baking paper uses

One of the most exciting things about the kitchen is when you discover new uses for an item or product you’ve been buying for years for one specific purpose. Discovering that a potato masher is wonderful when whipping up a batch of guacamole; finding that the green side of a scour sponge can de-pill your woollen jumpers; the magic of dish washing liquid when it comes to removing grease stains from clothing.

While not all handy hints and new discoveries will come as a revelation to everyone, you never know what you don’t know. So, just in case you weren’t aware, here are some handy uses for ordinary baking paper. You’re welcome.

  1. Protect your dishes: Serving utensils and food residue can shorten the life of your beautiful baking dishes and oven trays. Instead of simply spraying, or using oil, use a layer of baking paper to protect your dishes. Apply some cooking spray to ensure the paper sticks to the surface, and then simply lift the paper away when you’re finished cooking. You’ve just cut your cleaning time down, and prolonged the life of your favourite lasagne dish.
  2. Freeze biscuit and cookie dough: Especially around the festive season, biscuits can be in high demand. Next time you’re baking a batch of your favourite cut-out biscuits, make extra dough, and roll it out onto a sheet of baking paper – then stack the dough in a freezer-safe container, ready to cut and bake whenever you like.
  3. Rolling out dough: Speaking of dough, it can be incredibly tiresome to have to stop and remove clumps of the stuff from your rolling pin when you’re creating the perfect pastry or biscuit. So, instead of using extra flour (which can alter the taste and texture of your creation), place a piece of baking paper underneath your dough as well as on top of it for the easiest time you’ve ever had in the kitchen.
  4. Make muffin wrappers: At fancier cafes and coffee shops, you’ll often see muffins presented in white wraps of baking paper. If you want to add a chic touch to your next morning tea, cut out squares of baking paper (about 10 to 15cm, depending on the size of your muffin tin). Grease the insides of the muffin cups as you usually would (butter will probably work best), then press the paper firmly into the tin using a drinking glass. Spoon in your muffin batter, and voila!
  5. A handy sifting surface: When baking, sifting flour and other ingredients together can be a messy, time-consuming process. Instead of giving yourself another bowl to wash up, sift your ingredients onto a sheet of baking paper. Then simply pick up the paper, and pour everything into your bowl. Use one of the above tips to make sure you’ve made the most of the baking paper.

How do you use baking paper – are you making the most of it in your kitchen? Tell us in the comments below.

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