Podcast hosts slammed for disgusting remarks about women's postpartum bodies

<p><em>Image: Getty </em></p> <p>The male hosts of a concerning new podcast have received major backlash over comments made claiming they’d leave their future wife if she didn’t lose weight after giving birth.</p> <p>Brothers Anthony Casasanta and Nick Casasanta launched “The No Filter Pod” earlier this month with friend Jason Girratano – describing it as “the most blunt podcast in the world”.</p> <p>While their show is deliberately “controversial”, many are condemning the show over comments made by Anthony about a potential future wife’s body after she gives birth to his child.</p> <p>The comments have been quickly gone viral, with women branding them “disgusting”, “horrendous” and “God awful”.</p> <p>In a statement issued to news.com.au, “The No Filter Pod” said the comments had been taken “out of context” but doubled down on the controversial remarks.</p> <p>“We just don’t want our wives to be obese. We feel as if society promotes obesity which is a very unhealthy and uncomfortable way of living.</p> <p>“We promote healthy lifestyles here at NoFilterPod. It’s also not only about weight gain after childbirth, it’s also about mental health as well as the physical health. We feel like it’s very important to hold spouses both men and women to a high standard.”</p> <p>The backlash was sparked by the men themselves, who all play NFL in the US, after they shared the clip on TikTok, asking: “Is this too much?”</p> <p>“If my wife lets herself go after I have kids with her, I’m going to tell her once,” Anthony tells Nick and Jason.</p> <p>“‘If you don’t get your sh*t together, because I still want to be sexually attracted to my wife, my spouse, but if you can’t do that, I’m out’.”</p> <p>The guys said they were prepared a negative reaction but received an avalanche of a response, predominantly condemning the view and labelling it “misogynistic”.</p> <p>“We really feel as the video was taken out of context,” the trio said in a statement.</p> <p>“We will not be apologising.”</p> <p>Women have fought back in droves, with many creating videos in response to the clip, while others flooded the guys social media feeds with their thoughts forcing the podcast hosts to turn off comments.</p> <p>“Where is the respect, the love, the admiration for his partner. I actually feel sorry for him. Clearly he has no idea what love is,” one woman said.</p> <p>As one simply stated: “I can’t even comment on this cus the outrage is just UNREAL.”</p> <p>Comments on the guys’ personal Instagram accounts, which haven’t yet been disabled, displayed a similar response.</p> <p>“You’ve made a fool of yourself and you’ve made an already foolish world more worrisome,” one raged.</p> <p>“Why are you turning off your comments? yallll are a joke and can’t take the heat,” another lamented.</p> <p>Anthony, Nick and Jason have claimed they are receiving death threats over the outcry but have continued to post clips on TikTok on topics surrounding cheating, “fitness chicks” and female vs male value.</p> <p>According to the boys, girls who workout are “superior to all women”, calling them “top of the line”.</p> <p>They also reckon “girls cheat more than guys” and women seek “financial security from their husbands” citing that all they ask for in return is that “you don’t sleep around with like 50 other dudes”.</p> <p>These statements have obviously not gone down well, with words such as “repulsive”, “vile” and “red flag” being used to describe them in the comments.</p>

Body

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Exercise and Alzheimer’s: Is it necessary?

<div> <div class="copy"> <p>It’s no real surprise that an active lifestyle is beneficial for people with <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/predictive-test-for-alzheimers-disease/" target="_blank">Alzheimer’s disease</a>. But researchers from the University of California have now added another piece to the puzzle in understanding how physical activity improves brain health and helps people with Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>According to their study, <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://www.jneurosci.org/content/early/2021/11/11/JNEUROSCI.1483-21.2021" target="_blank">published</a> earlier this week in <em>JNeurosci</em>, exercise might play a role in decreasing immune cell activation<em>.</em></p> <p>The brain’s immune cells, called microglia, activate to clear debris and foreign invaders from the brain. But too much activation can trigger inflammation, damage neurons, and disrupt brain signalling.</p> <p>Animal studies have shown that increasing physical activity reduces abnormal microglia activation, but the link has not been established in humans.</p> <p>The researchers tracked the physical activity of 167 people, 60% of whom had Alzheimer’s disease, for almost a decade. The participants wore activity monitors 24 hours a day for up to 10 days straight before annual cognitive exams.</p> <p>They then analysed participants’ brains after their deaths, which occurred at an average of 90 years of age. After adjusting for age, sex, education, and motor performances, the researchers observed that brain immune cells were less active in those who exercised more, particularly in areas of the brain linked to Alzheimer’s disease.</p> <p>“We’ve known for a long time that midlife physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of dementia,” says Professor Amy Brodtmann, a neurologist at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health in Melbourne, who was not involved in the study. “But how late-life physical activity improves brain health still isn’t clear.”</p> <p>Brodtmann says past studies have looked at the effect of exercising on beta-amyloid and tau, two proteins that accumulate in the brain forming plaques and disrupting brain functioning. Muscle mass has also been associated with better brain health, while reducing cardiovascular disease and the risk of stroke in the brain through exercising contributes to lowering the risk of dementia.</p> <p>The role of brain immune cells in cognitive decline is now receiving an enormous amount of attention. “We used to think that inflammation came after the pathologies in the brain,” Brodtmann said. “But what we’re now thinking is that other events in life, particularly vascular disease, can cause increased inflammation in the brain, and this may be the primary driver of the pathology [in the brain].”</p> <p>Brodtmann says this study uncovered the positive effect of physical activity on neuroimmune modulation. “That means that at any stage in your life, you can affect your brain’s health by exercising.”</p> <p>She says that physicians should encourage patients to exercise regularly, as well as adopt a Mediterranean diet and address all other risk factors.</p> <p>“Age in itself is not a barrier to exercise,” Brodtmann says, adding that including physical activity in your routine could be as simple as going for a brisk, 30-minute walk most days of the week. Running, swimming, cycling and some gentle strength workout is also highly recommended.</p> <p>As people get older, reduced mobility might be a challenge, but Brodtmann said some level of physical activity is beneficial at any age and stage of the disease.</p> <p>“These diseases are usually the cumulative effects of a lifetime of not exercising or eating well, and this behaviour is not very easy to change.”</p> <em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/body-and-mind/exercise-and-alzheimers-is-it-necessary/">cosmosmagazine.com</a> and was written by Dr Manuela Callari. </em></p> </div> </div>

Body

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Your weekly horoscope for January 24th 2022

<p dir="ltr">As Aquarius season kicks into full gear, it’s time to break the mould and step out of your comfort zone.</p> <p dir="ltr">With this eccentric energy powering the week, channel your inner free spirit and don’t take things too seriously.</p> <p dir="ltr">As you grow tired of doing things the conventional way, use this Aquarian energy to challenge how you shake up your daily routine.</p> <p dir="ltr">♈ <strong>Aries (March 21st - April 19th)</strong></p> <p>Your career goals will be given the energy and momentum you’ve been waiting for to see you meet your objective with unwavering confidence.</p> <p dir="ltr">Be thoughtful and curious this week, but be careful of coming across as demanding.</p> <p dir="ltr">♉ <strong>Taurus (April 20th - May 20th)</strong></p> <p>You will be faced with challenges this week, giving you an opportunity to apply everything you have learned in order to reach a peaceful resolution.</p> <p dir="ltr">Use this week to reinvigorate your relationships with a new-found optimism, as you take time to invest in the people closest to you.</p> <p dir="ltr">♊ <strong>Gemini (May 21st - June 20th)</strong></p> <p>Despite your instinct to keep things close to your chest, you will feel inspired to start communicating your desires more bravely this week.</p> <p dir="ltr">Confide in people you trust, as your vulnerability will be rewarded.</p> <p dir="ltr">♋ <strong>Cancer (June 21st - July 22nd)</strong></p> <p>Grow through discomfort this week, as trying something new that is not in your comfort zone will have you flourishing.</p> <p dir="ltr">Open up conversations about the past, and allow yourself to let go and find closure.</p> <p dir="ltr">♌ <strong>Leo (July 23rd - August 22nd)</strong></p> <p>In order to reach your goals, start small and focus on the easier tasks at hand before allowing the pressure to build.</p> <p dir="ltr">Being detail-oriented will pay off in spades this week, as your focus and concentration is on overdrive.<br /><br />♍ <strong>Virgo (August 23rd - September 22nd)</strong></p> <p>It is safe to be seen in a vulnerable state this week, as your courage will be acknowledged and supported.</p> <p dir="ltr">Feeling this emotional exposure and uncertainty will help you feel more confident in relationships in the long run.</p> <p dir="ltr">♎ <strong>Libra (September 23rd - October 22nd)</strong></p> <p>Take the time to tune in to how your body reacts to your strong emotions, and ask yourself if your self-care routine could use some work.</p> <p dir="ltr">Name and normalise your feelings, and give yourself the validation you deserve.</p> <p dir="ltr">♏ <strong>Scorpio (October 23rd - November 21st)</strong></p> <p>Speak directly and listen accurately this week, and be wary of coming across aggressively with your communication.</p> <p dir="ltr">This “think before you speak” attitude will prove helpful in your relationships, as you work to improve your emotional dialogue.</p> <p dir="ltr">♐ <strong>Sagittarius (November 22nd - December 21st)</strong></p> <p>For your own sense of safety and security, live fully and unapologetically in your values and morals.</p> <p dir="ltr">Don’t spend too much of your time wishing you didn’t care so much, as your sense of empathy will attract lifelong partnerships.</p> <p dir="ltr">♑ <strong>Capricorn (December 22nd - January 20th)</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Your passion, energy and radiance will be on fire this week, giving you a boost of motivation to complete the tasks you have been putting off.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rely on your safety nets, and take the time to realise leaning on people for support isn’t a sign of weakness.</p> <p dir="ltr">♒ <strong>Aquarius (January 21st - February 18th)</strong></p> <p>It’s your time to shine this week Aquarius, as the stars align in your sign for the ultimate boost of confidence, creativity and optimism.</p> <p dir="ltr">Let your freak flag fly and be unapologetically yourself, as those around you will find your spirit infectious.</p> <p dir="ltr">♓ <strong>Pisces (February 19th - March 20th)</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">You will be united with friends and comrades who share the same worldview as you, giving you a community feel to relate to.</p> <p dir="ltr">You will have a better understanding of those around you this week, giving you the upper hand in your closest relationships.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Caring

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Meat Loaf’s daughter remembers her dad

<p dir="ltr">Amanda Aday, daughter of musician Meat Loaf, who passed away on Thursday at the age of 74, has spoken to the media for the first time since her father’s death, telling<span> </span><em>People<span> </span></em>he was a “complex man with a lot of passion who wore his heart on his sleeve”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Aday, 41, said that she and her sister Pearl "lived a very dichotomous life" as daughters of the<span> </span><em>Bat Out of Hell<span> </span></em>singer, touring arenas, travelling on tour buses, "and having all of these amazing experiences" as they travelled with their dad around the globe. When the tours were over and they returned home, however, "it was home and he was just dad," she says. "He wasn't Meat Loaf anymore."</p> <p dir="ltr">Aday describes Meat Loaf, whose real name was Michael Lee Aday, as a very involved parent, directing their school plays and coaching their softball teams. She said, "If we didn't get good grades, we were grounded, and all of that stuff. So, it was very much, when we weren't out on tour living this crazy life, it was very important to him that we were grounded in our home."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CZA1AWMMeJC/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CZA1AWMMeJC/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Amanda Aday (@amandaaday)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">He encouraged his kids to think for themselves and avoid following trends. Aday said, "Growing up, when we were little, he always said he never wanted to be hip. Pearl and I would want a new pair of shoes or something, whatever was in trend, fashion-wise or whatever, and he'd always say, 'Don't be trendy. Don't be hip. Be cool, because cool is always.' And that was him."</p> <p dir="ltr">Aday revealed that Christmas was his favourite time of year, sharing that, "He would stay up all night making train sets around the Christmas tree." She also shared an anecdote from her sixth Christmas, when Meat Loaf bought her every Playmobil toy imaginable. "He stayed up literally all night and erected an entire Playmobil city and circus underneath the Christmas tree, because that's what he did. He was dad,” she told<span> </span><em>People.</em></p> <p dir="ltr">She also revealed that both she and her sister rushed to Nashville to be by their father’s side after receiving a call informing them that his health "was declining very rapidly, more rapidly than expected."</p> <p dir="ltr">"As soon as we could, we just went to his bedside at the hospital and just sat with him and held his hand," she said, adding that she was “very thankful” they had a chance to see him before he died.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic, Inc</em></p>

Caring

Lifestyle

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Australian woman gives birth to own grandchild

<p dir="ltr">54-year-old Tasmanian woman Maree Arnold has given birth to her own grandson after acting as a surrogate for her 28-year-old daughter Meagan White.</p> <p dir="ltr">Meagan has no uterus and was unable to conceive, so her mum suggested the idea of acting as a gestational carrier. Meagan was diagnosed with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome at the age of 17 after not menstruating during puberty. MRKH is a rare disorder that affects one in 5000 women, and the syndrome means that while Meagan has no uterus, she does have working ovaries, so she is able to have a biological child with the help of a surrogate.</p> <p dir="ltr">The baby, named Winston, was safely delivered following a short two-hour labour on January 13th. Ms Arnold told<span> </span><em>Sunrise</em>, “We arrived at the hospital at 7 am and by 9 am he was born, it was so quick and organised.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I feel really well considering it’s only been a week, so it’s amazing.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Arnold, who had previously appeared on<span> </span><em>Sunrise<span> </span></em>last year while pregnant, told Kochie and Nat, “If I had my time again, I would do the same thing, it worked out perfectly.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms White said she was loving being a first-time mum to Winston, who is “not giving us too much grief” and sleeping well. Of his birth, she said, “It’s hard to describe the feeling of when he was born. It was definitely a pinching myself moment.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Experts say mother-daughter surrogacy is very rare and it’s recommended that gestational carriers are under 40 years of age. However, another older mum, 51-year-old Julie Loving from Chicago,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oprahdaily.com/life/relationships-love/a33013266/mother-becomes-surrogate-for-daughter/" target="_blank">made headlines</a><span> </span>in 2020 after carrying her daughter’s baby.</p> <p dir="ltr">Loving volunteered after watching her daughter Breanna Lockwood struggle with fertility issues for four years. The family welcomed a daughter, Briar, in November 2020, with Lockwood writing on Instagram, “My mom was an absolute rockstar through a difficult delivery. The sacrifices she took to bring this little slice of heaven into our world takes my breath away. Holding my daughter in my arms my heart is bursting. The feeling of how I would do absolutely anything needed for this child is radiating through me when I look at her, and reflects back on what my mom did for me.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Channel 7</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Readers respond: What was the best thing about how your parents raised you?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We asked our readers what the best thing about how their parents raised them was, and their responses were inspiring and overwhelming! Here’s what you said:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kayte Cole:<br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">I had the love &amp; support of a beautiful mother who taught me respect , manners &amp; to care for others, great work ethics, unconditional love &amp; a family bond that will never be broken ….I could go on forever but these are just a few that come to mind.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cherry Kemp:<br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">I asked my Mama if I could have a picnic. She made me peanut butter on saltine crackers, and put sweet tea in a Mason jar with a lid and gave me an old towel. I spread the old towel in the back yard, and had myself a picnic. That was a sweet memory for me.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ali Maleckas:<br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The importance of Family ties ♥️ Visited family every weekend growing up and celebrated every important event with Aunts, Uncles and Cousins Have tried to instill these values in my four own children and two stepchildren with little success Currently many of them don't speak and have little contact I wish it was different but accept their decisions Keep myself happy by keeping in touch with the them and the extended family as much as possible 😍</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sue Harris:<br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Learnt.Respect. Manners Honesty and treat people the way you would like to be treated yourself</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rachel Wright: </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">To respect others and treat each person as you will like to be treated.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">JillnGary Smith:<br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Genuine care &amp; lots of love...they taught us all the most valuable traits that make decent human beings. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gail Kraal:<br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">I was inspired by their great work ethic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sue Blatchford:<br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Respect for others and their property… particularly your elders</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stacia Hannum:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">I could count on my father no matter what. In his last years, he could count on me, no matter what.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dot Wilde:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">to have respect and manners ,to always be polite, Mums favourite saying (It doesn't cost anything to be polite)</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Marcia Delgado:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The unconditional love and respect for all individuals.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Julie Hargreaves: </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">They taught me honesty, respect, love, and to do the best I can.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mike Jones:<br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">To be content with what you had and to respect others. They taught me the importance of good manners and to never forget where I came from.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Julia Santos:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">My mom was very knowledgeable about plants, especially medicinal properties of herbs and spices. It awakened a desire to learn more. My dad was very hardworking. Very self reliant. Strong work ethic. Honest and fair. My parents were the best. 🙏❤️🙏</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pauline Godschalk:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">To be respectful, to believe in myself, and to help the less fortunate.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Julie Abbot:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">We were taught good manners and to help and respect other people, particularly our elders. We have a close knit family who love each other.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kathleen Couch:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">To care for other people.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Linda Taylor:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Respect for others,treat them as you wish to be treated.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rosemary Maybury:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">They taught me good manners and to be self reliant and strong! bless them both.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Vicki McCarthy:</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Just being my Mum, she always made time to sit and listen to whatever it was I wanted to talk about, she also always made the time for anyone who needed someone to talk to and had a never ending supply of hugs for everyone.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span></p>

Family & Pets

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“Hidden” sugars on our supermarket shelves

<div class="copy"> <p>Australians are buying large amounts of “hidden” added sugars in their supermarket groceries, according to a new study. The research, led by the George Institute for Global Health, found that over half of the food and drink bought in supermarkets contains added sugar, but it’s not clearly labelled as such.</p> <p>“We used supermarket survey data to look at the amount of added sugar that Australians buy when they shop at the supermarket,” says Daisy Coyle, a dietician and research fellow at the George Institute.</p> <p>The researchers looked at a year’s worth of purchases from 7,188 households. They found that on average, Australians are buying nine teaspoons (36g) of added sugar per person per day in groceries, with low-income households buying more.</p> <p>“It might not sound like a lot, nine teaspoons, but it’s recommended by the World Health Organization that we consume no more than 12 teaspoons each day. So we’re getting nine teaspoons just from packaged food from the supermarket alone,” says Coyle.</p> <p>Restaurant, takeaway and other non-supermarket food would need to be very lean in sugar indeed to avoid exceeding the recommended daily amount.</p> <p>Most of the added sugar comes from 10 different categories of food product. Coyle says that some of these products wouldn’t necessarily be thought to have large amounts of added sugar.</p> <p>“The usual suspects are up there, things like sugary drinks, and chocolates and lollies, but we’re also finding more of the everyday staple foods contain a lot of added sugar,” she says. “Things like breakfast cereals, pasta sauces and yoghurts.”</p> <p>The researchers believe these added sugars may make it more difficult for Australians to eat healthily.</p> <p>“The issue with added sugars is that it’s not on the nutrition label,” says Coyle. “So while consumers can pick up a product and look at, say, the protein, carbs and total sugar content, they can’t get any information about the added sugar. So you can’t compare products – you can’t make healthier choices.”</p> <p>Plenty of foods – like fruit and milk – contain sugar naturally, but this is less of a concern from a nutrition perspective.</p> <p>“Natural sugars come from healthy foods that contain other nutrients,” says Coyle. “If you’re talking about sugar that’s in fruit, you’re not just getting the sugar – you’re getting fibre and vitamins and minerals. Added sugar contains nothing but just sugar.”</p> <p>The researchers believe that this extra sugar needs to be addressed at a policy level. This could include making current voluntary <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://www.health.gov.au/initiatives-and-programs/healthy-food-partnership/partnership-reformulation-program" target="_blank">sugar reduction targets</a> mandatory and lower, and introducing stronger labelling guidelines, among other things.</p> <p>“We always think that it shouldn’t just be on the consumer, it shouldn’t just be on the individual,” says Coyle. “Our food environments, our supermarkets, should be made healthier, so it’s easier to make a healthy choice.”</p> <p>A paper describing the research is <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2021.06.013" target="_blank">published</a> in the <em>Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics</em>.</p> <em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/added-sugars-australian-supermarket-products/" target="_blank">cosmosmagazine.com</a> and was written by Ellen Phiddian. </em></p> </div>

Food & Wine

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Rekindling friendships after lockdown

<p>As we resume our social lives after strict COVID restrictions have lifted, many of us are finding it’s time to take stock of our friendships.</p> <p>Recent research I’ve been involved in found <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/lonely-after-lockdown-how-covid-may-leave-us-with-fewer-friends-if-we-are-not-careful-168844" target="_blank">friendship networks were shrinking</a> in Australia during COVID lockdowns.</p> <p>Some people pruned their networks, focusing on only the most important family and friends. Others lost friends through reduced recreational and community activities, falling out of the habit of socialising, and shifting to more digital interaction.</p> <p>As we start to re-engage, the obvious question is – how do we get our old friends back?</p> <p>We might also ask ourselves – which friends do we <em>want</em> back?</p> <p><strong>Which friends do we want?</strong></p> <p>There’s no one answer here – different people want different things from friends.</p> <p>Data I have calculated from <a rel="noopener" href="http://rpatulny.com/data/" target="_blank">the 2015-16 Australian Social Attitudes Survey</a> show the main form of support received from close friends in Australia is:</p> <ul> <li> <p>primarily, having a confidant who provides <strong>emotional support</strong></p> </li> <li> <p>followed by <strong>fun and good times</strong></p> </li> <li> <p>and then, <strong>favours and advice</strong> of various kinds.</p> </li> </ul> <p>These results vary by background and life stage.</p> <p>Women are much more likely to have a confidant who provides emotional support as their closest friend. Men are more likely to have friends who provide fun, good times, favours and advice – or else no regular support at all.</p> <p>Younger people are more likely to have a confidant, emotional support, fun and good times. Older people, aged over 56, are slightly more likely to receive favours and advice, and are much more likely to lack a close supportive friend.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/437962/original/file-20211216-19-ark8mw.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=237&amp;fit=clip" alt="Alt" /> <em><span class="caption">Women are much more likely to have a confidant who provides emotional support compared to men.</span> <span class="attribution"><a rel="noopener" href="http://rpatulny.com/data/" target="_blank" class="source">Data: Australian Social Attitudes Survey 2015-16/Roger Patulny</a>, <span class="license">Author provided</span></span></em></p> <p>These results are indicative of what different people get from close friendships, but may not represent what they <em>want</em> or <em>need</em>.</p> <p>The close confidants women report as friends may well alleviate <a rel="noopener" href="https://books.google.com.au/books/about/Loneliness_the_Experience_of_Emotional_a.html?id=KuibQgAACAAJ&amp;redir_esc=y" target="_blank">emotional loneliness</a>, which is defined as the absence of close attachment to others who provide strong emotional support.</p> <p>However, it may still leave them with <a rel="noopener" href="https://books.google.com.au/books/about/Loneliness_the_Experience_of_Emotional_a.html?id=KuibQgAACAAJ&amp;redir_esc=y" target="_blank">social loneliness</a>, or the feeling of lacking quality, companionable connections with friends.</p> <p>Conversely, male camaraderie built around fun, activities and mutual favours may alleviate social but not emotional loneliness.</p> <p>Emerging evidence suggests emotional loneliness has a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042811027029" target="_blank">stronger negative impact on well-being than social loneliness</a>, so it’s important for everyone to have <em>someone</em> to talk to for emotional support.</p> <p>We still need a variety of approaches and goals to suit different friendship needs nonetheless.</p> <p><strong>Beating social loneliness</strong></p> <p>The first way to reduce social loneliness is to reach out to those we already know, now that we can.</p> <p>We can message old friends, organise get-togethers, or start new conversations and activities with everyday contacts including colleagues, fellow students, regulars at the local club or cafe, or neighbours.</p> <p>That said, reconnecting may now be impossible or undesirable for several reasons. These can include physical distance, changed life circumstances, different interests, intractable arguments, or a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/australian-men-are-prone-to-loneliness/10555064" target="_blank">masculine aversion to initiating contact</a>.</p> <p>In these cases, we can join, organise, invite others, and connect with new social and community groups. Better groups tend to run regular activities that genuinely reflect members’ interests and input. Generic groups that meet sporadically <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/abs/cambridge-handbook-of-personal-relationships/loneliness-and-social-isolation/246AFB3CA8837959725B67497331E0A8" target="_blank">are less effective</a>.</p> <p>Some people may benefit from joining support groups designed for people subject to stigma based on identity or life events, such as <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6841046/" target="_blank">LGBTQI</a> or health recovery groups.</p> <p>Some groups help deal with the stigma of feeling lonely. This includes shared activity groups where people talk “shoulder to shoulder” rather than face to face, such as <a rel="noopener" href="https://hivelife.com/australian-mens-shed-association/" target="_blank">Men’s Sheds</a>.</p> <p>Groups focused on education, shared discussion, or exercise are particularly good for <a rel="noopener" href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24575725/" target="_blank">friendship and alleviating loneliness among older people</a>.</p> <p>While online options abound for connecting, it’s important to avoid activities which increase loneliness, such as <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07421222.2014.1001282" target="_blank">passive scrolling</a>, unsolicited broadcasting, or <a rel="noopener" href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1745691617713052?journalCode=ppsa" target="_blank">escapist substituting of digital communities for physical ones</a>.</p> <p>Interactive online contact and online groups that <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/does-social-media-make-us-more-or-less-lonely-depends-on-how-you-use-it-128468" target="_blank">help us organise in-person catch ups</a> (such as WhatsApp, Facebook or Meetup) are more effective.</p> <p><strong>Beating emotional loneliness</strong></p> <p>To beat emotional loneliness, the focus should be on deepening existing relationships.</p> <p>It’s essential to spend high quality, meaningful time with a few good quality friends (or even one).</p> <p>It might mean repairing damage, and <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-10/coronavirus-and-reflection-how-to-restore-a-friendship/12229750" target="_blank">apologising in a considered and respectful manner</a> if you did or said something wrong.</p> <p>Sometimes it just requires the effort of checking in more regularly. Organisations like <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ruok.org.au/how-to-ask" target="_blank">RUOK</a> provide sensitive, step-by-step suggestions on how to do this.</p> <p>Online contact and videoconferencing can help maintain intimate partner and family connections, as it did during lockdown. It’s particularly helpful for <a rel="noopener" href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21069600/" target="_blank">older people</a> and <a rel="noopener" href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2012-14727-003" target="_blank">migrants</a>, but less so for younger people <a rel="noopener" href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24321573/" target="_blank">already saturated in online social media</a> connections.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/436868/original/file-20211210-23-txf7t8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="One elderly man comforting another" /> <em><span class="caption">It’s crucial for our health and well-being to spend deep, meaningful time with close friends.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></em></p> <p>Some people may also need help from a professional psychologist, counsellor, or support group to process increased social anxiety, particularly after COVID lockdown.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2019-62767-001" target="_blank">Such support</a> can reduce emotional loneliness by helping us process social situations more positively and <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/abs/cambridge-handbook-of-personal-relationships/loneliness-and-social-isolation/246AFB3CA8837959725B67497331E0A8" target="_blank">be more realistic (and less anxious) about our friendship options</a>.</p> <p><strong>Ending wrong or ‘toxic’ friendships</strong></p> <p>In <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.verywellmind.com/news-how-to-rekindle-friendships-after-covid-19-5179635" target="_blank">reflecting on our friendships</a>, we may decide to end any that have become particularly toxic.</p> <p>Where possible, we should be kind, explain this, and avoid ghosting, as this can be <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/au/blog/living-forward/201511/why-ghosting-hurts-so-much" target="_blank">highly traumatic to those who are ghosted</a> and de-sensitise us to others’ feelings if we do it regularly.</p> <p>Before doing so, we should be careful we don’t just need a break to rebuild energy and habits of interactions.</p> <p>We should be especially careful with <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/friday-essay-on-the-ending-of-a-friendship-121627" target="_blank">ending long-term friendships</a>. Quality relationships take time, shared history, and involve natural ups and downs – especially in a pandemic. We should look to renegotiate rather than end them wherever possible.</p> <p>Take time, and seek counselling or another friend’s advice. Since listening is key to friendship, maybe ask yourself – have you heard everything they’re trying to say?<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/172853/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/roger-patulny-94836" target="_blank">Roger Patulny</a>, Associate Professor of Sociology, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-wollongong-711" target="_blank">University of Wollongong</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/lost-touch-with-friends-during-lockdown-heres-how-to-reconnect-and-let-go-of-toxic-ones-172853" target="_blank">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Relationships

Finance

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What is a climate stress test?

<p>Imagine this: You take out a mortgage to purchase your dream home. But the rate you were quoted has expired, and when you go to renew it you find there’s been a major hike in interest rates. With this new rate, you are no longer able to afford your monthly payments.</p> <p>How do you avoid this nightmare situation? <a rel="noopener" href="https://itools-ioutils.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/MQ-HQ/MQ-EAPH-eng.aspx" target="_blank">The answer is a stress test</a>.</p> <p>In the simplest terms, a stress test helps individuals and institutions mitigate risk and make better decisions by playing out big economic shocks — like a major jump in interest rates or a global pandemic — to ensure they have what it takes to weather the storm.</p> <p>A stress test is a “what if” exercise, where we contemplate scenarios that would pose the most harm to our financial systems and well-being in order to determine how we can best manage through them. They’re now being increasingly applied to future climate change and the financial risks that come with it.</p> <p><strong>Physical risks, transition risks</strong></p> <p>The <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/a-guide-to-the-financial-crisis--10-years-later/2018/09/10/114b76ba-af10-11e8-a20b-5f4f84429666_story.html" target="_blank">2008 financial crisis</a> put the need for better risk planning into sharp relief, especially for financial institutions. It’s no coincidence that we have seen a steady rise in the use of this tool since that time.</p> <p>Today, financial regulators, banks and policy-makers use stress tests to uncover weak points in how financial institutions operate and identify changes that will help buffer them (and our larger financial system and everyone who depends on it) from harm.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/442024/original/file-20220121-27-15onvnx.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/442024/original/file-20220121-27-15onvnx.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="A chart showing the top 10 risks to the world in the next decade" /></a> <em><span class="caption">Climate action failure, extreme weather events and biodiversity loss, are the top three global risks over the next 10 years, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Perception Survey.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">(World Economic Forum Global Risks Report 2022)</span></span></em></p> <p>So, what’s a climate stress test? It is the same what-if exercise, conducted through the lens of different climate scenarios that have diverse and significant financial consequences.</p> <p>On the one hand, there are physical climate risks. Think, for example, of extreme weather events, such as floods, droughts, ice storms or heat waves, that can damage property, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/article-supply-chain-issues-canada-covid-19-holiday-explainer/" target="_blank">disrupt supply chains</a>, increase insurance costs, and shut-down operations. In scenarios where global temperatures rise higher, the physical risks increase.</p> <p>On the other hand, there are also transition risks. This refers to the material impacts of various degrees of climate ambition and action.</p> <p>For example, new or more stringent government policies aimed to further reduce carbon emissions or at a faster pace will have different financial impacts on different companies, depending upon their climate-readiness, and on different sectors.</p> <p><strong>Scenarios aren’t predictions</strong></p> <p>Climate scenarios take both types of risk into consideration, physical and transition. Like other types of stress tests, these scenarios aren’t predictions. Imagining what would happen if interest rates skyrocket isn’t the same as predicting that they will.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441858/original/file-20220120-8832-eyucfm.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="An aerial view of a coal mine with large excavators digging into the Earth." /> <em><span class="caption">Investments in carbon-intensive sources of electricity production, like coal, carry a greater risk of defaulting during the energy transition.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">(Shutterstock)</span></span></em></p> <p>However, given the established scientific consensus that <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ipcc.ch/2021/08/09/ar6-wg1-20210809-pr/" target="_blank">climate change risks are increasing</a> and the high degree of uncertainty these risks create, climate stress tests are an important tool to assess the sustainability of companies, investments and our financial system overall. And there is increasing momentum behind this practice.</p> <p>For example, the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/BoC-OSFI-Using-Scenario-Analysis-to-Assess-Climate-Transition-Risk.pdf" target="_blank">Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) and the Bank of Canada recently released</a> a major report examining four climate scenarios over a 30-year horizon, from 2020 to 2050, that varied in terms of ambition, timing of global climate, and pace of global change:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Baseline scenario: A scenario with global climate policies in place at the end of 2019.</p> </li> <li> <p>Below 2 C immediate: An immediate policy action toward limiting average global warming to below 2 C.</p> </li> <li> <p>Below 2 C delayed: a delayed policy action toward limiting average global warming to below 2 C.</p> </li> <li> <p>Net-zero 2050 (1.5 C): a more ambitious immediate policy action scenario to limit average global warming to 1.5 C that includes current net-zero commitments by some countries.</p> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Physical risks dominate</strong></p> <p>The results of the analyses were clear.</p> <p>First, delayed action will lead to higher economic shocks and risks to financial stability. The longer we wait to act, the more drastic and sudden those actions will be.</p> <p>Second, while every sector will need to contribute to the transition, the analysis showed that “significant negative financial impacts emerged for some sectors (e.g., fossil fuels) and benefits emerged for others (e.g., electricity).”</p> <p>Third, macroeconomic risks are present, particularly for carbon intensive commodity exporting countries like Canada.</p> <p>The <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ecb.europa.eu/pub/pdf/scpops/ecb.op281%7E05a7735b1c.en.pdf" target="_blank">European Central Bank also conducted</a> a climate stress test with similar findings. It determined that climate change represents a systemic risk — especially for portfolios in specific economic sectors and geographical areas. For example, in the mining and agriculture sectors, or in oil-dependent regions like the Gulf States.</p> <p>It also found physical risks will be more prominent in the long run, compared to transition risks. The physical risks of climate change on real estate in coastal regions or on supply chains is expected to be greater than the effects of changes in carbon pricing or other policies.</p> <p>These findings have clear implications for companies and investors. Now more than ever the business case for prioritizing and evaluating corporate climate resilience is clear, especially as <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.fsb-tcfd.org" target="_blank">investors and lenders increasingly incorporate climate data into their financial decisions</a>.</p> <p>For example, it is now more broadly understood how climate policy changes could <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.cpacanada.ca/-/media/site/operational/rg-research-guidance-and-support/docs/02650-rg-a4s-essential-guide-valuations-climate-change.pdf" target="_blank">abruptly impact a company’s valuation and financial outlook</a>. This makes climate policy foresight critical, for corporate leaders and investors alike.</p> <p>As climate stress tests become increasingly common, their findings and implications will reverberate across the entire financial industry. Savvy leaders will both watch this conversation closely, and take the necessary steps to adapt and thrive.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/175313/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ryan-riordan-756409" target="_blank">Ryan Riordan</a>, Professor &amp; Distinguished Professor of Finance, Research Director at the Institute for Sustainable Finance, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/queens-university-ontario-1154" target="_blank">Queen's University, Ontario</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/what-is-a-climate-stress-test-a-sustainable-finance-expert-explains-175313" target="_blank">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Money & Banking

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The better you are at math, the more money seems to influence your satisfaction

<p>Your grade school math teacher probably told you that being good at math would be very important to your grownup self. But maybe the younger you didn’t believe that at the time. A lot of research, though, has shown that <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/people-who-are-bad-with-numbers-often-find-it-harder-to-make-ends-meet-even-if-they-are-not-poor-172272" target="_blank">your teacher was right</a>.</p> <p>We are two researchers who study decision-making and how it relates to wealth and happiness. In a study published in November 2021, we found that, in general, people who are better at math <a rel="noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0259331" target="_blank">make more money and are more satisfied with their lives</a> than people who aren’t as mathematically talented. But being good at math seems to be a double-edged sword. Although math-proficient people are very satisfied when they have high incomes, they are more dissatisfied, compared to those who aren’t as good at math, when they don’t make a lot of money.</p> <p>Many researchers have suggested that more money only increases <a rel="noopener" href="https://qz.com/1503207/a-nobel-prize-winning-psychologist-defines-happiness-versus-satisfaction/" target="_blank">life satisfaction and happiness</a> up to a certain point. Our research modifies this idea by showing that satisfaction derived from income relates strongly to how good a person is at math.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441600/original/file-20220119-27-1kh4idi.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441600/original/file-20220119-27-1kh4idi.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="A person holding a pencil above a sheet of paper." /></a> <em><span class="caption">Nearly 6,000 people responded to a survey that asked about math skills, income and life satisfaction.</span> <span class="attribution"><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/student-taking-math-quiz-cropped-royalty-free-image/97612935?adppopup=true" target="_blank" class="source">PhotoAlto/Odilon Dimier via Getty Images</a></span></em></p> <p><strong>A math and happiness test</strong></p> <p>We investigated the relationship between math ability, income and life satisfaction, using surveys sent to 5,748 diverse Americans as part of the <a rel="noopener" href="https://uasdata.usc.edu/index.php" target="_blank">Understanding America Study</a>.</p> <p>The study included two questions and one test relevant to our research. One question asked participants about their household yearly income. Another one asked respondents to rate how satisfied they are with their lives on a scale of zero to 10.</p> <p>Finally, people answered eight math questions that varied in difficulty to get a sense of their math skills. For example, one of the moderately difficult questions was: “Jerry received both the 15th highest and the 15th lowest mark in the class. How many students are in the class?” The correct answer is 29 students.</p> <p>We then combined the results to see how they all related to one another.</p> <p>Math skills and income also are tied to <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/money-buys-even-more-happiness-than-it-used-to-141766" target="_blank">level of education,</a> so, in our analyses, we controlled for education, verbal intelligence, personality traits and other demographics.</p> <p><strong>Connecting math skills to income and satisfaction</strong></p> <p>On average, the better a person was at math, the <a rel="noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0259331" target="_blank">more money they made</a>. For every one additional right answer on the eight-question math test, people reported an average of $4,062 more in annual income.</p> <p>Imagine you have two people with the same level of education, one of whom answered none of the math questions correctly and the other answered all of them correctly. Our research predicts that the person who answered all of the questions correctly will earn about $30,000 more each year.</p> <p>The survey also showed that people who are better at math were, on average, also more satisfied with their lives than those with lower math ability. This finding agrees with <a rel="noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1257/0002828041464551" target="_blank">a lot of other research</a> and suggests that income influences life satisfaction.</p> <p>But prior research has shown that the relationship between income and satisfaction is not as straightforward as “more money equals greater happiness.” It turns out that how satisfied a person is with their income often depends on how they feel it <a rel="noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797610362671" target="_blank">compares to other people’s incomes</a>.</p> <p>Other research has also shown that people who are better at math tend to make <a rel="noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1093/oso/9780190861094.001.0001" target="_blank">more numerical comparisons</a> in general than those who are worse at math. This led our team to suspect that math-proficient people would compare incomes more, too. Our results seem to show just that.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/439268/original/file-20220104-15-15r038f.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/439268/original/file-20220104-15-15r038f.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="A graph correlating math skills to life satisfaction and income." /></a><em> <span class="caption">This chart shows that people who scored highest on the math test (red line) appear to be happiest when they make a lot of money (top right of graph), but also the least satisfied when they make less money (bottom left of graph). Different color lines correspond to the number of math questions answered correctly.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Ellen Peters, Pär Bjälkebring</span>, <a rel="noopener" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/" target="_blank" class="license">CC BY-ND</a></span></em></p> <p>Simply put, the better a person was at math, the <a rel="noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0259331" target="_blank">more they cared about how much money they make</a>. People who are better at math had the highest life satisfaction when they had high incomes. But deriving satisfaction from income goes both ways. These people also had the lowest life satisfaction when they had lower incomes. Among people who aren’t as good at math, income didn’t relate to satisfaction nearly as much. Thus, the same income was valued differently depending on a person’s math skills.</p> <p><strong>Money does buy happiness for some</strong></p> <p>An often-quoted fact – backed up by research – says that once a person makes around $95,000 a year, <a rel="noopener" href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-017-0277-0" target="_blank">earning more money doesn’t dramatically increase satisfaction</a>. This concept is called <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-017-0277-0?mod=article_inline" target="_blank">income satiation</a>. Our research challenges that blanket statement.</p> <p>Interestingly, the people who are best at math did not seem to show income satiation. They were more and more satisfied with more income, and there didn’t appear to be an upper limit. This did not hold true for people who weren’t as talented at math. The least math-proficient group gained more satisfaction from income only until about $50,000. After that, earning more money made little difference.</p> <p>For some, money does seem to buy happiness. While more work needs to be done to really understand why, we think it may be because math-oriented people compare numbers – including incomes – to make sense of the world. And maybe that’s not always a great thing. In comparison, those who are worse at math appear to derive life satisfaction from sources other than income. So if you are feeling dissatisfied with your income, maybe seeing beyond the numbers will be a winning strategy for you.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/173720/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/par-bjalkebring-1289840" target="_blank">Pär Bjälkebring</a>, Assistant Professor of Psychology, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-gothenburg-1351" target="_blank">University of Gothenburg</a> and <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ellen-peters-812268" target="_blank">Ellen Peters</a>, Director, Center for Science Communication Research, <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-oregon-811" target="_blank">University of Oregon</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/the-better-you-are-at-math-the-more-money-seems-to-influence-your-satisfaction-173720" target="_blank">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Confusion, financial pressure, discomfort: older people can struggle with sustainable living, despite its obvious benefits

<p>Improving the sustainability of Australia’s housing stock is <a href="https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&amp;rls=en&amp;q=building+sector+australia+emissions+the+conversation&amp;ie=UTF-8&amp;oe=UTF-8">crucial</a> to meeting national emissions reduction goals. But for older adults, such changes can bring both benefits and challenges.</p> <p>My <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0360132321007344">recent research</a> examined the literature on environmental sustainability measures at residences for older adults. These included private homes, retirement villages and nursing homes.</p> <p>I found that while sustainability measures can bring multiple benefits to older people, they also bring challenges. For example, people living in sustainable dwellings may use less energy and water which leads to lower bills. But older people may suffer cognitive decline and struggle to use sustainable technology devices.</p> <p>The full effects of environmentally sustainable features must be better understood if we’re to provide seniors with high-quality residential environments.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441440/original/file-20220119-15-60lcsc.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Older man walks down corridor" /> <span class="caption">Sustainability measures can bring benefits and challenges to older people.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></p> <h2>Sustainability and ageing: a complex mix</h2> <p>Forecasts suggest that by 2056, <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports-data/population-groups/older-people/overview">22% of Australians</a> – or 8.7 million people – will be aged 65 or older. High-quality residential environments are important to maintaining the welfare of these people as they age.</p> <p>Environmental sustainability is playing an ever greater role in residential development across the board, including retirement villages. And <a href="https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jar/2014/919054/">previous research</a> suggests most retirement village residents want to lead more sustainable lifestyles.</p> <p>As climate change worsens, the dwellings of older adults should allow them to adapt to these changing conditions. The reduced ability of elderly people to regulate their body temperature means global warming is a profound threat to this group.</p> <p>Improving the sustainability of a residential environment may include:</p> <ul> <li>reducing waste</li> <li>using low carbon or recycled building materials</li> <li>solar passive design</li> <li>efficient heating and cooling</li> <li>using renewable energy such as rooftop solar.</li> </ul> <p><a href="https://new.gbca.org.au/case-studies/building/stockland-takes-sustainability-retirement-living/">Some residential projects</a> for the elderly already include environmental sustainability. A <a href="https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/F-08-2011-0060/full/html">case study</a> of a not-for-profit retirement village in South Australia revealed practices such as innovative floor plans, thermally efficient building materials, good window orientation and a water harvesting system.</p> <p>And my previous research <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0959652619341605">found</a> a range of sustainability features at eight private and not-for-profit retirement villages in Queensland.</p> <p>However, while many retirement village developers prioritise “social sustainability” features such as care provision and social interaction, environmental sustainability is <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0959652617313963">largely ignored</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441450/original/file-20220119-25-1qtv5d.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="elderly woman holds hands of carer" /> <span class="caption">Forecasts suggest that by 2056, 22% of Australians will be aged 65 or older.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></p> <h2>On the plus side</h2> <p>The benefits of environmentally sustainable features in in older adults’ residential environment include:</p> <p><strong>- reduced resource consumption:</strong> sustainable dwellings usually require less water and energy use, which lowers living costs. This is especially important for older adults who often have reduced financial capacity after retirement. Older people also use energy <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0301421597000402">more intensively</a> than other groups because they have fewer household members, greater heating requirements and spend more time at home.</p> <p><strong>- reduced health risks:</strong> environmentally sustainable measures can lead to healthier indoor environments. For example, good ventilation and high-quality air conditioning often lead to improved indoor air quality and more comfortable ambient temperatures.</p> <p><strong>- alleviated environmental challenges:</strong> many older people want their homes to be more environmentally friendly. Doing their bit to alleviate global problems such as greenhouse gas emissions can provide them with peace of mind.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441438/original/file-20220119-15-124namg.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="elderly person's hands on heater" /> <span class="caption">Sustainable dwellings usually require less water and energy use,</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span></p> <h2>The potential downsides</h2> <p>The challenges of environmentally sustainable home features for older adults include:</p> <p><strong>- financial pressure:</strong> the income of many older adults is substantially reduced after retirement. This <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0301421511005222">can conflict</a> with the high initial investment of developing an sustainable housing and the cost of replacing existing systems with sustainable ones.</p> <p><strong>- reducing energy consumption:</strong> in some cases, sustainability measures can involve tolerating slightly higher or cooler temperatures. For example, moving from a gas-heating system to a more sustainable type may <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421515001172">delay</a> the arrival of heat in a room and leave older people uncomfortable for a short time. This may conflict with older people’s <a href="https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/enepol/v84y2015icp250-256.html">increased sensitivity</a> to ambient temperatures.</p> <p><strong>- confusion and complexity:</strong> Older adults can have <a href="https://academic.oup.com/bmb/article/92/1/135/332828">reduced cognitive capabilities</a> affecting memory and information processing speed. As a result they may struggle to use sustainable technologies such as smart thermostats. Research has <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0301421514006259">suggested</a> ways of overcoming this, such as better recognising the diversity of older adults to achieve a better “person-technology fit”.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/441437/original/file-20220119-25-fkfanl.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Four older women shelter from the sun under umbrella" /> <span class="caption">Older people may have increased sensitivity to hot or cold temperatures.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Paul Miller/AAP</span></span></p> <h2>Next steps</h2> <p>Older adults have unique needs which their homes <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0360132321007344">must satisfy</a>, even when sustainability features are being adopted.</p> <p>Ageing should be seen as a dynamic process with physical, psychological and social dimensions. And the complex interrelationships of ageing, environmental sustainability and the residential environment also need to be recognised.</p> <p>Best practices and lessons learned in creating sustainable living environments for older adults should be <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0959652618325241">shared</a>.</p> <p>Finally, developers making sustainability decisions should consult other stakeholders. These include contractors, occupational therapists, researchers and most importantly, older adults themselves.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/174535/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/xin-hu-685656">Xin Hu</a>, Lecturer, School of Architecture and Built Environment, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/deakin-university-757">Deakin University</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/confusion-financial-pressure-discomfort-older-people-can-struggle-with-sustainable-living-despite-its-obvious-benefits-174535">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Retirement Income

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Novak set to sue Australia for big bucks

<p dir="ltr">Following Novak Djokovic’s<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://oversixty.co.nz/news/news/djokovic-escorted-out-of-australia" target="_blank">deportation from Australia</a>, it seemed that his fight to stay in the country had come to an end.</p> <p dir="ltr">But the fight may be renewed as the tennis star<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/sport/tennis/novak-djokovic-reportedly-looking-to-sue-australian-government-over-visa-and-ill-treatment-c-5378332" target="_blank">contemplates</a><span> </span>suing the Australian government for $6 million over his failed attempt to reinstate his visa, according to a UK report.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 34-year-old was deported to Serbia after he entered the country while unvaccinated, with hopes he would be able to play in the Australian Open’s opening round on Monday.</p> <p dir="ltr">Djokovic now faces a potential three-year-ban if he does re-enter the country, and has been ordered to pay the federal government’s legal costs.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/sport/17377639/novak-djokovic-sue-australian-government-talks/" target="_blank"><em>UK Sun</em></a><span> </span>has reported that Djokovic may be considering legal action against the government for “ill-treatment”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The publication said the $6 million figure he may be suing for would include the Australian Open prize money he expected to earn if he had won.</p> <p dir="ltr">The potential development in the Djokovic saga comes as the reasons why a three-judge panel of the Federal Court unanimously ruled against reinstating the Serb’s visa are due to be published by Chief Justice James Allsop at 4.15 pm on Thursday afternoon.</p> <p dir="ltr">Following the Federal Court’s decision on Sunday night, Djokovic said in a statement that he was extremely disappointed but respected the ruling.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I will cooperate with the relevant authorities in relation to my departure from the country,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Immigration Minister Alex Hawke said Djokovic’s presence in Australia was a public health risk, as it could excite anti-vaccination sentiment.</p> <p dir="ltr">Chief Justice Allsop also noted the international interest in Djokovic’s case, including in his home country of Serbia, before he delivered the ruling on Sunday evening.</p> <p dir="ltr">He explained that the decision focused on whether the government’s decision to cancel Djokovic’s visa initially was irrational or unlawful in any way, and that it was not an appeal against the government’s decision.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It is not part of the function of the court to decide upon the merits or wisdom of the decision,” Chief Justice Allsop said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Legal

Entertainment

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The best reactions to The Wiggles’ Hottest 100 win

<p dir="ltr">Each year, national broadcaster Triple J counts down the Hottest 100 songs of the previous year, as voted by the Australian public.</p> <p dir="ltr">This year, an unlikely candidate was tipped to take out the top spot: The Wiggles.</p> <p dir="ltr">At the beginning of 2021, the children’s musical act covered a song by indie artist Tame Impala in Triple J’s Like A Version studio, which saw the original Wiggles unite with the newer group members.</p> <p dir="ltr">The cover of the song, titled <em>Elephant</em>, racked up millions of views on Youtube, delighting fans of all ages as they combined the song with their famous Fruit Salad hit.</p> <p dir="ltr">As the cover won the coveted number one spot, social media went into meltdown at the iconic win.</p> <p dir="ltr">While some music sceptics were annoyed at the win, most were thrilled with the recognition.</p> <p dir="ltr">Thousands flocked to Twitter to share their thoughts on the win, with many calling it a remarkable win for the Australian music scene: particularly for the generation who grew up with The Wiggles and turned into avid Triple J listeners.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The Wiggles winning the 2021 Hottest 100 is the kind of thing that you gets more remarkable as you look at it written down.</p> — Rudi Edsall (@RudiEdsall) <a href="https://twitter.com/RudiEdsall/status/1484814710868361218?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Never underestimate this country’s love for the Wiggles <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/hottest100?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#hottest100</a></p> — Jacqui Dodd (@doddsie161) <a href="https://twitter.com/doddsie161/status/1484814376943366151?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">They tapped into that sweet venn diagram intersection of people who listened to fruit salad in 2000 as a toddler and tame impala last year as 20-year olds. Diabolically genius.</p> — Ruby Redshoes (@Ruby__Redshoes) <a href="https://twitter.com/Ruby__Redshoes/status/1484818453035122692?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">I don’t want to call voter fraud on The Wiggles’ <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Hottest100?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Hottest100</a> win, but when one of your band members can get you eight votes at once using each arm it seems dodgy. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Wiggles?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Wiggles</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TheWigglesForHottest100?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#TheWigglesForHottest100</a></p> — adam rozenbachs (@arozenbachs) <a href="https://twitter.com/arozenbachs/status/1484829361673216005?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <p dir="ltr"><span>The Queensland Police Twitter account even got involved, with others pointing out how The Wiggles’ win is also a win for Australian band The Cockroaches, whose guitarist Murray Cook is also known as the Red Wiggle.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Investigations have commenced into how The Wiggles created such a banger. 🎵 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Wiggles4Hottest100?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Wiggles4Hottest100</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/hottest100?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#hottest100</a></p> — Queensland Police (@QldPolice) <a href="https://twitter.com/QldPolice/status/1484719126438629376?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The Cockroaches were really playing the long game for a <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Hottest100?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Hottest100</a> win. Change your name, target pre-schoolers and wait for them to grow</p> — Imogen Hines (@Imi_cycles) <a href="https://twitter.com/Imi_cycles/status/1484817251971002369?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Only in 2022 could The Wiggles top the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Hottest100?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Hottest100</a> and it not feel like a strange thing.</p> — Sam Robinson (@samsquareeyes) <a href="https://twitter.com/samsquareeyes/status/1484815440023269379?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Can we all acknowledge that thousands of millennials just worked together to get the wiggles to win the hottest 100, beating some of the biggest Artists in the world. This is payback for the real ppl who raised us! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Hottest100?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Hottest100</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/wiggles?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#wiggles</a></p> — Patrickoliosis (@Patrick96380290) <a href="https://twitter.com/Patrick96380290/status/1484814925591871490?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 22, 2022</a></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">You can <span>check out The Wiggles’ winning cover of </span><em>Elephant</em><span> below.</span></p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a13WnqsRc5g" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Instagram @thewiggles</em></p>

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From fairytale to gothic ghost story: how 40 years of biopics showed Princess Diana on screen

<p>Since the earliest Princess Diana biopics appeared soon after the royal wedding in 1981, there have been repeated attempts to bring to the screen the story of Diana’s journey from blue-blooded ingenue through to tragic princess trapped within – and then expelled from – the royal system.</p> <p>A long string of actresses, with replicas of the outfits she wore and a blond wig (sometimes precariously) in place, have walked through episodic storylines, charting the “greatest hits” of what is known of Diana’s royal life.</p> <p>Biopics about the princess tend to be shaped according to the dominant mythic narratives in circulation in any given phase of Diana’s life. The first biopics were stories of fairytales and romance. From the 1990s, the marriage of Charles and Diana took on the shape of soap opera and melodrama.</p> <p>Now, with the Crown (2016–) and Spencer (2021), Diana has become a doomed gothic heroine. She is a woman suffocated by a royal system that cannot, will not, acknowledge her special place in the royal pantheon.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WllZh9aekDg?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <h2>Fairytales and soap operas</h2> <p>The first Dianas appeared on American television networks within months of the July 1981 wedding of Charles and Diana.</p> <p>Both Charles and Diana: A Royal Love Story (starring Caroline Bliss) and The Royal Romance of Charles and Diana (starring Catherine Oxenberg) invested wholesale in a fairytale lens.</p> <p>They told of the young and virginal beauty who had captured the attention of the dashing prince, whisked off to a life of happily ever after.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/54QRwogBUQI?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>The Diana biopics fell quiet for the first years of the marriage (fairytales don’t tend to interest themselves in pregnancies and apparent marital harmony), and then reemerged after the publication of Andrew Morton’s exposé, Diana: Her True Story (1992).</p> <p>Morton’s biography was written from taped interviews with the princess and inspired the next generation of Diana biopics, ones that I call the “post-Morton” biopics, which borrow from Diana’s own scripting of her life.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R7OnHYcTqLk?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>A series of actors were enlisted to play Diana in these made-for-television productions.</p> <p>Oxenberg turns up again in Charles and Diana: Unhappily Ever After (1992). In Diana: Her True Story (1993), Serena Scott-Thomas (who, incidentally, turns up in the 2011 television biopic William and Kate as Catherine Middleton’s mother Carole) does her best with a terrible script and series of wigs.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tUFUuGpHHPg?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Others gave it their best shot. We had Julie Cox in Princess in Love (1996), Amy Seacombe in Diana: A Tribute to the People’s Princess (1998), Genevieve O'Reilly in Diana: Last Days of a Princess (2007) and, briefly, Michelle Duncan in Charles and Camilla: Whatever Love Means (2005).</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eNTR0nZZXn4?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>But even large budget films (such as 2013’s cinema-release Diana, directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel and starring Naomi Watts) had critics and audiences letting out <a href="https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/diana_2013">a collective yawn</a>.</p> <p>In film after film we were offered yet another uninspired, soap opera-style representation of the princess’s life.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ca2GGofxzX4?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <h2>A gothic tale</h2> <p>Critics’ voices were quelled somewhat with the appearance of Emma Corrin’s Diana in season four of The Crown.</p> <p>With Netflix’s high budget and quality production values, many — <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-crown-season-4-review-a-triumphant-portrait-of-the-1980s-with-a-perfectly-wide-eyed-diana-149633">including myself</a> — felt Peter Morgan’s deliberate combination of accuracy and imaginative interpretation of Diana’s royal life offered something approximating a closer rendition of the “real” princess than we’d been presented with before.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Tedqw0gMuCI?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>And then we come to the most recent portrayal of Diana on screen, Pablo Larraín’s Spencer (2021), starring Kristen Stewart as Diana. What, royal biopic watchers wondered, could it possibly do to top The Crown’s Diana?</p> <p>Spencer’s statement in the film’s opening offers a clue: it promises to be a “fable from a true tragedy”.</p> <p>This is a film where genre imperatives and creative imaginings are placed at the forefront of its representation of the princess.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/f-FBHQAGLnY?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Taking its cue from the gothic themes and tropes Diana can be heard invoking on the Morton tapes, Spencer’s heroine is trapped in a frozen Sandringham setting, gasping for air to the point where her voice rarely lifts above a soft, almost suffocated, whisper.</p> <p>She tears at the pearls encircling her throat. She rips open the curtains sewn shut by staff. She self-harms with wire cutters. She runs like an animal hunted down manor house corridors and across frosty Norfolk fields.</p> <p>She is haunted by the ghost of Anne Boleyn, another royal wife rejected by her husband, prompting <a href="https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/arts-and-culture/a38164090/princess-diana-spencer-horror-movie/">one reviewer to ask</a>: “is Spencer the ultimate horror movie?”</p> <p>Larraín and Stewart’s Diana has her precursor in the spectral, gothic Diana who appears in the 2017 future-history television film King Charles III, based on Mike Bartlett’s 2014 play. The anguished howl of this Diana (played by Katie Brayben) echoes throughout the palace in the same way Spencer’s Diana is framed as the royal who will haunt the Windsors for decades to come.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nyckuIRtag0?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>The lamentable Diana: The Musical (2021) on Netflix (a filmed version of the Broadway production starring Jeanna de Waal) – with its cliched storyline, two-dimensional characterisation, awkward costuming and early 1980s Andrew Lloyd Webber-style aesthetic – offers some evidence that, even in 2021, the creators of Diana stories haven’t altogether abandoned their investment in the Diana of 1981.</p> <p>But with Spencer, we have a Diana shaped by both the princess’s own version of her story, and the screen Dianas that came before her. Spencer suggests new directions and potential for the telling of royal lives.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/173648/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UlebsnuEI1Y?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/giselle-bastin-391174">Giselle Bastin</a>, Associate Professor of English, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/flinders-university-972">Flinders University</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/from-fairytale-to-gothic-ghost-story-how-40-years-of-biopics-showed-princess-diana-on-screen-173648">original article</a>.</p> <p><span class="attribution"><span class="source"><em>Image: Pablo Larraín/Roadshow</em></span></span></p>

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63.5% of Australia’s performing artists reported worsening mental health during COVID

<p>92% of performing artists experienced significant changes to their work during early stages of the pandemic – and at least half experienced depression.</p> <p>These shocking figures comes from <a href="https://www.waapa.ecu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/960387/Breathing-through-the-pandemic.pdf">new research</a> talking to hundreds of performing artists from across Australia.</p> <p>The impact of COVID-19 was particularly devastating for performing artists because their artistic practice is highly ingrained in their identity.</p> <p>The disruption to performances during lockdown led performers to re-evaluate their artistic practice, whether through having a break or reassessing their career paths.</p> <p>Artists described cancellation of tours, gigs, and contracts which often happened overnight and without warning. Participants spoke of losing “27 gigs in three days” in March 2020, having a year’s worth of touring work cancelled, and not being able to find any new gigs.</p> <p>In our national survey of 431 performing artists, 63.5% of the participants reported feeling their mental health worsened during the pandemic.</p> <h2>Mental health stressors</h2> <p>COVID-19 exacerbated social, economic and mental health problems <a href="https://apo.org.au/sites/default/files/resource-files/2016-10/apo-nid121961.pdf">long-recognised</a> throughout the performing arts sector. In an industry that was already under the spotlight for stress and mental health, COVID-19 brought with it another test to the resilience of the industry.</p> <p>In our research, we used the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16004657/">short form Depression Anxiety Stress Scales 21</a> (DASS-21), a self-reported survey which measures levels of distress, and found scores on all three subscales were elevated compared to <a href="https://search.informit.org/doi/10.3316/informit.499926749273237">previous findings</a> among performing artists in 2015.</p> <p>49% of participants demonstrated moderate, severe or extremely severe levels of depression; 61% demonstrated moderate, severe or extremely severe levels of anxiety; and 47% demonstrated moderate, severe or extremely severe levels of stress.</p> <p>In line with these findings, almost half (47.9% of respondants) accessed mental health supports, such as psychologists and GPs.</p> <p>The participants most affected by poor mental health were early career artists, freelancers and women.</p> <p>Women not only faced the difficulties of COVID and related lockdowns, but also <a href="https://theconversation.com/planning-stress-and-worry-put-the-mental-load-on-mothers-will-2022-be-the-year-they-share-the-burden-172599">disproportionately</a> faced the challenge of increased care responsibilities for elderly parents and children, and the distractions of working from home during lockdown.</p> <p>Freelance artists often found themselves <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-government-says-artists-should-be-able-to-access-jobkeeper-payments-its-not-that-simple-138530">excluded from government support such as JobKeeper</a>.</p> <p>Early career artists questioned their future in the arts: their performing opportunities suddenly disappeared during lockdown, and they lost opportunities to gain new networks and build there careers. As one participant told us, “a whole year [was] just ripped away, that’s a year I’ll never get back, to add to my portfolio, to my connections and networks."</p> <h2>Ongoing stress</h2> <p>Difficulties weren’t just faced by individual artists. The immediate impact for performing arts organisations was a complete shock to the system.</p> <p>Workload stress for managers increased with their efforts to maintain operations and recoup lost income.</p> <p>Many artistic organisations are only now beginning to feel the true burden of COVID-19 and will continue to feel these impacts throughout the medium term.</p> <p>As the pandemic went on through 2020 and 2021, some organisations saw two seasons’ worth of programming delayed. 2022 and beyond will see these organisations trying to play catch up, causing additional logistical work – and as Omicron is proving, there will be with further disruptions and shutdowns in the sector.</p> <p>While almost half of the participants accessed mental health support during COVID-19, several barriers to seeking help were identified, such as financial constraints and a lack of available and appropriate mental health support which understood the particular stressors of working in the performing arts.</p> <h2>Community and resilience</h2> <p>Even as they were facing stress, our research found organisations acted as beacons of support for the wider performing arts community, honouring artist and employee contracts as much as possible.</p> <p>In turn, arts workers reported support from audiences, donors and direct support from government was instrumental in maintaining morale and purpose for organisations.</p> <p>The adaptability and resilience evidenced within the performing arts industry during COVID-19 should not be underestimated. Artists continued to create work throughout the pandemic, and even found positive outcomes from this challenging time.</p> <p>Participants reported being able to rest and reset.</p> <p>"Time for people to take a break is important, mental health is important, hard conversations are important. But we had the time to have them, instead of 'we can’t have that conversation because the show’s going on in two weeks and we’ve got to rehearse the scene.' It’s like, well, let’s stop and let’s talk about this. It was really beneficial for a lot of works that I was involved in."</p> <p>For many artists, it will be a long recovery for their careers and their health. Now is the time to consider how the industry can build back stronger post-COVID: increased arts funding, low-cost or free mental health services tailored to performing artists, and encouraging everyone to experience – and support – the amazing art being made in our own backyards.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/63-5-of-australias-performing-artists-reported-worsening-mental-health-during-covid-174610">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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"I'm so sorry": Adele issues teary apology

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pop legend Adele has made a </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/music/im-really-sorry-adeles-shock-announcement-on-eve-of-vegas-residency/news-story/92152db4a75ff220d6ff3aae7d233d03" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">teary announcement</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> online that shocked fans, revealing she has postponed her highly-anticipated Las Vegas residency the day before it was due to open.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 33-year-old was due to debut her </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Weekends with Adele</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> residency at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas on Friday, January 21, playing two shows every weekend until April.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, just 24 hours before her first show, Adele took to Instagram to make her announcement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She explained that she “wasn’t ready” for the residency, first announced in November 2021, due to Covid and other production delays.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CY-AYtZAgp-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CY-AYtZAgp-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Adele (@adele)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’m so sorry, but my show ain’t ready. We’ve tried absolutely everything that we can to pull it together and have it ready in time for you, but we’ve been absolutely destroyed by delivery delays and Covid,” she began in the clip.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Half my crew, half my team are down with Covid - still are. It’s been impossible to finish the show. I can’t give you what I have right now, and I’m gutted,” she continued.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’m sorry it’s so last-minute. We’ve been awake for over 30 hours now trying to figure it out and … we’ve run out of time. I’m so upset and I’m really embarrassed and I’m so sorry to everyone that’s travelled again.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’m really, really sorry. We’re on it, we’re going to reschedule all of the dates, and I’m going to finish my show and get it to where it’s supposed to be.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s been impossible. We’ve been up against so much and it just ain’t ready.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CW53ZoEgv-m/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CW53ZoEgv-m/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Adele (@adele)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The star’s announcement even seemed to take the venue by surprise, with Caesars Palace still listing the start date as January 21 on its website.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though Adele has simply said that “all dates will be rescheduled” in a caption accompanying her announcement, it’s unclear how many of the shows will be affected.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Adele is expected to earn almost $1 million per show, with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sun</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> reporting that the singer will also enjoy some perks during her stay at the famed location.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The casino will provide the </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Easy On Me</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> singer with a “$56,000-a-night private suite accessible at any time during the residency, a butler, an executive assistant, chauffeur and security”, as well as free food and drinks for her and any guests staying at a Caesars resort.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: @adele (Instagram)</span></em></p>

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Fire management in Australia has reached a crossroads and ‘business as usual’ won’t cut it

<p>The current wet conditions delivered by <a href="http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/enso/">La Niña</a> may have caused widespread flooding, but they’ve also provided a reprieve from the threat of bushfires in southeastern Australia. This is an ideal time to consider how we prepare for the next bushfire season.</p> <p>Dry conditions will eventually return, as will fire. So, two years on from the catastrophic Black Summer fires, is Australia better equipped for a future of extreme fire seasons?</p> <p>In our recent <a href="https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4040097">synthesis</a> on the Black Summer fires, we argue climate change is exceeding the capacity of our ecological and social systems to adapt. The paper is based on a series of <a href="https://www.bushfirehub.org/publications/?work_package_filter=all-work-packages&amp;category_filter=nsw_bushfire_inquiry_2020">reports</a> we, and other experts from the NSW Bushfire Risk Management Research Hub, were commissioned to produce for the NSW government’s bushfire inquiry.</p> <p>Fire management in Australia has reached a crossroads, and “business as usual” won’t cut it. In this era of mega-fires, diverse strategies are urgently needed so we can safely live with fire.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/440578/original/file-20220113-13-xa4qd3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="firefighter holds head while lying down" /> <span class="caption">In the age of mega fires, new strategies are needed.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">David Mariuz</span></span></p> <h2>Does prescribed burning work?</h2> <p>Various government inquiries following the Black Summer fires of 2019-20 produced wide-ranging recommendations for how to prepare and respond to bushfires. Similar inquiries have been held since 1939 after previous bushfires.</p> <p>Typically, <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/00049158.2005.10674950">these inquiries</a> led to major changes to policy and funding. But almost universally, this was followed by a gradual complacency and failure to put policies into practice.</p> <p>If any fire season can provide the catalyst for sustained changes to fire management, it is Black Summer. So, what have we learnt from that disaster and are we now better prepared?</p> <p>To answer the first question, we turn to our <a href="https://www.bushfirehub.org/nsw-bushfire-inquiry-2020/">analyses</a> for the <a href="https://www.nsw.gov.au/nsw-government/projects-and-initiatives/nsw-bushfire-inquiry#toc-published-submissions">NSW Bushfire Inquiry</a>.</p> <p>Following the Black Summer fires, debate emerged about whether hazard reduction burning by fire authorities ahead of the fire season had been sufficient, or whether excessive “fuel loads” – such as dead leaves, bark and shrubs – had been allowed to accumulate.</p> <p>We found no evidence the fires were driven by above-average fuel loads stemming from a lack of planned burning. In fact, hazard reduction burns conducted in the years leading up to the Black Summer fires effectively reduced the probability of high severity fire, and reduced the number of houses destroyed by fire.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/440583/original/file-20220113-19-8i5dnj.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="remains of homes destroyed by fire" /> <span class="caption">Prescribed burning reduced the numbers of homes affected by fire.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">James Gourley/AAP</span></span></p> <p>Instead, we found the fires were primarily driven by record-breaking fuel dryness and extreme weather conditions. These conditions were due to natural climate variability, but made worse by <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-020-00065-8">climate change</a>. Most fires were sparked by lightning, and very few were thought to be the result of arson.</p> <p>These extreme weather conditions meant the effectiveness of prescribed burns was reduced – particularly when an area had not burned for more than five years.</p> <p>All this means that hazard reduction burning in NSW is generally effective, however in the face of worsening climate change new policy responses are needed.</p> <h2>Diverse and unexpected impacts</h2> <p>As the Black Summer fires raged, loss of life and property most commonly occurred in regional areas while metropolitan areas were heavily affected by smoke. Smoke exposure from the disaster led to an estimated <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41893-020-00610-5">429 deaths</a>.</p> <p>Socially disadvantaged and Indigenous populations were disproportionately affected by the fires, including by loss of income, homes and infrastructure, as well as <a href="https://theconversation.com/strength-from-perpetual-grief-how-aboriginal-people-experience-the-bushfire-crisis-129448">emotional trauma</a>. Our <a href="https://www.bushfirehub.org/resources/demographic-characteristics-nsw-inquiry-impacts-on-people-and-property-report/">analyses</a> found 38% of fire-affected areas were among the most disadvantaged, while just 10% were among the least disadvantaged.</p> <p>We also found some areas with relatively large <a href="https://theconversation.com/1-in-10-children-affected-by-bushfires-is-indigenous-weve-been-ignoring-them-for-too-long-135212">Indigenous populations</a> were fire-affected. For example, four fire-affected areas had Indigenous populations greater than 20% including the Grafton, Eurobodalla Hinterland, Armidale and Kempsey regions.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/440370/original/file-20220112-17-wxfm5.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Two maps illustrating (a) the index of relative social disadvantage, and (b) the proportion of affected population that was Indigenous (2016 Census)" /> <span class="caption">Demographic characteristics of fire-affected communities in NSW.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4040097</span></span></p> <p>The Black Summer fires burnt an <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-0716-1">unprecedentedly large area</a> – half of all wet sclerophyll forests and over a third of rainforest vegetation types in <a href="https://doi.org/10.3390/fire4040097">NSW</a>.</p> <p>Importantly, for <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.13265">257 plant species</a>, the historical intervals between fires across their range were likely too short to allow effective regeneration. Similarly, many vegetation communities were left vulnerable to too-frequent fire, which may result in biodiversity decline, particularly as the climate changes.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/440585/original/file-20220113-27-yqcxil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="green shoot sprouting from burnt trunk" /> <span class="caption">Not all plant species can regenerate after too-frequent fire.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Darren England/AAP</span></span></p> <h2>Looking to the future</h2> <p>So following Black Summer, how do we ensure Australia is better equipped for a future of extreme fire seasons?</p> <p>As a first step, we must act on both the knowledge gained from government inquiries into the disaster, and the recommendations handed down. Importantly, long-term funding commitments are required to support bushfire management, research and innovation.</p> <p>Governments have already increased investment in fire-suppression resources such as <a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/new-weapon-to-fight-aussie-bushfires-kicks-off-service-in-wa/news-story/fa66e567e336164723cae8b98bb3ba8d">water-bombing aircraft</a>. There’s also been increased investment in fire management such as <a href="https://www.rfs.nsw.gov.au/news-and-media/ministerial-media-releases/further-$268.2-million-responding-to-nsw-bushfire-inquiry-recommendations">improving fire trails</a> and employing additional hazard reduction crews, as well as <a href="https://www.minister.industry.gov.au/ministers/porter/media-releases/world-class-natural-hazards-research-centre">new allocations</a> for research funding.</p> <p>But alongside this, we also need investment in community-led solutions and involvement in bushfire planning and operations. This includes strong engagement between fire authorities and residents in developing strategies for hazard reduction burning, and providing greater support for people to manage fuels on private land. Support should also be available to people who decide to relocate away from high bushfire risk areas.</p> <p>The Black Summer fires led to significant interest in a revival of Indigenous <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-26/cultural-burning-to-protect-from-catastrophic-bushfires/100241046">cultural burning</a> – a practice that brings multiple benefits to people and environment. However, non-Indigenous land managers should not treat cultural burning as simply another hazard reduction technique, but part of a broader practice of Aboriginal-led cultural land management.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/440593/original/file-20220113-21-fo43aj.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="three figures in smoke-filled forest" /> <span class="caption">Indigenous burning is part of a broader practice of Aboriginal-led land management.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Josh Whittaker</span></span></p> <p>This requires structural and procedural changes in non-Indigenous land management, as well as secure, adequate and ongoing funding opportunities. Greater engagement and partnership with Aboriginal communities at all levels of fire and land management is also needed.</p> <p>Under climate change, living with fire will require a multitude of new solutions and approaches. If we want to be prepared for the next major fire season, we must keep planning and investing in fire management and research – even during wet years such as this one.</p> <hr /> <p><em>Ross Bradstock, Owen Price, David Bowman, Vanessa Cavanagh, David Keith, Matthias Boer, Hamish Clarke, Trent Penman, Josh Whittaker and many others contributed to the research upon which this article is based.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/174696/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/rachael-helene-nolan-179005">Rachael Helene Nolan</a>, Senior research fellow, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/western-sydney-university-1092">Western Sydney University</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/grant-williamson-109967">Grant Williamson</a>, Research Fellow in Environmental Science, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-tasmania-888">University of Tasmania</a></em>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/katharine-haynes-4467">Katharine Haynes</a>, Honorary Senior Research Fellow, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-wollongong-711">University of Wollongong</a></em>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/mark-ooi-1218431">Mark Ooi</a>, Senior Research Fellow, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/unsw-1414">UNSW</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/fire-management-in-australia-has-reached-a-crossroads-and-business-as-usual-wont-cut-it-174696">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Darren England/AAP</span></span></em></p>

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Richard Gere lists stunning estate for eye-watering price

<p dir="ltr">A-list actor Richard Gere has<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.redfin.com/NY/Pound-Ridge/81-Lyndel-Rd-10576/home/20069606" target="_blank">listed</a><span> </span>his sprawling country estate for a costly $41 million.</p> <p dir="ltr">Set in Pound Ride, New York State, the property spans almost 200,000-square-metres, including an 1100-square-metre, New England-style home.</p> <p dir="ltr">The three-storey house includes eight bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, a chef’s kitchen, and nine fireplaces throughout. Other luxe fittings include a mahogany-lined study and a master suite with its own large soak tube in the master bathroom.</p> <p dir="ltr">Elsewhere on the property there are several other buildings, including extra guest accommodation, a stable and barn, and an office, as well as a full-sized soccer pitch, outdoor pool, summer house, horse riding trails, and a private pond.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite its seemingly picture perfect appearance, speculators<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nine.com.au/property/news/richard-gere-selling-new-york-state-pound-ridge-country-estate-for-39-million/7c43feec-20fc-4134-ae62-c3a22dff53d8" target="_blank">believe</a><span> </span>he may be offloading the stunning home after spending twenty years there with his ex-wife Carol Lowell.</p> <p dir="ltr">After marrying Spanish publicist Alejandra Silva in 2018, the<span> </span><em>Pretty Woman</em><span> </span>star and Silva purchased a property in the neighbouring town of North Salem.</p> <p dir="ltr">The couple discreetly bought the property about a year ago for $14.5 million, as well as a neighbouring parcel of vacant land, according to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dirt.com/gallery/entertainers/actors/richard-gere-house-pound-ridge-1203447885/richardgere_pr17/" target="_blank"><em>Dirt.com</em></a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Getty Images, Redfin.com</em></p>

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Technology has made buildings less climate-friendly: but we can look back in time for solutions

<p>It’s been <a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/10/04/new-technology-answer-climate-change-not-targets/">claimed</a> that technology is the answer to the climate crisis. By eventually separating economic growth from its effects on the environment through improving energy efficiency, the argument runs, better technology promises to prevent <a href="https://theconversation.com/theres-no-end-to-the-damage-humans-can-wreak-on-the-climate-this-is-how-bad-its-likely-to-get-166031">catastrophic</a> global warming.</p> <p>But among the many things that this argument fails to consider is the <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13563467.2019.1598964">reality</a> that new technology has often encouraged extravagant forms of consumption: from private cars and planes to kitchens full of appliances and air conditioning in countries with mild climates.</p> <p>Technology has also caused what’s called the “<a href="https://esrc.ukri.org/about-us/50-years-of-esrc/50-achievements/the-rebound-effect/">rebound effect</a>”: where improving energy efficiency leads to cheaper energy and therefore higher rates of energy consumption. For example, buying a more fuel-efficient car will reduce your average fuel cost per trip and thus is likely to lead to more trips, taking away at least some of your anticipated energy savings.</p> <p>A similar trend appears in architecture, where advances in artificial cooling, heating and computer-aided design have – rather than creating more efficient designs – actually introduced <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/667480/from-waste-to-resource-productivity-evidence-case-studies.pdf">wasteful</a> building styles.</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/2093761X.2016.1237397">my work</a>, I call this phenomenon the “architectural rebound effect”. This effect becomes especially clear when we look at how <a href="https://www.dezeen.com/tag/facades/">building façades</a> (the “skin” that covers buildings) have evolved over the past 100 years.</p> <h2>Façade failures</h2> <p>The <a href="https://cris.brighton.ac.uk/ws/portalfiles/portal/379433/CdR+Final+Diaz+%26+Southall+Published+Version.pdf">Cité de Refuge</a> residential building in Paris, designed by Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier in 1933, boasts one of the earliest examples of a façade made entirely out of glass. But with no windows or air conditioning, its summer indoor temperatures reached up to <a href="https://lmdvlugtdml.wordpress.com/home/lmd-words/miscellaneous-writings-and-publications/le-corbusiers-cite-de-refuge-historical-technological-performance-of-the-air-exacte/">33°C</a> – making it a “<a href="https://cris.brighton.ac.uk/ws/portalfiles/portal/379433/CdR+Final+Diaz+%26+Southall+Published+Version.pdf">notable failure</a>” in architecture.</p> <p>To fix this, the façade was fitted with external shading devices and about a third of its glass was made opaque. This strategy was mostly effective: computer simulations have shown that the upgraded design reduced indoor summer temperatures to <a href="https://cris.brighton.ac.uk/ws/portalfiles/portal/379433/CdR+Final+Diaz+%26+Southall+Published+Version.pdf">below 25°C</a>.</p> <p>From the 1950s, fully glazed façades without shading devices began to dominate city skylines thanks to increasingly efficient and cheap <a href="https://archive.curbed.com/2017/5/9/15583550/air-conditioning-architecture-skyscraper-wright-lever-house">air-conditioning systems</a> that allowed temperatures inside these buildings to be regulated.</p> <p>But these new glass boxes came with their own set of environmental problems. For instance, <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13602360903119405">research</a> has shown that office buildings built in the Manhattan borough of New York between 1965 and 1969 consumed twice as much energy per unit floor area than buildings erected between 1950 and 1954.</p> <p>One reason for this is probably the difference in the window-to-wall ratio between these groups of buildings. While the later buildings had a ratio between 53% and 72%, the earlier buildings’ ratio sat between 23% to 32%. This means that more heat was allowed into and out of the former group of buildings during summer and winter, increasing their need for artificial cooling and heating.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/437794/original/file-20211215-21-f60i8n.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="An apartment building with red, yellow and blue external features" /> <span class="caption">The Cité de Refuge after its refurbishment, with external shades and opaque glass.</span> <span class="attribution"><a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cit%C3%A9_de_Refuge.jpg" class="source">IanTomFerry/Wikimedia</a></span></p> <p>Another problem with fully glazed façades is the excessive glare they cause inside buildings, which means that indoor blinds must be pulled down most of the time. This blocks occupants’ views to the outside and increases reliance on artificial lighting, increasing energy consumption even further.</p> <p>These problems with fully glazed façades still plague buildings today. Now, parametrically designed shading devices are often used as a solution. Unfortunately, these tend to block outdoor views for those working inside, while keeping the need for <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0038092X12002046">artificial light</a>.</p> <h2>Limiting freedoms</h2> <p>Should we prevent architects from exercising their aesthetic freedom in designing these extravagant buildings that harm our planet? One solution could be to set a maximum limit on the amount of energy a building is allowed to consume. This would require architects to use <a href="https://www.re-thinkingthefuture.com/sustainable-architecture/a3992-what-are-passive-design-strategies/">passive design strategies</a> – techniques that enable humans to live in challenging climates without expending unnecessary energy.</p> <p>For example, by the year 400 BC, Persians had devised an ingenious way to <a href="http://jfa.arch.metu.edu.tr/archive/0258-5316/2012/cilt29/sayi_2/223-234.pdf">store ice</a> during hot summer months using ice pits called “yakhchals”. These were vaulted reservoirs with a height of up to 15 metres and a depth of approximately six metres.</p> <p>By allowing hot air to exit through an opening at the top of the reservoir and burying ice deep in the earth, the base of the yakhchal – and the ice inside – would <a href="https://www.maxfordham.com/research-innovation/the-physics-of-freezing-at-the-iranian-yakhchal/">remain cold</a> throughout the summer.</p> <p>An example from the modern era is the <a href="http://thegreentreefoundation.org/energy_concious_building/case_studies.pdf">Inspector General of Police Complex</a> building in Gulbarga, India, which uses a wind tower fitted with water sprays to create a comfortable environment in a hot and humid climate. Droplets from the sprays absorb heat from incoming air, reducing the air’s temperature by up to 13°C before it enters the building.</p> <p>It’s vital to first decide how best to measure buildings’ maximum energy limit. In current building energy rating schemes, “<a href="https://aiacalifornia.org/energy-use-intensity-eui/">energy use intensity</a>” is often used, which refers to the amount of energy consumed per unit of floor area.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/437800/original/file-20211215-25-1v88ihf.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="A brick building in the desert" /> <span class="caption">This yakhchal in Iran was used to keep ice cool.</span> <span class="attribution"><a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Iran_desert,_yakh-chal_(%D9%89%D8%AE_%DA%86%D8%A7%D9%84_en_persan)_,_goat_herd_-_glaci%C3%A8re,_troupeau_de_ch%C3%A8vres_(9261276542).jpg" class="source">Jeanne Menj/Wikimedia</a></span></p> <p>But a flaw of this metric is that it allows overly large, grandiose buildings to be certified as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUuVoMCVwQo&amp;ab_channel=InternationalPassiveHouseAssociation">low energy</a>. A more appropriate metric could focus on energy consumed in relation to the number of people using a building – in other words, a building’s energy use per person.</p> <h2>Making masterpieces</h2> <p>A possible objection is that this could result in “boring” buildings with no aesthetic appeal. In this case, we could encourage architects to express their creativity through building structures not designed to house people and therefore require little to no operational energy to run.</p> <p>This would considerably reduce the environmental impact of such architectural masterpieces. On average, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378778810001696">80% to 90%</a> of a building’s carbon emissions arise from operating it, not building it.</p> <p>What’s more, many iconic buildings have failed to function as they were designed to. Mies von der Rohe’s <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/aug/30/curse-mies-van-der-rohe-puddle-strewn-gallery-david-chipperfield-berlin-national">New National Gallery</a> in Berlin suffered from cracking windows and heavy condensation, while Frank Gehry’s MIT-based <a href="https://www.wired.com/2007/11/mit-sues-frank/">Stata Centre</a> in Massachusetts has leaky roofs and excessive mould. These buildings have not been demolished, however, but left standing as examples of top-quality design.</p> <p>Perhaps if architects channelled their desire for daring aesthetic into sculpture-like structures rather than buildings designed for habitation, they could continue to keep pushing the limits of design without making the planet pay.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/169551/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/bashar-al-shawa-1263266">Bashar Al Shawa</a>, PhD Student in Architecture, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-bath-1325">University of Bath</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/technology-has-made-buildings-less-climate-friendly-but-we-can-look-back-in-time-for-solutions-169551">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Micuradu/Flickr</em></p>

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Five home improvements that WON’T add value

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though renovations and home improvements are usually a sure way to add value to your property, that isn’t always true. There are some improvements that require a large investment that won’t turn a profit when you come to sell and others that add no value at all.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wendy Chamberlain, an avid house flipper and Buyer’s Advocate, shares five home improvements that won’t bump up your property’s selling price.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Over-the-top kitchen and bathroom updates</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though renovating the kitchen and bathroom is usually a worthwhile investment, ‘over renovating’ these spaces may result in your hard work (and cash) failing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Some key areas may make the home look more modern, but ultimately, buyers may not care that much,” Chamberlain told </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.domain.com.au/news/8-home-improvements-that-wont-add-value-to-your-property-2-1113892/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Domain</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If the existing kitchen, while dated, is functional, you may get away with leaving it as is and focusing your cash and efforts elsewhere.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As for the bathroom, adding marble tiles or other luxury fitting and fixtures may look great, but often won’t return the value you’d expect.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Integrated heating and cooling</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Heating and cooling are areas unlikely to provide an immediate renovation return,” Chamberlain said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since buyers will generally be satisfied with a simple split system air conditioning unit, installing expensive full ducting - which can cost up to $20,000 depending on the size of the house - may end up being a waste of money.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Ducted heating and refrigerated cooling are expensive to install. For your reno, a cheaper yet effective split system heating/cooling unit may be just as adequate for the job.”</span></p> <p><strong>3. Inconsistent design</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Adding stylish gold tapware and marble tiles to a bathroom sounds great, but it can work against you if the rest of the home uses chrome fittings and laminate floors - and stays that way.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chamberlain explained that changing one or two items or areas could also highlight problem areas in the house: “when you change one thing, the next looks dated”.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Bespoke features and luxe fittings</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though it’s common to see top-of-the-line flooring, fancy tech, imported tiles and elaborate light fittings in multi-million-dollar celebrity homes, more often than not these higher quality details won’t impact the final selling price as much as you may expect.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some custom high-end inclusions like an infrared sauna can also be seen as personal, while buyers will be wanting to see themselves in the space as their own (which may be sauna-free).</span></p> <p><strong>5. Messing with the existing floor plan</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For owners looking to renovate before selling to improve their returns, removing rooms is a big no-no.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chamberlain added that moving or removing load-bearing walls can become costly quickly.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Not to mention the quickly escalating costs as soon as you need to move plumbing,” she said. “If you can, stick to the existing layout and renovate the rooms and floor plan you already have.</span></p> <p><strong>Tips for renovating</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“When renovating, always keep in mind what is going to appeal to a future buyer when the time comes to eventually sell,” Chamberlain said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Before you bust up the drop sheets or call a builder, it’s important to do your research and note how your plans may compare to other homes in your area that are on the market.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If you’re renovating a property with the primary aim to sell it, consider which updates or areas will result in the best return for every dollar spent,” Chamberlain said.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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